Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Cessna 402B, N900CR, operated by Noble Air Charter: Accident occurred October 18, 2017 in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Noble Air Charter Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N900CR

NTSB Identification: ERA18LA011
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 18, 2017 in St. Petersburg, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 402, registration: N900CR
Injuries: 4 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 18, 2017, about 1545 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 402B, N900CR, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a street in St. Petersburg, Florida. The commercial pilot, one passenger, and two motorists sustained minor injuries. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for flight that departed Tampa International Airport (TPA), Tampa, Florida, at 1526. The flight was destined for the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida. The flight was operated by Noble Air Charter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, about 13 minutes after departure the pilot advised the Tampa air traffic control tower that he was "fuel critical" and requested vectors for the nearest airport. The TPA tower controller provided a heading toward the Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida, located about 7 miles away. The pilot reported that he had 20 minutes of fuel on board. At 1543, the pilot was given a vector to runway 4, which was at his 12 o'clock and 4 miles away. The pilot reported the airport in sight, and the TPA tower controller provided the SPG tower frequency. There were no further radio transmissions.

The airplane landed on a residential street about 2 miles from SPG, and collided with two motor vehicles.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings, the horizonal stabilizer, elevator, and nose section. Both wingtips and wing tip fuel tanks were separated from the wings. The left wing tip fuel tank exhibited minor sooting and heat damage. The left engine fuel selector was found in the left main fuel tank position, the right engine fuel selector was in the right main fuel tank position.

According to charter records obtained from the operator, the accident occurred during the third leg of a four-leg trip. The records indicated that at the start of the trip, the airplane's hour meter read 589.0 hours. At the accident scene, it read 592.6 hours.

According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent first class medical certificate was issued on November 16, 2016. According to his logbook, the pilot had accrued 622 total hours of flight experience.




ST. PETERSBURG — Officials released the names of the two people aboard the plane that made an emergency landing Wednesday on a neighborhood street in south St. Petersburg.

Manuel Izquierdo, 36, piloted the Cessna 402B that landed on 18th Avenue S near 16th Street about 3:45 p.m. Izquierdo was shooting for Albert Whitted Airport, but came up short by about 1.5 miles. He was nearly perfectly aligned with Runway 7 at the airfield.

Ronald Bizick, 50, was the passenger on board. Both Izquierdo and Bizick were released from Bayfront Health St. Petersburg, according to St. Petersburg Fire Rescue.

After Izquierdo touched the plane down, the continued to roll into two vehicles, a Mercury Mountaineer and a Chevrolet Tahoe. Kimberley Grooms, 34, was inside the Tahoe. She, too, was taken to Bayfront Health St. Petersburg.

Alphonsine Dean, 63, and her 3-year-old grandson were in the Mountaineer, which came to rest near the nose of the aircraft. Neither Dean nor her grandson were injured, Dean said Wednesday.

It was unclear what forced Izquierdo to attempt the emergency landing. Federal Aviation Administration officials were investigating.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.tampabay.com




ST. PETERSBURG (FOX 13) - A small plane made a crash-landing on a street in south St. Petersburg this afternoon, colliding with two vehicles on the ground in the process.

The scene is at 18th Avenue S and 16th Street S.  The view from SkyFOX showed the damaged twin-engine Cessna on the ground next to an SUV in the street.  Police say the plane struck two vehicles on the ground, sending three people to the hospital.  Their injuries were not said to be life-threatening.

Witnesses said on social media that the pilot survived, but there has been no official word. 

The plane appears to be registered to a charter company out of Opa-Locka.

The cause of the crash was not clear but a downed power pole nearby showed signs of being hit by the plane as it came down.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.fox13news.com




ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (WFLA) – A small plane crashed on a road and hit multiple cars in St. Petersburg Wednesday afternoon.

St. Pete police and fire departments are on scene at 18th Avenue South and 16th Street South.

Two people were on the plane.

Four people overall were taken to area hospitals and one person was treated at the scene.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://wfla.com




ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - A small plane crashed onto a road in St. Petersburg Wednesday afternoon.

Around 3:46 p.m., St. Pete Fire Rescue responded to a small plane crash at the intersection of 18th Ave. S. and 16th St.

The plane hit two vehicles and three people were transported to a local hospital.

