Friday, July 1, 2016

Man Calls 911 Thinking He Was in Plane Crash, But ‘It Was All Just a Dream’

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com




(ABC News) — A 75-year-old man from Renton, Washington, recently called 911 claiming he was in a small plane crash, only to discover it was all a dream that he says may have been brought on by a prescription sleeping aid he’d taken before bed.

In audio of the emergency call, the man can be heard telling the operator that he’s “pinned in” a plane that was in a “field with trees.” He can be heard adding that there were three other people on board who were unconscious.

Renton firefighters and police were dispatched to the man’s home, where they found the caller not in a plane, but in his bed at home, according to NORCOM, a dispatch agency that services King County, Washington.

The man was embarrassed and told emergency personnel that “it was all just a dream,” a NORCOM spokesman told ABC News today, adding that emergency personnel determined he was OK and left.

The caller, who wished not to be identified by name, told ABC News today that the incident happened in May after a recent surgery. He said he had been having trouble sleeping, so his daughter gave him half a pill of the sedative.

“It was a bad, terrible experience,” he said.

The 75-year-old added that he will “never again” take the drug and that he now just wants to put the scary episode behind him.

The drug’s developer says it has a 20-year track record and is perfectly safe when as directed.

Story and video:   http://wtnh.com

Incident occurred July 01, 2016 at Jamestown Regional Airport (KJMS), Stutsman County, North Dakota

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2016/07/incident-occurred-july-01-2016-at.html

A Piper Malibu aircraft traveling from Dickinson to Fargo Friday declared an emergency and made a precautionary landing at Jamestown Regional Airport, according to Sam Seafeldt, airport manager.

“About 1:45 p.m. Minneapolis Center informed Jamestown airport that the pilots had reported a possible fire,” he said. “Members of Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting, the Jamestown Fire Department and Jamestown Rural Fire Department responded.”

Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting is a unit of volunteers and paid firefighters stationed at the Jamestown Regional Airport.

Seafeldt said the plane landed safely at about 1:50 p.m.

“The airplane was inspected,” he said. “There was a failure of equipment but there was no evidence of a fire.”

Seefeldt said the equipment that failed was related to the operation of the plane’s instruments.

Most fire and rescue personnel were released from the scene by 2:30 p.m.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.jamestownsun.com


JAMESTOWN, N.D. (NewsDakota.com) – Emergency Officials were called to the Jamestown Regional Airport to a plane needing emergency landing Friday afternoon.


The pilot of a six passenger private airplane called down reporting that the plane was malfunctioning and requested emergency clearance to land in Jamestown.


The pilot reported that the engine gave out a puff of smoke indicating a problem.


Airport Manager Samuel Seafeldt says the flight was making a return trip to Fargo.


Seafeldt stated that some instruments were malfunctioning, which caused the pilot to believe there was a fire. Crews stayed on scene to make sure no flames erupted. 


Both of the planes lone occupants were not injured. The plane continued its trip after being cleared at 2:50 PM Friday afternoon. 

Story and audio:   http://www.newsdakota.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Bountiful Flight, N52071: Accident occurred July 01, 2016 in Bountiful, Utah

http://registry.faa.gov/N52071 


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA358
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 01, 2016 in Bountiful, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N52071
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during an "introductory flight" for two passengers, he departed the airport and flew into a canyon where the airplane encountered an "unforeseen immense downdraft". He further reported that he immediately initiated a right turn to exit the canyon but it became clear that a turn was not possible due to the mountainous terrain. Subsequently, the pilot decided to make an emergency landing on a mountain road. After touchdown the airplane skidded off the dirt road and down an embankment. A post-crash fire resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

As a safety recommendation the pilot reported that he should have given himself more altitude before entering the canyon.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to fly into a canyon without sufficient room to reverse course if necessary, which resulted in an emergency landing, loss of directional control, collision with terrain, and a post-crash fire.







FARMINGTON — Police say it was fortunate nobody was killed when a plane made an emergency crash landing Friday in Farmington Canyon.

