Thursday, April 20, 2017

Federal Agents Seize Records From American Flight Academy At Hartford-Brainard Airport (KHFD)

Federal agents with a search warrant seized records from American Flight Academy at Brainard Airport Thursday afternoon.

The agents from the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General arrived about noon and were still searching the flight school's office Thursday evening. The agents also searched an apartment building on Essex Street in Hartford where American Flight Academy students live.

Hartford police Deputy Chief Brian Foley confirmed that Hartford police assisted the federal agents in serving the search warrants, but declined to comment further. State police also assisted.

A person familiar with activity at the airport said Thursday night that when the agents arrived they announced they had a warrant and asked to see everyone's ID.

"They came in and said, 'We have a warrant, stay where you are,'" the person said.

A law enforcement official familiar with the investigation said the federal agents seized paper and computer records from the flight school offices and a flight school hangar at the airport.

The FBI has been investigating the Oct. 11, 2016, crash of an American Flight Academy aircraft in East Hartford. The flight instructor, Arian Prevalla, was burned in the crash and the student, Feras Freitekh, was killed.

American Flight Academy lost another airplane and student in a Feb. 22 crash near Tweed-New Haven Airport in East Haven.

Kevin Dehghani, a lawyer for American Flight Academy, could not be reached for comment Thursday evening. The U.S. attorney's office declined to comment.

In the East Hartford case, Prevalla told investigators that the student pilot began acting erratically as the aircraft prepared to land at Brainard Airport in Hartford, and that the crash appeared to be intentional.

The National Transportation Safety Board said its initial investigation indicated the crash was "an intentional act." As a result, the FBI took over the investigation and has not released any information since.

A final NTSB report has not been produced.

Prevalla told investigators that he screamed at Freitekh to release the airplane's controls and hit Freitekh's left hand, but Freitekh's grip remained firm and he refused to relinquish control, according to police reports and sources. Prevalla told police Freitekh continued to fight with him over control of the aircraft.

Prevalla also told investigators that Freitekh was from Jordan and was training to become a commercial pilot. Prevalla is the president of the flight academy and an investor in the Hartford Jet Center at Brainard. The plane involved in the East Hartford crash was a Piper PA-34 Seneca.

Immediately after the October crash, police and federal agents searched the Annawan Street apartment in Hartford that Freitekh shared with several other foreign flight students. The FBI also seized Freitekh's electronic devices and planned to search them. Authorities interviewed Freitekh's roommates, and cleared them, sources said.

FBI agents also interviewed several foreign students living at an Essex Street apartment owned by Prevalla and cleared them.

But federal officials have never closed their investigation into the crash. They told the state medical examiner several times that their investigation was continuing. The medical examiner eventually ruled the manner of Freitekh's death would be listed as undetermined and not suicide unless new information emerged.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.courant.com



HARTFORD — Federal authorities from the Department of Transportation were on the scene of a flight school that owned planes involved in two fatal plane crashes that happened four months apart.

Government agents were at the offices of American Flight School at Brainard Field on Thursday afternoon.

Connecticut State Police spokesperson Tpr. Kelly Grant said they assisted federal Department of Transportation officials in their investigation at the American Flight Academy today.

“There are no indications of what was being investigated or why.”

Instructors from the school were with students at the time of both crashes.

On October 11, 2016, a small plane crashed on Main Street in East Hartford. Feras Freitekh, the student pilot, was killed and Arian Prevalla, the flight instructor, was injured.  The NTSB announced their initial investigation into the crash “indicates the crash is the result of an intentional act.”

On February 22, student pilot Pablo Campos, 31, of East Haven, died in the crashed near Tweed-New Haven airport. The flight instructor, Rafayel Hany Wassef, 20, of New London, was critically injured. The NTSB said the pilot of the plane had been practicing landings and take offs, called “touch and go’s.” The student pilot and instructor had successfully performed three touch and go’s and on the last one declared a Mayday to the tower.

Read more here:  http://fox61.com





NTSB Identification: ERA17FA011

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 11, 2016 in East Hartford, CT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/28/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 34-200, registration: N15294
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 11, 2016, about 1530 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-200 twin-engine airplane, N15294, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Hartford-Brainard Airport (HFD), Hartford, Connecticut. The flight instructor was seriously injured, and the private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to International Aviation, LLC, and operated by American Flight Academy as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed HFD about an hour earlier.

