Sunday, October 12, 2014

Arnold Palmer Regional Airport (KLBE) begins moving earth to add 190 parking spaces

Work crews at Arnold Palmer Regional Airport plowed and piled up dirt Friday to make room for 190 parking spaces at the Unity facility.

The gravel lot will provide temporary overflow spaces in the spring during busy times when the other 1,100 spaces at the airport are full, said Gabe Monzo, executive director of the Westmoreland County Airport Authority.

“It's just going to be for when spring break comes around and we get overwhelmed with parking,” he said.

In June 2013, the airport added 250 paved spaces to keep up with demand for the free parking.

Construction of the overflow lot was spurred by an expiring Department of Environmental Protection permit, which the authority obtained last year. The spaces won't be put to use until 2015, Monzo said.

Future plans could include funding pavement and lights to make the spaces more permanent, however, he said.

The airport is awaiting the start of Spirit Airlines' seasonal flights to Fort Myers and Tampa, set to begin Dec. 18.

Oland Canterna, chairman of the airport authority board, said offering services such as more parking will encourage passengers to return time after time.

“We've got to do this to make sure the people are comfortable and happy,” Canterna said.

Between February 2011 and August, Spirit Airlines has carried 632,663 passengers to and from Arnold Palmer Regional Airport, including 178,424 passengers between January and August this year.

Airport officials have touted low fares, direct flights, free parking and lack of congestion in marketing the facility.

- Source: http://triblive.com

Obituary: John Brady

John Brady
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- John Davis Brady, 80, of Great Kills, a pilot, retired city Sanitation official and a committed volunteer who was dedicated to his family and his community, died Friday at home.

Born in the Bronx, he was brought to Staten Island as a boy. After graduating from Curtis High School, he attended a pre-engineering program at Carlsbad (Calif.) College and later attended Staten Island Community College.

Mr. Brady had a passion for flying early on and received his private pilot's license at age 17. He soon bought his own plane and flew it from the former Staten Island Airport in New Springville.

He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1953 to 1956, stationed in Japan.

Mr. Brady joined the U.S. Army in the late 1950s and went to its Flight School in Fort Rucker, Ala., and Aircraft Maintenance Officer and Test Pilot School in Fort Eustis, Va., graduating with distinction and becoming both a fixed-wing and helicopter pilot. He also was a member of the Army National Guard in New Jersey, based in Trenton, for 40 years and attained the rank of chief warrant officer IV.

An accomplished pilot, Mr. Brady flew many types of aircraft and was known as "Mr. Smoothie" for his piloting skills, family said. In addition to his military flying experience, he had worked as a private pilot for Trump Air Inc. and Ronson Oil Co.

He went to work for the city Sanitation Department as a mechanic in 1963 and became a director of motor equipment. In 1988, he was chief of motor transport for the city Emergency Medical Service. He retired in 1994.

A tireless volunteer, he gave generously of his time and energy at Sea View Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home. Most recently, he was an instructor for the SeniorNet computer training program at the Jewish Community Center.

Mr. Brady enjoyed time with his family and spending summers at his vacation home on Long Beach Island, N.J.

He was a 50-year parishioner of St. Clare's R.C. Church, Great Kills, where he had been a Eucharistic minister for 25 years.

He and his childhood sweetheart, Kathryn Freeman, wed in 1954. The couple had been married for 44 years when she died in 1998.

Surviving are his son, John Jr., his daughters, Kathleen Quinn, Patricia Levy and Elizabeth Meurer; two brothers, Patrick and Michael; a sister, Julieann Leach; nine grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

The funeral will be Wednesday from the Casey McCallum Rice South Shore Funeral Home, Great Kills, with a mass at 9:45 a.m. in St. Clare's Church. Burial will follow in Resurrection Cemetery, Pleasant Plains.

- Source:  http://www.silive.com

Passenger With Flu-Like Symptoms Causes Ebola Scare At Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — Authorities say a passenger with flu-like symptoms, who was on board a United Airlines flight, has been assessed and is not believed to have been exposed to the Ebola virus.

The plane in question, Flight 703, originated from New York’s JFK airport and landed at Los Angeles International Airport at 1:50 p.m. Sunday, according to an airport representative.

There were 142 passengers on board at the time, and six crew-members.

Following reports of an ill patient on an in-bound flight, the Los Angeles Fire Department responded about 1:28 p.m.

According to Airport police Sgt. Ortiz, the patient in question was vomiting and exhibited flu-like symptoms, prompting fears of an Ebola exposure.

Captain Jamie Moore, a public information officer for the LAFD, said at an afternoon news conference that the department responded, and followed protocol set forth by the Centers for Disease Control, after initially being told that the patient had contact with West Africa.

“Due to the concern and the nature of the illness, the Los Angeles Fire Department felt it very important to handle this following the CDC procedures,” Moore said. “It has turned out that there had been some miscommunication. This person had been to the continent of Africa but not near West Africa. As a matter of a fact, it was South Africa.”

According to Moore, the unidentified patient was assessed by both the LAFD and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and is not believed to have been exposed to the Ebola virus.

Moore said it’s believed the patient had experienced air-sickness.

During the incident, the plane had been diverted to a separate runway in order to prevent unnecessary fear, according to Moore. Initially, crews were seen boarding the plane wearing containment suits.

Story, Comments and Video:  http://losangeles.cbslocal.com

Kitfox, N725KA: Accident occurred October 12, 2014 at Nampa Municipal Airport (KMAN), Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR15CA011 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Nampa, ID
Aircraft: FOXAIR LLC KITFOX LIGHT SPORT, registration: N725KA
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The certified flight instructor (CFI) stated that the student had landed the airplane on the runway when it unexpectedly veered to the left approximately 20 degrees. The CFI called for power, instructing the student to abort the landing. The student applied full power and the airplane started to get airborne when it suddenly nosed over. The CFI stated that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

http://registry.faa.gov/N725KA


Two people suffered only minor injuries after the plane they were in slid off the runway during landing at the Nampa Municipal Airport Sunday afternoon, Nampa police report. 

