Friday, September 15, 2017

Beech A36, N18403, Travel Air LLC: Accident occurred September 15, 2017 near McAlester Regional Airport (KMLC), Pittsburg County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Travel Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N18403

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA357
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in McAlister, OK
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N18403
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 15, 2017, at 1620 central daylight time, a Beech A36, N18403, collided with a haybale during a forced landing following a loss of engine power while on approach to the McAlester Regional Airport (MLC), McAlester, Oklahoma. The private pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Travel Air LLC and was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident. The pilot had canceled his instrument flight rules flight plan when he had MLC in sight. The flight departed from the Garner file Airport (UVA), Uvalde, Texas, at 1357.



A single-engine aircraft crashed in a field south of McAlester Regional Airport on Friday evening.

Witnesses say the plane was attempting to land at the airport, but instead came down in a field south of the landing strip.

Scott Burke, principal at Frink-Chambers Public Schools, said he was working in the field at the time of the incident.

"We were just working on the tractor getting ready to bale some hay," Burke said. "The plane was flying pretty low, but to be honest with you, I didn't even hear him whenever he hit down."

Burke said he spoke with the pilot, who he said was coming in to land at the airport. The pilot survived the crash and did not suffer any major injuries, according to multiple witnesses.

The plane will sit in the field until Monday so National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials can further investigate the crash.

The aircraft registration number, N18403, says the 1977 Beech A36 fixed-wing aircraft is registered to Travel Air LLC, of Oklahoma City.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mcalesternews.com

Airmax SeaMax M-22, N885PR, Waterbird Holdings LLC: Incident occurred September 15, 2017 on Candlewood Lake, Fairfield County, Connecticut

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks, Connecticut

Waterbird Holdings LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N885PR

Aircraft landed on Candlewood Lake and sank.

Date: 15-SEP-17
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N885PR
Aircraft Make: AIRMAX CONSTRUCOES
Aircraft Model: SEAMAX M22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CANDLEWOOD LAKE
State: CONNECTICUT



SHERMAN, Conn. (WTNH) — Connecticut State Police are assisting officials from the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection after a plane made what they described as a “rough landing” on Candlewood Lake Friday afternoon.

According to DEEP officials, the plane landed on Candlewood Lake on the town line between Sherman and New Fairfield just after 4:00 p.m. Upon landing, the plane began taking on water.

State Police tweeted images of the plane submerged in the water . No injuries were reported.

DEEP officials said that everyone on board the plane was able to escape with the help of a good Samaritan in a nearby boat. DEEP is checking the water for possible environmental contamination from fuel leaking into the water.

It is unclear what may have caused the plane to make the rough landing. Police are conducting their investigation.

If you witnessed this plane landing on the lake, or if you have any information that could help Troopers in their investigation, you’re asked to call State Police Troop A at 203-267-2200.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wtnh.com




A seaplane made a "rough" landing Friday afternoon on Candlewood Lake, according to Connecticut State Police.

State Police troopers and Connecticut Department of Energy & Environment Protection crews are on the scene in Sherman.

The plane landed on the lake near the Sherman/New Fairfield line shortly before 4 p.m. and then began taking on water, according to a DEEP spokesperson.

The plane's occupants were able to get off the plane with the help of a good Samaritan's boat.

No injuries were reported.

DEEP's Emergency Response Team is arriving at the site of the landing to assist with any environmental concerns, including the possibility of fuel getting into the water.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbcconnecticut.com

Camarillo Airport (KCMA) gets last funds for hangar project



The Camarillo Airport has been awarded a $3.76 million federal grant, completing the funding for a $10.7 million hangar project.

County Airports Director Todd McNamee said the award from the Federal Aviation Administration plus a matching state grant of $100,000 will pay for infrastructure for 41 hangars.

The structures are expected to be finished by late next year, shortening the waiting list of 130 people. 

The federal money will be spent on taxi lanes, drainage systems, water and power connections plus planning, design and environmental costs, McNamee said Friday. 