The investigation of this event is being conducted under the jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The NTSB provided requested technical assistance to the FBI, and any material generated by the NTSB is under the control of the FBI. The NTSB does not plan to issue a report or open a public docket.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The NTSB did not determine the probable cause of this event and does not plan to issue a report or open a public docket. The investigation of this event is being conducted under the jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.




NTSB Identification: ERA17FA112
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, February 22, 2017 in East Haven, CT
Aircraft: PIPER PA38, registration: N2452C
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 22, 2017, about 0957 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-38-112, N2452C, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in East Haven, Connecticut, during the initial climb from Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut. The flight instructor was seriously injured and the student pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by American Flight Academy as an instructional flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane was performing touch-and-go landings on runway 20, a 5,600-foot-long, 150-feet-wide, asphalt runway. After three uneventful landings, one of the pilots declared an emergency during initial climb by stating "mayday" on the air traffic control tower frequency, but he did not specify the nature of the emergency. The airplane then spun to the left, descended and impacted terrain about 1,000 feet southeast of the departure end of runway 20. Another flight instructor, who was also flying in the airport traffic pattern at HVN during the time of the accident, stated that he heard the emergency transmission and could hear the airplane's stall warning horn in the background during the transmission.

No debris path was observed and the wreckage came to rest upright in a marsh, oriented about a magnetic heading of north. Both wings remained attached to the airframe, with the ailerons and flaps attached to their respective wing. The ailerons were approximately neutral and the flaps were partially extended. The fuel caps remained secured to their respective wing fuel tanks and although both wing fuel tanks were breached during impact, several gallons of fuel remained in each wing. The right wing was buckled, while the left wing exhibited more leading edge damage and its wingtip was bent upward.

The empennage was curled up and to the left. The horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, rudder, and elevator remained intact. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. Examination of the cockpit revealed that the seatbelts and shoulder harnesses remained intact. Additionally, the throttle and mixture levers were in the forward position and the magnetos were selected to both. The fuel selector was found positioned to the right main fuel tank.

The engine was partially buried in mud, but remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the engine. The two propeller blades did not exhibit rotational damage. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235, 112-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade, fixed-pitch Sensenich propeller. Review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that at the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated about 8,473 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 2,508 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for 78 hours since its most recent 100-hour inspection, which was completed on September 30, 2016.

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on November 14, 2014. Review of the flight instructor's logbook revealed that he had accumulated a total flight experience of approximately 236 hours; of which, 12 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane. The flight instructor had flown about 28 hours during the 30-day period preceding the accident.

Review of the student pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated a total flight experience of approximately 17 hours; of which, 15 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The reported weather at HVN, at 0953, included wind from 210° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles and an overcast ceiling at 7,500 feet.

Judge bows out of case seeking to stop Chino air show, what’s next



SAN BERNARDINO >> The judge assigned to a lawsuit seeking to shut down the Planes of Fame Air Show disclosed Thursday that he had a potential conflict in the case, so the case will instead be heard by a different judge starting next Friday.

A group of tenants at Chino Airport filed suit in March to stop the air show, scheduled for May 6-7, because they allege it obstructs business.

Judge Michael Sachs began Thursday’s hearing, the first in the case, by telling attorneys that he had reviewed many issues related to the airport as assistant county counsel for San Bernardino County, a position he held until 2007.

As a result, Tom Bochard, the attorney for airport tenants — including Yanks Air Museum and Flying Tigers Aviation — requested another judge take over the case.

Judge David Cohn then responded by email to say he would hear the case beginning 1:30 p.m. April 28, Sachs said.

The lawsuit seeks an injunction to stop the annual air show, which the plaintiffs allege completely shuts off access to any businesses not affiliated with the show.

“What began as a small gathering of aircraft enthusiasts has mushroomed into a massive weeklong undertaking that has become intolerable for other tenants,” the lawsuit sayss. “These tenants, their customers and guests are prevented from any reasonable access to their property because of physical barricades, prohibitive directional signage, traffic monitors, and traffic jams caused by the show.

“Planes of Fame Air Museum, which operates the Air Show, trespasses, creates a snarling, road-clogging nuisance both inside and outside of the airport, and thus interferes with other tenants’ businesses to such an extent that it deprives them of the use and enjoyment of their leaseholds.”

