Thursday, June 7, 2018

ONVOI Global Services: Flight Academy Opens in the Panhandle



DeFuniak Springs, Fla. - In DeFuniak Springs, a flight academy is officially open for business.

Locals and officials held a ceremonial ribbon cutting at the municipal airport. Onvoi Global Services has been open at the airport for about ten months, serving as a Defense Contractor for the air force with 19 contracts across the country.

They saw a need in the area that they knew they could cater too. The airline industry desperately needs pilots.

"Mainly to service the Fort Rucker, Eglin, Tyndall communities mainly for helicopter pilots that want to transition to fixed wings to go fly for the airlines. The airline industry is hiring at very, very high numbers," said Darryl Centanni, Onvoi Global Service.

The flight school will offer training programs on a fleet of Cessna 172s and a Cessna 208. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.mypanhandle.com

Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey, N907CB: Accident occurred June 07, 2018 near Buchan Airport (X36), Englewood, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N907CB

Location: Englewood, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA162
Date & Time: 06/07/2018, 1150 EDT
Registration: N907CB
Aircraft: BRYAN C L/LABRASH R D SEAREY
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On June 7, 2018, about 1150 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Searey, N907CB, was substantially damaged following a partial loss of engine power near Englewood, Florida. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a solo instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for flight that originated at Buchan Airport (X36), Englewood, Florida and was destined for Airport Manatee (48X), Palmetto, Florida.

The pilot reported that he flew the airplane earlier that morning for about 75 minutes with no anomalies noted. He landed at X36 and took a break for about 30 minutes. He fueled the airplane earlier that day and there were 13.6 gallons on board for takeoff from X36. He performed an engine runup at 3,500 rpm along the entire length of runway 30, then turned around for a takeoff on runway 12. After rotation, the pilot noted a partial loss of engine power. The airplane sank and struck a tree at the end of runway 12 before coming to rest in a lawn near the runway end.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the fuselage and left wing sustained structural damage.

The wreckage was recovered to a storage facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BRYAN C L/LABRASH R D
Registration: N907CB
Model/Series: SEAREY NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VNC
Observation Time: 1555 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Englewood, FL (X36)
Destination: Palmetto, FL (48X)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  26.987500, -82.368889 (est)




ENGLEWOOD — Norman Ellis ran into his home on Thursday to avoid being struck by an airplane that landed like a parked car beside his house.

“I had that plane coming right at me; I didn’t know where to go,” said Ellis of the crash at about 12:30 p.m. Thursday near Buchan Airport in Englewood. “I saw it hit the tree and spin around. I didn’t see it hit the road.”

Ellis was putting chemicals in his pool at 18 Jamestown Avenue when he saw a low-flying plane begin to stutter in mid-air. It went up and then down and hit a tree and crashed about 125 feet away from where he stood.

To avoid the crash, the retired firefighter, who lives at the south end of Buchan Airport in Englewood, ran inside his house for a few seconds. He came back out to see if the pilot was OK.

“He got out himself,” according to Ellis, who said, “He didn’t have any scratches or anything.”

The unidentified pilot told him his engine had stopped and he had lost power. The plane was less than 200 feet from the south end of Buchan Airport’s grass turf runway.

The unattended Sarasota County airport is tucked inside of a residential neighborhood next to the Englewood Area Historical Museum. Local obstructions include 42- to 115-foot trees and one slope. The runway is about 2,040 feet by 120 feet wide.

About 52 planes come and go from the air strip weekly, and 70 percent of the traffic is from local aviation — single-engine planes and ultralights. It is located about 2 miles northwest of the city of Englewood.

According to the FAA N-number registry, the plane is a Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey that is listed as experimental. The amateur-built plane was manufactured in 1997 by Bryan C L/Labrash R D.

The registered owner is Donald D. Disher of Tavares but it is unknown whether he was also the pilot of the plane built to touch down on land or water.

Ellis said it looked like the engine was running when he struck the tree and stopped after it hit the ground.

“I just mowed the lawn so he can park there, I guess,” said Ellis of the downed plane that sat on the edge of his property on Jamestown Avenue. “It looked like he parked it there.”

Ellis was a firefighter and EMT for 28 years and immediately tried to aid the single passenger.

“You don’t want to see it and you don’t want to be there, but you go anyway in case you can help them,” Ellis said. “He’s very fortunate.”