The plane, a Kitfox, flipped over after it want off the runway at about 4 p.m.

The plane has been removed from the runway, Monte Hasl, airport superintendent.

Witness originally reported a crash to police, said Sgt. Jamie Burns.

When Burns arrived on the scene, the two people were standing outside the aircraft.

Authorities are not releasing the names of the two people in the aircraft.

An FAA representative was at the scene, Burns said.



- Source:  http://www.idahostatesman.com





NAMPA -- Two people walked away with minor injuries after their small plane crashed at the Nampa airport Sunday afternoon. 

The plane flipped over onto its top in field next to a runway at about 4:20 p.m. It wasn't immediately clear whether the plane was attempting to take off or land at the time.

Nampa Police Sgt. Jamie Burns said the occupants of the plane suffered only "very minor" injuries, including a bump to the head and a scratched hand.

The airport remained open after the crash.

Federal Aviation Administration officials were on the scene investigating.


- Source:  http://www.ktvb.com

Cessna 170B, N3558C (and) ICP MXP-740 Savannah, N991TP: Fatal accident occurred October 12, 2014 in Yerington, Nevada

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board -  Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  - Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA010A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Yerington, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/02/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3558C
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A Cessna 170B and a Pettit Savannah collided in midair shortly after both took off from the same airstrip. The airplanes were the second and third airplanes in a group of three airplanes whose pilots planned to depart from a fly-in at the airstrip, form up together in the traffic pattern, and then depart the area. The first airplane took off and turned left 180 degrees onto the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, and it was followed by the Cessna. Subsequently, the Savannah took off on a heading about 45 degrees to the left of the airstrip's heading and entered a climbing left turn. Witnesses reported that when the airplanes collided, the Cessna was flying level on a westerly heading on the downwind leg, and the Savannah was on about a north heading in a climbing left turn. The witnesses observed the airplanes collide at nearly a perpendicular angle. 

Postaccident examination of the airplanes' wreckage revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of either airplane. A collision angle calculated from paint transfer and scratches on the Savannah's right wing indicated that the airplanes collided at an angle of about 90 degrees, consistent with the witness reports. 

The evidence indicated that the Savannah pilot attempted a join-up maneuver without maintaining adequate awareness of the Cessna's position. Before the collision occurred, the Savannah was in a climbing left turn and likely could not see the Cessna. The Savannah's pilot should have executed a clearing procedure during climb out to verify the position of the Cessna before attempting the join up. Also, had the Cessna's pilot executed a clearing procedure while on downwind, he might have been able to observe the Savannah as it was departing. 

The Savannah pilot's toxicology testing identified diphenhydramine, tramadol, mefloquine, and trazodone in the muscle and liver. Additionally, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its inactive metabolite tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid were detected in the lung, liver, and brain. The investigation was unable to determine why the pilot was using mefloquine or if he had any adverse effects from the medication. The combined effects of diphenhydramine, tramadol, trazodone, and THC, all of which cause sedation, likely impaired the Savannah pilot's decision-making. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the Savannah pilot to maintain awareness of the position of the Cessna while attempting a join up maneuver. Contributing to the accident was the impaired decision-making of the Savannah's pilot due to the combined effects of licit and illicit medications. Also contributing to the accident was the failure of the Cessna pilot to maintain awareness of the position of the Savannah as it was departing. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 12, 2014 about 0812 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 170B, N3558C, and an experimental amateur built Pettit Savannah, N991TP, collided in midair about 12 miles north of Yerington, Nevada. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the Cessna, and the private pilot, sole occupant of the Savannah, were fatally injured. Both the Cessna and Savannah impacted terrain and were destroyed. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either flight. The Cessna departed from a nearby dry lake bed about 0809 and the Savannah about 0811. Both airplanes had a planned destination of Carson City, Nevada.

Witnesses, who were participating in a fly in, located at the dry lake bed, reported that they observed the experimental Savannah take off about 45 degrees to the left of the outlined airstrip runway heading and then turn immediately left towards the Cessna and another airplane on the downwind leg. The Cessna was heading west while flying on downwind and the Savannah was climbing out to the north and turning left while attempting to join up with the Cessna. The witnesses observed the airplanes impact at nearly a perpendicular angle to each other.

According to the pilot in the first airplane that just departed the airstrip, the Cessna and Savannah airplane were to join up with his airplane and then depart the local area, flying as three airplanes together in a loose formation. His airplane was the lead airplane on downwind and the Cessna was the second airplane established on downwind. The Savannah was the third and last airplane in the group, and planned to join with the other two airplanes on the traffic pattern downwind.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 48, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane multi engine land, single-engine land, single engine sea, and instrument ratings. He was also a Certified Flight Instructor in airplane single engine and a ground instructor. The most recent medical was a third-class airman medical certificate on June 06, 2014, with no limitations stated. The pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application; that he had accumulated 2,500 total flight hours and 300 hours in the last six months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 26602, was manufactured in 1954. It was powered by a Lycoming O-360A1A, 180-hp engine. Review of the maintenance logbook records showed that the most recent inspection was an annual inspection completed on November 29, 2013, at a total airframe time of 12,022.9 hours. The most recent engine inspection was an annual inspection on November 29, 2013, at a total operating time of 2,754.8 hours. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0755 Carson Airport (CXP), Carson City, Nevada, recorded data from the automated weather observation station, located about 27 miles east of the accident site, revealed conditions were wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 7 degrees Celsius, dew point 2 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. 

