Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Quartz Mountain Aerospace Inc 11E, N515BW, registered to and operated by Oracle Aviation LLC: Accident occurred January 24, 2018 in Millard, Omaha, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Oracle Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N515BW

Location: Omaha, NE
Accident Number: CEN18LA085
Date & Time: 01/24/2018, 1415 CST
Registration: N515BW
Aircraft: QUARTZ MOUNTAIN AEROSPACE 11E
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 24, 2018, about 1415 central standard time, a Quartz Mountain Aerospace (Luscombe) 11E, N515BW, struck trees and a fence during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power in Omaha, Nebraska. The certificated airline transport instructor pilot and a certificated flight instructor were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Oracle Aviation, LLC, Omaha, Nebraska, and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Millard Airport (MLE), about 1100.

Preliminary information indicates the airplane was serviced to capacity, and the pilots had filed an IFR (instrument flight rules) flight plan prior to departing. After about a 3 hour flight, the pilots returned to the airport and were on approach when the engine lost power, The instructor assumed control and made a forced landing in a school ball park near 138th and Millard Avenue. During the forced landing, the airplane struck trees and a fence, incurring wing spar damage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: QUARTZ MOUNTAIN AEROSPACE
Registration: N515BW
Model/Series: 11E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:  No
Operator: Oracle Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MLE, 1051 ft msl
Observation Time: 1415 CST
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Omaha, NE (MLE)
Destination: Omaha, NE (MLE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.196111, -96.112222 (est)




OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) -- Federal Aviation Administration inspectors are investigating what caused a small plane to force land in a Millard ball field Wednesday afternoon.

Officials got word of the emergency landing at Anderson ball field near 137th and Millard Avenue around 2:20 p.m.

6 News has learned the single-engine plane is owned by Oracle Aviation. An Oracle spokesperson told 6 News a student pilot and his flight instructor were inside the plane. They were returning to Millard Airport from a 2 to 3 hour cross country training flight. Both the instructor and his student were unharmed and walked away from the landing.

Jim Bolamperti was working in the area when the low-flying plane caught his attention. He told 6 News: “I look up and he’s just barely clearing those treetops. And it sounded like he was clipping some of them. And then I heard some other loud noises which might have been him hitting that wire, there. I ran over here and sure enough there he is – right up there against the fence."

The circumstances of the incident remain under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Federal Aviation Administration is also investigating an incident last Saturday in which engine trouble forced a small plane, also owned by Oracle Aviation, to land in a field near 144th and Giles Road. A flight instructor and student were also involved in Saturday's incident. They were both unharmed.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wowt.com

Wittman W-10 Tailwind, N251WT: Fatal accident occurred January 24, 2018 near Sauk Centre Municipal Airport (D39), Stearns County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Lycoming; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N251WT

Location: Sauk Centre, MN
Accident Number: CEN18FA083
Date & Time: 01/23/2018, 1530 CST
Registration: N251WT
Aircraft: SKWIRA MATTHEW J W-10 TAILWIND
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 23, 2018, about 1530 central standard time, a Whitman Tailwind experimental homebuilt airplane, N251WT, registered to the pilot, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain about 2.7 miles south of the Sauk Centre Municipal Airport (D39), Sauk Centre, Minnesota. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and no flight plan was filed. The local personal flight was being operated under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from D39 about 1200.

After an ALNOT was issued, the airplane was located about 0820 on January 24, 2018. The ground search was assisted by the Air Force Forensic Cellular Team. The wreckage was located at grid coordinates North 45.659722 West 94.930278, about 2.7 miles south of the Sauk Centre airport.