Sarasota County detectives responded to the crash and said the National Transportation Safety Board would be taking over the investigation, according to a Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office post on social media. They stated that preliminary information indicated the pilot was departing from Buchan Airport when he experienced engine trouble.

The Sheriff’s Office said the pilot was not injured, but the plane is “totaled.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.newschief.com












ENGLEWOOD, Fla. (FOX 13) - Neighbors in an Englewood subdivision are breathing a sigh of relief after a small plane crash-landed into a yard off Old Englewood Road, a mere 15 feet from a house. They say thankfully, no one was injured.

Norman Ellis was busy treating his pool Thursday morning just before noon when all of a sudden, he noticed something was off with a nearby plane’s takeoff.

“I can see he was taking off,” he recalled, “and he started to take off, and he got up a little ways then he dipped down, I said, ‘He ain’t gonna make this. And he’s coming straight for me.'”

The plane veered down and hit a tree.

“He was spinning around in the air, and I ran into the house, because a lanai screen isn’t much protection,” Ellis continued.

A retired firefighter, Ellis immediately called 911 and was back outside in seconds.  The plane came within 15 feet of crashing into his home; thankfully, the pilot was OK.

“He was fine, he just sat there, he was kind of dazed. I couldn’t find any marks on him, he just opened the door and got out.”

The plane had taken off from Buchan Airport, the grass runway ending about 150 feet from where the man crashed. Just a few more feet, and Ellis says it could have been an entirely different story.

“I said, ‘You’re lucky to be alive.’”

Officials from the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office spent the afternoon at the scene, speaking with the pilot. They’re awaiting the arrival of the FAA, who will continue the investigation.

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox13news.com





ENGLEWOOD, FL (WWSB) - Fire and Rescue crews are on the scene of a small aircraft crash in an Englewood neighborhood.

According to the Englewood Fire Department, emergency crews responded to a home on Jamestown Avenue at 11:54 a.m. for reports of an aircraft crash.

Once on scene, firefighters discovered the ultralight aircraft in a homeowners yard.

Detectives with the Sarasota County Sheriff's office say that a preliminary investigation indicates that the pilot was attempting to depart from Buchan Airport at the time of the crash.

Story and video ➤ http://www.mysuncoast.com

Cessna 152, N93989: Incident occurred June 07, 2018 near Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV), Alachua County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft landed on a highway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N93989

Date: 07-JUN-18
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N93989
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GAINESVILLE
State: FLORIDA













GAINESVILLE, Fla. - Northbound traffic on Interstate 75 in Alachua County was blocked after a small plane made an emergency landing on the highway just before noon Thursday.

According to Alachua County Fire Rescue, the plane had mechanical problems and couldn't make it to the airport.

The plane landed safely near the State Road 121 exit. Both occupants were uninjured, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

After the plane was towed off the highway to a grass median, all northbound lanes of I-75 reopened about 3 p.m. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.news4jax.com

Van’s RV-4, N7765X: Accident occurred June 07, 2018 near Pittsburgh-Butler Regional Airport (KBTP), Butler County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/ N7765X

Location: Butler, PA
Accident Number: ERA18LA163
Date & Time: 06/07/2018, 1100 EDT
Registration: N7765X
Aircraft: AXELRAD MICHAEL R VANS AIRCRAFT RV-4
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 7, 2018, about 1100 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Vans Aircraft RV-4, N7765X, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain and trees during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Pittsburgh/Butler Regional Airport (BTP), Butler, Pennsylvania. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, shortly after takeoff, while on the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern, about 800 ft mean sea level, the engine lost total power. He landed straight-ahead in a field and the airplane subsequently impacted trees. The fuselage and left wing sustained substantial damage. The pilot added that this was the first flight after he had performed maintenance repairs on the engine, due to a prior engine failure that occurred about 1 month earlier.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He also held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate, limited to inspection of the accident airplane. His most recent Basic Medical requirements were completed on June 6, 2017.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the two-seat, low-wing, fixed landing gear, single-engine airplane was manufactured in 2015. It was equipped with an automobile converted GM Ecotec L61 engine.

The weather conditions reported at 1056 at BTP, included variable wind at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 17°C, and dew point 10°C.

