Sunday, November 01, 2020

Trick-or-treaters arrested for pointing lasers at Lee County Sheriff’s Office deputies flying helicopter




LEE COUNTY, Florida – Three people were arrested on Saturday after shining green lasers at Lee County deputies flying a helicopter over Fort Myers.

Lee County deputies arrested 15-year-old Alexander Harry, 18-year-old Xavier Satchell, and 40-year-old Adam Schlesier after the incident.

The deputies in the aviation unit for the Lee County Sheriff’s Office were responding to a call in the central district when a trick-or-treater shined a green laser light into the cockpit of the helicopter.

The Tactical Flight Officer in the helicopter used Forward Looking Infrared camera to find out where the laser light was coming from, according to LCSO.

The aviation deputies found three people walking through a neighborhood and intentionally pointing lasers at the helicopter.

The sheriff’s office said the pilot and TFO tracked the people and notified LCSO ground units they were standing in a driveway getting candy on Arbor Avenue.

Patrol deputies responded and arrested all three men for misusing a laser, which is a third-degree felony.

This is the second incident where laser lights were pointed at LCSO helicopters in the past three days, according to Lee County deputies.

“Our patrol and aviation units worked together to arrest four subjects for this crime in the last 72 hours,” Sheriff Carmine Marceno said. “Those who want to play this game will find themselves in the Lee County Jail.”

ALL TRICKS, NO TREATS: Three Arrested for Striking LCSO Chopper with Laser

“I can’t begin to explain how dangerous it is to put our aviation crew members in jeopardy by pointing a laser light at their eyes,” stated Sheriff Carmine Marceno. “Any person who intentionally tries to harm my family members will go to jail.”

On October 31, 2020, members of the Lee County Sheriff's Office Aviation Unit were responding to a call in Central District when a trick-or-treater shined a green laser light into the cockpit of the helicopter.

With the help of the Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) camera, the Tactical Flight Officer (TFO) was able to locate where the laser light was coming from.

Aviation deputies observed three individuals walking through a neighborhood and intentionally pointing a laser at the helicopter.

The pilot and TFO tracked the subjects and advised LCSO ground units they were standing in a driveway getting candy at 6190 Arbor Avenue.

Patrol deputies quickly responded and took Alexander Harry (DOB 8/17/05), Xavier Satchell (DOB 4/20/02), and Adam Schlesier (DOB 5/19/80) into custody and charged them with Misuse of a Laser, which is a third-degree felony.

“Our patrol and aviation units worked together to arrest four subjects for this crime in the last 72 hours. Those who want to play this game will find themselves in the Lee County Jail,” stated Sheriff Carmine Marceno.

One Boise air traffic controller slept, another reeked of marijuana. The Federal Aviation Administration sat on emails


BY JOHN SOWELL
NOVEMBER 01, 2020 04:00 AM

One night four years ago, the lone air traffic controller on duty on an overnight shift at the Boise Airport fell asleep. A second controller had left earlier only to return to the tower reeking of marijuana smoke.

An Air St. Luke’s helicopter pilot seeking to land at the airport, and a second pilot trying to take off, tried for more than five minutes to contract an air traffic controller. The pilots finally received permission from an airport grounds operation officer.

Today, the Federal Aviation Administration has still not fully explained what led to the breakdown that night in air-traffic control, a key part of the nation’s aviation-safety system. Nor has it said what happened to the two controllers.

The Idaho Statesman has been able to piece together some of what took place in those early morning hours of Saturday, November 19, 2016, from staffing logs and 313 emails the FAA released to the Statesman. They were released on Oct. 14 — 46 months after the newspaper filed a Freedom of Information Act request. The records are from FAA officials who looked into the incident.

The Boise Airport, operated by the city of Boise, never received an official report on the incident, though it was the city officer’s intervention that enabled the helicopters to land.

“The Boise Airport and the Federal Aviation Administration are separate agencies, and the airport has no authority over the FAA,” airport spokesperson Sean Briggs said by email.

