Friday, February 24, 2017

Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, N6629V: Fatal accident occurred November 30, 2014 near Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (KVER), Boonville, Missouri

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA060
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in Boonville, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/08/2017
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-30A, registration: N6629V
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was on a cross-country flight when the airplane encountered deteriorating weather conditions. A surviving passenger reported that the pilot decided to divert to a nearby airport. The airplane experienced a loss of engine power in the airport traffic pattern shortly after the pilot extended the landing gear during the base-to-final turn. The pilot was able to restore engine power briefly by advancing the throttle, but the engine quickly experienced a total loss of power. The passenger stated that the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall about 250 ft above the ground. The airplane subsequently impacted terrain in a near-level attitude. The pilot likely failed to maintain adequate airspeed following the loss of engine power, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and a subsequent aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.

A postaccident examination did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal engine operation; however, the right main fuel tank was void of any usable fuel, and the left main fuel tank contained about 1.5 gallons of usable fuel. Additionally, no fuel was recovered from the supply line connected to the fuel manifold valve, and only trace amounts of fuel were recovered from the engine-driven fuel pump outflow line. A first responder reported that the main fuel selector was positioned to draw fuel from the auxiliary fuel tanks. Although placarded for use during level flight only, both auxiliary fuel tanks contained sufficient fuel to maintain coverage over their respective outlet ports during maneuvering flight, and would have provided fuel to the engine. As such, it is likely that the main fuel selector was positioned to draw fuel from the right main fuel tank when the airplane initially experienced a loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. The pilot then likely switched to the right auxiliary fuel tank while attempting to restore engine power; however, there was likely insufficient time and altitude to re-establish fuel flow to the engine.

Although the airplane had experienced an alternator malfunction during the previous flight, a possible charging system failure would not have affected engine operation during the accident flight. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack, and an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s improper fuel management.

Charles K. Sojka is seen here in front of a Piper Cherokee in an old photo of the Woodward Airport. He was a Woodward native and a 1969 graduate of Woodward High School. He was a life-long pilot, flight instructor and Director of Maintenance for the Aviation Department at Kansas State University, Salina. Sojka was killed on November 30th, 2014 in a Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking plane crash in Boonville, Missouri.



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6629V

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA060 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in Boonville, MO
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-30A, registration: N6629V
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 3 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 30, 2014, about 0857 central standard time (CST), a Bellanca model 17-30A single-engine airplane, N6629V, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain during landing approach to runway 36 at Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER), Boonville, Missouri. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and his three passengers were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight that departed Spirit of St. Louis Airport (SUS), Chesterfield, Missouri, about 0740, and was originally destined for Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport (MKC), Kansas City, Missouri.

The day preceding the accident, the pilot had flown from MKC to SUS. After landing, about 1207, the pilot told a fixed-base operator (FBO) line technician that he had a depleted battery because of an unspecified charging system malfunction. The pilot, who also was an aviation mechanic, removed the battery from the airplane to have it charged. About 1800, the pilot returned to the FBO with the recharged battery. After reinstalling the battery, the pilot started and ran the engine for about 5 to 7 minutes. Following the engine run, the pilot removed the cowling and began adjusting a subcomponent of the alternator control unit (ACU). After adjusting the ACU, the pilot performed another engine test run that lasted about 10 minutes. Following the second engine test run, the pilot told the FBO line technician that the airplane's ammeter was still showing a slight discharge while the engine was running, and that he was uncomfortable departing at night with a charging system issue. The pilot asked if he and his passengers could stay the night in the pilot's lounge so they could depart early the following morning. The pilot also asked for the airplane to be towed to the self-serve fuel pumps because he did not want to deplete the battery further with another engine start.

The pilot prepaid for 20 gallons of fuel at the self-serve fuel pump. According to the line technician, the pilot nearly topped-off the right inboard fuel tank with 13 gallons before switching over to the left inboard tank. Upon a visual inspection of the left inboard tank, the pilot told the line technician that it contained less fuel than he had expected. The pilot proceeded to add the remaining 7 gallons of the prepaid 20 gallons to the left inboard fuel tank. The line technician noted that after fueling the left inboard fuel tank, the fluid level was about 2 inches from the top of the tank. The pilot did not purchase any additional fuel and told the line technician that both outboard "auxiliary" fuel tanks were nearly full. The line technician then towed the airplane back to the ramp for the evening. The line technician reported that the airplane departed FBO ramp the following morning.

According to air traffic control (ATC) data, the first radar return for the accident flight was shortly after the airplane departed from runway 26L at 0740:50 (hhmm:ss). The airplane initially transmitted a visual flight rules (VFR) beacon code (1200) during accident flight. The plotted radar track revealed the airplane flew west-northwest from SUS toward the planned destination. At 0751:03, the airplane stopped transmitting a 1200 beacon code and continued as a primary-only radar target. The location of the final 1200 code was about 21.5 miles west-northwest of SUS at 2,400 ft mean sea level (msl). The lack of a reinforced beacon return was consistent with the pilot turning the airplane transponder off. The primary-only radar track continued west-northwest at an unknown altitude. (The airplane's transponder transmits altitude data to the radar facility; a primary-only radar return does not include altitude data) At 0832:04, the airplane was still traveling west-northwest and was about 5 miles south of Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER). At 0836:21, the airplane descended below available radar coverage about 11 miles west-southwest of VER. There was no radar coverage with the airplane for about 19 minutes. At 0855:30, the radar facility began tracking a VFR reinforced beacon return (1200) about 2.3 miles north of VER descending through 1,500 feet msl. The time and location of the radar returns are consistent with the accident flight maneuvering to land at VER. The airplane entered a left downwind for runway 36 at 1,200 feet msl. At 0856:49, the last recorded radar return was about 0.9 mile southwest of the runway 36 threshold at 1,100 feet msl (about 400 feet above the ground).