COMMUNICATIONS

The accident airplanes were not in contact with Air Traffic Control and the remote, mountainous area where the dry lake bed was located provided no radar coverage. 

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The make-shift, temporary, airstrip was located on a dry lake bed with a reported field elevation of about 4,706 feet. The airstrip was equipped with an outlined dirt runway; runway 090/270 (about 1,400 feet long). An information bulletin on the airstrip, provided by the fly-in sponsor, listed the eastern runway as the primary landing direction and the traffic pattern called for left turns for both runways. 

WRECKAGE & IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed the Cessna wreckage came to rest about 1,700 feet North of the dry lake bed where the dirt strip used for takeoff was located. Two wreckage locations were identified and all major structural components of both airplanes were located within the wreckage debris area. A post-crash fire ensued at the Cessna wreckage site. The accident site was located on hilly desert terrain.

The Cessna's wings, fuselage were located within the wreckage site and were thermally damaged. The Savannah's vertical stabilizer and fuselage parts were located embedded in the Cessna wreckage. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) with the ground was about 20 feet upslope from the wreckage. The debris path was about 580 feet in length and about 460 feet in width. The direction of the wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 60 degrees magnetic from the FIPC. Various small pieces of the airplane were located throughout the debris area, including paint chips. 

Flight control cable continuity was confirmed on the Cessna. The left wing of the Cessna exhibited a flattened portion on its leading edge, inboard of the landing lights. Both airplane beacons were located near the Cessna wreckage. The Cessna's engine was thermally damaged but no other anomalies were noted. One propeller blade tip was observed to be bent and the other blade was bent back about 180 degrees, about mid-span.

The examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL & PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on October 14, 2014, by the Washoe County Medical Examiner's Office, Reno, Nevada. The stated cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on the specimens from the pilot with negative results for carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, and the listed drugs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Several personal electronic devices were sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division for potential data download. Some of devices had recoverable data. However, of the devices that had data, no information pertinent to the investigation was present.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations [14 CFR 91.113(b)] required that each person operating an aircraft maintain vigilance so as to "see and avoid other aircraft." When aircraft of the same certification category are converging, "the aircraft to the other's right has the right-of-way." However, the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) noted that even if entitled to the right-of-way, a pilot should yield if another aircraft seemed too close. The handbook also stated that high-wing and low-wing aircraft have their respective blind spots. The pilot of a high-wing aircraft should momentarily raise the wing in the direction of the intended turn and look for traffic prior to commencing the turn. The handbook further states that in order to assist with collision avoidance, pilots should execute clearing procedures periodically during sustained periods of straight-and-level flight. During climbs and descents, pilots should execute gentle banks left and right to permit visual scanning of the airspace. Vigilance should also be maintained during training operations and clearing turns should be made prior to a practice maneuver being performed.

The manufacturer provided information related to the field of view from the high-wing, Cessna airplane. An individual seated in the left pilot's seat, has a view from approximately 51 degrees up and 10 degrees down out the front windshield. When looking out the left side window, the view is approximately from level to 66 degrees down. When looking out the cabin on the opposite side window, the field of view is restricted to 0 degrees up and about 26 degrees down. Additionally, the aft view is about 28 degrees to the right and 63 degrees to the right.

A rejoin is used to expedite forming up together with another airplane and is frequently used in military formation flying. The maneuver is complex, since closure rate, airspeed, altitude, and alignment with the airplane that one is forming up to must be continuously monitored. According to Air Force's Primary Flying Manual for their T-6 primary trainer airplane, the following factors contribute significantly to the potential for a midair collision: Failure of the lead airplane to properly clear or visually monitor the number 2 airplane during a critical phase of flight, such as a rejoin. Failure of the number 2 airplane to recognize excessive overtake and the failure of the number 2 airplane to maintain lateral or vertical separation during rejoins. 

Further examination of the airframe and engine was accomplished by the NTSB investigator-in charge (IIC), an additional NTSB investigator, and an investigator from Textron Aviation. The flattened portion of the Cessna's wing leading edge corresponded to the width and shape of the damaged portion of the Savannah's vertical stabilizer and rudder.

A collision angle was calculated utilizing the paint transfer and scratches on the Savannah's right wing. The two airplanes collided about on a 90 degrees converging angle. 

The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA010B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Yerington, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/02/2016
Aircraft: PETTIT SAVANNAH, registration: N991TP
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A Cessna 170B and a Pettit Savannah collided in midair shortly after both took off from the same airstrip. The airplanes were the second and third airplanes in a group of three airplanes whose pilots planned to depart from a fly-in at the airstrip, form up together in the traffic pattern, and then depart the area. The first airplane took off and turned left 180 degrees onto the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, and it was followed by the Cessna. Subsequently, the Savannah took off on a heading about 45 degrees to the left of the airstrip's heading and entered a climbing left turn. Witnesses reported that when the airplanes collided, the Cessna was flying level on a westerly heading on the downwind leg, and the Savannah was on about a north heading in a climbing left turn. The witnesses observed the airplanes collide at nearly a perpendicular angle. 

Postaccident examination of the airplanes' wreckage revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of either airplane. A collision angle calculated from paint transfer and scratches on the Savannah's right wing indicated that the airplanes collided at an angle of about 90 degrees, consistent with the witness reports.

The evidence indicated that the Savannah pilot attempted a join-up maneuver without maintaining adequate awareness of the Cessna's position. Before the collision occurred, the Savannah was in a climbing left turn and likely could not see the Cessna. The Savannah's pilot should have executed a clearing procedure during climb out to verify the position of the Cessna before attempting the join up. Also, had the Cessna's pilot executed a clearing procedure while on downwind, he might have been able to observe the Savannah as it was departing. 

