Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Cessna 421 Golden Eagle, N731PF: Fatal accident occurred September 29, 2019 in DeLand, Volusia County, Florida

Armand Girouard 
December 28th, 1991 - September 29th, 2019

Ernendro Pedro Philippe 
September 14th, 1987 - September 29th, 2019

Shawna Jo Carbonaro
March 1st, 1985 – September 29th, 2019


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N731PF






Location: Deland, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA283
Date & Time: 09/29/2019, 1600 EDT
Registration: N731PF
Aircraft: Cessna 421
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 29, 2019, about 1600, eastern standard daylight time, a Cessna 421, N731PF, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain near Deland, Florida. The commercial pilot, pilot-rated passenger, and aft-seated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight originated from DeLand Municipal Airport-Sidney H Taylor Field (DED), Deland, Florida about 1542.

According to the owner of the airplane, he purchased the airplane on June 21, 2019, with plans to make repairs before selling it. The airplane was base at DED at the time of purchase and had not had an annual inspection for several years. The owner hired a mechanic to make necessary repairs and conduct an annual inspection on the airplane. During the inspection of the airplane, the mechanic informed the owner that the left tachometer generator and the fuel gauges did not work, along with other items that needed repair and replacement. The owner planned that once all of the work was done and the annual was signed off, the mechanic would find a pilot to transport the airplane to Texas, where he resided. The mechanic subsequently told the owner that he found a flight instructor that was able to fly the airplane back to Texas (the pilot-rated passenger). The owner stated that he did not know the pilot nor the other passenger onboard the airplane, and was not aware that the airplane was being flown by anyone when the accident occurred.

The mechanic he stated that he had not completed the necessary repairs to the airplane, nor had he signed off the airplane's annual inspection at the time of the accident.

According to air traffic control (ATC), a review of radar data revealed that the flight departed DED and proceeded to a point about 17 miles southwest of DED. The airplane was observed on radar conducting flight maneuvers at 2,500 ft. After the flight maneuvers were completed the airplane was observed heading back to DED. While returning to DED, the airplane descended until it reached 1,000 ft, then made a left turn before radar contact was lost. There were no ATC services and no voice communications with ATC.

According to a witness in the area at the time of the accident, he heard the airplane fly over at an altitude about 2,000 ft, and described the engine(s) sound as "rough." About 10 minutes later he observed the airplane coming back at an altitude of 1,000 ft and the engine sounds included "sputtering and backfiring." He was able to identify the airplane as a twin-engine Cessna and white in color. He did not see any smoke or fire emitting from the airplane when it flew over but continued to observe the airplane as it descended below the tree line. The witness did not see or hear the crash, but later that evening he heard about it on the local news and contacted the local authorities to report what he saw and heard.

According to another witness, about a mile away from the accident site, he was in his garage and heard the accident airplane flying over. It sounded very loud so he walked out of his garage and down his driveway to see. He said both engines were running, but they seemed to be running at idle. As he continued to watch the airplane, he said that it was flying "very slow and very low", and the flaps and landing gear was retracted. Suddenly the airplane rolled to the left and began to "spiral downward" three times before descending below the tree line. As the airplane spiraled to the ground the engines made "two popping" sounds before crashing into a wooded area. No smoke was seen emitting from the airplane during the descent. He report what he saw to the local authorities, and the local authorities responded shortly afterwards.

The pilot, age 27, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with an airplane single engine rating. His Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued June 4, 2018. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that the last entry was dated May 29, 2019. The total pilot in command time entered was 500 hours, including approximately 40 hours of multiengine flight time. Of the 500 hours, approximately 185 hours was flight instruction given in single engine airplanes. The logbook did not show that the pilot had received any instruction or had logged any previous flight experience in the Cessna 421.

The pilot-rated passenger, age 32, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most-recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on April 12, 2019. A review of the pilot logbook revealed a total of 155 flight hours, all in single-engine airplanes.