On January 25, 2018, The NTSB arrived at the accident site and examined the wreckage. The site was a large plowed field with no obstructions. Signatures at the site showed that the airplane impacted the ground approximately 45-degrees nose down. The cockpit and front structure of the cabin were mostly destroyed by impact forces. Both wings' leading edges were destroyed. The empennage was bent slightly forward and crumpled along its longitudinal length. There were no signs of rolling at impact and it appeared that the wings were level at the time of impact. One propeller blade was visible and was relatively undamaged. The second propeller blade was found shattered underneath the engine. The right elevator was found disconnected to the elevator control system and moved freely. The left elevator was locked in the full down position and was not able to be moved. The right elevator damaged portions were removed at the site and preserved for further examination.

The left side of the cabin structure had been moved by first responders for retrieval of the pilot. There was no evidence of a post-crash fire and the smell of fuel was not present. There was no evidence in the surrounding area of impact with any obstructions prior to ground impact.

The wreckage was recovered late on January 25th and transported to a secure facility in Lakeville, Minnesota, for more detailed examinations of the airframe and engine.

On January 26, 2018, the NTSB IIC examined the aircraft at Wentworth Aviation in Lakeville, Minnesota. Access panels and fabric were removed to facilitate a detailed flight control examination. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit to all control surfaces, except the connection to the right elevator control horn. The control horn was found fractured at the accident site. The fracture was adjacent to a weld joint. The left elevator was connected and appeared undamaged. Also, the right elevator shows damage at the upper and lower hinge points. The left elevator did not show damage to the hinge points.

No other anomalies were found during the airframe and engine examinations. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SKWIRA MATTHEW J
Registration: N251WT
Model/Series: W-10 TAILWIND NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: D39, 1242 ft msl
Observation Time: 1535 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 350°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sauk Centre, MN (D39)
Destination:  Sauk Centre, MN (D39) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  45.659722, 94.930278

Matthew James Skwira





Services celebrating the life of Matthew James Skwira, age 50 of Rice, will be 11:00 AM, Monday at the Community Church in Holdingford, burial will be in the Minnesota State Veterans Cemetery. Little Falls. Matt died from injuries in a plane accident on Tuesday. There will be a visitation from 2:00-6:00 PM, Sunday, and again after 10:00 AM Monday, at the church in Holdingford. Arrangements are being made by the Miller-Carlin Funeral Homes.

Matt was born October 2, 1967 in St. Cloud to James and Alice (Brinkmann) Skwira. He lived his entire life in the Holdingford area, with the exception of his time in the U.S. Marine Corps. He married Charlotte "Char" Spiczka on April 26, 1997 in Sauk Rapids. The couple owned Duckwood Prefinishing and Painting in Rice and Matt worked for Talon Innovations in Sauk Rapids. He was a man of many hobbies and talents. He was a man of great patriotism. Matt took much pride in our country and was a man who stood up for what he believed was fair and honest; he would not be swayed. He loved to debate and spent many hours studying his interests. He loved the outdoors, whether he was picking mushrooms, hunting, or fishing. He enjoyed his time on the school board where he fought for what was right for the kids, even if it wasn't popular He had an avid love of flying and he even built his own plane from scratch. He was an experienced pilot with over 10 years of flying. Matt was a member of the Stearns County Community Corrections Advisory Board, and the Bowlus Legion. He served on the Holdingford School Board for over 8 years and he is an alumni of the Holdingford FFA.

Matt is survived by his wife, Char, Rice; his children, Haley (fiancé Matthew Friese) Skwira, Phoenix, AZ and Gerald Skwira, Rice. He is also survived by his mother, Alice Skwira, Holdingford; his brother, Peter (Catherine) Skwira, Gilman and his sister, Donna (Tom) Check, Wisilla, AK, and his flying buddy, Ryan Eiden, Albany.


He is preceded in death by his father, and Char's parents, Rosemary and Paul Spiczka.

SAUK CENTRE, Minn. -- A 50-year-old pilot was found dead after his single-engine experimental aircraft was discovered Wednesday morning, Jan. 24, after the plane was reported missing on Tuesday, the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office said.

Authorities later Wednesday identified the pilot as  Matthew James Skwira, of Rice.  