The airplane was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AXELRAD MICHAEL R
Registration: N7765X
Model/Series: VANS AIRCRAFT RV-4 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BTP, 1248 ft msl
Observation Time: 1056 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Butler, PA (BTP)
Destination: Butler, PA (BTP) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.756111, -79.950556 (est)



A small homebuilt plane made an emergency landing Thursday morning in a Butler County horse pasture, and the sole occupant walked away with only a minor injury.

The incident occurred shortly before 11 a.m. when the pilot, identified by police as Michael Axelrad of Pittsburgh, took off from Pittsburgh-Butler Regional Airport in the experimental plane.

Mr. Axelrad "immediately experienced a power loss," Penn police Sgt. Cheryl Cranmer said. "As he was turning it around to turn back to the airport, he had what they call an off-runway landing. He was trying to bring it down into a field but managed to bring it down in a horse pasture."

The plane, which landed about 1 1/2 miles from where it took off, had damage to its propeller but otherwise appeared intact, Sgt. Cranmer said. Its front end was lodged in some brush.

Mr. Axelrad, who the sergeant said was in his 60s or 70s, had a scrape on his forehead and was treated at the scene by ambulance personnel.

A fence was struck but there was no other damage to property, according to Sgt. Cranmer.

Fire, police and medical units responded to the scene, as did someone from the airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating. An agency spokeswoman said the aircraft was a Van's RV-4, which is listed as a two-seater and is constructed from a kit.

Sgt. Cranmer described Mr. Axelrad as an accomplished pilot. She said he did not know why the power failed.

"He's been flying it for a couple of years, so it's not like it's a new plane for him. He built it himself," Sgt. Cranmer said, adding that he told her he had been working on it for about two decades and flying it for four years.

Original article ➤ http://www.post-gazette.com





A small, single-engine airplane crashed late Thursday morning in Penn Township.

The crash was reported to the Butler County 911 Center at 11 a.m. in a pasture near the 100 block of Royal Oak Drive.

The aircraft is believed to be a single-engine, one-person plane. A representative from the Pittsburgh-Butler Regional Airport said the plane took off from there before it crashed. The pilot reportedly lost power after taking off from the runway and crashed while attempting to circle back to the airport.

The airport representative said the pilot was not injured. A fence was damaged.

The FAA will investigate.

No further information has been released.

The scene of the crash on Royal Oak Drive is a rural area off Brownsdale Road. It’s about two miles from the airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://butlerradio.com





BUTLER, Pa. - A homemade plane crashed Thursday morning into a Butler County horse pasture.

The private plane crashed into a pasture in the area of Royal Oak Drive in Penn Township, just three miles from the Butler Airport.

The plane also missed a man by just a matter of feet, but he didn't hear it coming because of his lawnmower.

"He (the pilot) was already out of the plane. He had a cut on his head and was walking around. He seemed OK," said John Ehrhart.

According to airport officials, the pilot lost power shortly after takeoff and was trying to turn back when the plane went down.

No injuries were reported and the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.wpxi.com

Bellanca 7ECA, N8646V: Accident occurred June 06, 2018 near Fairbanks International Airport (PAFA), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks

http://registry.faa.gov/N8646V

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA357

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 06, 2018 in 3 miles south of the Fairbanks International Airport, AK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7ECA, registration: N8646V

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Windshield blew into aircraft under unknown circumstances.


Date: 06-JUN-18

Time: 13:30:00Z
Regis#: N8646V
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 7ECA
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: FAIRBANKS
State: ALASKA

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N9964L: Incident occurred June 06, 2018 at Fullerton Municipal Airport (KFUL), Orange County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach

Aircraft experienced a bird strike on departure.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9964L

Date: 06-JUN-18
Time: 03:15:00Z
Regis#: N9964L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: FULLERTON
State: CALIFORNIA

Beech A36 Bonanza, N710JT: Accident occurred June 06, 2018 at Gilliam Airport (LA54), Caddo Parish, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham

Havana Farms Equipment Co LLC


http://registry.faa.gov/N710JT

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA335
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 06, 2018 in Gilliam, LA
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N710JT

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During takeoff aircraft veered left and crashed in a field.