According to one of the surviving passengers, while enroute at an altitude of 2,000 to 3,000 ft msl, the airplane encountered a line of "dense clouds" near Sedalia, Missouri. The pilot attempted to navigate beneath the clouds, at an altitude of about 1,500 ft msl, before deciding to make a course reversal and divert to a nearby airport. The pilot told the passenger, who was seated in the forward-right seat, to be on the lookout for towers and obstructions because of their low proximity to the ground. The passenger reported that after flying east for a few minutes the pilot identified VER on his Apple iPad Mini. The flight approached the airport traffic pattern from the west and made a left base-to-final turn toward runway 36. The passenger reported that the landing gear extended normally. However, when the pilot reduced engine power, in attempt to reduce airspeed, the engine experienced a loss of power. The pilot was able to restore engine power briefly by advancing the throttle, but the engine quickly lost total power. The passenger reported that the pilot then began making rapid changes to the engine throttle and mixture control without any noticeable effect to engine operation. The passenger stated that as the pilot prepared for a forced landing the airplane encountered an aerodynamic stall about 250 ft above the ground. The passenger did not recall the airplane impacting the ground.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 63-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with single engine land, single engine sea, multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with single engine, multiengine, and instrument airplane ratings. The pilot's last aviation medical examination was on April 11, 2014, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. The pilot completed a flight review, as required by FAA regulation 61.56, on November 12, 2014, in a single-engine Cessna model 180 airplane.

The pilot's flight history was reconstructed using his pilot logbook and a computer spreadsheet. The last flight entry in the pilot logbook was dated January 8, 2012. The computer spreadsheet was last updated on November 16, 2014, at which time he had accumulated 3,036 hours total flight time, of which 2,955 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. He had accumulated 2,428 hours in single engine airplanes and 608 hours in multi-engine airplanes. Additionally, he had logged 43 hours in actual instrument meteorological conditions, 175 hours in simulated instrument meteorological conditions, and 233 hours at night.

According to available logbook documentation, the pilot had flown 19 hours during the previous 6 months, 10 hours during prior 90 days, and 3 hours in the month before the accident flight. According to a flight-monitoring website, FlightAware.com, the pilot had flown 1.3 hours during the 24-hour period preceding the accident flight.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1970 Bellanca model 17-30A, Super Viking, serial number 30312. The Super Viking is a single-engine, low wing monoplane with an all-wood wing construction and a fabric covered steel-tube fuselage. A 300-horsepower Continental Motors model IO-520-K reciprocating engine, serial number 209048-70K, powered the airplane through a constant speed, three blade, Hartzell model HC-C3YF-1RF propeller. The airplane had a retractable tricycle landing gear, was capable of seating the pilot and three passengers, and had a maximum gross weight of 3,325 pounds. The FAA issued the accident airplane a standard airworthiness certificate on October 23, 1970. The pilot purchased the airplane on July 5, 2014.

The airplane's recording tachometer meter indicated 621.4 hours at the accident site. The airframe and engine had accumulated a total service time of 2,858.7 hours. The engine had accumulated 1,429.7 hours since the last major overhaul completed on December 10, 1976. The engine had accumulated 206.1 hours since a top overhaul that was completed on December 8, 2007. The last annual inspection of the airplane was completed on November 1, 2014, at 2,853.5 total airframe hours. The airplane had accumulated 5.2 hours since the last annual inspection. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 0900 CST depicted a strong cold front immediately east of the accident site. The front stretched across Missouri between the departure airport and the planned destination. The cold front was associated with a defined wind shift and low stratiform clouds behind the front. There were several weather stations located near the accident site that had surface visibility restrictions in fog and mist. Weather radar imagery did not depict any significant weather echoes in the area of the accident site; however, the weather radar did detect a fine line of very light intensity echoes associated with the cold front. Satellite imagery depicted a band of low stratiform clouds extending over the accident site westward through the Kansas City area. The cloud band was located along and behind the cold front. The NWS 12-hour Surface Prognostic Chart depicted a cold front along the planned route of flight, a strong pressure gradient behind the front supporting strong north-northwest winds, and an extensive portion of Missouri that had marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) weather conditions.

At 0855 CST, an automated surface weather observation station located at Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER), Boonville, Missouri, reported: wind 310 degrees at 13 knots, gusting 16 knots; broken cloud ceilings at 2,600 ft above ground level (agl) and 3,400 ft agl, overcast ceiling at 4,100 ft agl; 10 mile surface visibility; temperature 11 degrees Celsius; dew point 7 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.82 inches of mercury.

