Monday, July 4, 2016

Fly-in Breakfast a Fourth tradition: Monmouth Municipal Airport (C66), Warren County, Illinois

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com


Monmouth residents Jim Pulse, left, and Damien Beaver get a closer look at a crop duster at Monmouth Airport for the Monmouth Flying Club Fly-in Breakfast on July 4th. 


MONMOUTH — The dreary morning put a damper on the 50th annual Fly-in Breakfast Monday morning.

Although fly-ins were halted, and flights were not being offered to those present, the fly-in nonetheless drew a large crowd, as it always does. Even without the attraction of the planes, the hangars at Monmouth Municipal Airport were full of laughing community members eating breakfast and enjoying each others’ company.

“We have lived here for 35 years, and we have been coming here all 35 years,” said Al Kulczewski. “There are people we see here regularly and others we only see once in a while.”

“I love seeing how the children of family and friends have grown,” added Peggy Kulczewski.

For the Kulczewskis and countless other families in the community, the Fly-in Breakfast has long been a Fourth of July staple. For many, the breakfast kicks off the holiday.

Al noted how lucky Monmouth is to have an operating airport, particularly when you consider the size of the city.

“When I moved here, I was surprised there was a municipal airport in a town this size,” said Al. “It is an opportunity for those learning to fly or those who do fly to have a place to fly in and out of, rather than having to go to a bigger city. It is opportunities like this, for us to be able to see these planes up close, that we do not ordinarily get to do.”

“It is a tradition for us to come out here. This is just where you go,” said Ralph Whiteman. “We are big fans of the Municipal Band. Not many towns this size have that. It is part of the quality of life we enjoy here.”

Ralph and Martha can count themselves among the small group of those who have attended every, or almost every, fly-in breakfast. They recalled memories from when they were children, attending the event decades ago.

“They used to have a softball tournament across the street,” said Ralph. “That would draw huge crowds.”

“I remember Jim McCoy built his airplane and flew it out here,” said Martha. “He was being directed in and flew into a hole. He was not happy about that one.”

Beginning the holiday on a positive, community-mined note helps set the tone for the rest of the day.

“The fly-in maintains the importance of the holiday,” said Ralph. “The Fourth has been very instrumental in the history of this country, and it is good that emphasis has been maintained.”

This year’s breakfast was particularly special, not only because it marked a half-century of annual breakfasts, but also because it was a celebration of the life of one of the Monmouth Flying Club’s long-time members. Paul Carner recently passed away. His wife and daughters were in attendance for the breakfast.

“This is a very nice tribute. Paul always loved to come to the fly-in, and he always supported the Flying Club,” said Nancy Carner. “Learning to fly, and anything aviation, was very important to Paul. He started at this airport and went further.”

In addition to his private flights and agricultural spraying business, Carner went on to become a United Airlines 747 pilot.

“He was a wonderful person. He was very good to those he cared most about,” said Carner.

Hundreds of pilots flew in just before the weekend to pay their respects to Carner during his visitation and funeral. Monmouth Flying Club brought in a charter bus just to shuttle them all from the airport to Turnbull’s Funeral Home.

“I was overwhelmed and very humbled that people throughout Paul’s life remembered him,” said Carner. “My husband was a mover and shaker. He lived life the way he wanted to live.”

For the Monmouth Flying Club, Paul Carner was a major success story. He climbed the ranks in all aspects of aviation, yet he never forget the airport and club that gave him his start.

“Mr. Carner had been a long-time member. He always supported the Flying Club however he could, and he always had the best interest of the club in mind,” said Monmouth Flying Club President Cal Ruderman. “To lose him so close to this occasion, it was only fitting to make it a tribute.”

For the Monmouth Flying Club, the Fly-in Breakfast not only offers a location for area pilots to converge, but it also helps to inform the public about what the club does.

“Pilots and general aviation is becoming more sparse. To see the variety of planes here is awesome, and it keeps pilots coming back,” said Ruderman. “The community loves being able to walk around the planes up close. It has become a tradition for many.”

Few outside aviation circles know just how important Monmouth Municipal Airport is to the community. Last year, during June and July, Monmouth Municipal Airport was the busiest single-runway airport in Illinois. At one point, it was the fourth busiest airport in the state.

“The airport is just the right size, and I think it does more than what the community can see. The airport helps out agriculture in the area. It is centrally-located in this area,” said Ruderman. “It is a great alternative for planes that must divert. With Smithfield and Cloverleaf, prior to them bringing out large surveying crew, they flew in planes to the Monmouth airport.”

Ruderman hopes to bring out many more planes next year to compensate for the lack at this year’s event.

“I hope for better weather and a record amount of planes to make up for this year,” said Ruderman. “The Flying Club is going to continue to expand general aviation through community activities like this.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.galesburg.com

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Atlanta airline mechanic accused of making threats about airline safety

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com


Neutne Williamson

COLLEGE PARK, Ga. —

A College Park airline mechanic is off the job and under investigation for threats he made about airline safety.

Neutne Williamson, who works as a mechanic at Hartsfield-Jackson International airport, was on a personal trip to Las Vegas when police say he told officers he’d use his knowledge of aircraft to take down certain people’s planes.