An online petition supporting the air show had gathered more than 15,000 signatures as of Thursday, calling it one of the few remaining opportunities for Southern California residents to see aircraft from the Golden Age of Aviation as well as a boon to the local economy.

Although he’s promised to refund all tickets if the air show is stopped, Planes of Fame Air Museum President Steve Hinton said after the hearing that he was looking forward to the show going on.

Read more here:  http://www.dailybulletin.com

Man tries to bring loaded gun to Norfolk International Airport (KORF)



NORFOLK  -   A Virginia Beach man tried to bring a loaded gun on a plane Monday. 

The man was stopped by Transportation Security Administration officers who saw the .45-caliber handgun as it was going through the checkpoint X-ray machine, said Lisa Farbstein, TSA spokeswoman.

Officers immediately contacted the Norfolk Airport Authority Police, who responded to the checkpoint, Farbstein said. 

Original article can be found here:   http://pilotonline.com

Northeast Kingdom Airport Expansion In Limbo After EB-5 Scandal Halts Private Development

Ray Pronto’s story starts simple enough. He left his hometown of Newport and landed in Pennsylvania, in the Pittsburgh area, where he founded a business in title insurance and loan closings. The company grew — a lot.  

“And then I sold that for quite a bit more money than I thought I’d ever see in my life," Pronto says. "And just for basically shits and giggles, I got into the country music business. And the first artist that me and my partner signed was Taylor Swift. And things went pretty well on that. And I just sold my interest to him a couple years ago. So I’ve had a couple businesses that did very very well." 

Now, when Pronto comes back to Newport to visit family who still live in the area, he charters a private jet. 

Lately, Pronto’s in good company at Newport’s tiny, state-owned airport — which is actually in the neighboring town of Coventry. 

In the wake of last year's fraud charges involving foreign investments in Jay Peak, Vermonters have heard a lot about that resort, and about Burke Mountain and downtown Newport. 

But Jay Peak owner Ariel Quiros and president Bill Stenger had still other plans for the Northeast Kingdom — plans that prompted a $27 million investment in the Newport airport's runway. 

Dan Gauvin owns Lakeview Aviation, the private company that’s contracted to run the airport. 

Gauvin says since the runway was extended to 5,000 feet, Newport can now handle private jets — not just the small propeller planes whose traffic has long kept the airport limping along. 

Gauvin recalls recent jet travelers who passed through town.

"It was just two guys came in, a crew of four people, eight seats," he says. "They had a full queen sized bedroom in the back, and a full bathroom. Yeah. Nice." Gauvin laughs. "It was a treat to go into that one, that was pretty sweet. And that’s a $52 million bird ... Yep. We have no idea, do we?” He laughs again. 

Gauvin’s not talking about Ray Pronto — it was someone he had never met before, whose "$52 million bird" left an impression. 

And that’s kind of the point. The longer runway accommodates bigger planes. It also makes takeoffs and landings easier for smaller planes in all sorts of weather. Seeing new faces and new planes tells Gauvin the multi-million dollar runway improvements, funded mostly with federal grants, are paying off. Gauvin says a lot of air traffic comes from tourists visiting Jay Peak and other area attractions.

But the business it generates is a far cry from what was envisioned in the airport’s Master Plan, which was formulated mainly around aviation developments promised by Jay Peak owner Ariel Quiros and president Bill Stenger. When the men announced their grand vision for revitalizing the Northeast Kingdom’s economy, the airport played a central role. 

“Yeah, in 2012 Jay Peak came in the picture," Gauvin recalls. "They had plans, big picture plans, everybody knew that.” 

Those plans included a new terminal building to house a customs outpost, an airplane manufacturing facility, a bonded warehouse for import/export businesses, a new hangar and maintenance facility and more. 

The “new and improved” airport would be necessary to service all the businesses Quiros and Stenger promised to bring to Newport: a Korean biomedical plant, a waterfront conference center and marina on Lake Memphremagog, a mixed-use “Renaissance Block” downtown. 

Trish Sears worked for years to promote both the downtown and airport developments.

"We really did believe that especially having the AnC Bio coming in, that they would need to get their devices and different things in and out very quickly, by FedEx or some other service," Sears says. "We expected some researchers coming in from other places that would go there.” 