Around 2 p.m., a passerby reported a small plane had crash-landed on a roadway near Sunset Campground, said Davis County Sheriff's Sgt. DeeAnn Servey. Two females and a male were "almost unscathed" in the crash, she said.

The two passengers were transported to a local hospital for precautionary reasons. The pilot stayed on scene. Servey didn't immediately know the identity of the pilot or where the plane took off from Friday.

Farmington Canyon was expected to remain closed through the evening.

"We’re holding it as a crime scene to make sure that we can see exactly what happened. … We treat all of these incidents initially as something we can investigate further and see if there was any wrongdoing that took place," she said.

Putting the plane down on the road instead of the rugged mountain terrain "probably saved their lives," Servey said of the plane's occupants.

"When we get the initial report that there’s been a plane crash up Farmington Canyon, no one expects that there’s going to be three survivors," she said. "So it’s just a relief for all of us that … these three individuals are doing well and able to talk and communicate and help us with the investigation."

The Federal Aviation Administration, Davis County sheriff's crime lab and U.S. Forest Service were all investigating. Servey didn't immediately know what caused the crash.

The crashed plane's fuselage was smouldering and caused a small fire, which crews from the Farmington Fire Department quickly extinguished, Servey said.


Source:   http://www.deseretnews.com









FARMINGTON CANYON, Utah (ABC4 Utah) Three people walked away from a small plane crash in Farmington Canyon Friday afternoon. 

Davis County Sheriff's Office, Farmington Fire Department and Forest Service officials responded to the crash five to seven miles up Farmington Canyon. 

The plane reportedly went down one mile east of the Sunset Campground. The crash started a small fire, but it was quickly extinguished. 

All injuries were reported to be minor.  The FAA is investigating the crash. Farmington Canyon is closed to traffic due to the investigation. 

Officials say the canyon should reopen Saturday. 


Story and video: http://www.good4utah.com






FARMINGTON, Utah — Davis County Sheriff's Office deputies responded to the scene of a plane crash in Farmington Canyon Friday, and all three occupants walked away with only minor injuries.

A light aircraft lost power during flight, and the pilot was able to land the plane on Farmington Canyon Road. The plane slid off the road and into the brush, where a small fire broke out.

"The plane was still, it had some fire, and it was causing a little bit of fire damage, so the fire department quickly responded and put that out... and now we're holding it as a crime scene in order to make sure that we can see exactly what happened," said Sgt. DeAnn Servey of the Davis County Sheriff's Office.

Servey said there were three occupants in the plane who suffered minor injuries, and two of them were taken to a hospital to be checked out.

Firefighters said the pilot did an excellent job landing the aircraft in a way that minimized the risk of injury.

Farmington Canyon Road was closed to traffic as the investigation continued, but it reopened later Friday night.

Van's RV-10, N104ME: Incident occurred June 29, 2016 in Fulshear, Fort Bend County, Texas

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N104ME

Date: 29-JUN-16
Time: 14:18:00Z
Regis#: N104ME
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV9
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
City: FULSHEAR
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT DOOR FELL OFF DURING FLIGHT. FLUSHER, TEXAS.

Cessna U206F, N9575G, Golden Eagle Outfitters: Accident occurred May 22, 2017 in Noatak; Incident occurred June 30, 2016 in Point Lay; Accident occurred October 09, 2012 in Buckland, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Golden Eagle Outfitters: http://registry.faa.gov/N9575G

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA024
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, May 22, 2017 in Noatak, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA U206F, registration: N9575G
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 22, 2017 about 1823 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna U206F airplane, N9575G, was destroyed following a fire while taxiing after landing, at a remote unimproved off airport landing site near Noatak, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and operated by Golden Eagle Outfitters, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot and sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Ralph Wein Memorial Airport, Kotzebue, Alaska about 1800.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 23, the pilot reported that after landing, he taxied to the end of the remote landing site and turned around while raising the airplane's flaps. Immediately thereafter, he began to feel heat on the left side of his face. After glancing out the left side pilot window, then turning to the right, he noticed flames in the aft cabin near the right-side cargo door. Both the pilot and passenger immediately exited the airplane. The pilot stated that he attempted to regain access to the burning airplane through the right-side cargo door, but was unable due to the heat and flames. The majority of the fuselage and right wing were consumed by fire. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery of the airplane.