Date: 06-JUN-18
Time: 13:40:00Z
Regis#: N710JT
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: GILLIAM
State: LOUISIANA

Cessna 152, N25983: Incident occurred June 06, 2018 in Springtown, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft landed in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N25983

Date: 06-JUN-18
Time: 16:15:00Z
Regis#: N25983
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SPRINGTOWN
State: TEXAS

Cessna 150H, N22586: Incident occurred June 06, 2018 in Antigo, Langlade County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aircraft landed in an empty field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N22586

Date: 06-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N22586
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150H
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANTIGO
State: WISCONSIN

Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport (KPUW) construction $20M over projections: Official says university land cost more to buy than first anticipated



Construction projects aimed at runway realignment at the Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport will go about $22 million over their original projections.

Due to higher-than-estimated costs in areas such as land acquisition and drainage among others, the project which is 70 percent completed will finish much higher than their $119 million project estimation in 2014, ending up at $142.5 million, Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport Executive Director Tony Bean said.

Land acquisition represented the largest increase, accounting for approximately $12 million in the extra costs, he said.

The difference in estimation versus cost came from the process the airport had to use to purchase the land using federal funds from the Federal Aviation Administration, who is providing 91.88 percent of funding with the remaining amount being covered by a number of local donors. However, these increased costs will result in only a little more than a $140,000 addition to the funding match needed from the donors.

Bean said one of the main reasons the purchasing of land ended up costing more than estimated was due to the process by which an organization must go through to buy property using federal funds, which doesn’t allow in-depth inspection of the land before making an offer.

“To make an offer we have to go get an appraisal and we have to go actually make an offer to a landowner under the Uniform Relocation Act,” Bean said. “You’re asking a real estate specialist in the infancy part of it [to estimate], where you haven’t gone on to the property and you haven’t looked at anything … you’re making an estimate based on that.”

Most of the land contributing to the rise in cost was bought from WSU, Bean said.

“When you actually get into negotiations and you start understanding what it is, that number can change and can change significantly,” he said. “The costs with WSU were significantly higher than we programmed for the purchase of the property.”

Along with the actual price of buying the land, some extra costs came in the form of “uneconomic remainder,” which occurs when a federally funded project must buy the remainder of a property, even if they don’t need it, due to the small amount left unwanted being made unusable or useless because of the purchase of the majority of the plot, Bean said.

Another reason for the discrepancy between the estimate and the actual bid costs comes from soil work. The airport couldn’t sample the portion of the land to be used that was covered by a creek, and the depth needed to reach bedrock for building purposes was deeper than expected, he said.

The airport also saw a larger increase in drainage work than previously expected. This, compounded with economic factors such as higher costs for the parts used due to last year’s hurricane season adding a lot of buyers to the market and the economy improving, led to the price hike, Bean said.

Another factor responsible for the new estimation is the fees associated with instrumental landing systems switching from local to FAA control, Bean said.

The project, which expects its final bid for a new taxiway to be finalized next year, will cause the airport to close from Sept. 8, 2019 until Oct. 3, 2019, Bean said, with commercial flights not resuming until Oct. 10.

Options for diverted flights during this time will be up to individual flyers, but Bean said options should be available in Spokane and Lewiston.

Original article ➤ https://dailyevergreen.com

Beech 19A Musketeer Sport, N6142N: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, Hawaii

Dean "Dingo" Hutton, private pilot 

Alexis Aaron, passenger

 Heather Riley and Gerrit Evensen, passengers


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii
Lycoming Engines; Chandler, Arizona
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
Location: Waipi'o, HI
Accident Number: WPR17FA170
Date & Time: 07/28/2017, 1852 HST
Registration: N6142N
Aircraft: BEECH 19A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii-Aleutian standard time, a Beech BE-19A airplane, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which departed Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837.

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Although the airplane was not in contact with air traffic control after departure from HNL, recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary transponder beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest.

At 1843, radar data showed the airplane at 1,800 ft mean sea level (msl) about 4 miles north of the airport and on a northwesterly heading (see figure 1). For the next 2 minutes, the airplane's altitude varied and descended to 1,500 ft when it turned west. About 1 minute later, the airplane started the first of three 360° turns. The first was a right turn at 1,200 ft. At the completion of the turn, the airplane resumed a westerly heading at 1,100 ft. Shortly thereafter, the airplane began the second 360° turn to the left, maintaining an altitude of 1,100 ft. At the completion of the turn, the airplane resumed a northerly heading and climbed to 1,600 ft.