Authorities were notified about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday that the aircraft hadn’t returned to the Sauk Centre Airport, where the pilot was to practice take-offs and landings, the sheriff’s office said. The plane was last seen around 3:30 p.m.


The sheriff’s office and Sauk Centre police began a search of the area with the assistance of the Federal Aviation Administration and cellular telephone carriers to try to pinpoint the aircraft’s location. Poor weather deterred an aerial search of the area, the sheriff’s office said.


With information from the FAA, Sauk Centre firefighters assisted in a ground search and located the aircraft around 8:25 a.m. Wednesday.


The FAA is conducting a crash investigation.


Sauk Centre is about 25 miles southeast of Alexandria along Interstate 94.


Original article ➤ https://www.duluthnewstribune.com


The pilot of an experimental plane was killed when the aircraft he was flying went down sometime Tuesday afternoon near Sauk Centre.

According to a release from the Stearns County Sheriff's Office, the single-engine plane was located Wednesday morning after a ground search. The pilot has been identified as 50-year-old Matthew James Skwira, of Rice.

The sheriff's office says authorities were notified about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday that the Skwira had not returned after spending time at the Sauk Centre Airport during the afternoon. The release says he had planned to practice takeoffs and landings.

After attempts to reach the pilot were unsuccessful, Sauk Centre police and the sheriff's office began a search of the area, with help from the Federal Aviation Administration and cellular carriers, in an attempt to pinpoint the aircraft. 

It said poor weather Tuesday night prevented an aerial search. 

A ground search resumed Wednesday morning based on information from the FAA, and the plane's wreckage was found about 8:25 a.m. by Sauk Centre fire personnel about six miles south of the airport.

The FAA is investigating. The plane is expected to stay in the field until investigators wrap up their work at the site.

Those who know Skwira say he spent months practicing takeoffs and landings in an experimental plane he built himself.

Story and video ➤  http://kstp.com

Friedman Memorial Airport (KSUN): Cougar on runway delays flight landing; animal killed by Department of Fish and Game

Wood River Valley residents and visitors are accustomed to plane flights to Friedman Memorial Airport being diverted due to bad weather, but passengers arriving from Salt Lake City on Saturday night experienced a first—the pilot of their Delta jet had to abort landing on the initial approach due to a mountain lion on the runway.

Hailey resident Diane Cordes was on the 8:15 p.m. flight expecting a routine landing as the plane skimmed over the southern end of the valley at about 9:15 p.m.

“The weather was clear so we were all happy,” Cordes said. “We were on an approach for landing and all of a sudden the pilot pulled up. After a couple of minutes, he came on the loudspeaker and said the tower called and we had to pull up because there’s a cougar on the runway.”

Cordes said the plane did one big loop, lasting about 20 minutes, and the pilot came back on and said the tower had approved a landing because airport personnel had been able to chase the lion outside the airport fence.

She said the plane landed at about 9:45 p.m., about 20 minutes late.

Cordes said the passenger sitting next to her was a man from Virginia making his first visit to the area.

“Does this happen all the time?” she said he asked her.

Cordes said she told him that mountain lion sightings are common, but she had never known of one on the airport runway.

Airport Manager Chris Pomeroy said the cougar was first reported by Atlantic Aviation, which serves private planes, at the southern end of the airport. He said observations Sunday of tracks on the outside of the perimeter fence, which surrounds the airport, indicated that the animal had been roaming around the fence for a couple of days. Pomeroy said the lion apparently saw something interesting inside the airfield and climbed on a wheel line irrigation device to jump over the fence.

Pomeroy said the airport has a wildlife management plan in place, and airport personnel went out to try to corral the cougar.

“We thought we had it contained but it did spring loose and walk across the runway when the Delta flight was several miles out,” he said.

Pomeroy said he used an airport car to chase the lion into a fenced-off area surrounding the air traffic control tower. He said he had contacted the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and a conservation officer was on the scene when the lion was trapped within the fence.