The closest communicated and archived weather reporting facility was the Ralph Wein Memorial Airport, Kotzebue, Alaska, about 38 miles south of the accident site. At 1758, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) from Ralph Wein Memorial Airport was reporting, in part: wind from 280 degrees at 9 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, clear; temperature, 55 degrees F; dew point 27 degrees F; altimeter, 29.71 inHG.

Aircraft struck the prop during taxi

Date: 01-JUL-16

Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N9575G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: POINT LAY
State: Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC13CA002
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 09, 2012 in Buckland, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012
Aircraft: CESSNA U206F, registration: N9575G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The pilot reported that while on final approach to a remote gravel bar adjacent to a river, in gusty and variable wind conditions, the 10-knot headwind subsided just before touchdown, and the airplane descend below the anticipated approach path. He initiated a go-around, but the right wing abruptly dropped, and the right main wheel struck the water, which pivoted the airplane 90 degrees to the right. The airplane’s right wing subsequently struck the surface of the water, sustaining substantial damage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's loss of airplane control during final approach in gusty wind conditions.

Aero Commander SR2 Thrush, N8870Q, Air Care Leasing LLC: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2016 in Alamosa, Alamosa County, Colorado -and- incident occurred June 30, 2016 in Alamosa County, Colorado

AIR CARE LEASING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8870Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA328
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 19, 2016 in Center, CO
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER S2R, registration: N8870Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2016, about 1155 mountain daylight time (MDT), an Aero Commander S2R, N8870Q, impacted terrain near Center, Colorado during an aerial application operation under unknown circumstances. The airplane was destroyed by post-impact fire. The commercial-rated pilot, and sole occupant onboard, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Air Care Leasing LLC and operated by Rocky Mountain Ag under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (KMVI), Monte Vista, Colorado.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email  assistance@ntsb.gov.

Date: 30-JUN-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N8870Q
Aircraft Make: PITTS
Aircraft Model: S2
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALAMOSA
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT MADE AN EMERGENCY LANDING IN A FIELD. ALAMOSA, COLORADO.



CENTER — A Monte Vista man flying a crop duster was killed when the plane went down in a barley field east of town Friday morning.

Dusty Claunch, 27, was pronounced dead at the scene, just south of Colorado 112, said Deputy Alamosa County Coroner Harry Alejo.

Alejo said witnesses reported that the plane stalled briefly upon making a turn and then crashed in the midst of its next pass over the field it was spraying.

The plane broke into flames upon crashing and ignited the barley field.

Alejo said two people pulled Claunch from the wreckage.

The fire was extinguished by fire departments from Center, Mosca and Hooper.

Claunch had spent the summer working as a pilot for a local agricultural company but was scheduled to return to his job as a deputy for the Alamosa County sheriff in the fall, according to a Colorado State Patrol news release.

He had previously worked for the Rio Grande County Sheriff’s office and was also the deputy coroner in that county, Alejo said.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been dispatched to investigate the accident.

Source:   http://www.chieftain.com 



ALAMOSA — A Monte Vista High School graduate died in a crop dusting accident Friday morning after his plane crash landed in a barley field just inside the Alamosa County line off Road 6 East and Highway 112.

The pilot, Dusty Claunch, 27, of Monte Vista, was deceased at the scene. Dusty had worked for Rio Grande Sheriff’s Office for several years and recently started working for Alamosa County Sheriff’s Office. He had taken the summer off to work for a local agricultural company as a pilot but was scheduled to go back with the sheriff’s office this fall.