This criminal complaint filed by the Clark County Nevada D.A.'s office outlines harassment charges against Williamson.

Authorities say Williamson went off on Las Vegas police in a McCarran Airport security line, suggesting he could take their planes down.

The incident happened in mid-June. Police say a belligerent Williamson was demanding respect as he tried to board a flight, warning officers he'd be the mechanic to work on their planes when they took vacation. “People's lives are in my hands, do you get it?" he allegedly asked.

“It’s very serious. I mean this whole community, this flying business, is all about trust,” aviation attorney Alan Armstrong said.

The report says Williamson took photos of their ID’s and asked if they were familiar with "planes that fall out of the sky.”

"Whoever transports me or ***** me off again, I’m going to get their ***** name, look them up, find out when they fly and ground the ***** plane,” he’s accused of saying.

Williamson's Atlanta airport and Express-Jet credentials were stripped and sent to the Atlanta FBI office. He spent five days in a Vegas jail before a judge granted a court-ordered release while prosecutors finished filing their complaint.

“He is de-credentialed. He is out of the community right now and I’ll doubt he'll ever come back,” Armstrong said.

Armstrong says in the heavily-regulated airport environment, he doesn’t think Williamson’s alleged threats are cause for concern.

“If he wanted to pull something off like that, he could? He has the knowledge?” Channel 2’s Nicole Carr asked.

“That is true. Aircraft do have vulnerable points. We're not going to get into those right now, but there are certain vulnerabilities to an aircraft that would be known to aircraft mechanics. Yes, that is true. (But) it's not a real threat. It's not a real threat. I wouldn't be concerned about it,” Armstrong said.

Story and video:   http://www.wsbtv.com


Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

A career-launching experience at Glasair in Arlington, Washington

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com


Students from Weyauwega-Fremont High School in Wisconsin work together with Glasair Aviation employees to build a Sportsman aircraft at the company’s manufacturing facility in Arlington on June 22. Four students were selected to spend two weeks working with and learning from professional mechanics at Glasair as part of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association’s Aviation Design Challenge.



Glasair Aviation’s Shaun Hunt (center) helps Weyauwega-Fremont High School students Austin Krause (left) and Derrek Cleaves install the firewall on the nose of a Glasair Sportsman at the company’s manufacturing facility in Arlington on June 22. 


Dennis Willows, of Friday Harbor, works with mechanic Dan Holtz (left) to assemble his Glasair Sportsman aircraft at the company’s manufacturing facility in Arlington on June 22.

Weyauwega-Fremont High School teacher Mike Hansen talks with Glasair Aviation’s Dan Holtz at the company’s manufacturing facility in Arlington on June 22. 



Weyauwega-Fremont High School student Natasha Stemwedel rivets the wing of a Glasair Sportsman aircraft at the company’s manufacturing facility in Arlington on June 22. 



ARLINGTON — Natasha Stemwedel held the rivet gun steady. Her eyes intently focused as she drove the rivet straight into the airplane’s polished metal wing.

Riveting on an airplane takes concentration. Lives depend on doing it right. That responsibility didn’t faze the 16-year-old.

“I really like working on the wings because you have to be very precise about everything,” she said.

That focus helped her and schoolmates win the Aviation Design Challenge, a national competition sponsored by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) and Glasair, an Arlington-based small airplane maker. Competing teams have to modify a small airplane in a flight simulator to improve its performance for a short trip between two points. Whichever team’s plane performs best in the simulator, wins.

This year’s winning team is from Weyauwega-Fremont High School in Weyauwega, Wisconsin, about 25 miles west of Green Bay. Stemwedel and her teammates beat out nearly 80 competing teams to win a trip to Arlington to build a real airplane, a Glasair Sportsman.

The competition’s six-week program teaches hundreds of high school kids each year about the science and mechanics of flight. It also spurs broader interest in the industry — at least that is the hope of its backers. Aviation is an aging industry. The legions of engineers, mechanics and pilots who joined the industry in the 1960s and 1970s are retiring in droves, leaving many vacancies among the industry’s 1.1 million jobs, said Pete Bunce, GAMA’s president and chief executive.

The big question for the Aviation Design Challenge organizers is “how many schools can we get involved?” he said.

The annual competition started four years ago with 55 schools. Bunce and other organizers hope to have more than 100 schools involved in a few years.

Several former winners currently are working on aerospace-related college degrees, said Mark Van Tine, the former head of Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen.

Van Tine helps run the competition. He flew in from Colorado, where Jeppesen is based, in his own Glasair Sportsman built by the first winning team.

“The kids aren’t just handing tools,” he said. “They’re drilling holes, riveting, doing fabrication. They’re doing real work.”

Each task is clearly listed in order on dozens of pages of paper tacked to a wall in the Glasair hangar. Customers regularly come to Arlington to build a kit airplane in two weeks with help from company workers. Glasair’s process is set up so the customer does at least 51 percent of the assembly work — a requirement for federal certification as an amateur-built airplane.