About 3 minutes after the completion of the second 360° turn, the airplane turned to the west toward a ridgeline. The airplane climbed to 1,800 ft and, about 1 minute later, began the third 360° turn to the left. At the completion of the turn, the airplane climbed to 2,000 ft on a westerly heading as it approached a ridgeline that ran perpendicular to its flight path. About 10 seconds later, the airplane initiated a descending left turn. The last target, at 1852, depicted the airplane at 1,900 ft.

A witness located 1/2-mile east of the accident site reported that he saw the airplane flying "very low." He added that the airplane was making a turn and eventually went out of view. The witness reported that he heard the engine producing power then heard a "boom," followed by silence.

At 1859, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Honolulu Control Facility (HCF) Front Line Manager (FLM) contacted the Coast Guard to report that aircraft in the vicinity of BOOKE intersection, west of O'ahu, were receiving a strong emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal. The Coast Guard reported that they had no active signals and advised that they did not have any further information but asked the HCF to pass on any additional reports. At 0844 the following morning, the FLM reported to the Coast Guard that the strongest signal was being received 5 nautical miles northwest of HNL. The Coast Guard reported that they had a C130 airplane returning to HNL and would do a shoreline pass.

At 1239, the owner of the accident airplane reported to the HCF that his airplane was missing; an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued at 1322. The Coast Guard subsequently located the wreckage in the vicinity of the last recorded radar return on the east side of steep, mountainous terrain at an elevation of 1,900 ft.


Figure 1. Radar Tracking 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/22/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/04/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 127.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 60 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

A review of FAA airman records revealed that the 29-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, which was issued on May 4, 2017. The pilot held an FAA first-class medical certificate issued in August 2012 with no waivers or limitations.

The logbook indicated that his first flight in the Beech 19A was a checkout flight with a flight instructor on June 8, 2017, for a total of 1.3 hours. The airplane flight time log indicated that this flight was actually recorded on July 8, 2017. Three other flights in the Beech 19A were identified in the pilot's logbook, with the last logged flight on July 19, 2017. The airplane flight time log indicated that the pilot also flew on July 21, 2017 for a total time of 0.9 hour; this flight was not logged in the pilot's logbook. Based on the entries in both logbooks, the pilot had accumulated about 6.3 hours in the Beech 19A.

The pilot's total flight experience was about 127.5 hours. He logged 9.1 hours in the previous 90 days, and 5.1 hours in the previous 30 days. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N6142N
Model/Series: 19A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: MB-413
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5072 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The 4-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number MB-413, was manufactured in 1969 and was powered by a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-E2A engine, serial number L-24212-27A. A review of the maintenance logbooks showed that the airplane had accumulated a total airframe and engine time of 5,072.11 hours at the most recent annual inspection, dated February 1, 2017. The engine time since major overhaul was 1,613.51 hours, with 153.61 hours since top overhaul.


Dean "Dingo" Hutton, pilot 


Weight and Balance

A current weight and balance calculation form was located within the wreckage. The form indicated a maximum gross weight of 2,250 lbs, and an empty weight of 1,436.40 lbs. Additional paperwork located within the wreckage addressed the fuel capacity for the airplane. A highlighted section of the Beechcraft Shop Manual indicated that each of the 2 fuel tanks contained a visual measuring tab in the filler neck; the lower tab indicated 15 gallons, and the upper tab indicated 20 gallons. The owner of the airplane reported that he checked the fuel level before the accident flight and that each tank indicated about 17.5 gallons of fuel.

The occupant seating locations and their weights were verified by an investigator for the Department of the Medical Examiner.

The gross weight at the time of departure was estimated at 2,311 lbs, 61 lbs over the airplane's maximum certificated gross weight. Per the center of gravity envelope graph for the airplane, it was loaded near its forward center-of-gravity (CG) limit at takeoff. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHNL, 13 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 40°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 20°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 23 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Honolulu, HI (PHNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1837 HST
Type of Airspace: 

An automated surface weather observation at HNL (elevation 13 ft msl, 12 miles southeast of accident site) was issued 1 minute after the accident. It indicated wind from 060° at 12 knots gusting to 23 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 2,500 ft and 3,600 ft, scattered clouds at 7,500 ft and 20,000 ft, temperature 27°C, dew point 20°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of mercury.