At 0853 CST, the weather conditions at Sedalia Memorial Airport (DMO), located near where a passenger reported the accident flight had encountered a line of "dense clouds", included a broken ceiling at 1,700 ft agl, another broken ceiling at 2,400 ft agl, and an overcast ceiling at 3,000 feet agl.

At 0854 CST, a surface observation made at the planned destination (MKC), included instrument flight rules (IFR) weather conditions, including an 800 ft agl cloud ceiling and 4 miles surface visibility with mist.

A review of weather briefing requests made to Automated Flight Service Stations (AFSS) and Direct User Access Terminal Service (DUATS) vendors established that the pilot did not receive a formal weather briefing before departure.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER), located about 3 miles southeast of Boonville, Missouri, was served by a single runway: 18/36 (4,000 ft by 75 ft, asphalt). The airport elevation was 715 ft msl.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident examination revealed that the airplane impacted a harvested soybean field on a 305-degree magnetic heading. The initial point-of-impact consisted of three parallel depressions in the field that were consistent with the spacing of the airplane's three landing gear. The main wreckage was located about 24 ft from the initial point-of-impact in an upright position. The accident site was located along the extended runway centerline about 0.4 miles south of the runway 36 threshold. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the individual flight control surfaces. The wing flaps were about 1/2 of their full deflection. The landing gear selector switch was in the DOWN position; however, all three landing gear assemblies had collapsed during the impact sequence. The main fuel selector was in the OFF position; however, a first responder had moved the fuel selector from the AUX position to OFF during rescue efforts. Additionally, the first responder turned the engine magneto/ignition key to OFF and disconnected the battery terminals after hearing the sound of an electric motor located under the floorboards. (The sound of an electric motor was later identified to be the electrohydraulic motor for the landing gear extension/retraction system.) The auxiliary fuel tank selector was in the RIGHT position. The electrical master switch was in the ON position. The digital transponder was in the ON/Altitude Encoding position. The electric fuel pump switch was in the OFF position. There were no anomalies identified during functional tests of the electric fuel pump and the aerodynamic stall warning system. The postaccident airframe examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane was equipped with two inboard main fuel tanks and two outboard auxiliary fuel tanks. The reported capacity of each main fuel tank was 19 gallons, of which 15.5 gallons were usable per tank. The reported capacity of each outboard auxiliary fuel tank was 17 gallons; however, according to a cockpit placard, the auxiliary tanks were for use during level flight only. A visual examination of the four fuel tanks revealed no damage or evidence of a fuel leak. The left main tank contained about 5 gallons of fuel. The right main tank contained 3-1/2 pints of fuel. The left auxiliary tank was near its 17-gallon capacity. The right auxiliary tank contained about 11 gallons of fuel. There was no fuel recovered from the supply line connected to the inlet port of the engine-driven fuel pump; however, the gascolator drain had fractured during impact and there was evidence of a small fuel spill underneath the gascolator assembly at the accident site. There was a trace amount of fuel recovered from the engine-driven fuel pump outflow line. There was no fuel recovered from the fuel supply line connected to the fuel manifold valve.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall by its engine mounts and control cables. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the engine components to their respective cockpit engine controls. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both magnetos provided spark on all leads when rotated. There were no obstructions between the air filter housing and the fuel control unit. The three blade propeller and crankshaft flange had separated from the engine. The propeller blades exhibited minor burnishing of the blade face and back. One blade appeared straight. Another blade exhibited a shallow S-shape bend along its span. The remaining blade was bent aft about midspan. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal engine operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On December 1, 2014, at the request of the Cooper County Coroner, the Boone/Callaway County Medical Examiner's Office located in Columbia, Missouri, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the autopsy. The toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all drugs and medications.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Four personal electronic devices were recovered at the accident site and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorders Laboratory in Washington D.C. for potential non-volatile memory (NVM) data recovery.

An examination of the pilot's Apple iPad Mini revealed it had the ForeFlight application installed. The application's map page displayed route information for a flight from SUS to MKC. The specifics of the flight included a calculated distance of 186 nautical miles between SUS and MKC, a calculated course of 281 degrees magnetic, an estimated time enroute of 1 hour 10 minutes (calculated using 160 knots true airspeed without the effect of winds aloft), and an calculated fuel consumption of 17.4 gallons. There was no track history for the accident flight; the option to record a track history was not selected for the accident flight. The most recent track history was for a flight completed on August 24, 2014. Further examination of the device established that the text messages, photos, and internet browser history did not contain any information pertinent information to the investigation. According to a passenger, the pilot had used the iPad Mini to navigate during the accident flight.

An examination of a passenger's Samsung Galaxy S III smartphone revealed that there were four photos taken during the accident flight between 0826:47 and 0831:51. During the five-minute period of recovered photos, the observed cloud cover near the airplane increased from clear skies to low-level, overcast stratocumulus clouds. Further examination of the device established that the text messages did not contain any information pertinent information to the investigation.

The remaining two devices, a Motorola Droid Smartphone and an Apple iPod Touch, did not contain any data pertinent to the accident investigation.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

According to available air traffic control data, the accident flight was at least 1 hour 17 minutes in duration. According to the airplane's owner manual, the expected fuel consumption rate at 2,500 ft msl and 77-percent power was 16.1 gallons per hour. At 77-percent engine power, the accident airplane would have used at least 20.7 gallons of fuel; however, engine operation above 77-percent power and/or insufficient leaning would have consumed additional fuel.