The Savannah pilot's toxicology testing identified diphenhydramine, tramadol, mefloquine, and trazodone in the muscle and liver. Additionally, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its inactive metabolite tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid were detected in the lung, liver, and brain. The investigation was unable to determine why the pilot was using mefloquine or if he had any adverse effects from the medication. The combined effects of diphenhydramine, tramadol, trazodone, and THC, all of which cause sedation, likely impaired the Savannah pilot's decision-making. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the Savannah pilot to maintain awareness of the position of the Cessna while attempting a join up maneuver. Contributing to the accident was the impaired decision-making of the Savannah's pilot due to the combined effects of licit and illicit medications. Also contributing to the accident was the failure of the Cessna pilot to maintain awareness of the position of the Savannah as it was departing. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 12, 2014 about 0812 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 170B, N3558C, and an experimental amateur built Pettit Savannah, N991TP, collided in midair about 12 miles north of Yerington, Nevada. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the Cessna, and the private pilot, sole occupant of the Savannah, were fatally injured. Both the Cessna and Savannah impacted terrain and were destroyed. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either flight. The Cessna departed from a nearby dry lake bed about 0809 and the Savannah about 0811. Both airplanes had a planned destination of Carson City, Nevada.

Witnesses, who were participating in a fly in, located at the dry lake bed, reported that they observed the experimental Savannah take off about 45 degrees to the left of the outlined airstrip runway heading and then turn immediately left towards the Cessna and another airplane on the downwind leg. The Cessna was heading west while flying on downwind and the Savannah was climbing out to the north and turning left while attempting to join up with the Cessna. The witnesses observed the airplanes impact at nearly a perpendicular angle to each other.

According to the pilot in the first airplane that just departed the airstrip, the Cessna and Savannah airplane were to join up with his airplane and then depart the local area, flying as three airplanes together in a loose formation. His airplane was the lead airplane on downwind and the Cessna was the second airplane established on downwind. The Savannah was the third and last airplane in the group, and planned to join with the other two airplanes on the traffic pattern downwind.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 28, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. The most recent medical that could be determined was a third-class airman medical certificate on August 30, 2011, with no limitations stated. The pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application; that he had accumulated 10.9 total flight hours and 10.9 hours in the last six months. In addition, the pilot had logged several hours in the accident airplane, that he purchased the previous month.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, high-wing, amateur built experimental fixed-gear airplane, serial number 04-06-51-297, was manufactured in 2004. It was powered by a Rotax experimental O-360-A4M, 100-hp engine. The airplane's maintenance logbooks were not located during the investigation. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0755 Carson Airport (CXP), Carson City, Nevada, recorded data from the automated weather observation station, located about 27 miles east of the accident site, revealed conditions were wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 7 degrees Celsius, dew point 2 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury. 

COMMUNICATIONS

The accident airplanes were not in contact with Air Traffic Control and the remote, mountainous area where the dry lake bed was located provided no radar coverage. 

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The make-shift, temporary, airstrip was located on a dry lake bed with a reported field elevation of about 4,706 feet. The airstrip was equipped with an outlined dirt runway; runway 090/270 (about 1,400 feet long). An information bulletin on the airstrip, provided by the fly-in sponsor, listed the eastern runway as the primary landing direction and the traffic pattern called for left turns for both runways. 

WRECKAGE & IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed the Savannah wreckage came to rest about 1,700 feet North of the dry lake bed where the dirt strip used for takeoff was located. Two wreckage locations were identified and all major structural components of both airplanes were located within the wreckage debris area. A post-crash fire ensued at the Cessna wreckage site. The accident site was located on hilly desert terrain.

The Savannah's vertical stabilizer and fuselage parts were located embedded in the Cessna wreckage. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) with the ground was about 20 feet upslope from the wreckage. The debris path was about 580 feet in length and about 460 feet in width. The direction of the wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 60 degrees magnetic from the FIPC. 

The majority of the parts in the debris field were from the experimental Savannah airplane. The first, was a nose landing gear strut and wheel assembly about 230 feet from the Cessna wreckage. The Savannah's engine, wings, and instrument panel contacted the ground first and then the remainder of the airplane continued forward for about 425 feet beyond where the engine impacted terrain. Various small pieces of the airplane were located throughout the debris area, including paint chips. On the Savannah's right wing struts several propeller strikes were observed that separated them into several sections near the fuselage mount point. Further, the right wing upper surface had 45-degree markings near the tip.

The examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL & PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on October 14, 2014, by the Washoe County Medical Examiner's Office, Reno, Nevada. The stated cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. Further, the autopsy report documented that the pilot was using Novolog and Lautus insulin, Tramadol, Lisinopril, and Medical Marijuana. 

The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on the specimens from the pilot with positive results for Diphenhydramine, Mefloquine, Tramadol, Trazodone, and Tetrahydrocannabinol.

The pilot of the Savannah reported no medical conditions or medical medications to the FAA on his last medical. While specific drugs and medications are not addressed individually by name; the prohibition of use of marijuana, medical marijuana, or any other impairing substance in general aviation operations is covered by Title 14 CFR part 91.17(a)(3) which states "No person may act or attempt to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft…while using any drug that affects the person's faculties in any way contrary to safety…"

NovoLog is the brand name of a fast-acting type of prescription injectable insulin and Lantus is the brand name of a long-acting type of prescription injectable insulin used for high blood sugar resulting from diabetes. Tramadol is a prescription opioid medication that is also a Schedule IV controlled substance. It is commonly sold with the name Ultram. Tramadol carries the warning, "May impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." Lisinopril is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure marketed under various names including Prinivil.