The airplane was manufactured in 1968. It was powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-D engines each rated at 375 horsepower. The engines were each equipped with a McCauley three-blade, controllable-pitch propeller. Review of the maintenance records revealed the airplane was last inspected in accordance with an annual inspection on February 15, 2014, at a Hobbs meter time of 858 hours. The current Hobbs reading at the time of the examination was 862 hours.

The DED weather at 1555 was reported as wind from 060° at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility or greater, a scattered ceiling at 3,100 ft above ground level (agl), broken skies at 4,800 ft agl, temperature of 29° Celsius (C), dew point temperature of 23° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.08 inches of mercury.

The airplane crashed in a heavy wooded area; the main wreckage was located approximately 4 nautical miles from DED on a 230 magnetic degree heading. The wreckage path was about 75 ft in length from the first broken tree branch, which was about 75ft high from where the airplane came to rest.

Examination of the accident site revealed the airplane was at the base of a tree in a upright position. There were freshly cut branches at the wreckage site. All flight control surfaces were located at the accident site. The cockpit section of the airplane was crushed and a tree trunk extended from the bottom of the fuselage through the top of the right side of the cockpit. The fuselage exhibited crush damage to the aft pressure bulkhead. The empennage was broken away from the fuselage at the aft pressure bulkhead and remained partially attached by flight control cables. The vertical and horizontal stabilizers remained attached to the empennage. The vertical stabilizer was buckled and the rudder was attached at the lower attachment points. The rudder was broken in two parts, the lower section containing the rudder trim was buckled. The upper section of the rudder was also buckled and partially attached to the remainder of the rudder assembly.

The horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and was buckled. The elevators were buckled remained attached to the horizontal assembly. Flight control cable continuity was established from the control yoke, rudder pedals and the trim actuator; to the rudder, rudder trim tab, elevator assemblies.

An examination of the left wing assembly revealed that a post-crash fire destroyed the wing assembly outboard of the engine nacelles. The left engine and nacelle exhibited fire and impact damage, and the inboard section of the wing remained attached to the fuselage at the wing root. The left landing gear was found in the extended position and the flaps were retracted. The left main and auxiliary fuel tanks were destroyed by post-crash fire. Flight control cables were found within the left wing assembly and extended outboard to fire damaged wing area. Flight control continuity was established from the aileron, aileron trim tab cables, to the control yoke and trim actuator.

Examination of the right wing assembly revealed that a post-crash fire destroyed the wing assembly outboard of the engine nacelles. The right engine and nacelle exhibited fire and impact damage, and the inboard section of the wing remained attached to the fuselage at the wing root. The right landing gear was found in the extended position and the flaps were retracted. The right main and auxiliary fuel tanks were destroyed by post-crash fire. Flight control cables were found within the right wing assembly and extended outboard to fire damaged wing area. Flight control continuity was established from the aileron, cables to the control yoke.

Examination of the right engine revealed that the crankcase remained intact and displayed impact and thermal damage signatures. There were no holes in the case that would indicate a catastrophic internal engine failure. The propeller flange remained attached to the rest of the propeller flange; the flange displayed impact damage and was bent. The propeller shaft gear was partially visible after removing the alternator; the gear displayed normal operating signatures. The propeller shaft was rotated using a hand tool; continuity was established between the propeller shaft, reduction gear, quill shaft, crankshaft, camshaft, connecting rods, and associated components. All six cylinders remained attached to their cylinder bays and displayed varying amounts of impact and thermal damage.

The cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope. The piston faces, cylinder bores and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. While rotating the propeller shaft it was noted that all six cylinders displayed thumb compression and suction. During rotation it was noted that all the rocker arms and valves moved accordingly.

Examination of the right propeller assembly revealed the three blade, constant speed propeller remained partially attached to the propeller flange and displayed impact damage signatures. The propeller blade marked "A" displayed minor damage to the rubber boot. The propeller blade marked "B" displayed minor impact damage near the root of the blade. Propeller blade marked "C" displayed minor S-bending as well as significant aft bending deformation. During the on scene portion of the investigation several tree branches were found with clean approximate 45 degree angle cuts and appeared to have black paint transfer on the right side of the airplane.