 






NTSB Identification: CEN15FA060 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in Boonville, MO
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-30A, registration: N6629V
Injuries: 1 Fatal,3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 30, 2014, about 0900 central standard time, a Bellanca model 17-30A airplane, N6629V, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain during landing approach to runway 36 at Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER), Boonville, Missouri. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and his 3 passengers were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight that departed Spirit of St. Louis Airport (SUS), Chesterfield, Missouri, about 0738, and was originally destined for Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport (MKC), Kansas City, Missouri.

The day before the accident, the pilot had flown from MKC to SUS. After landing, about 1207, the pilot told a fixed-base operator (FBO) line technician that he had a depleted battery because of an unspecified charging system malfunction. The pilot, who also was an aviation mechanic, removed the battery from the airplane to have it charged. About 1800, the pilot returned to the FBO with the recharged battery. After reinstalling the battery, the pilot started and ran the engine for about 5 to 7 minutes. Following the engine run, the pilot removed the cowling and began adjusting a subcomponent of the alternator control unit (ACU). After adjusting the ACU, the pilot performed another engine test run that lasted about 10 minutes. Following the second engine test run, the pilot told the FBO line technician that the airplane's ammeter was still showing a slight discharge while the engine was running, and that he was uncomfortable departing at night with a charging system issue. The pilot asked if he and his passengers could stay the night in the pilot's lounge so they could depart early the following morning. The pilot also asked for the airplane to be towed to the self-serve fuel pumps because he didn't want to further deplete the battery with another engine start.

The pilot prepaid for 20 gallons of fuel at the self-serve fuel pump. According to the line technician, the pilot nearly topped-off the right inboard fuel tank with 13 gallons before switching over to the left inboard tank. Upon a visual inspection of the left inboard tank, the pilot told the line technician that it contained less fuel than he had expected. The pilot proceeded to add the remaining 7 gallons of the prepaid 20 gallons to the left inboard fuel tank. The line technician noted that after fueling the left inboard fuel tank, the fluid level was about 2 inches from the top of the tank. The pilot did not purchase any additional fuel and told the line technician that both outboard "auxiliary" fuel tanks were nearly full. The line technician then towed the airplane back to the ramp for the evening. The line technician reported that the airplane departed FBO ramp the following morning.

According to one of the surviving passengers, while enroute at an altitude of 2,000 to 3,000 feet mean sea level, the flight encountered a line of "dense clouds" near Sedalia, Missouri. The pilot attempted to navigate beneath the clouds, at an altitude of about 1,500 feet msl, before deciding to make a course reversal and locate a nearby airport to divert to. The pilot told the passenger, who was seated in the forward-right seat, to be on the lookout for towers and obstructions because of their low proximity to the ground. The passenger reported that after flying east for a few minutes the pilot identified VER on his tablet computer. The flight approached the airport traffic pattern from the west and made a left base-to-final turn toward runway 36. The passenger reported that the pilot extended the landing gear without any difficulties. However, when the pilot reduced engine power, in attempt to reduce airspeed, the engine experienced a loss of power. The pilot was able to briefly restore engine power by advancing the throttle, but the engine quickly lost total power. The passenger reported that the pilot then began making rapid changes to the engine throttle and mixture control without any noticeable effect to engine operation. The passenger stated that the airplane eventually "stalled completely", about 250 feet above the ground, as the pilot prepared for a forced landing; however, the passenger did not recall the airplane impacting terrain.

A postaccident examination revealed that the airplane impacted a harvested soybean field on a 305 degree magnetic heading. The initial point of impact consisted of three parallel depressions in the field that were consistent with the spacing of the accident airplane landing gear. The main wreckage was located about 24 feet from the initial point of impact in an upright position. The accident site was situated along the extended runway 36 centerline, about 0.4 miles south of the runway approach threshold. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the individual flight control surfaces. The electric master switch was found in the "on" position. The wing flaps were observed to be positioned about 1/2 of their full deflection. The landing gear selector switch was in the "down" position; however, all three landing gear assemblies had collapsed during the accident. The main fuel selector was found in the "off" position; however, a first responder had moved the fuel selector from the "auxiliary" position to the "off" position during rescue efforts. The first responder also turned the engine magneto/ignition key to "off" and disconnected the battery terminals after hearing the sound of an electric motor located under the floorboards. (The sound of an electric motor was later identified to be the electrohydraulic motor for the landing gear extension/retraction system.) The auxiliary fuel tank selector was found positioned to the "right" auxiliary wing tank. (The auxiliary fuel tank selector had two positions, "right auxiliary" or "left auxiliary.") The electric fuel pump switch was found in the "off" position. There were no anomalies identified during functional tests of the electric fuel pump and the aerodynamic stall warning system.