The FAA would not disclose the controllers’ names, citing a personnel exemption in the public records law. Their names were blacked out throughout the emails provided to the Statesman.

Here’s what we know.

CHAOS ENSUED AFTER LONE CONTROLLER FELL ASLEEP

The two controllers began their shifts at 10:30 p.m. on Friday, November 18. One handled traffic in and out of the airport. The second one was assigned to flights arriving and leaving from Bozeman, Montana.

That time of night is fairly quiet, with only a few commercial flights between 10:30 p.m. and midnight. A schedule from November 18, 2016, showed seven flights scheduled to arrive between between 10:38 p.m. and 12:28 a.m. Nov. 19. The next flight wasn’t scheduled to arrive until 7:52 a.m.

Only one departure was scheduled before midnight, at 11:03 p.m. The next one wasn’t until 5:30 a.m.

At Bozeman, there were two commercial arrivals scheduled and no departures between 10:30 p.m. and 12:15 a.m.

The FAA emails explained that the controller handling the Bozeman traffic was allowed a break after the Bozeman air traffic control station shut down at 12:15 a.m. A memo written after the incident said “breaks should be of a reasonable duration” but did not specify how long reasonable was. It also said that “at no time” should one controller be left to work alone for an extended period.

However, under FAA rules, the controller was required to ask for permission from the other controller to leave the building.

“He was not asked, nor did he approve the absence of the second controller who left,” Holly Delay, the FAA tower manager, wrote in a Nov. 30, 2016, email to James Carter, an FAA labor and employee relations specialist.

AIRPORT OFFICER COULDN’T REACH THE TOWER

Beginning about 1:30 a.m., Bruce Gard, an airport operations officer, drove across the airport’s taxiways and runways, checking for burned-out lights. He was initially able to speak to the lone controller in the tower, who gave him permission to enter those restricted areas. His last communication with the controller was at 2:14 a.m.

At 2:31 a.m., as Gard proceeded to another location, he could not reach the tower on either a ground operations frequency or a tower frequency.

Meanwhile, the Air St. Luke’s pilot coming from the downtown Boise hospital asked for permission to land but received no response. An Air St. Luke’s pilot leaving for Twin Falls could not reach the tower, either.

Gard tried to call the tower three times on his phone. He had another airport operations employee call by phone and radio, but that person was not able to raise anyone.

Gard pointed his pickup at the tower and flashed his lights, which he described as “extremely bright,” again with no response.

He then asked the operations employee to use an emergency line to contact the tower. That failed too. Gard asked the employee to notify Ada County emergency dispatchers to send police and fire units to the tower. He thought there may have been a medical emergency.

Meanwhile, Gard gave the pilots permission to land and depart.

FLASHING LIGHTS, SIREN, AIR HORN DID NO GOOD

Four Boise police officers were dispatched to the tower at 2:41 a.m. They arrived a few minutes later, followed by Gard.

Officer Andrew Morlock pressed a call button at the tower’s access gate but got no response. He flashed his patrol car spotlight at the tower several times. He turned on his overhead flashing blue and red lights, activated a siren and used an air horn. All to no avail, according to a report he filed later that day.

About 2:50 a.m., a four-door sedan with Idaho license plates pulled into the lot. The driver identified himself as an air traffic controller. He said he was returning to work after having gone home to eat. He said he had not been notified of any problem.

Morlock later wrote that the controller said he had spoken to the controller in the tower within the last 15 minutes, “even though no other attempt to contact him had been successful.”

The controller let the officers through a security gate and escorted them into the building.

Investigators later determined that the controller had been gone for 2-1/2 hours. Despite saying he had gone home to eat, the controller was evidently still hungry: He went into a ground-floor kitchen and grabbed a pizza box and a soda from a refrigerator.

Gard was incredulous.

“I stated ‘seriously, pizza with what is going on, pizza?’” Gard wrote. “And he stated, ‘What, it’s pizza.’”

The controller joined the officers and Gard in the elevator for the ride to the top of the 268-foot tower.