“Two weeks is a very short amount of time to get everything done,” said Ryan Flickinger, who manages Glasair’s customer-build operations.

The airplane is inspected and approved to fly after two weeks. The student-built plane went through ground tests Friday. Flight tests and further fine-tuning come next. That process takes several weeks. The airplane won’t fly away until mid-September, he said.

Customers show up with a wide range of knowledge, Flickinger said. “Along the way, we’re teaching them the proper way to install a fire wall, how to bend cotter pins” and so on.

The Weyauwega-Fremont students had some experience when they arrived in mid-June. They are building their own small airplane, a Zenith CH 750, back in Wisconsin.

“We’re almost finished,” said Logan Feltz, 17. He’s worked on the Zenith since he was a freshman four years ago. The new graduate is headed to the University of Wisconsin — Stevens Point to study cytotechnology.

The Sportsman that Feltz and the other students are assembling belongs to Dennis Willows, an amateur pilot from Friday Harbor. The 75-year-old has been flying since 1965.

Why let a bunch of high school kids put your airplane together?

“They work hard and fast. They’re sharp,” he said.

Story and photo gallery:   http://www.heraldnet.com

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Paul Winkels: Life-long dream comes true for Minnesota man

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com






A contingent of relatives was on hand when Paul Winkels landed his RV-7 airplane at the Perham Airport at about 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 8.

With light crosswinds ranging from 8 to 10 mph, he set the aircraft down gently despite a wind gust just as the wheels touched the runway.

Under normal circumstances, Winkels probably would have landed the plane with no fanfare whatsoever, but this flight was special — it was the long-distance maiden flight of an aircraft he built over the course of 10 years.

It wasn't the first time the Van's RV-7, with the registration number of N77PB took to the air, he said. It had been flown by a test pilot once all the ground inspections had been completed, and he had flown it in a test area in central Georgia, near his home.

"It flies perfectly," Winkels said. "It doesn't really have any quirks at all. It's a very quick aircraft."

As a kid, he was fascinated with planes and why he went into avionics, spending 29 years at Northwest in Eagan, and three years at Delta in Atlanta, Ga.

"I told (my wife, Becky) before we were even married that I was going to build a plane," Winkels said. "I knew I would since I was a teenager."

He got his pilot's license while in college at Alexandria Technical College, but his dream was put on hold as his family grew.

"When you have kids, life gets in the way," he said. "I couldn't afford it, especially with the kids."

But as they finished college, he started saving up for the project — his goal was to avoid borrowing money and after 10 years, he can say he saved and paid for each step in the process without borrowing money to do it.

"I saved up for it all," he said. "We didn't drive new cars or have a big fancy house. That's where you sacrifice," Winkels said.

Well, another small sacrifice was made as well: the couple's cars sat outside because the plane was housed in the garage.

"(Becky) didn't complain much," he said. "Only sometimes in the wintertime when she had to scrape the windshield."

Becky supported her husband's dream and was actually his part time partner in the building of the plane, he said, doing her "Rosie the Riveter" imitation at various times on the more than 18,000 rivets that hold the plane and its parts intact.

Winkels bought the plane kit — which contained all aluminum parts and skins, and is precut and pre-punched — and started building the aircraft in his Lakeville garage in 2006, while working for Northwest. About three years ago, he was hired as the general manager of the avionics shop at Delta, and finished work at a rented hangar.

In addition to the kit, Winkels had to supply the engine, avionics and propeller for the tail dragger aircraft, none of which was cheap, he said.

"You don't have to buy everything all at once, I started with tail parts," Winkels said about paying for the plane.

The couple moved to Newnan, about 30 miles southwest of Atlanta after his hire at Delta, and he had the aircraft trucked to their new home. Using a company that transports planes, the pieces were loaded into a fifth-wheel trailer on a very cold and snowy January day in 2014, he said.

Many people questioned his sanity, Winkels said, and even he wondered more than once what he had gotten himself into with the project, but he just kept plugging away, one part at a time.

"I didn't really keep the end in mind, that was too overwhelming," he said. "I'd start on a part, finish it, then move on to the next part. It was a series of finishing parts so I felt like I was accomplishing something."

He averaged about 20 hours a week working on the plane, with a lot of work done on weekends, he said, adding he probably has about 3,500 hours into the plane over the 10 years.

The most difficult part of building the plane was fitting the bubble canopy on the plane in order to get everything to fit right with a good seal. He had the choice of a sliding or a tip-up canopy, and chose the sliding one because it offered a better fit.

Once the plane was completed, he had "many eyes" look at the plane. As a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association, he could request an inspection at any time throughout the building process from EAA tech counselors. He also had fellow pilots and builders look at the plane while it was being built.

"They point out mistakes or ask 'did you intend to do this?'" he said of the inspections.

The final inspection opens all areas of the plane for a Designated Airworthiness Representative, or DAR, to check everything over. It lasts about three hours and is a very thorough inspection, Winkels said.

"Inspection plates are removed, everything is open and the DAR inspects the cables, flight controls, the engine, everything," he said, adding the inspector didn't find any problems.

"It's the most perfect RV he's ever seen," Winkels said of the inspector's comments. "It felt extremely good."