The plane is in the roadway. Two people were on board the plane at the time of the crash and went to Bayfront.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.abcactionnews.com

Beech A24R Sierra, N400LE, OBX Airplanes LLC: Accident occurred October 18, 2017 at Dare County Regional Airport (KMQI), Manteo, North Carolina -and- Incident occurred April 28, 2017 at Piedmont Triad International Airport (KGSO), Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

OBX Airplanes LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N400LE




NTSB Identification: ERA18LA010
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 18, 2017 in Manteo, NC
Aircraft: BEECH A24, registration: N400LE
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 18, 2017, about 1000 eastern daylight time, a Beech A24R, N400LE, impacted hard during a forced landing at Dare County Regional Airport (MQI), Manteo, North Carolina. The private pilot undergoing instruction (PUI), sustained serious injuries while the flight instructor sustained minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged, and was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight which originated about 1 minute earlier.

The flight instructor, who was seated in the right seat, stated that there were no discrepancies with the airplane during the preflight inspection or engine run-up before takeoff. After becoming airborne, when the flight was near the midpoint of the runway at about 100 ft, the cockpit filled with smoke and she noted a burning wire and fire in front of her position. She also reported that the cockpit became hot. She took control from the PUI, and directed the battery and alternator switches to be turned off. She initiated a turn to return to the airport, parallel to runway 17, and reported the airplane impacted hard.

Preliminary examination of the accident site by several Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors revealed the airplane first impacted on airport property east of runway 17 near the approach end of the runway. The airplane came to rest upright about 500 ft and 212° from the initial impact location. Examination of the cockpit by a FAA airworthiness inspector revealed a wire with melted insulation hanging from under the right side of the instrument panel. The airplane was recovered and secured for further examination.
===========

DARE COUNTY, N.C. (WAVY) — A plane crashed Wednesday morning during an attempted emergency landing at a Dare County airport, officials say. 

The incident happened just before 10 a.m. A spokesperson with the Federal Aviation Administration tells WAVY.com a Beech A24R Sierra landed a field just short of a runway at the airport.


Dare County officials say a preliminary investigation found two people were in a plane — a student pilot and an instructor pilot — that began experiencing issues shortly after taking off from Dare County Regional Airport (MQI).


Officials say they were trying to make an emergency landing when the plane hit the runway, causing damage to the plane’s landing gear.


The student pilot, 23-year-old Balpreet Chahal, of Leesburg, Virginia, was taken to the Outer Banks Hospital after complaining of minor injuries, officials say.


The instructor, 32-year-old Jenny Hawk, of Manns Harbor, was checked out at the airport and transported to the Outer Banks Hospital for evaluation, officials say.


The FAA is now taking over the investigation.


Story, video and photo ➤ http://wavy.com


MANTEO, N.C. (WVEC) -- The North Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating after a small plane crash-landed at the Dare County Regional Airport on Wednesday morning. 

The accident happened at about 10 a.m. on Runway 5.


A preliminary investigation revealed two occupants -- a student pilot and an instructor pilot -- experienced issues that forced them to make an emergency landing. The plane landed hard on the runway and slid off it into the grass, collapsing the landing gear.


A spokesperson with the State Highway Patrol said the student pilot, Balpreet S. Chahal, 23 was transported by EMS to a local hospital for evaluation after complaining of minor injuries.


The other passenger, instructor Jenny Renea Hawk, 32, had no complaints of injuries.


Story, video and photo ➤ http://www.13newsnow.com


MANTEO, N.C. – Authorities are investigating a plane crash at the Dare County Regional Airport in Manteo that left one person with minor injuries.

The North Carolina Highway Patrol responded to the airport at approximately 10 a.m. after receiving reports of the crash.

The emergency landing was because of on board issues the plane was experiencing, said Dare County officials.

Officials say that the aircraft landed hard and slid into the grass off the right side of the runway.

Airport staff responded immediately, bringing along a fire truck because of leaking fuel.

NCHP says the preliminary investigation has revealed that two people, a student pilot and an instructor pilot, were attempting to make an emergency landing when the plane hit the runway, causing damage to the landing gear.

The student pilot, 23-year-old Balpreet S. Chahal suffered minor injuries and was transported to a local hospital for evaluation.

The instructor pilot, 32-year-old Jenny Hawk, was not injured. Hawk was involved in a plane crash ion the Croatan Sound in 2015 that left her in critical condition.

The Federal Aviation Administration will take over the investigation.