The county will pay for the hangars with $6.75 million in airport revenues, he said.

McNamee said he hopes to break ground within 90 days.

Rep. Julia Brownley, D-Westlake Village, a member of a House panel on aviation, announced the award earlier this month. The funds are generated by fuel excise taxes and airfares.

Story and video ➤ http://www.vcstar.com

Mooney M20F Executive, N9642M, N9642M LLC: Incident occurred September 15, 2017 at Crystal River Airport (KCGC), Citrus County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

N9642M LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9642M

Date: 15-SEP-17
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N9642M
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CRYSTAL RIVER
State: FLORIDA




A plane had to make an emergency landing Friday afternoon at the Crystal River Airport after its power and landing gear malfunctioned.

The single-engine Mooney aircraft, along with its four passengers — including its 19-year-old pilot — made a belly landing shortly after 2 p.m. at the airstrip on the corner of West Venable Street and U.S. 19, according to the Citrus County Sheriff’s Office and airport officials.

According to airport Capt. Tom Davis and Chief Flight Instructor Gudi Davis, the plane reported power and communication loss before coming in.

Tom Davis said airport crews knew the plane was having problems with its landing gear and kept it circling around the airport until emergency responders could arrive.

“He had no radio and couldn’t transmit, but we knew he didn’t have a gear indication,” Davis said.

The plane was able to land, but its nose collapsed soon afterward before coming to a stop on a grass median.

No fire or smoke was seen coming from the aircraft after it landed. Its passengers, who were on their way to Tallahassee, were not injured, according to the sheriff’s office.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the M20F Mooney is registered out of the city of Stuart in Martin County, Florida.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.chronicleonline.com

Just Sayin’: Air control system faces staff shortage



Air control system faces staff shortage

Aviation is an economic engine that helps drive New York and the nation. However, we face a nationwide air traffic controller staffing crisis, with a 28-year low in the number of fully certified controllers. Nearly one-third of controllers are eligible to retire.

The problem could worsen. A harmful proposal being considered in Congress would eliminate the Federal Employees Retirement System annuity supplement paid to retiring air traffic controllers, law enforcement officers and firefighters, who are subject to mandatory retirement before age 62. Any reduction in retirement benefits could remove an incentive for controllers to stay on the job.

Fortunately, Rep. Peter King has been eager to learn more about air traffic control and the range of aviation issues that affect the safety and efficiency of the system. I’m grateful to him for his leadership in protecting the system.

David Romano, West Babylon

Editor’s note: The writer is an air traffic controller at the New York Center in Ronkonkoma.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.newsday.com

Riverton Regional Airport (KRIW): Airline passenger numbers up 50 percent over last year; Continuing to trend upward



(Riverton, Wyo.) – The numbers of passengers using Fremont County’s only commercial airport keep getting better with over a 50 percent increase from last year to date.

“If you want a testament on how our airport is doing, this is the proof,” said Airport Manager and Public Works Director Kyle Butterfield. “We’ve already surpassed last year’s mark, and even though 2016 was a rebounding year, that trend is continuing.”  Butterfield made his remarks to the Riverton Airport Board Friday morning.

Specifically, the number of passengers who have boarded in Riverton this year total 5,579 with four months to go, compared with the whole of 2016 at 4,291 enplanements.

Denver Air Connection, which began service one year ago in July, has boarded 2,679 passengers compared with last year’s half-year mark of 1,621. In August, Denver air boarded 452 passengers while the airport’s other carrier, Great Lakes Airlines, boarded 327.

“August was a wonderful month from both a commercial and a general aviation aspect, thanks the the solar eclipse,” he said.

The airport’s general aviation side noted 222 transit operations in August, compared with only 88 one year ago (transit defined as those aircraft who stopped here and that were not based here). The Eclipse occurred on August 21st. Airport Police Sergeant Milan Vinich, standing in for Airport Division Manager Paul Griffin, said 113 aircraft flew into the city for the eclipse event. Twenty-four aircraft landed here in the days before the eclipse and 89 aircraft landed here within three hours of the eclipse. “We were really concerned about air traffic control with most of the aircraft coming in that morning, but it all went smoothly,” he  said.