After the inspection, a traditional ritual is to get a picture of the "RV grin," he said, but Winkels didn't get that photo in all the excitement of the moment.

The maiden flight of the aircraft came when the test pilot took to the air.

"He has many hours of experience—he has two RVs of his own — and he would know if there was anything wrong at all," Winkels said. "He said it flew perfect."

Winkels flies the plane using Visual Flight Rules which means see and avoid air obstacles, rather than by the instrument panel. The plane carries 42 gallons of fuel — 21 in each wing tank — and burns about 8-1/2 gallons of fuel an hour. Cost for fuel varies — he paid $3.52 per gallon in Newnan and $3.95 per gallon in Lincoln, Ill., where he stopped for a break. He averaged about 160 to 170 mph on the trip to Minnesota, which took about seven hours, he said.

He began his pre-flight check at 6 a.m. and was cleared to take off at about 7 a.m. Eastern Time, landing at about 2 p.m. Central Time at the Perham Municipal Airport, to a welcoming delegation of family.

A stickler for details and with test flights and inspections indicating the plane was safe to fly, Winkels had no qualms climbing into the cockpit for the long flight home.

The perception that homebuilt planes aren't safe is a myth, he said. People question how a plane built in a garage can be safe, but he said very few aircraft crashes are the result of a problem with the plane, it's typically pilot induced.

"Aviation itself can be dangerous and you have to respect that," he said, "but the odds are higher of getting into a car accident than an airplane crash. Frankly, I'm flying myself and my family so my standards are pretty high. There were lots of things I'd redo (during the building process) because I didn't like the way it looked."

Because a tail dragger is a more challenging plane to land and because he hadn't flown for a decade, Winkels chose to do an 40 additional hours of training, seven hours dedicated to tail wheel and stalls training and 10 hours of transition training, primarily practicing landings and takeoffs, which he estimates he did about 113 before the training was completed.

"That's where you need the work, once you're in the air, that's easy," he said. "I didn't just hop into the plane and start flying."

Winkels will eventually have the aircraft professionally painted, but he hasn't decided on a paint scheme yet. For now, he said he plans to take to the skies as often as possible and enjoy a life-long dream come true.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.perhamfocus.com

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Seawind, N46EB: Fatal accident occurred July 04, 2016 near Central Colorado Regional Airport (KAEJ), Buena Vista, Chaffee County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

BOEVE ENTERPRISES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N46EB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 04, 2016 in Buena Vista, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/29/2016
Aircraft: BOEVE EARL SEAWIND, registration: N46EB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was making a personal flight in the experimental amateur-built airplane. A witness at the destination airport reported hearing the pilot declare a "mayday" on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency, but the pilot did not state the nature of the emergency. Witnesses near the accident site reported hearing the airplane's engine running extremely rough and seeing the airplane's wings rocking back and forth. The accident site was in an open, flat field with sparse vegetation and ample area in which to make a forced landing. Examination of the wreckage indicated that the airplane impacted the ground and nosed over, and a fire then erupted which consumed most of the airplane. Fire damage precluded a complete examination of the airframe, engine, and systems; however, the examinations that were performed did not reveal any preimpact anomalies. Based on the available evidence, it is likely that the airplane's engine lost partial power for a reason that could not be determined due to the extent of the fire damage, and the pilot did not maintain control of the airplane during the ensuing forced landing. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power, which resulted in a hard landing and nose over. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined due to the severity of the postimpact fire damage.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 4, 2016, about 1128 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Seawind airplane, N46EB, was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire, during a forced landing near Buena Vista, Colorado. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to Boeve Enterprises, Inc., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Lake County Airport (LXV), Leadville, Colorado, at an unconfirmed time, and was destined for the Central Colorado Regional Airport (AEJ), Buena Vista, Colorado, when the accident occurred.

It was reported that the pilot flew the accident airplane from AEJ to LXV earlier in the day, and was on the return flight to AEJ when the accident occurred. The airplane owner, who witnessed the takeoff from LXV for the return flight to AEJ, reported no problems with the airplane's takeoff roll and initial climb.

A witness at AEJ reported that she heard the pilot declare a "mayday" on the airport common traffic advisory frequency, and that he was straight in for runway 15. The witness reported that the pilot did not state the nature of the emergency during the radio transmission.

Witnesses near the accident site reported hearing the engine running extremely rough as if it was running on only three cylinders and the wings were rocking back and forth. One witness reported seeing the airplane about 200 to 300 ft. agl, descending rapidly. The airplane made a steep left turn and witness noted that the landing gear was extended. The witness lost sight of the airplane prior to its impact with the ground.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION
The pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine and airplane multiengine land ratings. He also held a second class medical certificate issued on September 4, 2015. The medical listed the following limitation: Must wear corrective lenses.