“We ascended the tower and while in the elevator and after exiting the elevator, I could smell the odor of marijuana coming from the heavier-set male,” Morlock wrote, referring to the controller. “The male’s demeanor appeared to be slow and confused as to what was going on.”

They found the second controller awake at his desk.

“He appeared to have just woken up, but I did not observe him sleeping,” Morlock wrote. “The male had a demeanor and drowsy facial expressions that is common with an individual that was just sleeping.”

The controller admitted he had fallen asleep.

“He kept saying ‘Everything is OK, man, everything is OK,’” Gard wrote in his report. “I and the officers questioned him on what happened, why he was not answering his radio and phone, and he would just state ‘everything is fine.’”

Gard asked the sleepy controller whether he realized Gard had given the Air St. Luke’s pilots permission to land and take off.

“This seemed to get his attention (and) he stated, ‘You did?’” Gard wrote.

Meanwhile, the heavy-set controller didn’t act worried.

“This whole time (he) was sitting and eating his pizza and drinking his pop and was not even fazed,” Gard wrote.

MISSED PLANE IDENTIFICATIONS

After the controllers went back to work, Gard said he heard one of them twice incorrectly identify two private planes by the wrong tail number. The pilots corrected the controller in both instances, Gard wrote.

It’s unclear from the report which controller it was. The man’s name was blacked out.

While that was going on, a second officer, Officer Shane Langton said he wandered around the tower in an attempt to smell marijuana again. He said in a report that he was 3 to 4 feet from both controllers but could not smell any marijuana.

After Gard and the officers rode the elevator down and walked out the building, they discussed what they had seen and smelled.

“They all at once stated, ‘Did you smell the pot on the pizza guy in the elevator?’” Gard wrote.

An unidentified tower employee, possibly one of the controllers, informed FAA managers that a controller had been unresponsive for about 20 minutes.

POLICE TOOK NO ACTION AGAINST CONTROLLER

Later that morning, Sarah Demory, then-deputy director of airport operations for the Boise Airport, notified Holly Delay, the FAA tower manager in Boise, that police believed the one controller had been smoking marijuana. About 11 a.m., Delay emailed Christine Mellon, a Northwest FAA district manager in Renton, Washington.

“I feel at this point it would be important for us to substantiate through the police department if this ‘suspicious allegation’ is, in fact, true,” Delay wrote.

Delay questioned whether reports of the officers’ suspicions were accurate.

“I find it hard to believe that a policeman would ignore the fact that an individual was possibly impaired and allow them to return to work or duty without taking action,” she wrote.

After obtaining the police reports 20 days after the incident, on December 9, the Statesman reported that officers were unable to find any signs of marijuana on a table or in the trash on the tower’s ground floor. They took no further action to determine whether the controller was impaired.

Hayley Williams, spokesperson for the Boise Police Department, declined to say why officers did not conduct field sobriety tests.

“The information available about this incident is what was in the police report,” she wrote in an email.

It took the FAA four days after the incident to convene a hearing and order both controllers to submit to a drug test. The hearing took place after the FAA obtained reports from each of the Boise police officers detailing their suspicions.

Both controllers were tested, with the results coming back negative. The controllers cleared to return to duty on November 28.

FAA WON’T SAY IF CONTROLLERS DISCIPLINED

The emails do not indicate whether either controller was disciplined.

The FAA previously said disclosure of any disciplinary action would be considered an invasion of the employees’ privacy. On October 20, the agency reiterated that policy.

A Boise controller policy manual at the time said that controllers were not allowed to leave the building during their shifts. A month after the incident, the FAA told its Boise controllers once again that they were not allowed to leave the tower during their shifts. In case of sickness or an emergency, an employee would be required to sign out and notify management by telephone.

The emails showed the FAA was concerned about press coverage. Several hours after the incident, Jeff Planty, vice president of technical operations for the FAA in Washington, D.C., asked if there had been any media inquiries in an email sent to Peter Abbey, an FAA air traffic manager in Renton, Washington.