The Legislature even officially renamed the Newport State Airport the “Northeast Kingdom International Airport” in 2015 — a year before federal and state authorities charged Quiros and Stenger with operating a Ponzi-like fraud. 

Sears says the goal had been not just to build up the airport, but to really utilize the airport as a catalyst for economic development in the region. She helped secure federal approval of the airport as a recognized Foreign Trade Zone, which offers tax advantages to import/export businesses. 

"And there were supposed to be warehouses up there as well, which really would have made the foreign trade zone hub more of a magnet for other businesses that are around that could use it," Sears says. 

The airport build-out was not to be funded by the so-called EB-5 immigrant investor money caught up in those fraud allegations. Nonetheless, when all of Quiros’ assets were frozen because of the case, his long-delayed private developments at the airport ground to a halt.

The runway has been built, along with other infrastructure improvements. But without Quiros’ money, none of the private developments the runway was supposed to accomodate have been built — not the terminal, not the customs office, not the aircraft manufacturing, not the bonded warehouse. Likewise, all the businesses planned for downtown Newport stalled — before they even started. 

Guy Rouelle is the head of aviation for Vermont’s Agency of Transportation. He’s the one who got the federal funding to pay for the runway extension. And he says that, despite the setback, he did not oversee construction of a “runway to nowhere.” 

“Absolutely not," Rouelle says. "I will, in any — whatever capacity I sit in — ensure there will be development at that airport. And that’s not a cryptic message. I’m just saying I am strongly supportive and will ensure that that development continues.” 

Still, there’s a lot of ground to make up. Trish Sears says it's been hard to come to terms with the let-down. 

“It’s been a hard year. I’s been a very hard year to, to go through the stages of grief, and of being angry, being sad, being depressed," Sears says. "We’re still working, though, and I think we always have — we still have an asset. How do we continue on the trajectory of what we can control to do that?” 

Now, an airport steering committee is being formed to solicit proposals from different private investors, who may help the state and local towns eventually tap the airport’s economic development potential. 

Read more here:   http://digital.vpr.net

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N6013E: Incident occurred April 19, 2017 in Yankeetown, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

How Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6013E

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA160
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Yankeetown, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6013E
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 19, 2017, about 2045 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6013E, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to the Gulf of Mexico near Yankeetown, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from George T. Lewis Airport (CDK), Cedar Key, Florida, around 2025 and was destined for Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed an engine run-up with no anomalies noted. The airplane departed and leveled off about 5,500 ft mean sea level. About 15 minutes after takeoff, the engine "failed" and "violently" shook. The pilot declared an emergency and searched for a place to land. He attempted to restart the engine four times prior to ditching the airplane in the water. The pilot and passenger egressed without injury.

An examination of the airplane revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The engine remained attached to the airframe through all engine mounts.

Examination of the engine by an NTSB investigator revealed that crankshaft continuity was obtained when rotating the propeller by hand. All cylinders remained attached to the engine and were not damaged. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. The propeller remained attached to the engine and no damage was noted on the blades. All spark plugs were examined and no anomalies were noted with the electrodes. The oil screen was free of debris. The carburetor was examined, and no anomalies were noted. Fuel consistent with 100 low-lead (LL) aviation fuel was noted in the carburetor bowl, with traces of water. There was no debris noted in the fuel strainer, which also contained 100LL fuel with traces of water. The engine starter operated without anomaly when the key was turned in the ignition. The magnetos were removed, inspected, and were full of water. The magnetos were rotated by hand; however, spark could not be generated.


Coast Guard crew members from Station Yankeetown, Florida, are shown at the station with two plane crash survivors in front of the station's 24-foot Special Purpose Craft-Shallow Water,  April 19th, 2017. The boat crew used the SPC-SW when the Cessna 172N Skyhawk force landed near Yankeetown. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)






YANKEETOWN, Fla. An 18-year-old Cape Coral woman was one of two people rescued after their plane crashed in water Wednesday night, the U.S. Coast Guard said.

She and the plane’s pilot, a 19-year-old man from Longwood, were unhurt. They were traveling to Orlando Sanford International Airport from Cedar Key when their plane went down near the boat ramp at the end of County Road 40 in Yankeetown north of Tampa.