The pilot's flight logbook was not recovered during the investigation, however, the pilot reported having 2,000 total flight hours and 35 hours in the six months preceding his most recent medical examination.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
The accident airplane was a composite, four-seat, amphibian airplane that featured a single tail-mounted engine. The airplane was produced as a kit that was assembled by an individual. The airplane had retractable tricycle landing gear and was powered by a six-cylinder Lycoming model IO-540-K1G5D engine rated to produce 300 horsepower.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION
At 1115, the recorded weather conditions at AEJ were: wind 140 degrees at 8 knots, clear sky, temperature 22 degrees Celsius, dew point 3 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 30.35 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION
The accident site was located about 4 miles and 330 degrees from AEJ. The accident site was an open, flat field with sparse vegetation and ample area in which to make a forced landing. The initial impact point was located about 15 feet south of the main wreckage and contained the airplane's nose landing gear. The airplane came to rest in an inverted position. Based on the position of the airplane and the impact point, the airplane was heading in a northerly direction at the time of the impact. The entire airplane was almost completely consumed by the postimpact fire that ensued. Remnants of all of the major airplane components and control surfaces were located in the immediate vicinity of the main wreckage. The control system of the airplane consisted mainly of cable controls which were traced from the cockpit control to each respective control surface. All of the cables and end attachments remained intact except for one aileron cable turnbuckle. The fractured turnbuckle exhibited signatures consistent with overload failure due to impact forces. The elevator control had a bellcrank and pushrod that was mounted in the vertical tail that actuated the elevator. The pushrod was intact; however, the composite bellcrank was mostly consumed by fire. The engine control push-pull cables were traced from the cockpit to the engine. The throttle and mixture cables remained intact and attached to the throttle arm, and mixture arm of the fuel control unit. The fuel control unit itself was consumed by fire and only the steel components remained intact. The propeller control cable was intact from the cockpit to the propeller governor. No anomalies could be found with respect to the airframe, flight control system, or engine control system; however, the extent of the fire damage precluded a complete examination and testing of components.

The engine of the airplane was examined on-site. It was still attached to the steel tube engine mount structure. The oil sump, and rear accessory case portions of the crankcase were consumed by fire. The accessory gears remained in position and no anomalies were noted. The remnants of the dual magneto were still in-place on the rear of the engine; however, the aluminum components of the magneto had been consumed by fire. The fuel control servo had been almost completely consumed by fire with only the steel components remaining. The upper spark plugs were removed and examined. The right side spark plugs were covered by oil due to the resting position of the engine. The oil was allowed to drain from the plugs and the combustion deposits that remained indicated a normal burn signature. The left side plugs were dry and also exhibited normal combustion deposits. The valve covers were removed and the right side cylinders contained oil, indicating that oil was present in the engine prior to impact. No anomalies were noted with respect to the valves or valve rocker arms. No anomalies could be found with respect to the engine or engine accessories; however, the extent of the fire damage precluded a complete examination and testing of components.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION
An autopsy of the pilot was performed by the El Paso County Coroner's Office, Colorado Springs, Colorado, on July 5, 2016. The autopsy report listed the cause of death as multiple blunt force injuries sustained in the accident.


Toxicology testing was performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. Testing results were negative for all substances in the screening profile.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 04, 2016 in Buena Vista, CO
Aircraft: BOEVE EARL SEAWIND, registration: N46EB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2016, about 1128 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Seawind airplane, N46EB, was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire, during a forced landing near Buena Vista, Colorado. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to Boeve Enterprises, Inc., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Lake County Airport (LXV), Leadville, Colorado, at an unconfirmed time, and was destined for the Central Colorado Regional Airport (AEJ), Buena Vista, Colorado, when the accident occurred.

It was reported that the pilot flew the accident airplane from AEJ to LXV earlier in the day, and was on the return flight to AEJ when the accident occurred. A witness at AEJ reported that she heard the pilot declare a mayday on the airport common traffic advisory frequency, and that he stated that he was straight in for runway 15. The witness stated that the pilot did not state the nature of the emergency during the radio transmission.

The accident site was located about 4 miles and 330 degrees from AEJ. The accident site was an open, flat field with sparse vegetation. The initial impact point was located about 15 feet south of the main wreckage and contained the airplane's nose landing gear. The airplane came to rest in an inverted position. Based on the position of the airplane and the impact point, the airplane was heading in a northerly direction at the time of the impact. The entire airplane was almost completely consumed by the postimpact fire that ensued. Remnants of all of the major airplane components and control surfaces were located in the immediate vicinity of the main wreckage. The control system of the airplane consisted mainly of cable controls which were traced from the cockpit control to each respective control surface. All of the cables and end attachments remained intact except for one aileron cable turnbuckle. The fractured turnbuckle exhibited signatures consistent with overload failure due to impact forces. The elevator control had a bellcrank and pushrod that was mounted in the vertical tail that actuated the elevator. The pushrod was intact; however, the composite bellcrank was mostly consumed by fire. The engine control push-pull cables were traced from the cockpit to the engine. The throttle and mixture cables remained intact and attached to the throttle arm, and mixture arm of the fuel control unit. The fuel control unit itself was consumed by fire and only the steel components remained intact. The propeller control cable was intact from the cockpit to the propeller governor. No anomalies could be found with respect to the airframe, flight control system, or engine control system; however, the extent of the fire damage precluded a complete examination and testing of components.