The airport remains fully functioning at this time.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wtkr.com

Two people were taken to The Outer Banks Hospital for observation after their plane made a hard landing Wednesday morning at the Dare County Regional Airport on Roanoke Island.

A Beech A24R Sierra owned by OBX Airplanes, LLC. experienced issues shortly after take off that led to an emergency landing.

The aircraft landed hard and slid into the grass off the right side of the Runway 17, according to a Dare County news release.

There was a small fuel leak reported by emergency crews at the scene that was quickly contained.

The crash still is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Story and photo ➤ https://outerbanksvoice.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 28-APR-17

Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: N400LE
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GREENSBORO
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N51794, Christiansen Aviation Inc: Incidents occurred October 17, 2017 -and- October 17, 2016 at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Tulsa County, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on taxi, struck a parked aircraft wingtip.

Christiansen Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N51794

Date: 17-OCT-17
Time: 18:25:00Z
Regis#: N51794
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA

Aircraft on taxi, wingtip and nose struck the ground.

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 18:18:00Z
Regis#: N51794
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: TULSA
State: Oklahoma

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N6384D, N8074E LLC: Accident occurred October 17, 2017 at Old Bridge Airport (3N6), Middlesex County, New Jersey

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saddle Brook, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


N8074E LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N6384D


Location: Old Bridge, NJ
Accident Number: GAA18CA024
Date & Time: 10/17/2017, 1230 EDT
Registration: N6384D
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The student pilot reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane "slid" to the left off the runway. He added that he attempted to correct, but the airplane impacted trees.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Runway excursion
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/08/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 56 hours (Total, all aircraft), 56 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N6384D
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17272770
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: N8074E LLC
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BLM, 164 ft msl
Observation Time: 1556 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 130°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MILLVILLE, NJ (MIV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Old Bridge, NJ (3N6)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1130 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: OLD BRIDGE (3N6)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 87 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3594 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.331111, -74.344722 (est) 
 
Preventing Similar Accidents


Stay Centered: Preventing Loss of Control During Landing

Loss of control during landing is one of the leading causes of general aviation accidents and is often attributed to operational issues. Although most loss of control during landing accidents do not result in serious injuries, they typically require extensive airplane repairs and may involve potential damage to nearby objects such as fences, signs, and lighting.

Often, wind plays a role in these accidents. Landing in a crosswind presents challenges for pilots of all experience levels. Other wind conditions, such as gusting wind, tailwind, variable wind, or wind shifts, can also interfere with pilots’ abilities to land the airplane and maintain directional control.

What can pilots do?

Evaluate your mental and physical fitness before each flight using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) “I'M SAFE Checklist." Being emotionally and physically ready will help you stay alert and potentially avoid common and preventable loss of control during landing accidents.

Check wind conditions and forecasts often. Take time during every approach briefing to fully understand the wind conditions. Use simple rules of thumb to help (for example, if the wind direction is 30 degrees off the runway heading, the crosswind component will be half of the total wind velocity).

Know your limitations and those of the airplane you are flying. Stay current and practice landings on different runways and during various wind conditions. If possible, practice with a flight instructor on board who can provide useful feedback and techniques for maintaining and improving your landing procedures.

Prepare early to perform a go around if the approach is not stabilized and does not go as planned or if you do not feel comfortable with the landing. Once you are airborne and stable again, you can decide to attempt to land again, reassess your landing runway, or land at an alternate airport. Incorporate go-around procedures into your recurrent training.

During landing, stay aligned with the centerline. Any misalignment reduces the time available to react if an unexpected event such as a wind gust or a tire blowout occurs.

Do not allow the airplane to touch down in a drift or in a crab. For airplanes with tricycle landing gear, do not allow the nosewheel to touch down first.

Maintain positive control of the airplane throughout the landing and be alert for directional control difficulties immediately upon and after touchdown. A loss of
directional control can lead to a nose-over or ground loop, which can cause the airplane to tip or lean enough for the wing tip to contact the ground.

Stay mentally focused throughout the landing roll and taxi. During landing, avoid distractions, such as conversations with passengers or setting radio frequencies.

Interested in More Information?

The FAA’s “Airplane Flying Handbook” (FAA-H-8083-3B), chapter 8, “Approaches and Landings,” provides guidance about how to conduct crosswind approaches and landings and
discusses maximum safe crosswind velocities. The handbook can be accessed from the FAA’s website (www.faa.gov).