Fish and Game spokesman Kelton Hatch said the officer shot the lion to protect public safety, including the safety of the people exiting the plane.

“There was no way to get ahold of it and trap it in a timely manner,” Hatch said. “If we had let it out of the gate, it would have run out onto Highway 75.”

Mike McDonald, the department’s regional wildlife manager, said the conservation officer on the scene did not have access to a tranquilizer dart gun.

“Those folks [who do have them] are pretty highly trained to administer drugs for wildlife restraint purposes,” he said. “Currently, we are a little understaffed in that area.”

In any case, he said, the department does not normally relocate large predators such as mountain lions or bears that have become accustomed to being near humans.

“The risk isn’t worth the reward,” he said.

Hatch said the lion was a juvenile, less than a year old.

“They’re typically the ones that get into trouble,” he said. “They don’t have the full skill set that an adult animal does.”

The lion was the second one recently killed in the area. On Dec. 31, a lion was trapped and killed by personnel from the federal Wildlife Services after it apparently killed a goat and critically injured another one on private property along Broadford Road south of Hailey.

Pomeroy said animals occasionally get into the airport, but this was the first time he knows of that a cougar has done so. He said deer got in a couple of times last winter when the snow was so deep that they could jump over the fence.

Story and comments ➤ http://www.mtexpress.com

Clinton County formally supports Sky West bid

PLATTSBURGH — Clinton County legislators affirmed their support for a new airline service at Plattsburgh International Airport by unanimously backing a bid from Sky West to fly to and from Washington, D.C.

Sky West was selected by legislators Wednesday night from six bids to obtain federal Essential Air Service funding to fly out of Plattsburgh.

The airline, which is a partner of United Airlines, plans to fly from Plattsburgh to Dulles International Airport twice each weekday and once each Saturday and Sunday.

Sky West will receive about $6 million in federal money to provide the service, if it is selected by the U.S. Department of Transportation next month.

Legislators said they were elated to have the Sky West bid, which will give passengers more options for connecting flights out of Dulles.

Pen Air has been serving the Plattsburgh airport the past six years, providing daily flights to Logan International Airport in Boston.

Some passengers have complained about the difficulty in making connections out of Logan and the fact that they have to leave one terminal and re-enter another for connections, which means they would have to clear security again.

If DOT backs the county choice, Pen Air service to Boston will halt at the end of June and the new service to Washington will begin.

'GO ANYWHERE'

Connections with United, which has a code-share agreement with American, Delta and Alaska Airlines, will be more convenient for travelers, legislators say.

"You can go anywhere from Dulles," said former County Legislator Robert Heins, who chaired the Airport Committee.

He was leading the Airport Committee in 2003 when the county opted to move the airport from its small Route 3 location to the flight line of the former Plattsburgh Air Force Base.

The new airport opened for business in the summer of 2007.

Heins told legislators Wednesday night that he was proud of their efforts to secure the Washington route.

"To have six bids is incredible," he said.

"It is a dream come true, and I thank you guys for taking a leap of faith."

'WISE CHOICE'

James McCartney, principal of the CV-TEC satellite campus that operates Plattsburgh Aeronautical Institute, said he was also pleased to see the legislature back the Sky West bid.

"It is a very wise choice going with Sky West, and a lot of people in my circles are very excited," McCartney said.

Legislator Simon Conroy (D-Area 4, Town of Plattsburgh) said the county is riding a wave of success.

"I feel we are in a very good spot," he said. "And the airport is in an especially good spot." 

MORE PASSENGERS

Conroy said the Washington destination will bring many more travelers to Plattsburgh's airport.

"We will be looking at thousands of more enplanements, and that will be great for the economy," he said.

Legislator Chris Rosenquest (D-Area 9, City of Plattsburgh) said some people will miss the service to Boston.

"But this will serve the growth of our area," he said.

Legislator Mark Dame (R-Area 8, City and Town of Plattsburgh) said that making the switch is not about getting a bigger name, like United.