The engine of the airplane was examined on-site. It was still attached to the steel tube engine mount structure. The oil sump, and rear accessory case portions of the crankcase were consumed by fire. The accessory gears remained in position and no anomalies were noted. The remnants of the dual magneto were still in-place on the rear of the engine; however, the aluminum components of the magneto had been consumed by fire. The fuel control servo had been almost completely consumed by fire with only the steel components remaining. The upper spark plugs were removed and examined. The right side spark plugs were covered by oil due to the resting position of the engine. The oil was allowed to drain from the plugs and the combustion deposits that remained indicated a normal burn signature. The left side plugs were dry and also exhibited normal combustion deposits. The valve covers were removed and the right side cylinders contained oil, indicating that oil was present in the engine prior to impact. No anomalies were noted with respect to the valves or valve rocker arms. No anomalies could be found with respect to the engine or engine accessories; however, the extent of the fire damage precluded a complete examination and testing of components.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



The National Transportation Safety Board released its findings for the July 4th plane crash that took the life of local resident and aviation enthusiast Jay Jones.

The report determined the probable cause of the accident was pilot error, stemming from failure to maintain control of the amateur-built Seawind airplane during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power.

“The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined due to the severity of the post-impact fire damage,” the report states.

Jones departed from the Lake County Airport at an unconfirmed time and was traveling to Colorado Central Regional Airport when the crash occurred.

The accident site was located about 4 miles from CCRA. One witness reported she heard Jones declare a “mayday” over his radio, though he did not state the nature of the emergency.

“Witnesses near the accident site reported hearing the engine running extremely rough as if it was running on only three cylinders and the wings were rocking back forth,” the report states.

An autopsy following the crash reported that the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries sustained during the crash. Toxicology testing results were also negative for all substances.

The 63-year-old Jones owned a small hangar at the airpot where he built experimental aircraft, similar to the one involved in the crash, and racing aircraft.

He owned Quadnickel Racing and frequented an air racing circuit in Reno every year.

The aircraft Jones was flying during the crash had mostly been constructed from a kit by a friend of Jones. The friend had intended on donating the aircraft to Jones for an aerospace museum he was starting.

Airport manager Jill Van Deel said following the crash that Jones may have been involved with partial construction of the kit.


According to the NTSB report, the airplane owner witnessed take off from the Lake County Airport and reported no problems with the airplane’s takeoff and initial climb.



BUENA VISTA, COLO. (AP) - A Buena Vista man is dead after his small plane crashed and burned Monday afternoon north of the town.

Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze says 63-year-old Jay Jones was the only person on board the plane that went down in a field about 4 miles north of the airport.

He says one witness reported hearing the engine sputter, but authorities are still trying to determine the cause.

Story and video:   http://www.9news.com


A single-engine plane crash near Buena Vista about noon Monday, July 4, killed the pilot, Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze said mid-afternoon Monday.

The pilot of the plane was identified as Jay Jones, 63, a local pilot and resident of Buena Vista in press release sent by the sheriff early Tuesday morning.

The Chaffee County Communications Center received the first call that a plane was in trouble about 12:15 p.m. and very shortly thereafter calls that a plane had crashed, Spezze said Monday afternoon. There were several witnesses to the crash, he said.

"We're doing a preliminary processing of the scene and securing the area, which we have to do in order to remove the body," Spezze said.

The plane crashed about 1.5 miles north of Buena Vista and south of CR 356 and just west of U.S. 24.

The sheriff's department was securing the scene for investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and The National Transportation Safety Board. Spezze said the FAA was expected sometime today and NTSB Tuesday.

"We'll be here securing the area overnight until they get here," Spezze said.

Source:   http://www.chaffeecountytimes.com



The pilot of an experimental plane died Monday afternoon when his plane crashed and exploded upon impact as it approached the Central Colorado Regional Airport outside Buena Vista, about two hours west of Colorado Springs, according to airport manager Jill Van Deel.

There were no other fatalities or injuries, she said.


The National Transportation Safety Board tweeted that it was investigating the crash and identified the plane as an experimental model.


The incident happened about noon as the plane, flying from Leadville to Buena Vista, was attempting to land, Van Deel said. The crash occurred in open space about 3 miles northwest of the airport, she said.


"It was an explosion" upon impact, Van Deel said of the crash.


Authorities know the pilot's identity, but aren't releasing it until family members are notified, she said.


Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze said his office received calls about 12:15 p.m. When deputies arrived, they found the plane had crashed in an open field about 2 miles north of Buena Vista, and that there was one fatality.


Authorities assume it was the pilot, although there have been no determinations made on the victim's identity, Spezze said.


There were no other injuries, he said.


A witness told deputies she heard what sounded like a sputtering engine as the plane approached, Spezze said.


The Federal Aviation Administration was investigating along with the NTSB, he said.