According to the Colorado State Patrol, the call on the crash came into their dispatch center at 10:53 a.m. The crash landing also sparked a fire in the immediate area. The plane was engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived on scene. The flames from the crash also ignited the barley field that the plane had crashed into. 

Volunteer fire units from Center, Mosca-Hooper responded to the call. A CSP trooper reported the blaze was extinguished within about 15 minutes of arrival.

The Colorado State Patrol was assisted by units from the Alamosa Sheriff's Department, Rio Grande County Sheriff's Department, Saguache Sheriff's Department and the Center Police Department. The FAA and NTSB are enroute to the crash scene to conduct an investigation.

Source:  http://www.montevistajournal.com

Incident occurred June 30, 2016 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Date: 30-JUN-16
Time: 17:24:00Z
Regis#: RPA4346
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: ERJ170
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SIOUX FALLS
State: South Dakota

AIRCRAFT TIRE BLEW ON LANDING. SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA.

Fred Kessler: Pilot earned his wings for safety, longevity

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com



Fred Kessler recently received the FAA Wright Brothers Master Pilot award for 50 years of active, incident-free flying.



Frederick Kessler has joined the ranks of only a few thousand U.S. pilots who have received the Federal Aviation Administration’s Wright Brothers Master Pilot award.

The Lewisburg resident and president of Nottingham Village was 18 when he took his first solo flight in 1958 in a Piper Cub in Ithaca, N.Y., and continues to fly regularly today.

To earn the Wright Brothers award, a pilot must have 50 years of active flying, exhibit professionalism, skill and expertise.

Only 3,630 pilots have earned the award, said John Sibole Jr., program manager at the FAA’s Harrisburg Flight Standards District Office.

“It’s impressive,” said Sibole, who presented the prestigious award to Kessler last month at Penn Valley Airport in Selinsgrove.

Flying has been a family passion for decades, starting with Kessler’s father who piloted his own private planes in the 1930s and 40’s.

Kessler has been flying for business and pleasure for nearly 60 years, often with his wife of 52 years, Virginia, as a co-pilot on trips across the country, Canada, Mexico and the Bahamas.

Kessler’s favorite trip? “The next one,” he said.

The 76-year-old was encouraged to apply for the Wright Brothers Award by his son-in-law, Andrew Misener, also a pilot and private airplane owner.

“Flying is an adventure that seems to just continue,” said Kessler, who hopes his 5-year-old grandson will keep up the family’s aviation tradition.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dailyitem.com

Cessna 150L, N1567Q; accident occurred June 30, 2016 near Atlanta Regional Airport / Falcon Field (KFFC), Atlanta, Georgia -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N1567Q

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Peachtree City, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N1567Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 29, 2016, at 1930 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150L, N1567Q, experienced a total loss of engine power and was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Atlanta Regional Airport (FFC), Peachtree City, Georgia. The student pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the solo instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated that she performed the preflight inspection, engine start, run-up, and takeoff from runway 31 with no anomalies noted. At 400 feet above ground level, the engine "sputtered, and then stopped." The pilot selected a golf course for the forced landing, and touched down on a slightly rolling fairway lined with trees. During the rollout, the airplane clipped trees and struck a small berm, which collapsed the nose landing gear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the engine firewall. The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller. The magnetos produced spark at all eight spark plugs. A compression check was performed, and thumb compression was confirmed on all but the No. 3 cylinder.

The No. 3 cylinder was removed and severe impact damage was noted on the dome of the piston and the cylinder head. The exhaust valve was separated at the stem, and the intake valve was fractured, with about 50 percent of the valve head separated. Pieces of the valve were recovered in the exhaust manifold. The airplane and its engine were secured for a detailed examination at a later date.

The pilot held an FAA student pilot and third-class medical certificate, issued on December 22, 2015. She reported 41 total hours of flight experience, of which 38 were in the accident airplane.

The two-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1971 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-200 series engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on July 5, 2015, at 3,488 total airframe hours.