Vinich, Butterfield, and airport board members all joined in congratulating Jim’s Aircraft Service, the airport’s fixed based operator, for the assistance and work they performed in parking and refueling the incoming planes, as well as entertaining those pilots and their passengers before the eclipse itself. “Paul and his staff at the airport also did a great job getting everything ready,” Butterfield added.

Board Vice-chairman Mick Pryor of Hudson was pleased with the growth of passenger enplanements. “It’s good to see the  uptick in commercial and general aviation at the airport,”  he  said. “Things are definitely getting better.”

Original article can be found here  ➤ https://county10.com

CBS 42 Special Report: The dangers of bird strikes



BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — You may remember that it was a bird strike that brought down U.S. Airways flight 1549 into the Hudson River in January of 2009. The plane lost both engines.

So, when CBS 42 captured video of a flock of birds at the Birmingham International airport, we wanted to know if the birds posed a danger to planes landing and taking off.

As we investigated, we discovered some alarming information about the dangers of bird strikes.

According to the FAA, bird strikes have damaged 500 planes in the past 17 years – 166 of those planes were so damaged they had to make emergency landings.

We recorded the flock of birds as they circled in clear view of the airport tower. We showed the video to Reverend Dr. Tommie Lee Watkins Jr. He has been a private pilot since 1992 and he says the site was concerning.

“It’s a very concerning fear,” Watkins said. “You know it may be an occasion where you will have to circle around the airport to see where the flock will go.”

CBS 42 asked the Birmingham Airport Authority if the flock of birds was a concern.

“I can’t say for sure those birds, there was zero chance for them flying into an aircraft,” Airport Wildlife Specialist Claude Vaughn said. “There’s always that possibility.”

The airport turned to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) after a dangerous bird strike in 2007. Vaughn said when the plan ingested some doves, it caused enough damage to warrant a wildlife damage assessment.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) considers wildlife strikes as a serious aviation safety issue that is growing. Its most recent report shows an increase in wildlife strikes reported to the FAA from 1,851 in 1990 to a record 13,668 in 2014.

Fortunately, the number of planes damaged by strikes has declined from 606 to 581.

Toni Herrera Bast is the Birmingham Airport Authority Spokeswoman and she says safety is their number one concern.

“It is very important for our passengers and the traveling public to be going to an airport that is safe and secure. That’s our top priority,” Bast said.

Vaughn says the airport uses several different methods to keep wildlife out of the path of planes.

“We use harassment techniques, we use pyro’s, we have bird canons, we have sirens on the vehicles, and plus we have us here, non-stop monitoring it to try to disperse them and keep them out of here whenever possible,” Vaughn said.

The Birmingham airport also uses lethal methods to get rid of birds.

The airport is surrounded by three parks. Airport officials say it’s really important that residents do not feed the birds. If they don’t have food, water, and shelter, they are less likely to hang around the airport, which of course reduces the likelihood of a dangerous bird strike.

Story and video ➤ http://wiat.com

Chemical explosion near Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (KLAL)



LAKELAND (FOX 13) - Lakeland officials are gathering information about a reported explosion near Lakeland Linder Regional Airport.

Initial reports indicate there was a chemical explosion at Ruthven warehouses on Drane Field Road. 

The Lakeland Fire Department says four people were injured, but there were no fatalities "as of yet." 

The chemicals reported to be involved are Toluene, which is used in work operations involving paint, metal cleaners, adhesives and other products.

Sodium Hypochlorite is the main ingredient in laundry bleach.

Fire officials said there was not an active fire at the scene.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.fox13news.com

Main runway at the Burlington International Airport (KBTV) was shut down for several hours after a cut wire caused the runway lights to stop working

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. —  The main runway at the Burlington International Airport was closed for about four hours Thursday evening because the runway lights were not working properly, according to airport operations.