Diphenhydramine is an over-the-counter sedating antihistamine used to treat allergic conditions and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under the trade names Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following FDA warning: "may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." Mefloquine is a prescription medication used to treat malaria. It carries the warning: may cause neuropsychiatric adverse reactions in adults and children. Psychiatric symptoms range from anxiety, paranoia, and depression to hallucinations and psychotic behavior and neurologic symptoms include dizziness or vertigo, tinnitus, and loss of balance. Trazodone is a prescription antidepressant marketed as Desyrel and sometimes used as a sleep aid. Trazodone carries the warning "may cause somnolence or sedation and may impair the mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks. Tramadol is an opiate analgesic used to relieve moderate to moderately sever pain. 

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive compound found in marijuana. THC has mood-altering effects including euphoria, relaxed inhibitions, sense of well-being, disorientation, image distortion, and psychosis. The ability to concentrate and maintain attention are decreased during marijuana use, and impairment of hand-eye coordination is dose-related over a wide range of dosages. Significant performance impairments are usually observed for at least one to two hours following marijuana use, and residual effects have been reported up to 24 hours.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Several personal electronic devices were sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division for potential data download. Some of devices had recoverable data. However, of the devices that had data, no information pertinent to the investigation was present.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations [14 CFR 91.113(b)] required that each person operating an aircraft maintain vigilance so as to "see and avoid other aircraft." When aircraft of the same certification category are converging, "the aircraft to the other's right has the right-of-way." However, the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) noted that even if entitled to the right-of-way, a pilot should yield if another aircraft seemed too close. The handbook also stated that high-wing and low-wing aircraft have their respective blind spots. The pilot of a high-wing aircraft should momentarily raise the wing in the direction of the intended turn and look for traffic prior to commencing the turn. The handbook further states that in order to assist with collision avoidance, pilots should execute clearing procedures periodically during sustained periods of straight-and-level flight. During climbs and descents, pilots should execute gentle banks left and right to permit visual scanning of the airspace. Vigilance should also be maintained during training operations and clearing turns should be made prior to a practice maneuver being performed.

A rejoin is used to expedite forming up together with another airplane and is frequently used in military formation flying. The maneuver is complex, since closure rate, airspeed, altitude, and alignment with the airplane that one is forming up to must be continuously monitored. According to Air Force's Primary Flying Manual for their T-6 primary trainer airplane, the following factors contribute significantly to the potential for a midair collision: Failure of the lead airplane to properly clear or visually monitor the number 2 airplane during a critical phase of flight, such as a rejoin. Failure of the number 2 airplane to recognize excessive overtake and the failure of the number 2 airplane to maintain lateral or vertical separation during rejoins. 

Further examination of the airframe and engine was accomplished by the NTSB investigator-in charge (IIC), and an additional NTSB investigator. The damaged portion of the Savannah's vertical stabilizer and rudder, corresponded to the width and shape of the flattened portion of the Cessna's wing leading edge. 

A collision angle was calculated utilizing the paint transfer and scratches on the Savannah's right wing. The two airplanes collided on about a 90 degrees converging angle. 

The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA010A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Yerington, NV
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3558C
Injuries: 2 Fatal.


NTSB Identification: WPR15FA010B 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Yerington, NV
Aircraft: PETTIT SAVANNAH, registration: N991TP
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 12, 2014 about 0812 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 170B, N3558C, registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight, and an experimental amateur built Pettit Savannah, N991TP, registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight, collided in midair about 12 miles north of Yerington, Nevada. Both the Cessna and Savannah were destroyed. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the Cessna, and the private pilot, sole occupant of the Savannah, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either of the flights. Both flights departed from a nearby dry lake bed at an unknown time with a planned destination of Carson City, Nevada.

Witnesses, who were participating in a fly-in, located at the dry lake bed, reported that they observed the experimental Savannah take off and immediately turn left towards the airplane on downwind, for the outlined landing area. The Cessna was flying on a heading of about 260 degrees while on downwind and the Savannah was climbing out on a heading of about 350 degrees. The witnesses observed the airplanes impact at nearly a perpendicular angle to each other.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-In-Charge revealed that both wreckages came to rest about 425 feet from each other and about 1,700 feet from the outlined runway area. All major structural components of both airplanes were located within the wreckage debris area. A postcrash fire ensued at the Cessna wreckage.

The airplanes were recovered to a secure location for further examination.


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

N3558C CESSNA 170 AND N991TP EXPERIMENTAL SAVANNAH AIRCRAFT COLLIDED IN MIDAIR, THE ONE PERSON ON BOARD N3558C AND THE ONE PERSON ON BOARD N991TP WERE FATALLY INJURED, 11 MILES FROM YERINGTON, NV 

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11 

REGISTRATION PENDING: http://registry.faa.gov/N991TP

THOMAS R. WEISS: http://registry.faa.gov/N3558C 

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Friends and family are remembering a Corvallis pilot after a mid-air plane collision in Nevada killed two Oregon pilots this weekend. 


Law enforcement officials in Nevada say the two pilots in the crash, 28-year-old Tyler Adams of Corvallis and Captain Thomas Weiss of Roseburg both died after their two planes collided.

“He brought laughter with him everywhere he went,” said Timothy Frink of Adams, who had been friends since high school. “He did what he loved.”

When Frink received a text message on Monday from a friend with the news of the crash, he could not believe it.

“It was literally unreal to me,” he said. “I just couldn’t fathom it. The last couple of days have been a lot of tears and a lot of conversations with old friends about memories that we had with Ty.”

Ginny and Paul Adams, Tyler’s parents, released a statement on behalf of  the family on Wednesday, saying their son was the shining light in their lives.

His friends are sharing a similar message.

“It is just really hard for me to believe that somebody who was that excited about life is no longer with us,” Frink said. “It’s like a star burned out.”