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) provides access to online training courses, seminars, and webinars as part of the FAA’s “WINGS—Pilot Proficiency Program.” This program includes targeted flight training designed to help pilots develop the knowledge and skills needed to achieve flight proficiency and to assess and mitigate the risks associated with the most common causes of accidents, including loss of directional control. The courses listed below can be accessed from the FAASTeam website (www.faasafety.gov).

Avoiding Loss of Control
Maneuvering: Approach and Landing
Normal Approach and Landing
Takeoffs, Landings, and Aircraft Control

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute offers several interactive courses, presentations, publications, and other safety resources that can be accessed from its website (www.aopa.org/asf/).

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, N62LP, Crosswinds Inc: Incident occurred October 17, 2017 at Millard Airport (KMLE), Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Crosswinds Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N62LP

Date: 18-OCT-17
Time: 00:20:00Z
Regis#: N62LP
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MILLARD
State: NEBRASKA

MILLARD, Neb. —  An aircraft made an emergency landing at the Millard Airport Tuesday night around 7:30 p.m., according to a representative with Omaha's Airport Authority.

The pilot, who was the only person on the plane, had taken off from Millard Airport earlier in the evening and was returning when he realized that his retractable landing gear was not working.

The pilot was forced to land the plane on its belly and managed to do so without incident.

Fire and Rescue crews responded to the incident and the airport was shut down until 9:43 p.m. when the plane was removed from the runway.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ketv.com

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Cessna 210-5, registered to and operated by the pilot, N8347Z: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2017 in Russian Mission, Alaska

Kyle Stevens, 31

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bethel, Alaska
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location:  Russian Mission, AK
Accident Number: ANC18FA003
Date & Time: 10/16/2017, 1430 AKD
Registration: N8347Z
Aircraft: CESSNA 210
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 16, 2017, about 1430 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 210-5 airplane, N8347Z, impacted the Yukon River about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission, Alaska. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. No flight plan had been filed for the visual flight rules (VFR) flight, and no record of the pilot receiving a preflight weather briefing could be found. The flight originated about 1415 from Kako Airport, Kako, Alaska, with a destination of Bethel Airport (PABE), Bethel, Alaska. 

Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the time of departure. According to a pilot of an airplane that departed about 10 minutes ahead of the accident airplane on the same route of flight and also destined for Bethel, widespread areas of low-level fog (between 400 and 600 ft above ground level [agl]) existed along the route. This pilot stated, during a postaccident interview, that he conversed with the accident pilot (after he departed from Kako) about the fog layers. No further radio communications occurred between the pilots. The interviewed pilot indicated that he tried to contact the accident pilot about 15 minutes after their conversation but received no response. After arriving at PABE and loading passengers, the interviewed pilot departed for a return flight to Kako. During that flight, he searched for the accident pilot's airplane but could not locate the airplane. After landing at Kako, the interviewed pilot notified the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Flight Service Station about the overdue airplane, and the FAA issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1748. On October 17, the accident airplane was located submerged in the Yukon River about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission. 

The interviewed pilot stated that he flew his airplane at 1,500 ft agl above the fog and with 20-mile visibility. The pilot also stated that, at that altitude, he could see fog laying on the ground, on hills, and over the Yukon River. He did not know the altitude of the accident airplane but indicated that, in the area of the accident site, the fog was thick with no holes visible.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  35 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 31, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot did not have an instrument rating. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on February 1, 2014, without waivers or limitations. At the time of the pilot's application for his medical certificate, he reported 35 hours of total flight experience. A relative of the pilot estimated that he had accumulated about 160 hours of total flight experience. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N8347Z
Model/Series: 210 5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1963
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 205-0347
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  09/08/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5533.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 265 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was manufactured in 1963 and was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-470 series engine. The airplane's last annual inspection was completed on September 8, 2017. At that time, the airplane had accumulated 5,533.7 total hours, and the tachometer displayed 1,649.2 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PARS, 51 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2213 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 24°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 300 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3600 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.68 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: RUSSIAN MISSION, AK (9AK2)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BETHEL, AK (BET)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1415 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) performed a detailed weather study for this accident. Russian Mission Airport, located about 9 nautical miles (nm) north-northeast of the accident site, was the closest airport with official weather observations. At 1413 (about 17 minutes before the accident), a METAR reported the following information: wind from 140° at 3 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; scattered clouds at 300 ft agl, scattered clouds at 2,600 ft agl, and broken ceiling at 3,600 ft agl; temperature 37°F; dew point 36°F; and altimeter setting 29.68 inches of mercury. At 1446 (about 16 minutes after the accident), a METAR reported the following information: wind from 170° at 4 knots; visibility 10 statute miles with light rain; scattered clouds at 1,000 ft agl, broken ceiling at 2,300 ft agl, and overcast skies at 3,400 ft; temperature 37°F; dew point 34°F; and altimeter setting 29.68 inches of mercury. In addition, the 1446 METAR reported that the rain began at the airport at 1432.