Original article can be found here: http://gazette.com

Cessna 305A (L19) Bird Dog, Simmons Aviation Services LLC, N5291G: Accident occurred July 04, 2016 in Narragansett, Rhode Island

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

SIMMONS AVIATION SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5291G


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boston FSDO-61

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 04, 2016 in Narragansett, RI
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N5291G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2016, about 1250 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 305, N5291G, was substantially damaged after it experienced a total loss of engine power while in cruise flight, and ditched on the ocean, about 1 mile from shore, near Narragansett, Rhode Island. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the banner-tow flight. The airplane was owned and operated by Simmons Aviation Services, LLC, and the flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he departed on the flight with 5 hours of available fuel. About 3.5 hours into the flight, the airplane was flying over the ocean about 500 feet above ground level when the engine lost total power. Subsequently, the pilot performed a forced landing to the water; the airplane sank, and came to rest in about 30 feet of water. The pilot egressed and was rescued a short time later.

The airplane was recovered and initial examination revealed that the fuselage and right wing were substantially damaged. Furthermore, crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section of the engine by rotating the propeller by hand. The top spark plugs were removed and compression was noted on all cylinders. The spark plugs were examined and exhibited normal wear when compared to the Champion-Check-A-Plug Chart.

The engine was retained for further examination.

Jeremiah Coholan 



NARRAGANSETT, RI (WPRI) — The pilot of the plane that crashed while towing a commercial banner over the crowded Narragansett beaches on July 4 may not have been allowed to fly due to a lack of medical certification, the Target 12 Investigators have learned.

Jeremiah Coholan, 36, of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, acknowledged to Target 12 that his medical certification had been delayed at the time of the crash, and still is.

“I’m not flying now,” he said.

But he also insisted he was allowed to fly the plane that crashed four weeks ago.

That may not be the case, according to to the Federal Aviation Administration, which, along with the National Transportation Safety Board, is investigating the crash that did extensive damage to the single-engine plane, but did not cause any injuries.

Under the “Medical” heading on Coholan’s certification page on the FAA website, it reads “No Medical Available.”

“In general terms, [No Medical Available] means the airman would not be able to use the pilot license,” FAA spokesman Jim Peters said. “Some light aircraft do not require a medical along with the license.”

Coholan was flying a Cessna 305 as he floated a commercial banner over the 4th of July beach crowd.

Peters said that craft would not be considered a light aircraft. Speaking hypothetically, when asked if a pilot can fly commercially if their medical status documentation is delayed, Peters answered with one word.

“No,” he said.

Peters said Coholan has no incidents, accidents or enforcement history with the FAA.

According to the NTSB preliminary incident report, the Cessna, “experienced a total loss of engine power while in cruise flight, and ditched on the ocean, about 1 mile from shore,” three and a half hours after taking off.

“At 500 feet, the engine just stopped,” Coholan said a few days after the crash.

Coholan was rescued with only scratches on his shins. The plane was pulled from 30 feet of water with fuselage and right wing damage, according to the NTSB report.

“The engine was retained for further examination,” the report stated.

An NTSB spokesperson said the final report could take a year to complete.

Simmons Aviation Services, a Pawcatuck, Conn. company that owns the plane, has not responded to a request for comment.

The July crash was the second time within six months that Coholan was at the controls for an unexpected landing.

On January 21, Coholan brought a plane down in a snow covered field in Macedon, New York.

“I lost the engine about 2,000 feet out from where I touched down. Complete dead stick,” Coholon told Time Warner Cable News after that incident. “I’ve trained for it, but never done it.”

The incident did not prompt an NTSB report because there was no damage or injury involved.

Story and video:   http://wpri.com



NARRAGANSETT, R.I. (WJAR) — A small plane carrying a banner crashed into the water at Kelly Beach in the Bonnet Shores area of Narragansett Monday afternoon.

"It kind of just hit the water nose first and then probably within 10 or 12 seconds, it was completely submerged," Brian Kelley, a witness told NBC 10 News.

Narragansett police arrived at the scene around 1 p.m., and swimmers were evacuated from the water.

An NBC 10 reporter, who was at the beach with his family when the crash occurred, said the Coast Guard, as well as the Department of Environmental Management, arrived shortly afterward.

"(It's) just crazy," said Nick Mongeau, a lifeguard. "You don't expect this type of thing to happen."

The plane's pilot, Jeremiah Coholan, told NBC 10 he was not injured. He said he waited in the water for about 4 minutes before being rescued by a private boat.

"Thank god for those guys," Coholan said.

Coholan also told NBC 10 the plane's engine failed.

"The engine just stopped and I had 8 to 10 seconds to react, so that was it," he said.

Coholan was eventually brought to Monahan's Dock by the Narragansett Fire Department. Once ashore, he declined medical treatment.

The beach reopened just before 3 p.m.

Story and video:  http://turnto10.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N52106: Incident occurred January 21, 2016 in Macedon, Wayne County, New York



Date: 21-JAN-16
Time: 18:38:00Z
Regis#: N52106
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Rochester FSDO-23
City: MACEDON
State: New York

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A ROAD, NEAR MACEDON, NY


http://registry.faa.gov/N52106 








MACEDON — “Hell, I’ve got a plane in the back yard.”