Examination of the left engine revealed that the crankcase remained intact and displayed impact and thermal damage signatures. There were no holes in the case that would indicate a catastrophic internal engine failure. The propeller flange remained attached to the rest of the propeller flange; the flange displayed impact damage and was bent. The propeller shaft gear was partially visible after removing the alternator; the gear displayed normal operating signatures. The propeller shaft was rotated using a hand tool; continuity was established between the propeller shaft, reduction gear, quill shaft, crankshaft, camshaft, connecting rods, and associated components. The crankshaft gear was visible after removing the starter adapter; the gear remained intact and was undamaged. All six cylinders remained attached to their cylinder bays and displayed varying amounts of impact and thermal damage. The cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope; the piston faces, cylinder bores, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. While rotating the propeller shaft all cylinders displayed thumb compression and suction and all of the overhead valve components moved accordingly.

Examination of the left propeller assembly revealed the three blade, constant speed propeller remained partially attached to the propeller flange and displayed impact damage signatures. The propeller blade marked "A" displayed minor impact damage to the root and was not bent. The propeller blade marked "B" displayed S-bending, twisting, and aft bending deformation as well as significant polishing of the cambered side. The propeller blade marked "C" displayed aft bending deformation and leading edge polishing near the tip. During the on scene portion of the investigation several tree branches were found with clean approximate 45 degree angle cuts and appeared to have black paint transfer on the left side of the airplane.




The preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board about a fatal plane crash in Deland in September said the Cessna 421 had not had an annual inspection in more than five years and was not supposed to be in flight.

The plane crashed in a wooded area off State Road 44 and Grand Avenue on September 29th and burst into flames.

The pilot, Armand Girouard, a former Embry Riddle student and current employee, was killed along with two passengers.

The report said the Texas-based owner of the plane bought it this past June and planned to make repairs before selling it.

According to the report, the owner hired a mechanic who discovered parts, including fuel gauges and a left tachometer generator, that didn't work and other parts that needed repair.

According to the report, the repairs had not been completed when the crash occurred nor did the owner know the plane was in flight.

A pilot-rated passenger on board had been identified by the mechanic as someone who could fly the plane back to Texas once the repairs were complete.

https://www.wesh.com




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N731PF
Model/Series: 421 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DED, 79 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3100 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 60°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4800 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Deland, FL (DED)
Destination: Deland, FL (DED)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 29.024444, -81.344167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Armand Girouard


On Sunday September 29th, 2019, Shawna Jo Carbonaro, 34, mother of 3 amazing children, has earned her wings alongside of her longtime boyfriend Emendro “Andrew” Philippe. Shawna was born March 1st, 1985 in Orlando Florida to Dom Carbonaro and Suzanne Rice. She was a wonderful mother to her son, Da’mon Floyd, and two daughters, Shawnice Floyd and Dominique Toliver.

Shawna was employed at IHOP where she was a server, alongside family and friends. She enjoyed living Life, playing pool, dancing, singing music of all genres and making everyone in her presence happy. She set her goals high in life and was determined to achieve them all, big or small.

Shawna is survived by her grandmothers Karen Carroll, Barbara Robertson, and Leona Carbonara (Granny Lee), her grandfather David Crane Sr., mother Suzanne Rice, father Dom Carbonaro, step-father David Crane Jr, step-mother Maria Carbonaro, three children Da’mon Floyd, Shawnice Floyd, Dominique Toliver, two sisters Jamie Rice, Cadie Crane, one brother David Tyler Crane, many Aunts and Uncles, several cousins, nieces and nephews, and several friends.

A Funeral Service will be held Friday October 4th, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. The Service will take place at Deltona Memorial Funeral Home & Cemetery, 1295 Saxon Blvd. Orange City, Fl. 32763.