At the time, there had been no inquiries. The Statesman received a tip two days later and broke the story on November 22, 2016.

On November 30, 2016, Mellon wrote to Delay, the tower manager, asking what the Boise tower’s midnight shift policy was and whether she believed there was a violation. Mellon said the information would be provided to the FAA’s public affairs office, but no statement was ever provided to the Statesman or other media.

The only information provided to the Statesman was that the matter was under investigation and that the controllers had passed the drug tests.

On December 6, 2016, Delay sent an email to Mellon and other FAA officials informing them the investigation was completed.

FAA TRIED TO BLOCK RELEASE OF POLICE REPORTS

On December 9, 2016, the Boise Police Department released the police reports of the tower incident following a public records request by the Statesman. Earlier that day, an FAA lawyer in Los Angeles, Lierre Green, wrote to other FAA officials saying that the city of Boise had notified her of the impending release.

“I am working ... to see if there is any way we can stop the release,” Green wrote.

Her efforts failed, and the Statesman that day reported the allegations that one controller fell asleep and the other smelled of marijuana.

Despite Delay’s message that the investigation was complete, the agency maintained on December 10 that it was still ongoing, according to an email from the Statesman from Ian Gregor, an FAA spokesperson in El Segundo, California.

On Dec. 13, acting Boise Airport Radar Manager Frederick Wilson emailed Delay a copy of the Statesman’s Dec. 9 story.

“The printed articles continue to prompt questions and comments from family, friends and neighbors to our Tech Ops folks,” Wilson wrote. “I imagine it is bad for your folks, too.”

The Statesman filed its Freedom of Information Act request on December 12, 2016. The federal Freedom of Information Act gives agencies 20 working days to respond to records requests, though they can often take an extra 10 days, and the FAA said it would.

But the law does not penalize agencies or their employees for delays; citizens must sue. The FAA has not explained why it took nearly four years to comply with the request.

In a statement October 20, the FAA said it addressed the incident “at the Boise control tower in accordance with standard agency processes and policies.”

The FAA said it continues to require two controllers to work overnight shifts together, and it reinforced the importance of following this policy with its Boise workers.

“As a general practice, FAA air traffic managers review data and monitor our air traffic facilities, including during the overnight shift, to ensure policies are being followed,” the statement said.


BEHIND OUR REPORTING

How we did this story

Why did we write this story?

The Federal Aviation Administration never has explained what happened when no one was in command at the Boise Airport air traffic control tower during a 20-minute period on November 19, 2016. The only information provided by the agency was that the incident was under investigation. It would not say whether the two controllers were disciplined, saying it would be an invasion of their privacy.

What were we trying to do?

We wanted to go beyond what was contained in Boise Police Department reports on the incident and determine whether the two controllers were disciplined and what steps were taken by the agency in records alight of what happened.

How did we report it?

Business reporter John Sowell filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the FAA on December 12, 2016. Agencies have 20 working days to respond to records requests, but the FAA asked for an additional 10 days to collect the records. They were never delivered. On February 10, 2020, the FAA contacted Sowell and asked whether he was still interested in obtaining the records. He said yes. They were finally delivered on a CD received by the Statesman on October 14. There was no explanation of the delay. The records blacked out the names of the two controllers whenever they were mentioned. The records mentioned reports submitted by the two controllers under a program meant to resolve safety issues, but the FAA did not include them.

Raytheon 400A Beechjet, N456FL: Accident occurred November 01, 2020 at Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (KFHB), Nassau County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Nextant Aerospace; Cleveland, Ohio
Georgia Jet; Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Flight Options LLC


Location: Fernandina Beach, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA036
Date & Time: November 1, 2020, 14:00 Local
Registration: N456FL
Aircraft: Raytheon 400A
Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

On November 1, 2020, about 1400 eastern standard time, a Raytheon 400A airplane, N456FL, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (FHB), Fernandina Beach, Florida. The pilot, copilot, and four passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 air taxi flight.