The airplane was equipped with two inboard "main" fuel tanks and two outboard "auxiliary" fuel tanks. The reported capacity of each inboard fuel tank was 19 gallons, of which 15.5 gallons were useable per tank. The left inboard tank contained about 5 gallons of fuel. The right inboard tank contained 3-1/2 pints of fuel. The inboard fuel tanks appeared to be undamaged and there was no evidence of a fuel leak from either tank. The reported capacity of each outboard "auxiliary" fuel tank was 17 gallons; however, those tanks were placarded for level flight only. The outboard fuel tanks also appeared to be undamaged and there was no evidence of a fuel leak from either tank. A visual inspection of the left outboard tank confirmed that it was filled near its capacity. The right outboard tank contained about 11 gallons of fuel. No fuel was recovered from the fuel supply line connected to the engine-driven fuel pump inlet port; however, the fuel gascolator drain had fractured during the accident and there was evidence of a small fuel spill underneath the gascolator assembly at the accident site. Only trace amounts of fuel were recovered from the engine-driven fuel pump outflow fuel line. No fuel was recovered from the fuel supply line connected to the flow-divider assembly.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall by its engine mounts and control cables. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both magnetos provided spark on all leads when rotated. There were no obstructions between the air filter housing and the fuel control unit. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the engine components to their respective cockpit engine controls. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control data, the accident flight departed SUS around 0738. According to local law enforcement, the initial 911-emergency call was received at 0901. As such, the accident flight, from takeoff to the accident, was at least 1 hour 22 minutes in duration. According to the airplane's owner manual, the expected fuel consumption rate at 2,500 feet msl and 77-percent power was 16.1 gallons per hour. At 77-percent engine power, the accident flight would have consumed at least 22 gallons of fuel; however, engine operation above 77-percent power and/or insufficient leaning would have consumed additional fuel.

At 0855, the VER automated surface observing system reported: wind 310 degrees at 13 knots, gusting 16 knots; broken cloud ceilings at 2,600 feet above ground level (agl) and 3,400 feet agl, overcast ceiling at 4,100 feet agl; 10 mile surface visibility; temperature 11 degrees Celsius; dew point 7 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.82 inches of mercury.

Cessna 414A Chancellor, N414JM: Incident occurred February 24, 2017 at Easterwood Field Airport (KCLL) College Station, Brazos County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N414JM

Aircraft getting in and out of Easterwood Airport were slowed down Friday afternoon after the main runway was shut down.   That’s after a private plane blew a tire.

College Station fire department battalion chief Greg Rodgers says the pilot and two passengers were not injured, and the plane had no other damage. 

 Airport manager Josh Abramson says aircraft was diverted to the alternate runway.



COLLEGE STATION, Tex. (KBTX)- There were no injuries reported after a private plane slid off the runway at Easterwood Airport Friday afternoon.

College Station firefighters responded to an aircraft emergency at the airport.

Upon landing one of the main wheels of a Cessna 414A Chancellor plane buckled causing the aircraft to slide. 

Due to the softened ground, it took a few hours to extract the plane and realign the wheel.

There were 3 people on the plane, but none of them are seriously hurt.


Just before 7 p.m. Friday, airport director Joshua Abramson said the aircraft was cleared and the runway and airport were in full operation. 

Source:  http://www.kbtx.com

Delta Airlines, McDonnell Douglas MD-88, N918DL: Incident occurred February 24, 2017 at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (KCLT), North Carolina




Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N918DL

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – A Delta flight from Charlotte to Atlanta was forced to make an emergency landing Friday after it struck a bird.

According to Charlotte Douglas International Airport officials, an alert was called in from the crew about a possible strike just before 9:30 a.m. Officials say the plane landed safely and taxied to the gate.

Air Traffic Control transmissions overheard the pilot of the plane saying the flight hit a flock of birds at around 1,000 feet on takeoff. 

Delta Airlines released the following statement after the strike:


"The crew of Delta flight 1591 from Charlotte to Atlanta elected to return to Charlotte after encountering a bird shortly after departure. The McDonnell Douglas MD-88 aircraft landed without incident, taxied to the gate normally and the 122 customers are being reaccommodated on alternate flights. The safety of Delta’s customers and crew is our top priority and we apologize for the inconvenience."

Officials say that no one was injured during the incident.

Last week, an American Airlines flight bound for Gulfport, Mississippi struck a deer on takeoff at Charlotte Douglas. 

Story and video:  http://www.wcnc.com

Trick Trikes 582 Cyclone Storm, N993RA: Accident occurred March 24, 2015 in Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA168
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 24, 2015 in Live Oak, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: TRICK TRIKES 582 CYCLONE STORM, registration: N993RA
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While flying about 1,000 ft above ground level (agl) during a flight test for the issuance of a sport pilot certificate, the sport pilot examiner instructed the sport pilot applicant to reduce power to idle for a simulated loss of engine power. The applicant chose a suitable field, began a spiral descent, and positioned the weight-shift-control aircraft for the simulated off-airport landing. When the aircraft was about 50 ft agl, the maneuver was terminated, and the examiner told the applicant to add power and go around. The applicant immediately started turning away from the field and then rapidly advanced the throttle. The engine sputtered and did not respond to the throttle input, and the aircraft then impacted trees. The applicant reported that at no time during the descent with the power reduced did he clear the engine nor did he recall the examiner telling him to clear the engine while descending at a reduced power setting. The applicant added that he mistakenly turned the aircraft before adding power and that, if he had not done so, he could have successfully landed it in the field.