An automated surface weather observation at Wheeler Army Airfield (HHI), Wahiawa, Hawaii (elevation 843 ft msl, 5 miles northeast of accident site), was issued 1 minute after the accident. It indicated wind from 070° at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 2,000 ft, temperature 25°C, dew point 21°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  21.427222, -158.084722 (est) 

The wreckage was located on steep mountainous terrain at an elevation of about 1,900 ft. The airplane collided with densely-vegetated terrain in a nearly wings-level attitude about 50 ft below a ridge that ran perpendicular to the main north/south-running ridgeline. The highest point of the ridge line near the accident site was about 2,800 ft. The accident site was located south of Pohakea Pass (2,100 ft), an area commonly used by pilots to transition the inland mountains of O'ahu (see figure 2).


Figure 2. Accident Site Location

All major components of the airplane were located and identified in the immediate area of the main wreckage. The outboard section of the right wing, with aileron attached, separated from the inboard section at the aileron/flap junction and was located about 30 ft below the main wreckage. The inboard section of the right wing remained attached at the wing root. The right flap separated from the inboard wing section and was also located below the main wreckage.

The left wing remained attached to the airframe wing root, and the aileron and flap remained intact and attached to the wing. Extensive compression-like impact damage was noted to the outboard section of the wing assembly.

The tail cone was compressed and buckled to the left. The vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizers, and elevators remained attached to the tail. The elevator control cables and rudder cables remained attached to the flight control surfaces in the tail.

Extensive impact-related damage was noted to the cockpit and cabin area. The inboard attachment points of the two front seats were impact-separated from the floor assembly.

The engine remained attached to the airframe by the engine mount and was displaced upward and aft toward the firewall. The vacuum pump and drive coupler were visible from the top rear section of the engine. The carburetor was not visible due to the engine positioning and surrounding terrain.

The spark plugs were secure, and their respective leads were attached. The top spark plugs were removed. The spark plug electrodes remained undamaged and displayed normal operating signatures when compared to the Champion Spark Plugs "Check-a-Plug" chart AV-27. Both magnetos appeared to be securely mounted at their respective mounting pads with their harnesses secured.

The rocker box covers at cylinder Nos. 1, 2, and 4 were removed. The No. 3 cover was not removed due to corrosion of the cover screws. The rocker boxes and valve train components appeared undamaged with no evidence of oil contamination or foreign objects.

The combustion chamber of each cylinder was examined through the spark plug holes via a lighted borescope. The chambers remained mechanically undamaged with no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The valves were intact and undamaged.

The fixed-pitch, metal propeller blades remained partially attached to the crankshaft flange. Complete rotation of the crankshaft was not possible due to the engine position; however, partial rotation was obtained, and continuity to the vacuum pump drive was confirmed.

The propeller blades displayed leading edge gouging, torsional twisting, chordwise striations across the cambered surface, and trailing edge "S" bending. The signatures were consistent with rotational forces applied at the crankshaft at the time of impact.

The wreckage was not recovered and remained at the accident site. 



Medical And Pathological Information

The Department of the Medical Examiner, Honolulu, Hawaii completed an autopsy of the pilot and concluded that the cause of death was blunt impact to the torso.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens recovered from the pilot. The results of the testing were negative for carbon monoxide, volatiles, and tested drugs. The laboratory did not perform tests for cyanide. 

Additional Information

FAA-H-8083-25B (2016), Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, stated:


The detrimental effects of overloading on performance are not limited to the immediate hazards involved with takeoffs and landings. Overloading has an adverse effect on all climb and cruise performance, which leads to overheating during climbs, added wear on engine parts, increased fuel consumption, slower cruising speeds, and reduced range.



NTSB Identification: WPR17FA170 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Waipi'o, HI
Aircraft: BEECH 19A, registration: N6142N
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2017, about 1852 Hawaii standard time (HST), a Beech BE-19A, N6142N, collided with terrain near Waipi'o, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Aircraft Maintenance Hawaii as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1837 HST.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1322 HST, July 29, when family members reported that the flight was overdue. The US Coast Guard located the wreckage later that day on steep, mountainous terrain at the last identified latitude and longitude .

A review of recorded air traffic control communications indicated that the airplane departed HNL runway 04R. Recorded radar data displayed the airplane's secondary beacon code as it departed and made a left turn to the northwest. After flying about 9 minutes along that course, the target made a left turn, and was at a mode C reported altitude of 1,800 feet mean sea level (msl). It made descending and climbing turns during the next 6 minutes. During the last minute, it climbed and was at a maximum mode C altitude of 2,000 feet when the target disappeared.