The flight departed from Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples Florida about 1304, and was subsequently cleared for the RNAV (GPS) RWY 13 approach at FHB.

According to the copilot, the automated weather observation system at FHB reported winds 110°-120° at 4 knots, gusting to 18 knots. Rain showers had passed over the airport prior to arrival. Takeoff and landing data calculations were within limits for a 5,100-ft-long, wet runway.

The approach was normal and flown utilizing the autopilot. They had the runway in sight approximately 3 miles out. The pilot reduced thrust to idle power at 50 ft above ground level and touched down on speed, centerline, and on aim point. The copilot then deployed speed brakes at approximately 97 knots.

The pilot applied the brakes and then stated he was getting no braking feel. The airplane was not decelerating normally. The copilot selected antiskid off; however, there was no improvement in braking action.

The pilot managed to “scrub off” some groundspeed by steering to the left and right sides of the runway before the airplane departed the end of the runway. The airplane stopped approximately 150 ft past the runway in soft soil and grass.

According to the pilot, the wind was reported as 110° at 4 knots, gusting to 18 knots. The runway was wet, and it appeared opaque with no standing water. The airplane touched down on speed and on the aiming point markers. Upon applying the brakes, he received zero feedback. The antiskid off was turned off while on the last third of the runway and the airplane experienced some side to side skidding toward the end of the runway.

After the accident, the airport manager and the pilot drove down the full length of the runway and the pilot could not find any skid marks except for the side to side skidding.

Initial weight and balance calculations revealed that the airplane was within limitations when the accident occurred. Postaccident examination of the airplane by an NTSB investigator confirmed that the antiskid switch was in the “OFF” position. Examination and testing of the brakes and antiskid system indicated that they were operating normally.

The recorded weather at FHB at 1400, included wind 290° at 17 knots, gusting to 23 knots, 1 1/4 miles visibility, heavy rain, and mist.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Chart Supplements, FHB was owned by the City of Fernandina Beach. It was classified by the FAA as a publicly owned, uncontrolled, public use The airport elevation was 15.7 mean sea level and runways were in a 4/22, 9/27, and 13/31 configuration.

Runway 13 was asphalt with porous friction courses, in good condition. The runway was 5,152 ft long by 100 ft wide. It was marked with nonprecision markings in good condition with a touchdown point. It was equipped with medium intensity runway edge lights, runway end identifier lights, and a 2-light precision approach path indicator on the left side of the runway which provided a 3.00° glidepath to
touchdown. Obstacles existed in the form of a tree located 2,045 feet from the runway, 50 ft right of centerline, which took a 42:1 slope to clear.

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Raytheon 
Registration: N456FL
Model/Series: 400A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FHB,16 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:00 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 1300 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots / 23 knots, 290°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1300 ft AGL 
Visibility: 1.2 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Naples, FL (APF)
Destination: Fernandina Beach, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 None Latitude,
Longitude: 30.611833,-81.461194 (est)
 



FERNANDINA BEACH, Florida — A runway is closed at the Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport after a small jet skidded off the runway Sunday, according to the City of Fernandina Beach Government.

In a post to Facebook, the city government said passengers and crew are OK but the jet's pilot sustained a bump to his head. 

Runway 13/31 is closed following the incident. The city government said the FAA and NTSB were both notified. 

Aeronca 11AC, N9171E: Accident occurred October 28, 2020 at Wabash Municipal Airport (KIWH), Indiana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana


Location: Wabash, IN
Accident Number: CEN21LA037
Date & Time: October 28, 2020, 13:30 Local 
Registration: N9171E
Aircraft: Aeronca 11AC 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
  
Aircraft Make: Aeronca 
Registration: N9171E
Model/Series: 11AC NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:
  
Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
  
Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HHG,806 ft msl 
Observation Time: 12:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -13.9°C /-17.2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Wabash, IN
Destination: Wabash, IN
  
Wreckage and Impact Information
  
Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.761972,-85.79875 (est)