Director of Airport Aviation Gene Richards said a wire was cut during a construction project by the Vermont Air National Guard earlier in the day.

“Last night, we were notified that the lights didn’t come on,” Richards said.

Friday morning, travelers were still stuck waiting for hours for their plane to take off.

“We got here at about 4:50 a.m. for a flight that was going to leave at 6:30 a.m.,” said Brad Schwartz who was traveling with his wife to visit family in Oklahoma.

But when they arrived, they were told their flight had been delayed. They weren’t alone.

“The airport website said all the flights were delayed,” said Rosemary Rinder, who was waiting for her daughter’s flight to land. “I’m guessing it’s going to be more than a one hour delay.”

While the accident happened during the day, crews didn’t discover the issue until later in the evening when the lights were usually turned on for the night.

“We created a patch and patched the lights and came back in around 10:30 last night,” Richards said.

At least two flights scheduled to land at the airport late Thursday evening were diverted to other cities in the northeast.

They included Endeavor Air flight 3304 from Detroit, which was diverted to Syracuse, and Delta Airlines flight 1335 from Atlanta, which was diverted to Boston.

A Friday morning United flight from Chicago to Burlington was diverted to Manchester.

A United flight from Washington, D.C., to Burlington was also diverted to Syracuse.

Some flights scheduled to depart from Burlington were delayed as crews worked to fix the issue.

Richards told NBC5 News the current fix to repair the lights was temporary, so flights could quickly resume.

The outage caused other flights to be delayed.

A 9 p.m. flight from Philadelphia to Burlington was delayed until 6 a.m. Friday.

Flights to and from Burlington to Philadelphia, Newark, Washington, Chicago and Charlotte were all delayed.

Rinder said while the ordeal caused plans to change, they were trying to be patient.

“In my family, we always say as long as you arrive safe and sound, it was a good trip,” Rinder said.

Story and video ➤ http://www.mynbc5.com




South Burlington, Vt. - Lights went out for a period on Thursday night at Burlington International Airport. The culprit, a severed utilities line.

According to Gene Richards, the director of aviation at Burlington International Airport a utility line was severed by an excavator sometime earlier in the day.

Around 7:45pm, the FAA reported the runway lights were not illuminating and notified Richards. Crews did respond within twenty minutes of the call to attempt to fix the issue but were not successful.

At this point no commercial flights were allowed to depart or arrive from BTV. This impacted Air Shuttle flight 6013, and jetBlue flight 2533 from departing.

The problem was corrected by 10:51pm, allowing Air Shuttle flight 6013 to take off at 11:13pm.

"The excavator, I just met with them. They were not aware the lines were there. They were not in a logical place along the runway. Fortunately our electrician worked with our other electrician who was on vacation. They came up with a jumper, and they jumped the system and we were able to get the system back up an running," said Richards.

A number of flights were delayed Friday morning, including four American and three United flights. As of Friday afternoon Richards reports the airport is back to business as usual.

Original article  ➤ http://www.mychamplainvalley.com

Apple Hospitality CEO is back on job after plane crash • Aviat A-1C-180 Husky, N272WY, Inspire Aviation LLC: Accident occurred July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, Buckingham County, Virginia

Justin Knight, CEO of Apple Hospitality REIT Inc.





Justin G. Knight is back at his downtown Richmond office running one of the nation's largest hotel businesses after suffering injuries in a plane crash on July 4.

Knight, president and CEO of Apple Hospitality REIT Inc., had suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries when the small plane he was piloting crashed in Buckingham County.

"Beginning this week, he has been back in the office on a full-time basis," said Kelly Clarke, vice president of investor relations at Apple Hospitality, which owns 237 hotels in 33 states including the Richmond Marriott in downtown Richmond and the Courtyard by Marriott and Residence Inn by Marriott in Shockoe Slip.

Clarke said 10 days ago that "Justin is making incredible strides towards his full recovery."