Marshall Don Hunter Sr. Airport, Marshall, Alaska, the next closest airport with official weather observations, was located 21 nm northwest of the accident site. At 1356 (34 minutes before the accident), a METAR reported wind from 250° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, broken ceiling at 2,700 ft agl and overcast skies at 3,500 ft agl, temperature 37°F, dew point 35°F, and altimeter setting 29.67 inches of mercury.

Only one pilot report (PIREP) was available for the 3 hours surrounding the accident at an altitude below 18,000 ft and within 200 nm of the accident site. The PIREP was reported over Aniak, Alaska (about 50 nm southeast of the accident site), at 1512. The pilot of a Cessna 208 reported an overcast ceiling at 700 ft with cloud tops at 4,000 ft.

The area forecast issued at 1206, which was valid at the time of the accident, forecasted an AIRMET for instrument conditions, broken to overcast ceiling at 300 ft with cloud tops at 10,000 ft, and visibilities below 1 mile in mist with improving conditions forecast into the afternoon and evening hours.

The closest National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) was near PABE, located 52 miles south-southwest of the accident site. The radar detected reflectivity targets and associated rain showers above the accident site at 1422 and 1432. The area of rain showers was moving from southwest to northeast and had moved over and past the accident site between 1402 and 1442. No lightning strikes were at or near the accident site at the accident time.

The FAA's aviation weather cameras in Russian Mission showed the weather conditions surrounding the time of the accident. Images from the south- and southwest-facing cameras depicted rain shower conditions with the rain showers moving across the area with low ceiling and visibility conditions within the rain showers beyond the visibility reference point. The south-facing camera also indicated a low bank of clouds toward the Yukon River, the accident site, and along the intended flight route.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 61.640000, -161.445556 

The airplane was located about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission, submerged about 15 ft in the Yukon River. The main wreckage was recovered and moved ashore. A portion of the forward fuselage, the engine, and the wings were located but could not be recovered. The location of these parts items has been confirmed using SONAR equipment and will be examined if they are eventually recovered at a later date.

The horizontal and vertical stabilizers remained attached to the empennage. The vertical stabilizer and left horizontal stabilizer were relatively free of impact damage. About 3 ft of the outboard portion of the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator was displaced about 45° up and was absent any leading-edge nicks or gouges.

The aft fuselage separated from the forward fuselage at the upper production joint near the forward end of the rear windows. The rivets from the upper production joint on the left side were pulled through the joint, which was consistent with the left wing rotating forward during impact. The rivets from the upper production joint on the right side did not pull but were popped out, which was consistent with the right wing rotating aft during impact.

The front left (pilot) seat was located about 5 miles downstream from the main wreckage location. The seat did not show any evidence of compression damage. The front right (copilot) seat was located about 10 miles downstream from the main wreckage location. Compression damage appeared on the bottom of the seat on the right side. More compression was found on the forward right side of the seat than on the rear right side. The left side of the seat showed relatively little crushing damage.

Medical And Pathological Information

The State of Alaska Medical Examiner's Office, Anchorage, Alaska, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. His cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot, which were negative for drugs, ethanol, and carbon monoxide. 

Tests And Research

The airplane was equipped with a J.P. Instruments (JPI) Engine Data Monitor (EDM) model 730, installed under STC SA00432SE and STC SA2586NM. The EDM model 730 is a panel-mounted LCD display that can monitor and record up to 24 parameters related to engine operations, including cylinder head temperature for each cylinder, exhaust gas temperature for each cylinder, fuel flow, fuel pressure, RPM, manifold pressure, and oil pressure and temperature.