The Coast Guard was notified at 8:48 p.m., and a Coast Guard boat crew arrived on scene at 9:21. They found the man and woman on top of the plane in about 2 feet of water.

The plane had been having engine trouble before it went down, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the crash.

The names of the man and woman were not released.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.winknews.com

Cessna 210 Centurion, Skydive Canyonlands, N9589T: Accident occurred April 19, 2017 near Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK), Salida, Chaffee County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Denver, Colorado 

http://registry.faa.gov/N9589T

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA162
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Salida, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N9589T
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 19, 2017, about 1918 mountain daylight time, an Cessna 210 airplane, N9589T, impacted a fence and irrigation equipment during an off airport forced landing while on approach to the Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK), Salida, Colorado. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 business flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Page Municipal Airport (PGA), Page, Arizona.

The pilot stated she was delivering the airplane to a new owner in Denver and was landing at ANK for fuel. While turning from base to final for runway 24, the engine lost power. The pilot made a forced landing in field where the airplane contacted a fence and irrigation equipment.



A Cessna 210 Centurion aircraft force landed in a field at 8371 CR 160 in Salida Wednesday evening, causing damage to the plane and irrigation equipment but no injuries.

Chaffee County sheriff’s deputies responded to the incident shortly before 8 p.m.

Deputy Jesse Sanderlin said only the pilot was in the aircraft and was not injured in the crash, which Sanderlin said appeared to be due to engine failure. 

The plane came to rest in the field on its wheels, facing north near a broken fence and severely bent irrigation equipment.

The Federal Aviation Administration will come to the site today to investigate the crash, Sanderlin said.

The plane did not take off from the Salida airport prior to the crash, Sanderlin said.

Sanderlin said the sheriff’s office will release more information today.

The field at 8371 CR 160 is the location of the planned Longhorn Ranch subdivision, and the land is owned by Ron and Jo Jones, according to a public notice posted on the property.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the 1960 Cessna 210 Centurion is a fixed-wing, single-engine, 260-horsepower aircraft with four seats.

Robert P. Gray of Moab, Utah, owns the plane, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.

Text on the side of the plane reads “Skydive Canyonlands,” and the plane is shown in photos posted online by a Moab-based skydiving business with the same name.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.themountainmail.com

Beech BE23, N786KS: Accident occurred April 19, 2017 at Darrow Field Airport (26NV), Fallon, Churchill County, Nevada

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N786KS

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA239
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Fallon, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N786KS
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that two private airports were near each other, and he mistakenly landed at the wrong airport. He added that, once he realized his mistake, he referenced the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chart supplement and visual flight rules sectional chart and observed a published runway length of 2,600 ft for departure. The pilot reported that he referenced the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH) and noted that the calculated takeoff distance was 1,350 ft.

The pilot reported that, during the takeoff roll, he decided to abort the takeoff with about half of the runway remaining because the airplane had not reached the speed he expected. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane pulled to the left of the runway centerline “slightly” when the brakes were applied, and the left wing struck two fence posts along the runway. The collision with the fence posts pulled the airplane off the runway surface to the left and into a ditch and a barbed wire fence.

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The FAA Aeronautical Information Services Office was asked by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge to evaluate the published runway dimensions at the accident airport. Upon review, the FAA determined that the runway dimensions provided for the airport should have been 2,483 ft by 25 ft rather than 2,600 ft by 25 ft. The FAA submitted the revised dimensions to the National Flight Data Center for publication.    
  
According to takeoff performance calculations with the FAA Koch Chart, the airplane would have likely experienced a 60% increase to the normal takeoff distance. When factoring in this increase with the airplane’s POH takeoff distance chart, the ground roll required was about 1,808 ft, and the total distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle was 3,128 ft. Numerous trees were located at the end of the runway. The distance to clear the 50-ft obstacle exceeded the published runway length and revised runway length. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inaccurate takeoff performance calculations and failure to maintain directional control during an aborted takeoff.

North American SNJ-5 Texan, Condor Squadron Officers and Airmens Association, N7969C: Accident occurred April 19, 2017 at Van Nuys Airport (KVNY), California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Condor Squadron Officers and Airmens Association, Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N7969C

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA242
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Van Nuys, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN SNJ, registration: N7969C
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, as the tailwheel was contacting the ground, a “sudden gust of wind” lifted the right wing and that the airplane weather-vaned to the right. Subsequently, the airplane ground looped and exited the right side of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
The automated weather observation system on the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported that the wind was from 270° at 9 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control of the airplane during the landing roll with a quartering tailwind. 