PEACHTREE CITY, Ga. - Golfers on the Planterra Golf Course in Peachtree City had quite the spectacle Wednesday. No, it wasn’t a hole-in-one and it definitely wasn’t par for the course.

Facebook post Wednesday evening told the tale of the very unusual day on the links.
  
Moments later, the Cessna 150L was on the grass having just made an emergency landing right in front of those same golfers.

The Peachtree City Police Department and Peachtree City Fire Rescue’s Facebook page posted a picture of the aftermath. The front landing gear can be seen in the photo bent completely back.

The caption of the stated the 17-year old pilot managed to walk away without any injuries and no one on the ground was hurt.

"She walked away. That's a good landing to flying folks. Perfectly executed emergency landing it seems. Good job, Sierra!" Matt Waddell replied in the post.

"I was on hole 9 and her plane was sputtering badly. Glad you are OK young lady," Pb Ford posted in reply.

One commenter also jested if she yelled "fore" before the hard landing.

Loretta McGibney offered the advice to “Be sure to hang that prop someplace special. Good work!”

The police and fire rescue page ended the post with a simple “Way to go!!!”

Officials have not said what caused the incident.


Original article can be found here: http://www.fox5atlanta.com

Planterra Golf Club was the June 29 site of the crash landing of a single-engine plane where the 17-year-old Peachtree City pilot walked away unharmed .

The crash occurred at approximately 7:30 p.m. on the #11 tee box at the Planterra Golf Club situated near Falcon Field after pilot Sierra Lund experienced mechanical trouble.

Peachtree City Police Department spokesman Odelia Bergh said the 17-year-old pilot experienced mechanical problems and landed the plane. Berg noted that witnesses reported the plane’s engine sputtering prior to the landing.

Brown said the pilot who was flying solo was unharmed in the incident.

Peachtree City Fire Rescue in a statement said, “At approximately 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday evening our units responded to a report of a plane crash near the 11th tee at the Planterra Golf Course. Upon our arrival we found that a small single-engine plane had crashlanded on the fairway with one person on board. The scene was secured and left for investigators.”

Bergh said a posting on the police department’s Facebook page by mom Steph Lund recalled the crash and the response of others at the scene.

“Sierra was in the process of completing one of her solo (flights) which is a requirement for student pilots. After take-off she had to make an emergency landing,” Lund said. “As a parent of a student pilot you often wonder if your child will stay calm and recall what she has been trained to do. (I’m) happy to report that Sierra did just that.”

Lund expressed her gratitude to first responders and to those who made kind comments in support of her daughter’s efforts.

“Never underestimate this rising generation. So many of them are doing amazing things,” said Lund.

Original article can be found here:   http://thecitizen.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, Lone Star Asset Acquisition Advisors LLC, N5724F: Accident occurred June 30, 2016 near Tradewind Airport (KTDW), Amarillo, Texas

Lone Star Asset Acquisition Advisors LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5724F

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA359
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 30, 2016 in Amarillo, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5724F
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After takeoff from an airport with an air density altitude near 6,400 feet, the pilot reported that he felt the airplane was not producing enough lift during the initial climb, so he considered returning to the airport to land, but saw the stall warning light illuminated and decided to land in a newly developed dirt field straight ahead. The pilot further reported that he continued to "nose over to develop airspeed" and maintained wings level throughout the descent. During the touchdown, the nose landing gear collapsed and the fuselage and right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain an adequate rate of climb, which resulted in off airport landing and substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.




Three Amarillo men escaped a plane crash uninjured Thursday afternoon after the aircraft came to rest at a construction site just south of Tradewind Municipal Airport in Amarillo.

The Texas Department of Public Safety said the pilot was Timothy Craddock and the passengers were Iain McCown and Bradford Benbell.

The plane is a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee.

The crash occurred shortly after takeoff from the airport at 4105 Tradewind St.

The plane came to rest facing north upon a crumpled right-front landing gear and a ruined prop. The nose of the plane was embedded in the ground.