The EDM was removed from the accident airplane and sent to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorders Laboratory in Washington, DC, for download. The data began recording at 1418:42 and were recorded in 6-second intervals. At 1420:30 and 1421:30, the engine parameters appeared consistent with the engine run-up. The manifold pressure, rpm, and other engine parameters appeared consistent with the takeoff roll at 1421:40.

For about the next 9.5 minutes, until the data recording ended at 1431:06, all engine parameters appeared nominal. Specifically, the final set of recorded data indicated that the cylinder head temperatures ranged from 290° to 365° F, exhaust gas temperatures ranged from 1,404° to 1,503° F, fuel flow was 13.1 gallons per hour, rpm was 2,415, manifold pressure was 23.4 inches of mercury, oil pressure was 39 psi, and oil temperature was 123° F. The EDM specialist's factual report is in the public docket for this accident.

The attitude indicator was also removed from the airplane and was examined by the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC. The indicator's glass face was intact with slight scratching damage. No significant deformation damage was found on the outside of the case. After disassembly, the gimbals were found to move freely. Further disassembly to the gyro revealed wetness and corrosion, but the rotor spun freely on the shaft within its housing. No scoring or deep gouge marks were observed in either the rotor or gyro housing surfaces.

Additional Information

An FAA safety brochure, titled "Spatial Disorientation Visual Illusions," included the following information:

The flight attitude of an airplane is generally determined by the pilot's visual reference to the natural horizon. When the natural horizon is obscured, attitude can sometimes be maintained by visual reference to the surface below. If neither horizon nor surface visual references exist, the airplane's attitude can only be determined by artificial means such as an attitude indicator or other flight instruments. Surface references or the natural horizon may at times become obscured by smoke, fog, smog, haze, dust, ice particles, or other phenomena, although visibility may be above VFR minimums. This is especially true at airports located adjacent to large bodies of water or sparsely populated areas, where few, if any, surface references are available. Lack of horizon or surface reference is common on over-water flights, at night, or in low visibility conditions.

To prevent spatial disorientation, the brochure recommended relying on flight instruments when flying in reduced visibility conditions and not attempting visual flight when there is a possibility of being trapped in deteriorating conditions.


NTSB Identification: ANC18FA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 16, 2017 in Russian Mission, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N8347Z
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2017, about 1430 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 210-5 airplane, N8347Z, impacted the waters of the Yukon River, about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission, Alaska. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The flight was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 visual flight rules (VFR) flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the time of departure. No flight plan had been filed and there is no record of the pilot receiving a preflight weather briefing. The flight originated about 1415 from the Kako Airport, Kako, Alaska, and it was destined for Bethel, Alaska. 

According to a pilot that departed about 10 minutes ahead of the accident pilot on the same route of flight and also destined for Bethel, wide-spread areas of low level fog existed along the route. He stated in an interview that after both aircraft departed and were airborne, he conversed with the accident pilot and discussed the fog layers. He flew his route at 1,500ft above ground level (agl), above the fog and in good visibility but he was unsure of the altitude of the accident pilot. He estimated the fog existed between 400ft agl and 600ft agl. When he tried to contact the accident pilot about 15 minutes later, there was no response and no further radio communications were received.

After arriving in Bethel and loading passengers, the interviewed pilot departed for a return flight to Kako. Along the flight, he searched for the second airplane, but was unsuccessful in locating the airplane. After landing at Kako, he notified the FAA Flight Service Station and an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued at 1748. On October 17, the airplane was located about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission, submerged in the waters of the Yukon River. The main wreckage was recovered and moved to shore. To date, a portion of the forward fuselage, the engine and wings remain submerged. The location of these items has been confirmed using SONAR equipment and will be examined if recovered later. 


The closest official weather observation station is Russian Mission, which is located about 10 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1413, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 140° at 3 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling 200 ft scattered, 2,600 ft scattered, 3,600 ft broken; temperature 37° F; dew point 36° F; altimeter 29.68 inches of Mercury.



The remains of a pilot who went missing Monday while flying a small plane from Russian Mission to Bethel were found Friday evening, Alaska State Troopers said.

Around 7 p.m. Friday, the remains of Kyle Stevens, 31, were recovered from the Yukon River, troopers said in a dispatch Saturday afternoon. Troopers located the remains using sonar. Stevens' family has been notified, troopers said.

Stevens worked at the Kako Retreat Center in Russian Mission. He had been flying to Bethel to pick up volunteers, according to the center's Facebook page.