Donations are accepted and appreciated. An account has been set up on her behalf. Thank you, https://www.gofundme.com



Ernendro 'Andrew' Philippe, 32, resident of Kissimmee, FL, entered into eternal peace on September 29, 2019. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 14, 1987, to Pedro Philippe and the late Immacula Alexa.

He was a successful entrepreneur with many interests and passions. In a short time, he ran successful businesses, became a master technician, and a real estate investor. He was also able to carry out his greatest childhood dream of becoming a pilot. Andrew always enjoyed sharing his love for flying with family and friends. We were so proud to watch him live out his dreams.

Andrew went by many names, father, Son, brother, uncle, nephew, & friend. He was a devoted father to his Son Isaiah and a selfless person who always put his family first. He always made sure to share the legacy of his late mom in all of his accomplishments.

Andrew was many things-humble, loving, caring, generous, outgoing, intelligent, laid back & family orientated he did many charitable works from his heart.

Andrew is survived by his beloved father, Pedro Philippe, his two amazing brothers Adler Sanon and Rodney Philippe, Megan Brown, and their Son Isaiah Philippe.  He also leaves memories to be cherished by his loving Aunt Esther Fleury-Alexa; cousins: Aisha Beauvais, Randy Fleury, Melissa Fleury Sandra Fleury-Sanon, Youdy Sanon and there four children.

Andrew grew up in church, and he is a believer in Christ. His favorite verse was john 3:17 " For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn but to save the world through him. In Andrew's words (LOVE ALL SERVE ALL).













DELAND, Florida — An investigation into a plane crash that killed three people over the weekend in wooded area of DeLand is underway.

A National Transportation Safety Board​'s investigator-in-charge was due to the scene Monday morning.

According to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office, the Cessna 421 Golden Eagle crashed at about 4 p.m. Sunday near West New York Avenue and Grand Avenue and caught fire.

When first responders arrived at the scene, they found the three people with no pulse, deputies said. Several witnesses told authorities they saw the plane go down.

"We tried to put the fire out with fire extinguishers," Greg Kwiatkowski said. "(We) blew through like 10 fire extinguishers and didn’t do anything."

The Sheriff's Office on Monday released the identities of the victims: Armand Girouard, 27, of DeLand; Ernendro Philippe, 32, of Kissimmee; and Shawna Carbonaro, 34, of DeLand. Girouard was the pilot.

The Sheriff's Office released body camera footage and 911 audio on Monday and said the crash investigation has been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB.

NTSB spokesperson Terry Williams stressed the agency is in the “fact-gathering stage." A preliminary report is expected within 10 days, outlining the facts gathered by the investigator. It will not draw any conclusions about possible causes of the crash -- that will be included in the NTSB’s final report, which could take months or more complete.

The NTSB investigator will continue to work at the crash site Tuesday. At some point soon, the wreckage will be moved to a more secure location as the investigation continues, Williams said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mynews13.com

Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-38-112, N9708T; accident occurred October 15, 2019 at Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N9708T


Location: Colorado Springs, CO

Accident Number: GAA20CA014
Date & Time: 10/15/2019, 1000 MDT
Registration: N9708T
Aircraft: Piper PA38
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, shortly after takeoff the airplane drifted left off runway heading. He attempted to correct, but the airplane continued to drift left, impacted a fence and came to rest in a horse corral.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport's automated weather observation station reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was 220° at 10 knots, gusting to 18 knots. The pilot reported that, about the time of the accident the wind was 330° at 11 knots. The airplane was departing from runway 08. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/02/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/19/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 609.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 607.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 569.5 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 55.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4.9 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N9708T
Model/Series: PA38 112
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 38-78A0164
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/01/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1670 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3463.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-235-C
Registered Owner: Rock Springs Worship Center
Rated Power: 125 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLY, 6874 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1555 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 18 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 220°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / -9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Colorado Springs, CO (FLY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Saratoga, WY (SAA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Meadow Lake (FLY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 6877 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 08
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2074 ft / 35 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.942778, -104.570000 (est)

Piper PA-32R-301T Turbo Saratoga, N30144: Incident occurred October 15, 2019 at Pompano Beach Airpark (KPMP), Broward County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft during takeoff became airborne and went off the end of the runway and gear collapsed.