Starting a few weeks ago, Knight was in the office often but not on a full time basis, she said. He did, for instance, participate in last month's conference call with investors to discuss second quarter earnings.

"Justin has been actively engaged with the Apple Hospitality team and others that he would normally interact with that are part of the company’s business since very shortly after the accident," Clarke said.

Knight declined to comment, she said.

"At this time, Justin’s primary focus continues to be on his family, his full recovery and remaining actively engaged with his colleagues at Apple Hospitality. That being said, he is not available for an interview at this time," she said.

The Aviat A-1C-180 aircraft Knight was piloting had stalled out, causing it to crash-land in a cornfield, law enforcement officials had said.

The 44-year-old Knight, who lives in Chesterfield County, was flown to the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville after the crash. His 11-year-old son, the only passenger, was treated at the scene for minor injuries.

During his recovery, Krissy Gathright, the company's executive vice president and chief operating officer, and Bryan Peery, executive vice president and chief financial officer, shared in the responsibilities and oversight of Apple Hospitality's day-to-day activities.

In 2014, Knight was named CEO of the company, which has one of the largest portfolios of upscale service hotels in the U.S. Knight has served on the board since 2015 and joined the company in 2000.

Original article can be found here ➤http://www.richmond.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Inspire Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N272WY




NTSB Identification: ERA17LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 04, 2017 in Dillwyn, VA
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-180, registration: N272WY
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2017, at 1224 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C-180, N272WY, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Dillwyn, Virginia. The private pilot was seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed.

According to a witness, the pilot was attempting to land the airplane on a grass field. Three attempts were made, and the airplane touched down on the third attempt. The pilot then executed a go-around, and the airplane climbed, turned to the right, and stalled. The airplane then collided with terrain in a cornfield adjacent to the grass field.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the airplane came to rest in a steep, nose-low position in the cornfield. There was no fire. The airplane was recovered to a hangar for a further examination by the FAA.

The inspector reported that the field where the pilot was attempting to land was a grass strip designed for radio-controlled aircraft. The strip was oriented to the northeast/southwest and was about 665 ft in length.

Beechcraft King Air 90, N903MD, Maryland Department of Agriculture: Mosquito spraying to take place today in Somerset County, Maryland



SOMERSET COUNTY, Md. - Officials have announced on Friday that areas in Somerset County will be treated by an aircraft to cut the adult mosquito population, starting on the evening of Friday, until completion, weather conditions permitting.

The aircraft is a twin engine, white plane with red and blue stripes, registration number N903MD. It will fly 300 to 500 feet above the ground during the evening.

Mount Vernon is one of the communities that will be affected by this, along with Crisfield, Smith Island, Champ, Oriole, Deal Island, Wenona and Fairmount.

Residents of the affected area are advised that the insecticide that will be used is Trumpet, which is a formulation containing naled and applied at less than 1.0 fluid ounce per acre. About 23,148 acres will be treated. Officials say that it is not necessary for people, pets or livestock to leave the area during this time.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wmdt.com

Able Flight: Program Gives People With Disabilities Rare Chance To Pilot Planes

Raymart Tinio earned his private pilot's certificate after graduating from Able Flight.



It’s opportunity many of these students never thought possible.

The program is called Able Flight. Purdue University has hosted it for the past seven years, and it’s the only place in the state where people with disabilities can learn how to fly.

In 2008, Wesley Major was in a motorcycle accident and now has paraplegia. He uses a wheel chair to get around. During recovery, his mentor, another graduate of Able Flight, introduced him to the program.

Now, he’s been flying for five years.




“During the rehab process I focused a lot on what I cannot do. I can’t play hockey anymore, I can’t go up steps, I can’t run,” he says. “But the Able Flight program did the opposite. It opened the doors to what you’re capable of actually doing.”

During the six-week program, students spend time in the classroom and using a virtual simulator before before they’re introduced to the open skies.

All Able Flight pilots train on a small sport aircraft that is modified for each individual user. For Major, all he has to do is add an additional handle to his controls.


Major uses this handle to control the plane's rudders.