Cessna 310R, N101G: Fatal accident occurred October 29, 2020 near Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada 


Location: Las Vegas, NV 
Accident Number: WPR21LA030
Date & Time: October 29, 2020, 09:39 Local
Registration: N101G
Aircraft: Cessna 310 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:

On October 29, 2020, about 0939 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 310, N101G was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Henderson, Nevada. The pilot and the passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot departed North Las Vegas Airport (VGT), Las Vegas, Nevada at 0929 en route to Gillespie Field Airport (SEE), San Diego/El Cajon, California. At 0935, the pilot contacted Air Traffic Control (ATC), declared “engine-out” and requested to change the destination to Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Las Vegas, Nevada. About three minutes later, the airplane crashed 4.5 miles northwest of HND Airport.

The airplane was secured for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N101G
Model/Series: 310 R 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLAS,2180 ft msl
Observation Time: 09:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C /-7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Las Vegas, NV (VGT) 
Destination: San Diego, CA (SEE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 36.026127,-115.19351

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Tyrone Cabalar, 35 (passenger)

Robert J. Golo

 


Clark County officials have identified the passenger of a plane that crashed in the Las Vegas area shortly after takeoff to San Diego.

The county's Office of the Coroner/Medical Examiner says 35-year-old Tyrone Cabalar was killed in the crash on October 29th.

Cabalar was one of two people aboard the Cessna 310R when it went down minutes after taking off from North Las Vegas Airport.

The pilot of the plane, which was heading to Gillespie Field in San Diego, has not been identified.

On October 29th the plane crashed at about 9:30 a.m. near Raven Avenue and Hinson Street, several miles southwest of the Las Vegas Strip.

Witnesses told the Clark County Fire Department they saw the plane flying low before hearing the crash and describing an "awful" sound and a giant "fireball."

First responders say the plane struck the wall of a construction site and burst into flames.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration continue to investigate the incident.


LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -- Two people have died after a small plane crash west of I-15 in Las Vegas Thursday morning, according to the Clark County Fire Department.

The aircraft was a 1974 Cessna 310-R, according to CCFD Deputy Chief Warren Whitney.

It departed North Las Vegas airport at 9:29 a.m., Whitney said. No other injuries were reported.

The incident occurred near Raven Avenue and Hinson Street, west of I-15 near Valley View Boulevard.

CCFD said the plane caught fire, which extended to a nearby trailer. Bruce Langson said he was in the trailer at the time of the crash.

"I could hear the propeller turning over and it sounded like a helicopter. Then I heard a thud, crash and a gigantic ball of flames, fuel splashed over my construction trailer," Langson said. "I ran around and saw it was totally engulfed in flames, a giant fireball.

"There was nothing I could do personally to assist anyone there. It was just... it looked like a movie scene from the worst horror movie I've seen," Langson said.

Audio recordings from Flight Aware reveal what the pilot said moments before the crash.

The pilot told the Henderson control tower he had to shut down one of the engines and needed to land at the Henderson Airport.

An air traffic controller asked if he wanted to get emergency crews ready.

The pilot responded, “negative” then went silent.

About 23 seconds later, the air traffic controller asked for other controllers and pilots to stand by because  they, “just had an aircraft incident.”

Las Vegas police assisted on scene. The FAA is conducting an investigation.



LAS VEGAS (KSNV) — Two people were killed when a small plane crashed at a construction site in the south valley Thursday morning, a fire official has confirmed.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration said the Cessna 310 crashed into a lot about four miles northwest of Henderson Executive Airport around 9:30 a.m.

Two people were on board at the time, and the plane caught fire after crashing into a wall at the construction site.

Thomas Touchstone with Clark County Fire Department discusses the plane crash in the south Las Vegas valley.

Thomas Touchstone with the Clark County Fire Department said crews responded around 9:40 a.m. and were able to put out the fire by about 10 a.m. Nobody else was injured.

The cause of the crash is under investigation and the identities of the two people on board have not yet been confirmed, Touchstone said, adding that several witnesses reported seeing the plane flying low before it crashed.