That’s what Brian Pulcini said when he looked out his window and discovered a single-engine Cessna about a stone’s throw from his hilltop home that overlooks the village of Palmyra.

According to New York State Trooper Sergeant D. Lester, it was about 1:45 p.m. on Thursday when the single-engine Cessna experienced an engine malfunction, likely related to the cold weather, and was forced to make an emergency landing. The plane was over the village of Palmyra, heading west on a business flight from Bedford, Massachusetts, to Rochester, when the carburetor “froze up” and the engine cut out, he said.

Touchdown, in a small field off of Quaker Road near O'Neil Road, was classic, leaving the pilot and one passenger, both from Bedford, unharmed and the plane undamaged.

“It was kind of real quiet, engine off, gliding, then we made a couple moves to take away some speed and we just kind of found the perfect place to land,” said passenger Richard Medeiros. "It was just as easy as landing in an actual airport — believe it or not."

The plane touched down not far from its final stop, its momentum slowed when it ramped up a fairly significant hill, grazed a large bush, and spun around before coming to rest.

Pilot Jeremiah Coholan estimates he was cruising at an altitude of 5,500 to 6,000 feet when he saw the clouds building up.

“So I put in a request to Rochester for lower altitude while I could still see holes in the clouds," he said. “At about 1,800 feet — which is just below the clouds — the engine starting running really, really rough, getting rougher and rougher,” said Coholan. “And then it just quit."

Medeiros said that was the moment he knew the flight was “pretty much over.”

“We knew we weren't going to land on pavement — it was going to be in a field somewhere,” he said.

What was running through Coholan’s mind as he searched for a place to land?

"Don't die or kill my friend,” he said. “Basically, it was — you know — to remember my training and aviate, navigate and communicate, in that order basically."

It was shortly after the successful emergency landing that Pulcini saw two people come running up his driveway — they’d watched the plane go down.

“I thought somebody lost their dog and they were looking around,” said Pulcini, who never heard the landing because the engine was off.

 “Right now we’re trying to determine what to do with the plane,” Lester said Thursday afternoon. “The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) is going to inspect it and see if it’s safe to operate. If it is, we’re going to have to determine where it’s going to fly from. I don’t think we have quite enough length here to do that.”

Lester said the plane may have to be trailered or taken apart and moved — plans were “kind of up in the air” — but either way he was “sure it’s going to be expensive.”

“He wants to fly it out of here right now,” said Pulcini. “But that can sit there till spring and it won’t bother me.”

Seth Pulcini, Brian’s son, took Coholan out on the family’s four-wheeler to scout for takeoff options. Eventually a makeshift runway was plowed out in the cornfield.

But with the plane's carburetor still frozen, that was not to be.

“No bueno," said Coholan. I was hoping I'd be able to take off — it would have been one hell of a takeoff."

According to Lester, Medeiros continued on by car, most likely because “he’d had enough flying for one day.”

“Nobody’s hurt and you know what? Footprints in my yard don’t bother me,” said Pulcini. “Dinging the little bush over here don’t matter. Who cares? Everybody’s safe.”

Story and photo gallery: http://www.mpnnow.com





An iced-up engine forced a small plane headed to Rochester to land in a Macedon backyard Thursday.

Pilot Jeremiah Coholan and passenger Richard Medeiros felt the engine seizing up as ice clogged the carburetor on their Cessna aircraft while they approached the Rochester area from New Bedford, Massachusetts, at around 1:45 p.m.

“Once it got below the clouds, it ran rougher and rougher and rougher,” said Coholan.

He quickly looked for a place to land and found a small backyard field area off of Quaker Road near Macedon’s village center. Neither passenger was hurt during the emergency landing and the plane was not damaged.

Federal Aviation Administration representatives came to the scene to inspect the plane, according to New York State police, who assisted at the scene.

While there was a fleeting thought of possible catastrophe in Medeiros’ head, the landing seemed like it would go well as they approached the field, he said.

“It was just as easy as landing in an actual airport,” he said. “It was just a little bit more like, ‘What do we do now when we get out of the plane?’”

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.democratandchronicle.com






MACEDON, N.Y. (AP) The pilot of a single-engine plane safely landed in a backyard field at western New York home after the engine iced-up during a flight from Massachusetts.

Pilot Jeremiah Coholan and passenger Richard Medeiros took off from New Bedford Thursday and were approaching the Rochester area around 1:45 p.m. when the engine of their Cessna began seizing up as ice clogged the carburetor.

Coholan says he looked for a place to land and found a small, snow-covered field behind a home in the Wayne County village of Macedon, 10 miles east of Rochester.

The plane landed safely. The two men weren't injured.

State police say Federal Aviation Administration representatives went to the scene to inspect the plane.

Source:  http://wsyr.iheart.com






Wayne County, N.Y. - A small plane flying into Rochester experienced trouble and landed in a field in Wayne County Thursday.

The plane was traveling from Massachusetts to Rochester when the carburetor froze up.

The pilot told radio towers in Rochester that he would not be able to land at the airport.

The plane then landed safely in a field on Quaker Road.

There is no damage to the plane and no one was injured.

The pilot is waiting for approval from the FAA before he can take off.