"Kyle was vivacious, funny, honest and kind," the Christian mission said in a Facebook post. "He loved the Lord with all his heart and he poured his life, passion and love into serving the Yupik and Athabascan kids of the (Yukon-Kuskokwim) Delta."

Stevens and his family — his wife, Ella, and their two daughters, Kate and Lauren, according to the Kako Retreat Center website — also lived at the Christian mission, said his co-worker Sharon Penz. He was the director of the kids' summer camp there, she said.

Another pilot traveling with Stevens in another airplane had reported "that he had encountered heavy fog," troopers said earlier this week. Stevens' plane was located in the Yukon River, about 10 miles downriver from Russian Mission on Tuesday, troopers said.


https://www.adn.com

Photo of missing pilot, Kyle Stevens, and family.


BETHEL, Alaska (KTUU) - 10:00 p.m. Wednesday update:

Bad weather Wednesday prevented search crews from reaching the site where wreckage of a small plane was found in the Yukon River.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators said they will fly to Bethel on Thursday, with hopes of reaching the wreckage by helicopter.

The family of the missing pilot, Kyle Stevens, released a statement Wednesday:

Cheri Stevens, the pilot's mother, wrote "Kyle is known and loved in Alaska villages by the native children, whom he has served for 12 years at Kako Retreat Center, first as a counselor, and then as a camp director. He has delighted in making it a secure and happy place for the children who come. His passion in life has been to help them to know the truth about God from the Bible, so that they can have their sin forgiven and receive eternal life by repenting of their sin and trusting and following Jesus Christ . Kyle has also delighted in mentoring the young people who come to work and counsel at the camps. He is loved by all who know him and has impacted the lives of many people. Kyle is extremely loved by his family---his wife Ella and two young daughters, Lauren, 7 months, and Kate, 2 years, who live at the Kako Retreat Center near Russian Mission, and his mother and eight siblings, many of whom have counseled at the children's camps through the years. Kyle's plane went down while doing the work of the ministry that he has cared so much about. He was not afraid to die because death means being with the Lord that he loves."

6:00 p.m. Update:

Tuesday afternoon, Alaska State Troopers located Stevens' plane approximately 10 miles downriver from Russian Mission in the Yukon River. Officials towed the plane out of the river and onto the bank, where it was positively identified as the missing plane.

Troopers said Stevens remains unaccounted for, and that his next of kin have been updated as to the situation.

Correction: In a previous release, Alaska State Troopers incorrectly stated that a USCG helicopter was participating in the search effort. Instead, it is the Air National Guard who is assisting in the search.

Original Story:

The search is underway for a missing pilot, after he did not arrive at his Bethel destination on Monday.

Early Tuesday, Alaska State Troopers confirmed that Kyle Stevens, 31 of Russian Mission, was missing. Officials say Stevens was flying from Kako to Bethel along with another pilot in a separate aircraft. When that pilot arrived in Bethel, but Stevens did not, he notified authorities with the Rescue Coordination Center.

"The other pilot had reported that he had encountered heavy fog around the area of the Russian Hills," troopers wrote in a dispatch. Stevens was last seen near Russian Mission, and search efforts were concentrated in that area Tuesday.

Stevens was flying a Cessna 205, tail number N8347Z, maroon in color with a white stripe.

"Right now we're playing the waiting game," said Clint Johnson with the National Transportation Safety Board.

On Monday, AST says aircraft with the Civil Air Patrol was launched from Bethel and an Air National Guard HH-60 launched from JBER to assist in the search efforts; however, they had to turn back due to "weather related issues." Both CAP and ANG continued their search efforts early Tuesday morning. 


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ktuu.com




Rescuers searching for a Russian Mission pilot found the man's airplane in the Yukon River downriver from the village, but the man himself is still missing, Alaska State Troopers said Tuesday.

Kyle Stevens, 31, went missing Monday while flying a small plane from Russian Mission to Bethel to pick up volunteers for the Christian mission where he works, a co-worker said.

His plane was found about 10 miles downriver from Russian Mission, and boats towed it to shore, said troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters.

"Stevens remains unaccounted for," Peters said, adding that troopers have updated his family about the situation.

Stevens is well known across the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for his role as a summer camp counselor at the Kako Retreat Center, about 10 miles north of the village, said Sharon Penz, who works at the mission.

"A lot of people are desperately praying for him," Penz said Tuesday morning.