Postaccident examination of the aircraft, which included an operational test of the engine, revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The applicant’s failure to clear the engine during the prolonged descent and his subsequent rapid advancement of the throttle after terminating the simulated loss of engine power likely caused excessive fuel in the cylinders, which would have led to the engine’s failure to respond to throttle input.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot applicant’s failure to clear the engine during a prolonged descent of a simulated engine failure and his subsequent rapid throttle input at the completion of the maneuver, which resulted in the engine’s failure to respond. Contributing to the accident was the sport pilot applicant's decision to turn the aircraft away from a suitable landing area before adding power.

On March 24, 2015, about 1915 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Trick Trikes 582 Cyclone Storm weight-shift control aircraft, N993RA, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees during a forced landing near Live Oak, Florida. The sport pilot applicant (SPA) owner and sport pilot examiner (SPE) sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated about 1845, from a private airstrip near Live Oak, Florida.

Earlier that day the SPA flew the accident aircraft with his instructor for about 1 hour and no discrepancies were reported with the engine during that flight. Following the flight, the SPA drove to the SPE's location and passed the oral portion of the practical test for issuance of a sport pilot certificate. The SPA then drove to where the aircraft was located, fueled it, performed a preflight inspection, and then flew to the location of the SPE, landing uneventfully.

Before departure of the accident flight, a preflight inspection and an engine run-up were performed; no discrepancies were reported. The flight departed with "at least" 5 gallons of fresh fuel on-board that he mixed with a little more than a 50:1 ratio of fuel to two-cycle engine oil. After takeoff, the SPA performed maneuvers, and while flying about 1,000 feet above ground level (agl) with fields nearby, the SPE informed the SPA that they would be performing emergency power off procedures, and asked him to reduce power. He did so, selected a suitable landing field, and surveyed the condition of the field while in a spiral descent. He set up to land in the field, and when the aircraft was aligned with the field about 50 feet agl, the SPE said the maneuver was terminated and to add power and go-around. The SPA immediately started turning, and then added power, but the engine sputtered and did not respond to the throttle input. The aircraft subsequently impacted trees. The SPA indicated that at no time during the descent with the power reduced did he add power to "clear" the engine, nor did he recall the SPE advising him to "clear" the engine while descending at a reduced power setting. He also indicated that he mistakenly turned before adding power, and otherwise could have landed "OK" in the field he had selected. In hindsight, he believed that the sputtering was related to the lack of clearing of the engine during the descent while at a reduced throttle setting.

The SPE stated that he informed the applicant to turn to a heading of 090 degrees, and as the right turn was started, he informed the SPA to reduce the throttle to idle to simulate an engine failure, and asked him to designate an emergency landing field. The SPA indicated the field below them was suitable, and began a spiral descent. The field below was an open 1.5 square mile area of cattle farm, which consisted of flat grassland with cows and small isolated groves of trees. During the spiral descent he did not recall the SPA "clearing the engine," and thought in hindsight that he should have. At 200 feet agl, he informed the SPA to "throttle up go-around." When the SPA advanced the throttle, the engine did not regain power. The intended landing field was straight ahead, but the aircraft turned left and began to climb immediately. The SPE attempted to recover, but the aircraft entered a left descending turn and hit trees no taller than 15 to 20 feet. The aircraft impacted the ground at an estimated speed of 30 mph. He and the SPA evacuated from the aircraft and walked to a house to summon assistance. The SPE further stated that the engine's failure to respond could have also been due to SPA's rapid throttle application, which he described as "a little fast."

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector-in-charge, during his examination of the aircraft, the frame near the nose gear was slightly bent to the right, and the right side diagonal frame tube was significantly bent. One propeller blade of the three bladed propeller was impact damaged, and approximately 5 gallons of uncontaminated fuel were recovered from the aircraft's fuel tank. The examination of the Rotax 582 engine did not reveal any apparent damage. Both carburetor bowls were removed and inspected, no contamination was noted. The aircraft was fueled with the recovered fuel and the impact damaged propeller was removed. The engine was then started immediately and ran to an idle power setting with no issues.

Following recovery of the aircraft, the SPA/owner inspected the engine with the exhaust removed and reported there was no scuffing or scoring of the sides of the pistons; honing marks in each cylinder were present. A replacement propeller was installed and after setting propeller blade angle, the engine was started and achieved near full red line rpm with no discrepancies noted.

According to the engine operator's manual, the engine by design is subject to sudden stoppage, which can result in forced landings or no power landings. The manual also indicated, "Do not idle for prolonged periods as normal rich condition present at this power setting can cause unnecessary carbon deposits and spark plug fouling." A representative of the engine manufacturer reported that during a long underpowered descent, a two-stroke engine such as the accident engine "loads up" because not all fuel is burned in the cylinders. With a rapid throttle advance, the fuel/air ratio becomes too high, causing hesitation until the excess fuel is cleared out.

The aircraft had been operated for about 19 hours since its last condition inspection, which was performed on April 14, 2014. At that time, the aircraft total time was 180 hours.