"It's about the data, and it shows that there are thousands more in our area that will fly to Washington from here," Dame said.

"The more passengers we have, the better it will be for our taxpayers, and it will help our economy grow even more." 

PEN AIR PRESSURE

DOT will make its final selection in mid February, and the public has until Feb. 7 to submit comments in support of Pen Air or Sky West.

Pen Air officials are urging residents to send letters of support for their service to Boston, citing its established presence and local employees.

Legislature Chairman Harry McManus said the county will be sending a "very strong" letter of support for the Sky West bid to DOT, as will the City and Town of Plattsburgh.

Local businesses and community organizations are also being asked to send letters in support of Sky West, McManus said.

He said Heins and his colleagues deserve a lot of the credit for the airport's success.

"The community will be forever indebted to that group from 2003 to 2007," McManus said.

Legislator Robert Hall (D-Area 10, City of Plattsburgh), who chairs the Airport Committee, said Heins and his colleagues were instrumental in the airport's success, which has carried on to the current legislature.

"It took all 10 of us and Michael (County Administrator Zurlo) and Rodney (Deputy Administrator) Brown to get this done," Hall said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.pressrepublican.com

Boeing A75N1(PT17), N53459: Incident occurred January 21, 2018 at Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Riverside, California

Aircraft scraped both wingtips on runway during landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N53459

Date: 21-JAN-18
Time: 23:25:00Z
Regis#: N53459
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: A75N1 (PT17)
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: RIVERSIDE
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-60-602P Aerostar, N602WK, Edward Pike Company: Incident occurred January 22, 2018 at Sacramento Executive Airport (KSAC), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Sacramento, California

Aircraft struck flock of birds on landing roll out.

Edward Pike Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N602WK

Date: 22-JAN-18
Time: 21:26:00Z
Regis#: N602WK
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 60 602P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Van's RV-10, N728TT: Incident occurred January 20, 2018 in Washington, District of Columbia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;   Washington, District of Columbia

Aircraft veered off the runway during departure roll. Struck 2 lights, a sign and went into the grass. 

http://registry.faa.gov/N728TT

Date: 20-JAN-18
Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: N728TT
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: WASHINGTON
State: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N2335U: Incident occurred January 22, 2018 at Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft aborted takeoff on runway after sustaining a tail strike.

Dolphin Leasing LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N2335U

Date: 22-JAN-18
Time: 20:56:00Z
Regis#: N2335U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Trans Air, Short SD-3-60-200, N808TR: Incident occurred January 20, 2018 at Kalaeloa Airport / John Rodgers Field, Kapolei, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Flight MUI-2:  Landed gear up.

Trans Executive Airlines of Hawaii Inc dba Trans Air

http://registry.faa.gov/N808TR

Date: 20-JAN-18
Time: 23:10:00Z
Regis#: N808TR
Aircraft Make: SHORT
Aircraft Model: SD 3 60 200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: TRANS EXECUTIVE AIRLINES OF HAWAII
Flight Number: MAUI2
City: KAPOLEI
State: HAWAII

Why Airfreight Traffic Is Up: Dog Food and Semiconductors Are Vying for Space • Need for fast delivery ramps up battle for cargo room; ‘begging and pleading to get on airplanes’

Executives at Flexport, a San Francisco-based firm that helps customers arrange freight shipments online, say finding space on planes is getting harder.


The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron and  Jennifer Smith
Updated Jan. 24, 2018 7:37 p.m. ET


Companies are shipping more items by plane to meet customers’ rising expectations for rapid delivery, prompting a scramble for cargo space that has sent airfreight rates soaring and pushed Amazon.com Inc. and others into the airline business.

Global airfreight traffic climbed almost 9% year-over-year in November, the start of the peak shipping season, and rates for airfreight were up 17% annually for the month, the biggest price increase since the aftermath of the financial crisis, according to cargo data provider WorldACD.