Roberti Aviation Of Delaware Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N30144

Date: 15-OCT-19
Time: 17:36:00Z
Regis#: N30144
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: POMPANO BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172, N609SG: Incident occurred October 15, 2019 in Louisville, Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville

Aircraft landed, veered off runway and flipped over.

https://registry.faa.gov/N609SG

Date: 15-OCT-19
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N609SG
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LOUISVILLE
State: KENTUCKY

Loss of Control on Ground: Luscombe 8F, N2037B; accident occurred October 15, 2019 at Lebanon Municipal Airport (KLEB), Grafton County, New Hampshire

View of damaged lower fuselage.
Federal Aviation Administration



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N2037B

Location: Lebanon, NH
Accident Number: GAA20CA028
Date & Time: 10/15/2019, 1845 UTC
Registration: N2037B
Aircraft: Luscombe 8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that during landing, shortly after touchdown, a wind gust lifted the right wing and the airplane veered to the left. The pilot attempted to apply control inputs and added power to maintain directional control, however, the airplane exited the runway to the left and impacted a drainage ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/10/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/10/2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) , 197.1 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Luscombe
Registration: N2037B
Model/Series: 8 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 6464
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: C90
Registered Owner: Silvaire LLC
Rated Power:
Operator: Silvaire LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLEB, 570 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1553 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 260°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination:
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Lebanon Muni (LEB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 603 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5496 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 43.626111, -72.304167 (est)

Sonex Waiex-B, N315LW: Incident occurred October 15, 2019 at Eugene Airport (KEUG), Lane County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft landed hard and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N315LW

Date: 15-OCT-19
Time: 18:14:00Z
Regis#: N315LW
Aircraft Make: SONEX
Aircraft Model: WAIEX
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EUGENE
State: OREGON

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 180J, N333DW, accident occurred October 12, 2019 at Majors Airport (KGVT), Greenville, Hunt County, Texas

View of damaged left wing.
Federal Aviation Administration


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas,  Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N333DW


Location: Greenville, TX
Accident Number: GAA20CA024
Date & Time: 10/12/2019, 1430 CDT
Registration: N333DW
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane veered right, exited the runway to the right, ground looped, and the left wing impacted the terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider; Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/10/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/01/2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1107.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 28.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 9641.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 105.15 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N333DW
Model/Series: 180 J
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18052491
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/07/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 9122 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R
Registered Owner: John Brent Rowland
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGVT, 535 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1935 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 46°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / -5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Rockwall, TX (F46)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greenville, TX (GVT)
Type of Clearance:None 
Departure Time: 1350 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Majors (GVT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 534 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8030 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Stop and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.067778, -96.065278 (est)

Mooney M20R Ovation, N9159Q: Incident occurred October 12, 2019 at Smyrna Airport (KMQY), Rutherford County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville

Aircraft nose gear detached and was found on the runway.

Medpharm Management LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9159Q

Date: 12-OCT-19
Time: 20:09:00Z
Regis#: N9159Q
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SMYRNA
State: TENNESSEE




SMYRNA, Tennessee (WSMV) - A small plane had to make an emergency landing at the Smyrna Airport early Saturday evening due to mechanical issues. 

The plane ended up circling the Smyrna Airport for nearly an hour and half in order to burn off fuel. 

The mechanical problem was with the nose landing gear. 

The gear would not come down.

 The pilot was forced to land the plane with only the back landing gear. 

After touching down, the plane lunged forward coming to a quick stop.

The pilot is fine. 

Smyrna Airport emergency officials were on standby in case of emergency.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wsmv.com