The plane took off from North Las Vegas Airport and crashed after about nine minutes in the air, Touchstone said.

Preliminary details indicate it was bound for Gillespie Field Airport in San Diego, according to the FAA.

Both the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, with the NTSB taking the lead. The FAA says it will release the tail number of the plane once verified by investigators on the ground.



LAS VEGAS (FOX 5) --  Thursday started as a normal day for many people in a neighborhood that sees planes every 15 to 20 minutes.

"We were just getting ready during our daily routine," said Anthony Mair, who witnessed the accident. 

"We were taking a morning stroll with my sister," said Isreal Tigabu. 

"I was driving up, I think this is Arville street, on my way to physical therapy," said Ron Cook. 

It didn't take long for witnesses to realize something was wrong. 

"I noticed it about 10 to 15 seconds before it crashed because it was flying very low," Cook said.

"We noticed one of the propellers wasn't working," Tigabu said. "We were like 'Oh my God. I hope the pilot knows."

"It didn't look like it was out of control or anything so I thought it was going to make it," Mair said.

Sadly, that wasn't the case.

"I looked and I saw the plane coming from the west and I said 'Where did that take off from? I can't tell where it's going,'" said Kristin who saw the accident. "My husband immediately said, he's not going to make it."

"At the last second, about 50 feet above the ground, it just turned to the right, I believe, and nosedived," Cook said. "Went straight down, flames came straight up. I pulled over and called 911 and just went running to it.

Authorities said the Cessna 310R crashed just nine minutes after it took off. Neighbors said they're just glad the plane didn't hit a home.

"You're grateful for when others don't die also," Cook said. "And I don't know how many people were on board. Just any loss of life is sad of course."

Authorities said two people died in the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the accident.

Starduster SA300, N768P: Accident occurred October 29, 2020 at Cedar City Regional Airport (KCDC), Iron County, Utah

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah


Location: Cedar City, UT 
Accident Number: WPR21LA031
Date & Time: October 29, 2020, 12:50 Local 
Registration: N768P
Aircraft: Pearson Starduster 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pearson 
Registration: N768P
Model/Series: Starduster SA-300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 37.700972,-113.09886 (est)

Cirrus SR22T GTS G6 carbon, N113ED: Incident occurred October 28, 2020 at Montauk Airport (KMTP), Suffolk County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aircraft landed and went off end of runway through a fence, over a road and through another fence. 

Hopscotch Air
Blue Sky November LLC


Date: 28-OCT-20
Time: 12:20:00Z
Regis#: N113ED
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MONTAUK
State: NEW YORK



No one was hurt when a plane skidded off the runway in Montauk and into a fence on what is shaping up to be a rainy and windy Thursday morning.

The Cirrus SR22T GTS G6 was landing at the Montauk Airport on East Lake Drive at about 8:15 a.m., according to data on FlightAware.com.

The four-seater orange plane crossed East Lake Drive and hit a stockade fence, just missing a boat on the other side, at the Montauk Bungalows, next to Rick’s Crabby Cowboy. A crane from Keith Grimes Inc. was brought in to remove the plane, while East Hampton Town police kept the road closed.

No one was hurt. The Montauk Airport was briefly closed. The Federal Aviation Administration will conduct a routine investigation into what caused the crash.

The rain had just begun Thursday morning when the incident occurred. The East End is feeling the effects of Zeta with heavy rain and wind gusts between 20 and 40 mph expected throughout the rest of the day.

The plane arrived in Montauk from Westchester County Airport in White Plains, where it had taken off at 7:40 a.m., FlightAware shows.

The plane is owned by Blue Sky November LLC, based in Mamaroneck.

Back in August, a small plane also skidded off the runway in Montauk.  The pilot told police he was landing when the plane hit a wind-shear, hit a wing, and went off the runway. No one was hurt then either.

Kitfox III, N593SL: Incident occurred October 28, 2020 at Ephrata Municipal Airport (KEPH), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft ground looped on landing. 