The cause is twofold: As online shoppers come to expect faster home delivery of everything from smartphones to paper towels, passenger jets and dedicated cargo planes are picking up more kinds of cargo traditionally carried by container ships, trains and trucks. At the same time, strong global economic growth also is spurring demand for goods long ferried by air, such as automotive and manufacturing parts.

Those factors are creating some of the stiffest competition for air-cargo space in years. To meet the rising demand, Amazon is starting its own airline and some air-cargo operators are searching for older, idle jets to convert into freighters.

“You’re literally begging and pleading to get on airplanes, leveraging any contact you can,” said Neel Jones Shah, global head of airfreight for Flexport Inc., a San Francisco-based firm that helps customers arrange freight shipments online.

Some analysts caution the pace of growth may slow in 2018, when year-over-year comparisons will be tougher given the market improvements over the past year.

Still, growth “will be probably in the 4% to 5% range, because the outlook for industrial activity and trade in 2018 is pretty strong,” said Tom Crabtree, regional director of airline market analysis for Boeing Co.’s commercial airplanes unit.

Demand for new smartphones from Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. last year pushed up airfreight costs. Elevated semiconductor shipments, an airfreight mainstay, also have been gobbling up cargo space. And increasingly, manufacturers are loading toys, clothing and other products onto planes to meet shorter delivery windows and leaner retail inventories.

Shoppers accustomed to getting e-commerce orders in two days or less are adding to the pile at airport cargo terminals with items such as dog food and spaghetti sauce. “We’re shipping more and more of what you might consider to be everyday basics,” said Jim Mayer, a spokesman for the airline unit of United Parcel Service Inc.

To avoid the bottlenecks surging air-cargo traffic is creating at major hubs such as New York and Atlanta, some companies that arrange shipments for clients such as retailers are routing cargo through airports in cities like Detroit or Charlotte, N.C.

Air-cargo executives expect the crush to increase their industry’s share of global shipments beyond its current level of about 2%. Already, air cargo represents about one-third of global goods shipments by value, because pricier, time-sensitive items such as fresh flowers and consumer electronics tend to be sent by air.

“We expect more profitable growth in 2018 and beyond as airfreight claims a bigger share of overall cargo volume to achieve ever faster e-commerce deliveries,” said Joe Hete, chief executive of air-cargo specialist Air Transport Services Group Inc., or ATSG, which flies cargo for DHL Express and Amazon.com Inc.

Amazon is building its own airline operation to augment shipments it makes through DHL, UPS and FedEx Corp.

Amazon contracted ATSG in 2015 to make trial flights of shipments to airports close to its giant fulfillment centers. Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings Inc., one of the world’s largest air-cargo operators, has since joined as an additional partner, and by the end of 2018 the two airlines plan to have converted 40 used Boeing 767-300 jets to freighters to fly under Amazon’s Prime Air banner in the U.S.

Amazon’s partners have scoured the market for used passenger aircraft to convert to cargo use to keep up with Prime Air’s rapid growth. Last year, ATSG acquired three Boeing 767 jets that had been retired and parked in the Arizona desert by American Airlines Group Inc. Older planes are routinely parked in such desert lots, where dry conditions prevent corrosion. Often they end up broken apart for spare parts.

“Atlas and ATSG are taking planes far older than anyone anticipated,” said Steve Rimmer, chief executive of Altavair LLC, a Seattle-based aircraft leasing company that wasn’t involved in deals for the Amazon jets. He said relying on jets built in the early 1990s could require more maintenance and become problematic for a company like Amazon that stakes its reputation on reliable deliveries.



ATSG’s Mr. Hete said on a recent earnings call that the lower cost of the used jets was a major benefit. “The converted freighter pretty much does the same thing as a brand new one at basically a third of the cost,” he said. ATSG said some logistics companies that haven’t previously hired its jets also are looking to help establish mini-networks serving a particular industrial sector.