“Upon takeoff, the pilot said he noticed it wasn’t gaining enough lift, so he was trying to find a spot to make an emergency landing,” DPS Sgt. Dan Buesing said. “The pilot said he encountered a downdraft that really slammed his plane down into the field, damaging his landing gear and his prop.”

The crash remains under investigation.

Original article can be found here:  http://amarillo.com



Aircraft force landed in a field near 46th and Tradewind St.

Officials say that the plane was attempting to take off but could not get enough lift.

The model of the plane is a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee.

Three men were on board, no reported injuries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.myhighplains.com



AMARILLO, Texas (KVII) — A small plane force landed off 46th Avenue and Tradewind Blvd. just before 3 p.m. on Thursday.

According to Randall County Sheriff's Office, there were three people on board the small single-engine aircraft, which was a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee. None of those people were injured in the crash.

Witnesses on scene said there appeared to be damage to one of the wings and the aircraft ended up landing in a construction site.

According to RCSO, the pilot was attempting to take off but could not gain enough altitude and set the plane down in a field. The plane slid for several hundred feet before the nose gear gave way, causing the plane to crash.

Original article can be found here: http://abc7amarillo.com

Piper PA-28-161, N8237Z: Accident occurred June 29, 2016 at Cherry Ridge Airport (N30), Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N8237Z

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA237
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Honesdale, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-161, registration: N8237Z
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

At an airport with a field elevation of 1,357 ft above mean sea level, where the temperature was 23°C, the pilot loaded the airplane with passengers, luggage, and fuel, to near its maximum gross weight. He then initiated a takeoff on a 2,986-ft-long runway, which had an approximate 500-ft displaced threshold on each end, a 0.6-percent uphill gradient, and trees off the departure end. While attempting to take off, the airplane failed to become airborne, and the pilot aborted the takeoff. The airplane traveled off the right side of the runway and was substantially damaged when it struck vegetation and terrain. The pilot and the three passengers were not injured. Review of airport security camera footage revealed that the pilot had initiated a rolling, 0-flap takeoff from an intersection with about 200 ft of usable pavement behind him. Review of the weather conditions present at the time of the accident indicated that the density altitude was 2,805 ft. Review of weather information and a Koch chart also indicated that with the density altitude that existed at the time of the accident, a 30 percent increase in takeoff distance should have been anticipated by the pilot along with a 23 percent decrease in climb rate. Review of the information manual for the airplane revealed that it contained performance information. When asked if he had checked the density altitude before takeoff, the pilot replied that he had not.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in his attempt to take off near the airplane’s maximum gross weight in high-density altitude conditions that degraded the airplane’s takeoff and climb performance and resulted in an aborted takeoff and subsequent runway excursion.

Air Tractor Inc AT-301, Thomas Ag Aerial Inc., N2374W: Incident occurred June 29, 2016 in Thomas, Custer County, Oklahoma

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

THOMAS AG AERIAL INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2374W

Date: 29-JUN-16
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N2374W
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT301
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Aerial Application
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15
City: THOMAS
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT DURING AERIAL APPLICATION OPERATION, FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD AND STRUCK THE PROPELLER, NEAR THOMAS, OKLAHOMA.

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, American Flyers, N106AF: Accident occurred June 29, 2016 at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Houston, Texas

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

AMERIFLYERS OF CALIFORNIA INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N106AF

Date: 29-JUN-16
Time: 16:52:00Z
Regis#: N106AF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Houston FSDO-09
City: HOUSTON
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT DURING FLIGHT, SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE INTO THE WINDSHIELD, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, 15 MILES FROM HOUSTON, TEXAS.




HARRIS COUNTY, Texas - A bird strike broke a small plane's windshield and forced the aircraft to make an emergency landing in northwest Harris County, according to the Federal Aviation Authority.

Officials said the single-engine Cessna 172 with an instructor and a student on board had just taken off from David Wayne Hooks Airport when the plane hit a bird and broke the aircraft's windshield.