Date: 28-OCT-20
Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: N593SL
Aircraft Make: KITFOX
Aircraft Model: III
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EPHRATA
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N814BA: Accident occurred October 27, 2020 at Richland Airport (KRLD), Benton County, Washington

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Barr Air Patrol LLC

Location: Richland, WA
Accident Number: WPR21LA029
Date & Time: October 27, 2020, 10:12 Local 
Registration: N814BA
Aircraft: Cessna A185
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N814BA
Model/Series: A185 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRLD,394 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Richland, WA (RLD) 
Destination: Richland, WA (RLD)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 46.306105,-119.30835 (est)

Cessna 182T Skylane, N3537C: Accident occurred October 28, 2020 near Warren County Airport at John Lane Field (I68), Lebanon, Ohio

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio


Location: Lebanon, OH 
Accident Number: CEN21LA034
Date & Time: October 28, 2020, 11:45 
Local Registration: N3537C
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:

On October 28, 2020, about 1145 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182T airplane, N3537C, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lebanon, Ohio. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated he and the passenger were ferrying the airplane from Clermont County Airport (I69), Ohio, to Warren County Airport (I68), Ohio following maintenance to install new avionics. While flying at 3,000 ft mean sea level (MSL) in instrument meteorological conditions the oil pressure dropped to zero. The engine initially ran smooth but began knocking and vibrating. The pilot declared an emergency and proceeded direct to I68, but was unable to maintain altitude. The airplane broke clear of the clouds about 600 ft above the ground and the engine subsequently lost all power. Unable to make the runway, the pilot elected to land in a harvested corn field. The pilot could not stop the airplane before it hit trees at the end of the field, damaging the airplane’s wings and fuselage.

The engine was examined, and a brightly colored plastic cap was found installed on the crankcase breather port, which completely blocked the port. The engine crankcase seal on the front of the engine was found dislodged and oil was found on the underside of engine compartment and cowling. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3537C
Model/Series: 182 T 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: I68 
Observation Time: 11:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 500 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Overcast Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Batavia, OH (I69)
Destination: Lebanon, OH

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.431359,-84.256329 (est)
 

WARREN COUNTY, Ohio (FOX19) - Two people were on board a small plane when it made an emergency landing Wednesday morning in Warren County, Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt. Chuck O’Bryon said.

The accident happened around 11:40 a.m. in a field just north of State Route 63 between McClure Road and State Route 741 in Turtlecreek Township.

Troopers say a Cessna Skylane made an emergency landing in the field and came to rest in a tree line.

The pilot, Stephen Reinhardt, 66, of Cincinnati, and his passenger, Clemens Saalfield, 77, also of Cincinnati, were not hurt.

The plane was traveling from the Clermont County Airport to the Warren County Airport

The incident remains under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol - Lebanon Post.


WARREN COUNTY, Ohio — A small plane carrying two people made an emergency landing in a cornfield in Warren County on Wednesday, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

OSHP said the pilot crashed into a tree line just north of State Route 63 between McClure Road and State Route 741 in the Turtlecreek Township area of Warren County at around 11:40 a.m.

"There was just sheriff after sheriff after sheriff and state highway patrol after state highway patrol. I thought this is strange and were police parked in every driveway and they closed down the road," said neighbor Janet Porter.

The pilot, 66-year-old Stephen Reinhardt, was coming from the Clermont County Airport and was trying to land at the Warren County Airport.

Passenger, 77-year-old Clemens Saafeld, was inside the plane at the time of the landing. Neither the pilot or the passenger were injured, OSHP said.

According to OSHP, the pilot originally reported having mechanical issues but they're still investigating what caused the crash.

The plane suffered extensive damage and spilled fuel.

A fellow member says the people involved were apart of The Flying Neutrons, he says the pilot has nearly 20 years of experience.

"I'm just grateful that the people that were in the plane were okay...their angels were with them today, " said Porter.

Authorities are still investigating.