Randy Tinseth, Boeing’s marketing chief, said he expected airlines to start ordering more new jets in around 2022 when many existing planes hit 20 years of age.

Amazon has used its current fleet of about 30 jets primarily for its fastest Prime delivery service, according to a person familiar with its operations. The dedicated fleet has allowed it to extend the window for guaranteed two-day delivery from 6 p.m. on the East Coast to as late as 11 p.m. The company also is evaluating a new design for the air-cargo containers used on Boeing 767s to reduce wasted space and loading times, the person said. Amazon declined to comment.

The e-commerce giant also plans to build its own cargo hub at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport, with the first phase running by 2020 ahead of an expansion that would make it capable of handling 100 jets.

The air-cargo surge was apparent during a recent night shift at DHL Express’s Americas hub there. Thousands of packages whipped through on conveyor belts like a scene from a multilevel videogame. Forklifts zoomed past loaded with pallets of bulky items like industrial machinery, while workers packed round-topped shipping containers bound for cargo jets on the tarmac. On Dec. 20, the busiest night of this holiday season, volume was up 11% compared with the previous year.

DHL, a unit of Deutsche Post AG , recently added 16 gates at the airport and expects volumes there to have surged as much as 26% annually during the 2017 holiday season, when U.S. shoppers were forecast to have spent more than $100 billion online.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Piper PA-24-260, N9100P: Incident occurred January 20, 2018 at Goshen Municipal Airport (KGSH), Elkhart County, Indiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9100P

Date: 20-JAN-18
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N9100P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 260
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GOSHEN
State: INDIANA

Buckeye Dream Machine 582, N92048: Accident occurred January 19, 2018 in Chester, Liberty County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Struck power lines.

http://registry.faa.gov/N92048

Date: 19-JAN-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N92048
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: DREAM MACHINE 582
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: CHESTER
State: MONTANA

Cessna 210D Centurion, N884KM, Pinnacle Medical Solutions LLC: Accident occurred January 21, 2018 at Sussex Airport (KFWN), New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown

Pinnacle Medical Solutions LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N884KM

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA115
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, January 21, 2018 in SUSSEX, NJ
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N884KM

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Landing gear collapsed on landing roll out. Aircraft caught fire and was destroyed.

Date: 21-JAN-18
Time: 07:50:00Z
Regis#: N884KM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210D
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SUSSEX
State: NEW JERSEY

United Continental May Drag Industry Into Price War: Airline’s plans to increase capacity has investors worrying that carriers are losing their discipline



The Wall Street Journal
By Justin Lahart
Jan. 24, 2018 1:42 p.m. ET

When the going gets good, it can be tough to avoid overconfidence. Investors fear United Continental Holdings could be making exactly that mistake.

Late Tuesday United reported fourth-quarter earnings that topped analyst estimates, but by Wednesday morning nobody was paying attention to that.

Instead, the focus was on the airline’s plan to increase available seat miles, a measure of capacity, by 4% to 6% a year over the next three years, compared with 3.5% last year and 1.4% in 2016.

That raised concerns United risks making the oft-repeated mistake of expanding too quickly and then having to cut ticket prices sharply to fill seats.

United’s stock nose-dived over 10% by Wednesday afternoon. Shares of other airlines also fell sharply on worries that United’s growth plan would prompt them to respond in kind in an effort to protect their market share.

The environment airlines are operating in is unusually strong. The U.S. economy is doing well, as are most other economies around the world. Airlines have shown unusual discipline on costs since the financial crisis, and that has translated into strong profit growth and, Wednesday’s drop notwithstanding, soaring stock prices. Domestic carriers also count as some of the biggest beneficiaries of recently enacted tax cuts.

The challenge for the industry right now is figuring how long the good times are going to last.