The plane landed safely back at Hooks. 

Both people reported minor injuries.

Sky 2 aerials showed the shattered windshield. A man on the ground was holding what appeared to be a large, dead bird.

The plane is registered to an owner in the Dallas area.

The FAA is investigating.

Story and video:   http://www.click2houston.com




TOMBALL, TX (KTRK) --

The pilot of a small Cessna aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing in Tomball after a bird crashed through the windshield and hit him in the face.

The pilot landed safely at Hooks Airport around noon. However, a spokesperson with the Texas Department of Public Safety did not know whether either of the two people on board needed medical attention.

A student pilot and a flight instructor were flying the Cessna model 172 R plane to Hooks Airport from Lake Conroe, according to DPS. As the plane was about 13 miles north of its destination, a flock of birds appeared in their path. One of the birds broke from the flock and flew straight through the windshield, hit the pilot, exited through the right window and then struck the wing.

The Federal Aviation Administration says in the last 10 years, 15 animal strikes have been reported by planes landing or taking off from Hooks Airport. The last incident happened in October 2015 and caused about $2,600 in damage to the left wing of a twin turboprop aircraft. Most of the incidents have involved birds, but two planes have struck deer during landings.

State wide, 736 wildlife strikes on airplanes have been reported this past year.

Original article can be found here:   http://abc13.com

Evolution Revo, Twilight Aviation LLC, N20EV; accident occurred June 29, 2016 near Park Township Airport (HLM), Holland, Michigan -Kathryn's Report

TWILIGHT AVIATION LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N20EV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Grand Rapids FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA245
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Holland, MI
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC Revo, registration: N20EV
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 29, 2016, at 1900 eastern daylight time, an Evolution Aircraft Inc Revo, N20EV, impacted terrain during an initial climb at Park Township Airport (HLM), Holland, Michigan. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor received serious injuries and a student pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the student pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that originated at 1800.




Holland, Mich.--

A Holland pilot whose small aircraft crashed Wednesday evening, June 29, at the Park Township Airport remains in critical condition at Spectrum Health in Grand Rapids.

Richard Henley, 63, was still listed in critical condition Friday afternoon.

Henly was injured when his aircraft, an Evolution Revo, veered off the runway and overturned in the grass during a landing at the Park Township Airport on Ottawa Beach Road.

Henley was treated at the scene before being turned over to AeroMed.

The backseat passenger and the aircraft's owner, Leland Klink, 71, of Spring Lake, suffered minor injuries and was treated and released at the scene.


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified of the crash.


OTTAWA COUNTY, Mich. --  A man was airlifted to the hospital after the small aircraft he was piloting toppled after landing.

Ottawa County deputies say the crash happened around 7:08 p.m. at Park Township Airport on Ottawa Beach Road. An ultralight aircraft was landing when it veered off the runway and rolled into the grass.

Richard Henley, 63, from Holland was piloting the craft and was seriously injured. He was airlifted to the Spectrum Butterworth by Aero Med.

His passenger - and the aircraft's owner - Leland Klink, 71, from Spring Lake suffered only minor injuries and was treated at the scene.

The accident remains under investigation.

Story and video:  http://fox17online.com

HOLLAND, MICH. - Ottawa County officials say two men were on board a small aircraft that crashed at Park Township Airport at 1269 Ottawa Beach Road in Holland. 

It happened just after 7:00 p.m. Wednesday night, as the aircraft landed. Officials say it veered off the runway into the grass, where it overturned. 

The pilot of the plane, 63-year-old Richard Henley, of Holland, was flown from the scene by Aero Med to Spectrum Butterworth with serious injuries. His passenger and the owner of the plane, 71-year-old Leyland Klink, of Spring Lake, was treated at the scene for minor injuries.

We're told the aircraft was a Evolution Revo. 

The FAA and NTSB are now investigating. 

Story and video:  http://www.wzzm13.com