Bell 407, PHI Inc., N501PH: Accident occurred June 08, 2015 in Pecan Island, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
PHI Inc.; Lafayette, Louisiana 
Bell Helicopter; Hurst, Texas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

PHI Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N501PH

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA265
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, June 08, 2015 in Pecan Island, LA
Aircraft: BELL 407, registration: N501PH
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 8, 2015, at 1432 central daylight time, a Bell 407 helicopter, N501PH, made an autorotation to the ground near Pecan Island, Louisiana. The airline transport rated pilot and four passengers were not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by PHI Inc., Lafayette, Louisiana, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an air taxi flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a company flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Vermilion Block 256-E in the Gulf of Mexico about 1400 and was en route to Pecan Island.

The pilot and operator stated that the helicopter was in cruise flight about 1,000 ft above ground level when the pilot felt an impact and a strong vibration of the helicopter. The pilot completed an instrument and functional control check and could not immediately identify any anomalies. Soon after, the pilot initiated an airspeed and power reduction and noticed a heavy mechanical sound and strong vibration. The vibration worsened and the helicopter began a slow right turn so the pilot entered an autorotation. The pilot noticed that as the engine power was reduced further, the helicopter began to oscillate and he experienced difficulty maintaining directional control. With the floats inflated, the pilot made a hard forced landing into a marsh with tall grass. During the landing, the tail rotor gear box (TRGB) separated from the helicopter and was later located in the marsh. 

The helicopter was equipped with Outerlink, which recorded several of the helicopter's parameters, including GPS location, at 30 second intervals. The data was used to correlate the pilot's recollection of the anomalous vibrations, helicopter location, and timeline.

On June 24, 2015, representatives from the FAA, Bell Helicopter, PHI, and the NTSB convened at Bell Helicopter facilities in Hurst, Texas, to examine the recovered tail rotor head, tail rotor blades (TRB), TRGB, TRGB support structure, and remnants of the flexible coupling that was still attached to the TRGB input flange. The exterior of the gearbox exhibited light damage and dirt consistent with immersion in the marsh. The bottom surface of the four mounting feet exhibited evidence of corrosion from exposure to the brackish water. All four TRGB attachment studs were fractured. The four attachment stud locations were labeled "A", "B", "C", and "D" for the purpose of the examination. All gearbox-side attachment studs remained within the gearbox housing; the mating half from attachment stud A was recovered from the accident site. Three of the four TRGB attachment studs exhibited signatures of fatigue fracture. Attachment stud A exhibited reverse bending fatigue through the majority of its cross-section. Attachment stud B exhibited reverse bending fatigue through about 2/3 of its cross-section, and exhibited signatures of low cycle fatigue and overload through the remaining 1/3 of its cross-section. Attachment stud C exhibited signatures of low cycle fatigue and overload. Attachment stud D exhibited signatures of overload. The reverse bending fatigue found on attachment studs A and B were primarily in the lateral axis. Multiple tool ratchet marks were observed at the reverse bending fatigue origins. 

The recovered TRGB support structure exhibited multiple fractures consistent with overload. Impact damage consistent with main rotor blade contact was observed on the forward end of the structure. Mechanical damage and rotational scoring was observed near the forward end near the area where the TRGB input flange and flexible coupling are normally located; the damage exhibited a shiny, silver-colored appearance. The four TRGB mount spot faces exhibited evidence of fretting damage adjacent to the TRGB mount bores. Fractures were observed through the thickness of the mounting bores for attachment studs A and B; the fractures exhibited signatures consistent with overload. Additionally, the bores for attachment studs A and B exhibited thread impressions along the length of the bore and the entirety of the bore circumference. Lastly, the bores for attachment studs A and B, normally circular in shape, exhibited elongation in the same direction as the reverse bending fatigue observed on the studs. The bores for attachment studs C and D exhibited thread impressions along the length of the bore along the fore-aft axis. Evidence of sealant was observed on the TRGB mount spot faces. 

Remnant pieces of flexible coupling remained attached to the TRGB input flange (driveshaft adapter) at its two bolted locations. The fracture surfaces of the remnant flexible coupling exhibited signatures consistent with low cycle reverse bending fatigue. When disassembled, evidence of corrosion and corrosion byproducts were observed in the interior surfaces of the TRGB housing and the input quill duplex bearing assembly. The TRGB input flange could not be rotated manually. 

The two TRBs remained attached to the tail rotor hub; one was relatively intact with minor exterior damage and the other exhibited leading edge damage and the outboard section was separated near midspan. The damaged TRB exhibited signs of high-energy contact with a main rotor blade. 

On August 16, 2016, the TRGB mounting studs were re-examined for evidence of striations. The fracture surfaces of attachment studs A and B were examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and revealed a significant amount of mechanical contact and corrosion damage. The damage precluded a striation count to estimate a crack growth rate for attachment stud A. On attachment stub B, a localized area of intact striations was observed between the mechanical contact damage, which revealed a localized fatigue striation spacing of about 0.000016 inches. 

On September 21, 2016, the damaged TRB was re-examined for evidence of proper bonding. Examination of the tip block bond line on the outboard portion revealed pieces of chopped fiberglass, which is a material used to manufacture the tip block. The tip block adhesive exhibited signatures consistent with a cohesive failure. The tip block adhesive showed evidence of adequate tip block adhesion to the blade skin. 

The operator's maintenance personnel performed a postaccident damage assessment and found a small hole in the aft bulkhead fairing. The hole was continuous to the aft baggage compartment where a brass threaded stud was found inside. The stud was identified as a tail rotor tip block weight.