Stevens was flying his own personal plane, a donation from his mother that arrived just last week to help Stevens provide outreach in villages across the region, Penz said.

Stevens is married with two young children, she said. He has worked at Kako for many years.

Penz said her husband, Jonathan, was traveling ahead of Stevens in a separate Cessna plane on Monday. Her husband encountered heavy fog along the route. He notified authorities when Stevens failed to land in Bethel.

Russian Mission is situated along the Yukon River, about 70 miles north of Bethel.

State troopers received a report of the missing pilot at 6:29 p.m. Monday, the agency reported Tuesday.

Aircraft from the Civil Air Patrol in Bethel conducted aerial searches Tuesday, along with an Alaska Air National Guard helicopter from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The helicopter had also taken off Monday night in an effort to search for the plane but turned back because of poor weather, said Peters.

Daryl Polty, a former search and rescue coordinator in Russian Mission, said he helped with the search on Tuesday.

A boater traveling along the Yukon River from another village spotted the plane in the water Tuesday and contacted Russian Mission by short-wave radio, Polty said. The boater's information was relayed to a small commercial airplane leaving Russian Mission, whose pilot relayed the plane's coordinates to state troopers, Polty said.

Polty said Tuesday evening that Russian Mission search teams will continue looking for Stevens, with a "full-scale" search expected on Wednesday.

"They'll be looking on the river, and the islands and sandbars and fish camp areas," Polty said, for any sign of Stevens.

Polty said he hopes the break in the weather on Tuesday continues to hold, and there won't be the rain, fog and sometimes snow that the area has been seeing lately.

"With God's hands, I hope we find him and he's OK," Polty said.

Correction: An earlier version of this story, citing Alaska State Troopers, said the Coast Guard was conducting an aerial search, but the Coast Guard said Tuesday afternoon it was not.

Story and photos ➤ https://www.adn.com

Update: On Tuesday at about 1:36 p.m., Kyle Stevens' family was notified that the wreckage of Stevens' plane has been found. Kyle Stevens himself is still missing. 

Original article, published on Tuesday at 1:00 p.m.:

Local volunteers and law enforcement are searching the area for Kyle Stevens, age 31.

Stevens took off from Russian Mission yesterday, piloting his small, maroon plane. 

A beloved summer camp counselor at the Kako Retreat Center, Stevens was headed to Bethel to pick up volunteers for the Christian mission that he works with.

He was supposed to land in town yesterday, but his plane never arrived. Another pilot who was traveling with Stevens in a separate plane said that he encountered heavy fog as he flew above the Russian Hills.

State Troopers and rescue workers are looking for Stevens, and the Civil Air Patrol and Air National Guard are helping conduct an aerial search for the pilot and his plane.

Stevens’ missing plane is a maroon Cessna 205 with a white stripe. Its tail number is N8347Z. If you see any sign of it, or have any information about his whereabouts, please contact the Bethel State Troopers at 907-543-2294.

KYUK's reporting on Stevens' disappearance is ongoing.

Correction: In a previous version of this story, we reported that Stevens was a resident of Russian Mission. According to his brother-in-law, James Buckingham, he resides at the Kako Retreat Center outside of the village. We regret the error.

Story and photo ➤ http://kyuk.org

UPDATE: While an aircraft was found 10 miles downriver of Russian Mission, and verified as being the missing airplane, there is no sign of the missing pilot. 

The aircraft was towed to the bank of the river.

Steven’s next of kin were notified of the discovery.

ORIGINAL: Alaska State Troopers received a report at 6:29 pm on Monday evening, advising them that there was a missing aircraft that was traveling between Russian Mission and Bethel.

According to the report by troopers, 31-year-old Kyle Stevens, of Russian Mission was flying from Russian Mission to Bethel with another pilot flying with him in a separate aircraft.

The pilot flying the same flight path as Stevens reported the aircraft, a maroon Cessna 205 with a white stripe, bearing the tail number N8347Z, called in the report, when that plane failed to land in Bethel. The pilot reported that they had encountered heavy fog in the Russian Hills area.

Although Civil Air Patrol aircraft in Bethel flew the area, the searchers failed to locate the aircraft. An Air National Guard HH-60 launched from JBER, but was forced to turn back because of adverse weather conditions.

Civil Air Patrol and the Air National Guard will continue their search of the area today.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://alaska-native-news.com