In their statement, the Adams say: “We take some small comfort in knowing that he was doing what he loves most in the world. Flying.”

Meanwhile, family and friends say Adams, or Ty as they called him, will continue to be a star that will never leave their hearts.

“He was super enthusiastic, super pumped about life, and just a really awesome, fun person to be around,” Frink said. “He will be missed by many. He had a lot of friends all over the world.”

The Federal Aviation Administration is continuing to investigate the crash.




 


WINSTON, Ore. -- A 22-year veteran of the Winston-Dillard Fire Department is dead after his plane was involved in a crash northwest of Yerington, Nevada.

 Fire Captain Thomas R. Weiss was piloting a private plane in Nevada when authorities received calls of a crash involving two planes Sunday morning. Both pilots were killed, according to authorities. One caller said it occurred near Wabuska, Nevada.

Weiss had served the past 12 years at the rank of Captain/Paramedic with WDFD.  Department officials say he had a passion for flying and had been flying aircraft for more than 34 years. During his off-duty time, he flew a spotter plane for the Douglas Forest Protection Association (DFPA) for the past three fire seasons.

“This is a tragic loss to the entire central Douglas County Fire Service,” said Fire Chief Greg Marlar.  “Tom was a professional that gave 110% of himself to his profession and the community he served. I have some sense of comfort knowing that Tom was doing one of the things he loved most.”

Winston Fire district personnel are assisting the family with services, which are planned for Sunday, October 19th.  In lieu of flowers the family is asking that donations be made to the Tom Weiss Memorial Scholarship fund at the Winston Dillard Fire District.

According to department officials, the FAA and NTSB responded and will be conducting an accident investigation, which is ongoing.


- Story and Comments:  http://www.kpic.com

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.








5:55 p.m. update

Two aircraft collided Sunday in the skies near a dry lake bed in Northern Nevada's Lyon County, killing both pilots.

The mid-air collision between the single-engine Cessna 170 and the unidentified experimental aircraft occurred around 8 a.m., Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

The names of the pilots were not immediately available. They were pronounced dead at the scene, the Lyon County Sheriff's Office said.

Each pilot was flying alone. No injuries were reported to anyone on the ground.

The circumstances of the midair collision were not immediately known, Gregor said in an emailed statement.

The site is about 10 miles north-northwest of Yerington, the FAA's  Gregor said, near Adrian Valley.

"Deputies met with witnesses on scene who stated that two airplanes collided north of the dry lake bed and crashed into the side of a hill," sheriff's Sgt. Ryan Powell said in a statement.

The wreckage of both planes was entangled where they came to a rest.

The collision occurred during an informal weekend fly-in at the dry lake bed, the sheriff's office said.

Those still in the area after the crash said that when the collision occurred, they were gathered around a large campfire while breakfast was being prepared by a caterer.

They heard what several described as a "pop." They looked toward the sound, saw debris falling and then smoke from an area just over the hill near the lake bed.

At that point, people began either running or driving to the site in vehicles or ATVs.

Jack Lyons, an owner with Men Wielding Fire restaurant, said he was cooking eggs when he heard the pop, looked and saw the debris falling and people taking off toward that area to see if they could help. "Everyone was in shock," he said.

Kevin Quinn of Truckee said the pilots have a runway marked with orange cones and rocks, and they have one radio frequency used so they have radio contact.

Quinn, a pilot, said he was just behind the cooking trailer when the collision occurred. He said he took a few steps upon hearing the sound and saw the debris falling.

The investigation is continuing.

Several airplanes were flying in and out of the dry lake bed over the weekend, the sheriff's office said in its statement.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, Gregor said.

The sheriff's office took the initial call about the collision.

"We're working hand-in-hand with the FAA," sheriff's Lt. Abel Ortiz said earlier Sunday.

Lyon County Search and Rescue personnel responded to the scene to help with putting up tape to mark off the accident site. Others walked, looking for debris from the aircraft until the FAA investigator arrived.

Autopsies are planned by the Washoe County Medical Examiner's Office, the sheriff's office said in the statement.

The pilots' identities will be released pending further investigation and notification of next of kin, the statement said.

11:05 a.m. update:

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the aircraft involved in the crash around 8 a.m. were a single-engine Cessna 170 and an unidentified experimental aircraft.

The collision was about 10 miles north-northwest of Yerington, Gregor said. That puts it near Adrian Valley.

The circumstances of the midair collision above a dry lakebed are not immediately known, Gregor said in an emailed statement.

The FAA has an investigator en route and the FAA and the National Transportation and Safety Board will investigate, Gregor said.

_________________________

Lyon County Sheriff's Office dispatch is confirming two fatalities in the crash of two airplanes near Yerington this morning.

Other details were not immediately available.

- Source:  http://www.rgj.com

YERINGTON, NV - A single-engine Cessna 170 and an unidentified experimental aircraft collided under unknown circumstances in midair above a dry lake bed approximately 10 miles north-northwest of Yerington.

On Sunday at approximately 8:00am the Lyon County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch Center received a call of a plane crash 11 miles north west of Yerington Nevada. Another caller stated they witnessed the accident and advised that it was near Wabuska, Nevada.

Sheriff’s Deputies and Fire Personnel from the Mason Valley Fire Protection District responded and located an informal “fly-in” which was a located at a remote dry lake bed, north west of Wabuska.

According to authorities, several airplanes were flying in and out of the dry lake bed over the weekend. Deputies met with witnesses on scene who stated that two airplanes collided north of the dry lake bed and crashed into the side of a hill.

Deputies located the crash site and discovered two airplanes which were badly damaged. Both pilots were pronounced dead at the scene.

Lyon County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue responded and assisted in the investigation by cordoning off the scene and locating debris from the accident.