The pilot reported that as the tailwheel was contacting the ground, a "sudden gust of wind" lifted the right wing and the airplane weathervaned to the right. Subsequently, the airplane ground looped and exited the right side of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.


The automated weather observation system on the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind at 270° at 9 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16.

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA242
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Van Nuys, CA
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN SNJ, registration: N7969C
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that as the tailwheel was contacting the ground, a "sudden gust of wind" lifted the right wing and the airplane weathervaned to the right. Subsequently, the airplane ground looped and exited the right side of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system on the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind at 270° at 9 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16.

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, Unique Equipment Leasing LLC, N736VK: Incident occurred April 17, 2017 at North Las Vegas Airport (KVGT), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

Unique Equipment Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.govN736VK

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft on landing, struck a runway light. 

Date: 17-APR-17
Time: 22:35:00Z
Regis#: N736VK
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NORTH LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Diamond DA40 NG, CTC Aviation, N154BY: Accident occurred April 20, 2017 and Incident occurred May 31, 2016 near Phoenix Goodyear Airport (KGYR), Goodyear, Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

CTC Aviation Leasing (US) Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N154BY

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA099 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 20, 2017 in Goodyear, AZ
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND GMBH DA 40 NG, registration: N154BY
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 20, 2017, at 0719 mountain standard time, a single-engine Diamond Aircraft DA 40 NG airplane, N154BY, lost engine power during the takeoff from the Phoenix Goodyear Airport (GYR), Goodyear, Arizona. CTC Aviation Training (US) operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. The student pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local area solo flight and no flight plan had been filed.

According to the student pilot, he performed a preflight check in accordance with the airplane flight manual; it included a check of the ECU, with no discrepancies noted. Taxi and takeoff were normal until about 400 feet above ground level (agl). The pilot noticed a change in the engine sound. When he looked at the engine load indicator, it read 35%, he then tried to cycle the power level to see if he had any control, but the load indication remained at 35%. Shortly thereafter, the pilot reported the annunciator lights for the ECU illuminate; ECU A FAIL and ECU B FAIL.

The pilot stated that he did not believe there was sufficient altitude to turn back to the airport. Per the flight schools standard operating procedures (SOP), below 1,000 feet it is advised to not turn back to the airport. The student pilot maneuvered to a field to the right of him, however, he stated that his altitude was low, and he did not think the airplane was going to be able to clear power lines. He decided to go under the power lines, and as the airplane went under the power lines, it struck the bottom wire. There was a white flash in the cockpit, and the pilot stated that he tried to get the airplane to a field for landing. When the airplane touched down, it bounced, and then eventually struck a ditch. He switched off the fuel pumps, opened the canopy, and exited the airplane.

Two Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors responded to the accident site. 

The airplane was recovered for further examination.




A pilot walked away from the crash landing of a small plane this morning in Goodyear.

The single-engine prop plane out of Phoenix Goodyear Airport made what authorities described as a “hard crash landing” at 7:30 a.m. about 200 feet south of MC85 between Sarival Avenue and Cotton Lane.

The pilot, who was the only occupant of the plane, walked away from the crash and refused medical treatment, according to Tom Cole, deputy chief of the Goodyear Fire Department.

Cole said there was no fire at the crash site, but the fire department handled a small fuel leak.

He said Arizona Public Service Co. was also on the scene since the plane may have clipped power lines east of the landing site.

The plane did not flip, but ended on its wheels with its nose down into the turf of a farm field, Cole said.

Cole indicated the pilot, who was not immediately identified, was a student on a training flight from an aviation school at the Goodyear airport.

As the investigation into the crash proceeds, the plane will be repositioned and towed from the field, Cole said.

Cole said the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board would investigate the accident.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.westvalleyview.com











GOODYEAR, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -  A small plane went down in a field in the area of MC85 and Sarival Avenue in Goodyear, not far from Goodyear Airport, Thursday morning.

The pilot, the only person aboard, was not injured.

The plane had just taken off from Phoenix Goodyear Airport when something went wrong.

The pilot was able to put the plane down in a nearby field and walk away unhurt. The Goodyear Fire Department tweeted that he refused medical treatment.