About three weeks prior to the accident, on May 13 and 15, 2015, the tail rotor blades were repaired and inspected by an outside vendor. On May 21, 2015, the accident tail rotor assembly was reinstalled and balanced by the operator, at an aircraft total time of 16,624 hours, 13 flight hours prior to the accident.

Cirrus SR20, N255JB LLC, N255JB: Accident February 24, 2017 near Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 
Continental; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus; Duluth, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N255JB LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N255JB

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA113
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 24, 2017 in Daytona Beach, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20, registration: N225JB
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 24, 2017, about 0639 eastern standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N255JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The personal flight, destined for Lumberton Regional Airport (LBT) Lumberton, North Carolina, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane climbing out on runway heading to about 300 feet mean sea level, before beginning a descending right turn to the north. About two minutes later, radar contact was lost at an altitude of 50 feet on a northerly ground track.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site. According to the inspector, the engine was separated from the airframe. The wings, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage all sustained extensive impact damage.

The weather conditions reported at Dayton Beach Regional Airport, Florida, located about 7 nautical miles north of the accident site, at 0627, included scattered clouds at 500 feet, wind from 340 at 7 knots, visibility 6 statute miles, mist, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and an altimeter setting 29.79 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.
 

Alan and Wendy Kanabay








An Illinois couple were injured Friday morning when their small plane crashed into some woods just after takeoff from the Spruce Creek Fly-In, according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office.

Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, from Lakewood, Illinois, were pulled from the wreckage of the Cirrus SR20 by rescue crews. They were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center where they were in stable condition, according to a statement by the Sheriff's Office.

It was the third crash in three months involving a plane arriving or departing the Spruce Creek Fly-In, including one in which two people were killed on Dec. 27.

The two have a home at the Spruce-Creek Fly-In. The crash was reported about 6:40 a.m. just minutes after the plane was scheduled to depart Spruce Creek Airport at 6:37 a.m., according to FlightAware which indicated they were headed to Lumberton, N.C.

A 9-1-1 caller said the plane was upside down with its wings ripped off but the man inside was alive, although he could not see his face.

"He's moving - he answered me - I'm going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders," the caller told a dispatcher. "Tell them to come to my house, and I'll get them out into the swamp."

He told the dispatcher that he could not tell if anyone else was in the plane. He ran back to the road to direct rescuers.

A woman called 9-1-1 to report an unusual sound.

"It sounded like a plane was flying really low over our house and then you heard a huge, huge crash, explosion or something. I don't know if the plane crashed. I don't know if it was a bad car wreck," she said.

On Dec. 12, Lee Kraus suffered minor injuries when his single-engine Beechcraft crashed after take-off from the Spruce Creek Fly-In. The crash caused a small brush fire near Venetian Bay in the New Smyrna Beach area.

On Dec. 27, Daryl Ingalsbe and his partner Deb Solsrud were killed when a single-engine Epic LT aircraft when their plane crashed into a front yard of a home at the Spruce Creek Fly-In.

Federal Aviation Administration Safety Inspector Rick Brown checked the scene shrouded in trees and left just before 11 a.m.

Brown said while the FAA was working on the cause of the crash, he couldn't release any details at the moment.

"I can only tell you that I took some pictures. We're going to review them back at the office," Brown said, who added the federal agency is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to analyze the crash and why it happened.

Story and video:   http://www.news-journalonline.com









VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. - A man and a woman survived a plane crash early Friday near Port Orange, the Volusia County Sheriff's Office said.

Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, both of Illinois, were aboard a small plane when it crashed shortly before 6:45 a.m. near the Spruce Creek Fly-In, Sheriff's Office spokesman Andrew Gant said.

The plane crashed in a wooded area shortly after takeoff, Gant said.

"I thought it was a tree that fell down. It sounded like nothing too severe, and it wasn't until five minutes later I heard my dad run into the house saying a plane had crashed," said neighbor Cody Fulbright.

Deputies said it took firefighters an hour to extricate the pair from the wreckage.

Both were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach in stable condition.

“It’s great to know they are all right,” Fulbright said. “It’s nerve-wracking to know it was right there near the house, and it really could have happened right there at our house."

Investigators said a witness called 911 to report that the plane had flipped and that it was missing its wings.

"He’s moving; he answered me," the witness said in a 911 call. "I’m going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders. Tell them to come to my house and I’ll get them out into the swamp."

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.wftv.com






PORT ORANGE, Fla. - A man and woman survived a plane crash Friday morning in Volusia County, officials said.

Volusia County sheriff's officials said the victims, Alan Kanabay, 65, and Wendy Kanabay, 64, of Illinois, were pulled from the downed aircraft. They were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach, where they were listed in stable condition.

The crash was reported about 6:40 a.m. in a wooded area near the 2600 block of Bravo V Circle, about a mile from the Spruce Creek Fly-In in Port Orange, where the plane took off, sheriff's officials said.

A 911 caller reported that the plane was upside down with its wings stripped off. 

“He’s moving. He answered me," the caller said. "I’m going to go out to the road so I can direct the responders. Tell them to come to my house, and I’ll get them out into the swamp.”

Fog was reported in portions of Central Florida, but it's not known if weather played a role in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.clickorlando.com