The Federal Aviation Administration responded to the scene and subsequently conducted the accident investigation. The Lyon County Sheriff’s Office conducted the death investigation.

Autopsies will be performed on both subjects on Monday by the Washoe County Medical Examiner’s Office. The NTSB is also responding and will be conducting an accident investigation. The investigation process is ongoing.

The identities of the pilots will be released at a later date, pending further investigation and notification of next of kin.


Story and Comments:  http://www.kolotv.com



UPDATE 5:00 P.M.-

- According to an FAA spokesperson, a single-engine Cessna 170 and an unidentified experimental aircraft collided midair under unknown circumstances above a dry lakebed approximately 10 miles north-northwest of Yerington and near Wabuska, Nev. around 8 a.m. 

Sheriff’s Deputies and Fire Personnel from the Mason Valley Fire Protection District responded and located an informal “fly-in” which was a located at a remote dry lake bed, north west of Wabuska. Several airplanes were flying in and out of the dry lake bed over the weekend. Deputies met with witnesses on scene who stated that two airplanes collided north of the dry lake bed and crashed into the side of a hill.

Deputies located the crash site and discovered two airplanes which were badly damaged. Soon after the Yerington Police Department confirmed that two people were dead, one was piloting the Cessna 170 and the other the experimental aircraft.

Autopsies will be performed on both pilots on Monday by the Washoe County Medical Examiner's office.

Officials report that the investigation is ongoing.

Incident occurred October 12, 2014 in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

The Coast Guard was in the harbor Sunday afternoon rescuing the pilot of a float plane that capsized.



THUNDER BAY -- Nobody was injured after a float plane crashed in the harbor Sunday afternoon.  

 Just after 2:30 p.m. the small plane capsized in Lake Superior just off the shoreline as it appeared to take off.

The Coast Guard was first on scene and was able to rescue the pilot, who was the lone occupant of the plane and was uninjured. Police, paramedics and firefighters were also quickly on scene.

Witness Wendy Jaun was walking around the Fisherman’s Park area just off Grenville Avenue when she saw the plane inside the break wall.

“We saw a small plane about to take off,” she said. “It got dipped and made lot of noise and banked severely to the right.”

At that point she rushed towards the water and saw the plane again.

“By the time we came to the end of the dock and saw the plane it was submersed upside down in the water. The person was sitting on top of the plane,” Jaun said.

Her husband immediately called 911 but was told responders were already on the way and they showed up almost as soon as he hung up.

Police officials said the plane was retrieved from the lake.


- Source:  http://www.tbnewswatch.com

Incident occurred October 12, 2014 at Caesar Creek Gliderport (2OH9), Waynesville, Ohio



MASSIE TWP., Warren County —   A female pilot was complaining of back pain after landing a small airplane too hard, according to Brian Stoops, flight operations director at the Caesar Creek Soaring Club.

The landing didn't cause any visible damages to the aircraft.

Stoops said the pilot was taken by squad to the hospital more as a "precaution" than any definite injuries.

Stoops, who first flew at the site at 10 years old, said he's never had a hard landing, but likened it to "jumping off a roof."

"It causes a hard impact," he said. "You are sitting down so you're back is going to take the majority of the compression."

BREAKING REPORT

A glider came down too fast and landed too hard today at the Caesar Creek Soaring Club near Waynesville.

Fire and rescue crews responded at approximately 12:40 p.m. to the rural runway at 5385 Elbon Road.

Warren County dispatch records indicated it was a reported hard landing by a glider and there were no serious injuries.

The Ohio Highway Patrol is the investigating agency.

- Source: http://www.whio.com

Incident occurred October 12, 2014 in Granville, Hampden County, Massachusetts

 
Granville, Mass. (WWLP) – New information on a small plane that crashed in Granville.

According to State Police Media Relations, the plane crash landed in a wooded area near Timber Doodle Road. The pilot was the only person in the plane at the time, and was not injured.  However, the plane was heavily damaged during the crash.

Troopers from the State Police Barracks in Russell along with troopers from the Crime Scene Service Section, troopers assigned to the Berkshire District Attorney’s Office, and the Granville Police and Fire Departments were all on hand to help.

The Federal Aviation Administration was also contacted and responded the crash.  They are now working to figure out what caused the crash.

- Source:  http://wwlp.com





Cessna 180K Skywagon, N2590K: Incident occurred October 12, 2014 near Boca Raton Airport (KBCT), Florida

 A man with a bandaged leg speaks to officials at the scene of a Cessna 180K plane crash in a community under construction on the old Royal Palm Polo grounds off Jog Road and north of Clint Moore Road in Boca Raton on Oct. 12, 2014.


 A man with a bandaged leg removes belongings as officials investigate the scene of a Cessna 180K crash in a community under construction on the old Royal Palm Polo Grounds off Jog Road and north of Clint Moore Road in Boca Raton on Oct. 12, 2014.


 Boca Raton police and officials investigate the scene of a Cessna 180K plane crash in a community under construction on the old Royal Palm Polo Grounds off Jog Road and north of Clint Moore Road in Boca Raton on Oct. 12, 2014.




JOHN H. DUKESHERER: http://registry.faa.gov/N2590K 


BOCA RATON — Two people apparently escaped serious injury when their  Cessna 180K crashed Sunday in northwest Boca Raton, near the Royal Palm Polo Club.

The plane crashed on a dirt road, about 3 miles northwest of the Boca Raton Airport at about 12:45 p.m., said Kathleen Bergen, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane took off earlier in the day from Columbus Metropolitan Airport in Georgia, Bergen said, and was headed to Boca Raton.

The two people on board appeared to have minor injuries, said Officer Sandra Boonenberg, spokeswoman for the Boca Raton Police Department.

Boonenberg said the investigation has been handed off to the FAA.