"A single-engine Diamond DA 40 crashed under unknown circumstances shortly after departing from Runway 21 at Goodyear," Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said in an email response to our inquiry.

The Goodyear Fire Department also tweeted that fuel was leaking from the downed plane, but said there was no fire.

It's possible that the plane clipped a power line as it went down, knocking out power to a few area residents.

Bruce Haffner was over the scene in the Penguin Air & Plumbing New Chopper. His video showed firefighters walking around the plane, which is registered to a flight school called CTC Aviation.

The FAA is en route to investigate the incident.

The Diamond DA40 is a four-seat aircraft with fixed tricycle landing gear and a T-tail.

According to a 2011 analysis by Aviation Consumer magazine, the Diamond DA40 has the lowest fatal accident rate in U.S. general aviation.

"Its overall and fatal accident rates are one-eighth that of the general aviation fleet ...," according to Wikipedia.

Phoenix Goodyear Airport is a general aviation reliever airport for Sky Harbor International Airport. According to its website, GYR has "one of the best general aviation runways in the country."

The U.S. Navy built and ran the airport until 1968, when the City of Phoenix bought it and took over operations.

Original article and video can be found here:  http://www.azfamily.com

May 31, 2016:   Aircraft force landed in a field. Ten (10) miles from Phoenix Goodyear Airport (KGYR), Goodyear, Maricopa County, Arizona

Date:  31-MAY-16
Time:  20:08:00Z
Regis#:  N154BY
Aircraft Make:  DIAMOND
Aircraft Model:  DA40
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Activity:  Instruction
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  GOODYEAR
State:  Arizona



GOODYEAR, AZ - Authorities are responding after a plane landed in an empty lot near the Goodyear airport on Tuesday.

Images from Air15 showed the plane in a desert area southwest of the airport, near S. Sarival Avenue and MC 85.

Goodyear firefighters said the plane landed safely and the two pilots onboard were not injured.

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com










GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Authorities say a small plane from a flight school had to make an emergency landing in a field south of Phoenix Goodyear Airport.

Goodyear Fire Department officials said a crew responded to the scene Tuesday afternoon after reports of a plane down near 163rd Avenue and Ocotillo Road.

They said the two pilots aboard the plane weren’t injured. Their names and ages weren’t immediately released, but authorities said the plane was affiliated with BTC flight school.

There’s no immediate word on why the aircraft had to make the emergency landing.


GOODYEAR, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -  A small plane landed in a field near 163rd Avenue and Ocotillo Road Tuesday afternoon.

Crews from the Goodyear Fire Department responded to the scene, calling it out as an Alert 2.

Firefighters say the aircraft landed safely just south of an airport.

Neither pilot was hurt.

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, Bluth Equipment LLC, N24158: Incident occurred April 19, 2017 in Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

Bluth Equipment LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N24158

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.  

Date: 19-APR-17
Time: 14:40:00Z
Regis#: N24158
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Quicksilver Sport 2S, N396DF: Accident occurred September 09, 2016 in Cleveland, White County, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

http://registry.faa.gov/N396DF

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA314
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Cleveland, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: QUICKSILVER MANUFACTURING INC SPORT 2S, registration: N396DF
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the experimental, amateur-built airplane reported that he was demonstrating turns for the passenger while flying at a low altitude when he lost control of the airplane and “stalled.” The airplane collided with trees and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, wings, and empennage. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.









CLEVELAND -- One person received minor injuries when an experimental amateur-built aircraft with two people on board crashed behind a home at 4879 Highway 115 East in the Leaf community east of Cleveland on September 9th, 2016.

Emergency personnel responded to the crash just before noon Saturday, September 10th. 

White County Public Safety Director David Murphy said a passenger was injured in the crash, and was checked out by White County EMS personnel Friday night, September 9th, though emergency personnel were not aware those injuries were related to an aircraft incident. 

For unexplained reasons the aircraft crash was not properly reported until Saturday morning, September 10th, Murphy said. 

Murphy said the scene has been secured and turned over to White County Sheriff’s Office, who, along with the Federal Aviation Administration, will be investigating. 

An Federal Aviation Administration representative was scheduled to be at the crash site Saturday afternoon, September 10th.

Original article can be found here:   http://accesswdun.com