It is easy to tell a story in which more people take to the skies as global standards of living rise and corporate travel budgets expand. Companies can tell themselves those kinds of stories when times are good. After so many years of feast, though, airlines risk forgetting all about famine.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Swearingen SA227-TT, N6UP, registered to and operated by AIRCO JN LLC: Accident occurred January 19, 2018 in Houston, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

AIRCO JN LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6UP

Location: Houston, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA086
Date & Time: 01/19/2018, 1600 CST
Registration: N6UP
Aircraft: SWEARINGEN SA227 TT
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On January 19, 2018, about 1600 central standard time, a Swearingen SA227-TT airplane, N6UP, experienced an electrical malfunction during cruise flight and executed a forced landing to Ellington Airport (EFD), Houston, Texas. The two pilots and two passengers were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to both engines during landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by AIRCO JN LLC, Freedom, Oklahoma, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Beaumont, Texas, and was destined for Uvalde, Texas.

According to one of the pilots, while in cruise flight maneuvering around thunderstorm activity, the airplane lost electrical power. The pilots attempted to troubleshoot the problem and could not regain electrical power. The pilots declared an emergency and diverted to EFD. Due to the loss of electrical power, the pilots manually extended the landing gear and could not verify if all the landing gear were down and locked. During the forced landing, the nose landing gear was retracted, and the airplane skidded on the forward fuselage after touchdown. Due to the nose gear being retracted during landing, both propeller assemblies and engines sustained substantial damage.

The airplane was recovered from the runway for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SWEARINGEN
Registration: N6UP
Model/Series: SA227 TT TT
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: AIRCO JN LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EFD, 32 ft msl
Observation Time: 1550 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 80°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility:  5 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Beaumont, TX (BPT)
Destination:  Uvalde, TX (UVA) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.607222, -95.158611 (est)

Cirrus SR22, N7822M: Incident occurred January 19, 2018 at Caledonia County Airport (KCDA), Lyndonville, Vermont

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft reported left brake locking after landing. Veered off runway and struck runway lights.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7822M

Date: 19-JAN-18
Time: 10:30:00Z
Regis#: N7822M
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LYNDONVILLE
State: VERMONT

Cessna 172RG Cutlass RG, N9415B, registered to Dulles Aviation and operated by Av-Ed Flight School: Accident occurred January 21, 2018 at Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport (KMRB), Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Dulles Aviation Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N9415B

Location: Martinsburg, WV
Accident Number: ERA18LA067
Date & Time: 01/21/2018, 1804 EST
Registration: N9415B
Aircraft: CESSNA 172RG
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 21, 2018, at 1804 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172RG airplane, N9415B, sustained substantial damage while landing at the Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport (MRB), Martinsburg, West Virginia. The flight instructor and the private pilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to Dulles Aviation, Manassas, Virginia, and operated by Av-Ed Flight School, Leesburg, Virginia, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from MRB.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to practice commercial pilot maneuvers and landings. The flight was normal, and they had completed about six short and soft-field takeoffs and landings without incident. On the seventh landing, after the private pilot extended the landing gear, the gear down-and-locked light did not illuminate. A visual check revealed that the nose gear was extended but the main gear was trailing and not fully extended. The flight instructor said they used the emergency gear handle to try and pump the main gear down, but there was no pressure in the system. The flight instructor then landed the airplane with the nose wheel still extended. He said he was able to keep the airplane straight for about 600 ft, but the airplane's left wing dropped resulting in substantial damage to the wing and elevator. After exiting the airplane, hydraulic fluid was observed pooling under the airplane and along the side of the empennage.

The airplane was retained for further examination of the hydraulic and landing gear systems.

At 1753, the weather conditions reported at MRB was calm wind, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 4,900 ft, overcast clouds at 8,000 ft, temperature 11° C, dewpoint 5° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.11 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N9415B
Model/Series: 172RG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:  No
Operator:  DULLES AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MRB, 564 ft msl
Observation Time:  EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 8000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Martinsburg, WV (MRB)
Destination:  Martinsburg, WV (MRB) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.000000, -77.000000 (est)