It was not clear what role if any that weather may have played in the crash. Skies were mostly clear and sunny in Boca Raton at the time of the crash, and winds were out of the east at 10 to 15 mph, typical for this time of year, a National Weather Service spokesman said.

The  Cessna 180K is registered to John Dukesherer from Cass County in southwest Michigan, according to its tail number. Known as the Skywagon for its workhouse utility, the four-to-six seat Cessna model is often used in bush flying and can be equipped with pontoons or skis. The model was discontinued in 1981.


- Story and Comments:  http://www.palmbeachpost.com

 Two people walked away Sunday afternoon after a single-engine plane crashed at a construction site and flipped over about three miles northwest of the Boca Raton Airport, according to federal officials.

No injuries were reported when the Cessna 180K went down at 12:45 p.m., said Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The flight departed from Columbus Metropolitan Airport in Georgia, Bergen said.

The crash on vacant land in the area near Clint Moore Road and Jog Road was witnessed by a Sun Sentinel reporter.

David Fleshler, who lives nearby, was walking his dog when he said he "heard a very loud airplane engine noise." The red and white plane was flying "way too low," about 200 feet in the air, he estimated.

"It went behind some trees and I saw its tail flip up vertically," Fleshler said. "It was straight up in the air and then it disappeared."

The plane came to a stop just short of a wall. It landed on a large expanse of grass.

Fleshler said he ran to the scene to help.

"I saw a man and woman standing next to the plane," Fleshler said. "The man raised his hands and told me I shouldn't hurry, everybody is fine."

Boca Raton police and fire rescue crews responded to the scene, Fleshler said.

The man declined to talk about the incident, Fleshler said.

The Cessna is owned by John Dukesherer, according to FAA registry records. Other public records list residences for Dukesherer in Delray Beach and Michigan.

Reached by phone Sunday afternoon, Dukesherer identified himself but hung up the phone without comment.

The incident is under investigation by the FAA, Bergen said. She said the National Transportation Safety Board will determine probable cause and will post a preliminary report in 10 days.

Since 1983, there have been 41 aircraft accidents in Boca Raton involving planes arriving to or departing from the airport, according to the NTSB. The latest accident prior to Sunday was on Dec. 23, 2012, a nonfatal crash.

There have been five fatal crashes in that 30-year span, claiming a total of 14 lives. The last fatal accident occurred on Sept. 6, 2009, when an experimental, amateur-built plane crashed as it approached landing at the airport, killing the pilot, the sole occupant.

- Source:   http://www.sun-sentinel.com

Colombia LC41-550FG, N2507S, Avemax LLC: Incident occurred October 12, 2014 near Reigle Field Airport (58N), Palmyra, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania



CAMPBELLTOWN >> A Maryland couple escaped serious injury after the plane they were flying crashed on the edge of a corn field along Route 117 (South Forge Road) in South Londonderry Township late Sunday afternoon.

Campbelltown Fire Co. Safety Officer Mark Houser Jr. said they were dispatched to the crash scene along Route 117, in the area of the turnabout, around 4:45 p.m. Both people in the plane had gotten out, he said.

"We have a member that was in the military and he went over and depowered the plane, turned the fuel off, turned the batteries off, completely depowered it down," Houser said.

The pilot, Dennis Berman of Maryland, said he and his wife had planned to visit Hershey when they flew into Reigle airport.

Berman said the runway at the small airport is a bit shorter than he is used to.


"I made a mistake. I landed too fast," he said. "This is what's called a short runway. The runway I'm normally on is 4,000 feet. This is a little less than 2,000 (feet). Once I was three-quarters down the runway, I realized the braking I was doing was not going to stop the plane before the road," he said.

While on the runway, he said he saw a car coming along the highway and tried to make a right turn into a grassy field just south of the runway, "but when it hit the berm, a front wheel broke, at which point I had not control to steer it. It skidded across the road" to the edge of the field, he said.


Berman said he and his wife were unhurt. He estimated the plane was only going about 15 mph when it skidded across the roadway.

The plane blocked the roadway for about 45 minutes, until firefighters and police were able to move it back onto the airport property.

South Londonderry Township police Sgt. Gerald Cassel said the pilot was unable to stop the airplane at the end of the runway, ended up going across the roadway to the edge of the field. Cassel said Berman and his wife refused medical treatment at the scene. Cassel said agents from the Federal Aviation Administration would be investigating the crash.

In addition to Campbelltown, Lawn Fire Co. and ambulances from Lawn and Life Lion EMS assisted at the scene.

- Source:  http://www.ldnews.com


AVEMAX LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2507S 

Air ambulance obliterates gazebo after ‘flying too low’



An Eastbourne couple were left shocked and annoyed after the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Air Ambulance caused damage to their property.

The air ambulance helicopter landed in Five Acre Field on October 1 but upon taking off, flew so close to a row of houses, it scared residents and left a trail of destruction.

Margaret and Rodney, who live in Middleton Drive, bore the brunt of the damage.

Margaret said, “The helicopter was getting closer and I began thinking it wasn’t going to clear our house. I ran outside because I was scared it would hit us. I came back to find tiles and guttering pulled away from the roof and our gazebo was in our neighbor’s garden, which means it must have been lifted about 12 feet off the ground. The frame, which is metal and not particularly lightweight, is all mangled and broken.”

Rodney added, “The air ambulance do a wonderful job but I don’t understand why the pilot didn’t get the height before flying over houses. It could have been a lot worse.”

Leigh Curtis, director of operations for the KSS Air Ambulance said, “We are aware of the incident in question and we are in the process of thoroughly investigating the matter. We take these matters extremely seriously and ensuring the safety of the public we serve is always of primary importance to us. We are not able to comment further until our investigation is complete.”

Story and Photo:  http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk