Friday, September 9, 2016

Unregistered Sorrell SNS-8 Hiperlight: Incident occurred September 09, 2016 in Ronan, Lake County, Montana

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05 

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT, CRASHED IN A FIELD UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, NEAR RONAN, MONTANA.  

Date: 09-SEP-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: RONAN
State: Montana

RONAN -   A small aircraft pilot is in the hospital after his hyperlight plane crashed in a Mission Valley field Friday afternoon.  The single-engine SNS8 aircraft crashed just south of Ronan.  The pilot was identified as Robert Christensen of Ronan.  Christensen was not critically injured.  Ronan resident Dave Kauffman happened to be outside before the incident took place.  Kauffman says he thought something about the plane's flying pattern was strange, so he kept a close eye on the small aircraft.

"I first of all saw the plane flying over the field, and I knew he was fairly low.  I watched the plane swing around and head back toward the north, which was my direction,” said Kauffman.  “The plane disappeared behind a little hill, I heard a thump, and saw a big cloud of dust and knew the plane was on the ground."

Kauffman did not hesitate; He pulled his cell phone from his pocket and immediately dialed 9-1-1.  He says crews wasted no time:  "Within about eight minutes, the first responders were here,"

When emergency crews responded, they found the pilot pinned inside the wreckage; trapped, but alive, conscious and talking.  Lake County Sheriff Don Bell says the aircraft flipped during the crash.  They say there was no one else in the plane.  Crews were able to free Christensen and pull him to safety.  He was then rushed to a local hospital.  Kauffman says had the responders not acted as quickly as they did, this story would have ended in tragedy.

"It's the time of year when you, we all should really appreciate how those people respond to an accident.  They're friends, neighbors, part of the community."

Christensen is in stable condition with no life-threatening injuries.

(previous report)

Lake County authorities have confirmed that a small plane crashed southwest of Ronan early Friday afternoon.

Lake County Sheriff Don Bell tells MTN News a single engine Hyperlight SNS8 aircraft went down shortly before 12:30 p.m. near Songer Road.

He reports it was the maiden voyage for the plane.

Officials say based on witness reports and evidence on scene, the plane kept losing altitude before hitting an embankment.

Sheriff Bell tells MTN News the wing hit the slope, spinning the plane sideways. The aircraft then flipped over on its top, with a single occupant trapped inside.

Law enforcement extricated the pilot from the plane on scene, and say he was conscious and taken to a local hospital with unclear injuries.

(first report)

MTN News is receiving reports that a small plane has crashed in Lake County.

An eyewitness tells MTN News that he saw a small plane go down in the area of Songer Road, southwest of Ronan.

One person was seen being removed from the plane crash site alive.

Story and video:   http://www.ktvq.com



RONAN – A longtime Ronan resident who was taking his small experimental aircraft out for the first time crashed in a rolling grain field southwest of Ronan around 12:30 p.m. Friday.

Lake County Sheriff Don Bell said Robert Christensen was conscious and alert in a local hospital a couple of hours after the crash near Songer Road, where Christensen lives.

A friend of Christensen watched as the aircraft got lower and lower and finally caught the left wing on a hillside about 1½ miles out of Ronan. The ultralight made mostly of aluminum and plastic spun to the left, sticking the rotor into the dirt and flopping over, sliding on its top for a short distance and leaving the pilot hanging upside down, Bell said.

“It wasn’t going very fast on impact,” Bell said.

The friend called 911 at 12:27 p.m. and sheriff, ambulance, fire and tribal law and order responded. The man was cut out of his harness and taken to the hospital, where Bell talked to him at around 2 p.m.

Bell said Friday's accident took place several miles to the east of the site of a light plane crash in December 2014 that killed two men. 

Source:   http://missoulian.com


A Ronan man was injured when the ultralight aircraft he was piloting landed hard and flipped onto its top.

Lake County Sheriff Don Bell says the aircraft came down in a field near the pilot's home on Friday afternoon. His family witnessed the crash. Bell says it was the first time the man had flown the aircraft.

Bell says that the man suffered a cut on his head, but he didn't know what other injuries he might have. He was taken to the hospital in Ronan.

Bell says the aircraft was about 18 feet long and 20 to 25 feet wide.

Source:  http://www.nbcmontana.com







RONAN -  Lake County authorities have confirmed that a small plane crashed southwest of Ronan early Friday afternoon.

Lake County Sheriff Don Bell said a single engine Sorrell Hiperlight SNS-8 aircraft went down shortly before 12:30 p.m. near Songer Road.

He reports it was the maiden voyage for the plane.

Officials say based on witness reports and evidence on scene, the plane kept losing altitude before hitting an embankment.

Sheriff Bell said the wing hit the slope, spinning the plane sideways. The aircraft then flipped over on its top, with a single occupant trapped inside.

Law enforcement extricated the pilot from the plane on scene. He was conscious and taken to a local hospital with unclear injuries.

Source:  http://www.kpax.com

Grob G10, N909G: Accident occurred September 09, 2016 in Emigrant Gap, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N909G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA489
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Emigrant Gap, CA
Aircraft: BURKHART GROB FLUGZEUGBAU G109, registration: N909G

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.





AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN THE TREES NEAR THE BLUE CANYON NYACK AIRPORT, EMIGRANT GAP, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 09-SEP-16
Time: 21:35:00Z
Regis#: N909G
Aircraft Make: GROB
Aircraft Model: G109
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: EMIGRANT GAP
State: California


Fire crews on Friday extricated a glider pilot from trees in the median of Interstate 80, near the Blue Canyon Road offramp.

According to the California Highway Patrol, the glider was hanging in trees about 25 feet off the ground. The lone occupant was seat-belted in the glider and reportedly had suffered minor cuts.

The aircraft lost power went down shortly after 2:30 p.m. The CHP reported that it took fire crews a while to get the pilot out of the plane and onto the ground, but he walked away with only minor injuries.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the glider is a Glob Flugzeugbau. The FAA Registry lists the registered owner as Richard L. Pearl of Lincoln.

The California Department of Transportation reported that although no lanes were closed, traffic on eastbound I-80 was slow in the area of the crash.

Source:   http://www.sacbee.com

Cessna 310N, N126P: Accident occurred September 09, 2016 near Wickenburg Municipal Airport (E25), Maricopa County, Arizona

The NTSB did not travel to the scene of this accident.

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N126P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Wickenburg, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 310N, registration: N126P
Injuries: 4 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2016, about 0700 mountain standard time, a Cessna 310N, N126P, struck a refuse transfer trailer shortly after takeoff from Wickenburg Municipal Airport, Wickenburg, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight departed Wickenburg with a planned destination of Payson, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses reported observing the airplane takeoff from Runway 23, and veer to the right of centerline shortly after rotation. Having reached an altitude of about 75 ft above ground level, the airplane failed to climb, and crossed over the runway verge and towards an adjacent industrial park. A few seconds later, the airplane rolled almost 90 degrees to the right, and the right wing struck the refuse trailer. The right wing separated from airframe, and the main fuselage came to rest about 75 ft downrange.



The airplane came to rest within the confines of the City Sanitation Department, about 2,200 ft beyond the runway departure threshold, and about 30-degrees right of centerline.








WICKENBURG, Ariz. - One couple has a lot to be thankful for after surviving a plane crash. 

"Got married in Sun Valley, California in a Catholic church."
  
It was a sweet ceremony on September 9th.

"Got out of the service and my mom says, why don't you start dating that little girl down the street. I already had mom's approval."

Pat and Linda Brewster tied the knot, then 44 years to the day, who knew they'd be here.

"I thank God and Fred the pilot everyday that we made it."

There had been a horrible plane crash near the Wickenburg airport.

"We were really looking forward to it. It was our anniversary.. 44th anniversary and going to Payson for breakfast. Our friends, the pilot and his wife had asked us the day before if we wanted to fly and we said, wow, yeah," said Linda.

Linda and Pat don't remember much about the crash.

"I sat down in the cockpit and I don't remember taxiing or nothing, we just remember waking up in the hospital," said Pat.

"We had lots of broken bones, bruises.. spine, bunch of cracked ribs," said Linda.

"I had a broken elbow, broken femur above my knee," added Pat.

He says his injuries from the crash weren't much when compared to what he saw as a Los Angeles firefighter for many years.

"Most of them were fatal, but this one, for some reason, the big man upstairs decided he didn't want us yet."

Firefighters, paramedics, helicopters -- all were quickly on the scene. The four of them in the plane left the Wickenburg airport and didn't make it far. The plane crashed nearby -- and their children and the community came to the rescue as well.

"We had 30 days of meals delivered to our house, people we knew, everyone wanted to be a part of helping," said Linda.

Linda will wear a brace for a bit longer. Pat will be out of his wheelchair by Christmas. A speedy recovery with lots of well wishes for this active couple in the comforting Arizona town of Wickenburg.

"All of our friends caring about  us, everyone says if you need any help you call me, and they'll even give the phone number.. they're really serious, we are very thankful, the Thanksgiving we are most thankful for out of any Thanksgiving we've ever had," said Linda.  "It was incredible. We were very lucky and thankful."

Source:   http://www.fox10phoenix.com












WICKENBURG, AZ - Officials are investigating after a small plane crashed near Wickenburg.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Cessna 310N reportedly crashed a quarter of a mile west of the airport near Highway 60. It went down on departure, crashing in a group of bushes near a structure.

Wickenburg police said four people were seriously injured in the crash and taken to the ICU.

Police identified the plane owner as Linda Gagliano, but the pilot at the time was Fred Gagliano. Linda was a passenger, along with two others, Patrick and Linda Brewster. All four occupants are said to be in their sixties.

The cause of the crash has not yet been identified, but the FAA is investigating possible mechanical failure.

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com

Cessna 150G, Prince Air Inc., N3666J: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 in Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



PRINCE AIR INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3666J

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA293
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 150G, registration: N3666J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1300 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150G, N3666J, was substantially damaged during cruise flight when the left side of the elevator detached from the horizontal stabilizer. The flight instructor and student pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight, which departed Montauk Airport (MTP), Montauk, New York, destined for Brookhaven Airport (HWV), Shirley, New York.

According to the student pilot, he and the flight instructor were on a dual instruction flight when the accident occurred. They had departed MTP and were on their way back to HMV cruising at 4,500 feet above mean sea level, when the student pilot noticed a roughness and vibration coming through the control wheel. He told the flight instructor about it, and then while looking around the airplane he noticed that the left elevator tip was hanging down 6-10 inches from its normal mounting position.

According to the flight instructor, when the student pilot complained that the airplane was handling "funny," he took control of the airplane and noticed that the left elevator was moving up and down uncontrollably. At this point, the airplane was directly in line with runway 24 at HWV, so the flight instructor made a slight power reduction to descend at 150 feet per minute, kept the wing flaps retracted, did not move the flight controls, and made a 7 mile long straight in approach to the runway where the airplane touched down firmly without further incident.

Examination of the elevator and horizontal stabilizer by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left outboard elevator attach bolt had backed out of the nut plate. Further examination also revealed that the right elevator attach bolt would move in the nutplate when the elevator was moved up or down.

According to FAA records, the flight instructor held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land, and commercial privileges for airplane single-engine land and airplane single-engine sea. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multi-engine, and instrument airplane.  He also held a ground instructor certificate with a basic rating, and a mechanic certificate with ratings for airframe and powerplant, with an inspection authorization from the FAA. His most recent application for a FAA third-class medical certificate was dated January 20, 2015. He reported that he had accrued 8,700 total hours of flight time, 1,300 of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA records, the student pilot held a student pilot certificate. His most recent application for a FAA first-class medical certificate was dated November 14, 2013. He reported that he had accrued 56 total hours of flight time, all of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1966. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 1, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued approximately 2,860 total hours of operation.

The elevator attach bolts, nutplates, and bushings, were retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Cessna 140, Computer Systems Flight Inc., N2614N: Accident occurred August 25, 2016 in Lebanon, Boone County, Indiana

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board - Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS FLIGHT INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N2614N

NTSB Identification: CEN16CA360
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 25, 2016 in Lebanon, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N2614N
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing approach to the grass runway he had ample time to observe the runway surface and the turf appeared smooth and even. He continued the approach and executed a soft field landing. While on the landing roll, he noticed a puddle of water ahead. He commanded full up elevator and attempted to "jump" the puddle, but the airplane had already slowed below flight speed. The main landing gear of the tailwheel equipped airplane struck the standing water that was about 3 inches deep, and hidden by the grass. The airplane slowed abruptly and the airplane subsequently nosed-over resulting in substantial damage to the vertical tail, and right wing strut. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions of the airplane.

Piper PA-28-180, N9241J: Accident occurred September 04, 2016 in Cuba, Sandoval County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA349
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 04, 2016 in Cuba, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/26/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N9241J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and passenger departed on a night cross-country flight using flight following. About 2 hours after departure, the engine suddenly lost partial power. The pilot checked the engine gauges, which were all in the green, and advised air traffic control (ATC) of the loss of engine power. The pilot switched fuel tanks, then activated the carburetor heat. He tried switching magnetos and enriching the mixture for “a few seconds.” He then leaned the mixture again and “deactivated the carb heat,” all with no changes observed in engine power. The pilot declared an emergency with ATC and used his tablet computer’s navigation application to align the airplane over a road. Upon touchdown, the airplane’s wing impacted a guardrail, and the airplane subsequently nosed over. Although weather conditions at the nearest weather reporting facility about 50 miles from the accident site were conducive to the accumulation of serious carburetor icing at cruise power, the investigation could not determine whether the loss of power was a result of carburetor ice, and no postaccident examination of the engine was conducted to rule out other causes. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined based on available information.

On September 4, 2016, about 0435 mountain daylight time, a Piper PA 28-180 airplane, N9241J, impacted ground obstacles and nosed over during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power near Cuba, New Mexico. The pilot and his passenger reported no injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the nose over. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight and the flight did not operate on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Levelland Municipal Airport (LLN), near Levelland, Texas, about 0235 central daylight time, and was destined for the Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), near Farmington, New Mexico.

The flight landed at LLN to obtain fuel and subsequently departed for FMN. About an hour after departing LLN, Albuquerque Center advised the pilot that there was light to moderate precipitation extending approximately 20 miles north of Albuquerque. He observed on an iPad application that the weather was a "non-factor" by the time he reached Albuquerque. The pilot continued the flight northwest and felt the engine suddenly lose power. He checked the engine gauges, which were all in the green. He advised Albuquerque Center of the loss of engine power. The pilot switched fuel tanks then activated the carb heat. He tried switching magnetos and enriching the mixture for "a few seconds." He leaned the mixture again and "deactivated the carb heat." He advised Albuquerque Center that the airplane was not going to be able to maintain altitude and declared an emergency. He used the iPad application map and he aligned the airplane over a road. The airplane's wing impacted a guard rail during the forced landing and the airplane subsequently nosed over. The pilot reported that fuel leaked from the fuel tank caps vents while he and his passenger exited the inverted airplane.

At 0453, the recorded weather at the Santa Fe Municipal Airport (SAF), near Santa Fe, New Mexico, was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 16 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury.

SAF's temperature and dew point were plotted on a carburetor icing probability chart. The plot shows a probability of serious icing at a cruise power settings at the temperature and dew point reported about the time of the accident.

The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, in part, stated:

When conditions are conducive to carburetor icing during flight, periodic checks should be made to detect its presence. If detected, full carburetor heat should be applied immediately, and it should be left in the ON position until you are certain that all the ice has been removed. If ice is present, applying partial heat or leaving heat on for an insufficient time might aggravate the situation. In extreme cases of carburetor icing, even after the ice has been removed, full carburetor heat should be used to prevent further ice formation. A carburetor temperature gauge, if installed, is very useful in determining when to use carburetor heat.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9241J

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA349
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 03, 2016 in Cuba, NM
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N9241J
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 3, 2016, about 2240 mountain daylight time, a Piper PA 28-180 airplane, N9241J, impacted ground obstacles and nosed over during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power near Cuba, New Mexico. The pilot and his passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the nose over. The airplane was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight and the flight did not operate on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Levelland Municipal Airport (LLN), near Levelland, Texas, and was destined for the Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN), near Farmington, New Mexico.

The flight landed at LLN to obtain fuel and subsequently departed for FMN. According to initial information given to the Federal Aviation Administration, the airplane lost partial engine power. The pilot elected to perform a night forced landing on a roadway. The airplane's wing impacted a ground obstacle and subsequently nosed over.

At 2253, the recorded weather at the Santa Fe Municipal Airport, near Santa Fe, New Mexico, was: Wind 110 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 8,000 feet, overcast clouds at 11,000 feet; temperature 19 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury.

Stinson L-5 Sentinel, American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum, N178: Accident occurred September 08, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas

AMERICAN AIRPOWER HERITAGE FLYING MUSEUM:   http://registry.faa.gov/N178

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA481
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 08, 2016 in San Antonio, TX
Aircraft: STINSON L 5, registration: N178

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

AIRCRAFT GROUND LOOPED DURING LANDING. SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

Date: 08-SEP-16
Time: 23:29:00Z
Regis#: N178
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: L5
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAN ANTONIO
State: Texas

Cessna 182H Skylane, Lottman Aviation LLC, N1928X: Accident occurred September 07, 2016 in Diller, Jefferson County, Nebraska

LOTTMAN AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N1928X

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA470
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Diller, NE
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N1928X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he landed on his 2,000-foot private grass airstrip with a slight tailwind shortly after it had rained. The airplane touched down at the mid-point of the airstrip, which was his normal go around point. The pilot further reported that he applied the brakes, but the airplane was not slowing due to the wet grass, so he added full power to abort the landing. The airplane became airborne, cleared some plastic barrels north of the airstrip, but the right wing collided with other farm equipment. The airplane impacted terrain and sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.