It’s a quick change that allows Major to do things with his hands that a pilot without his disability would do with their feet.

Purdue Aviation Professor Bernie Wulle oversees the program. He says Able Flight has made the entire School of Aviation and Transportation Technology better. Flight instructors learn to be more adaptable to their students’ abilities and learning styles, and engineers look to make aircraft more accessible.

“We don’t redesign anything, but it does get other people thinking,” Wulle says. “We’ve had a couple of engineers start looking at how to do hand controls for a variety of different airplanes.”

Wulle says Able Flight participants have the same requirements any pilot would need to get certified.

“It’s a very intensive program. They are going through basically the same thing a private pilot would here, and most private pilots would take four to six months, and they’ve gotta do it within six weeks.”

Over the years, the program has hosted people with paraplegia and quadriplegia, people who are Deaf, and even someone with diabetes.

Raymart Tinio always wanted to fly, but he could never get a certified flight instructor to take him on as a student. Tinio is Deaf, and he finally got his chance to fly when he received a scholarship from Able Flight two years ago.

He uses several methods to communicate with the Air Traffic control tower.

“Most of the airspace doesn’t require the use of radio. So if required, we can use the light gun signals method, or something like texting,” he says.

As a Purdue student, Tinio researches how to make flying more accessible for deaf pilots like himself. Since the program, he’s gone on to earn his private pilot certificate and hopes to one day be a professional pilot.

And are people surprised to find out he can fly?

“There are many different responses. Some people did not believe it and said I can’t. I had to quietly explain and educate them,” he says. “Most people are surprised and inspired that disabled people and Deaf people can.”

Tinio and Major are just two of the more than 50 graduates of Purdue’s Able Flight program.

Wulle is set to retire within the next two years, and the university selected Major as the next director of the Able Flight program. Able Flight will welcome its eighth class of students next summer.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://indianapublicmedia.org

Claremore, Oklahoma: Drone photography business is flying high



While no one could accuse Claremore resident Levi Green of putting on airs, when it comes to his photography business, he very much puts on airs — 400 feet worth of air, to be exact.

As owner and pilot for his locally-owned aerial photography business, IFly 107 Drone Photography, Green’s drones take pictures of client’s properties, businesses and more from a perspective hundreds of feet up in the air.

“Photos are a reflection of people’s experiences — what drives them, where they’ve been, where they’re going, who they love,” Green said. “My company, IFly 107, is a commercial drone photography company, which takes aerial shots for homeowners, companies, real estate agents, events, and more.”

Green first got into drone photography roughly three years ago, when was working in land development.

“Starting out, I used to do the (drone) photography on our projects — a real estate agent would ask me if I could fly (a drone) over their house or property,” he said. “Eventually, I got to thinking ‘Hey, I should be getting paid for this,’ and the business kind of got going from there.”

But starting and operating one’s own drone photography business wasn’t as simple as buying a drone and sending it up.

“I took an unmanned aircraft course and was tested to fly (the drone) as a commercial (drone) pilot,” he said. “Just owning a drone and flying it as a hobbyist doesn’t require a license, but if you’re going to use it professionally, you’re required to be licensed, to have liability insurance, etc. It’s very involved.”

Once licensed, Green added two more drones to his fleet.

“Basically, the three drones I own are about the same, but each is slightly different so as to be better suited for different kinds of jobs,” he said. “I use the most up to date DJI Phantom 4 Pro Drones, which has a 20MP camera to capture 4K 60 fps video, with a 30-minute maximum fight time, and maximum control range of 4.3 miles.”

Due to FAA regulations, commercial drone pilots such as Green are only allowed to fly the drones up to 400 feet without wavers.

“A while back, I did a project for downtown Tulsa, flying over several tall buildings, for which I had to get wavers to fly (the drone) higher — they can fly up to 2,000 feet, but you’re not allowed to do this without special permission (from the FAA),” he said. “Typically, though, up to 400 feet is more than high enough for most jobs.”

Currently, most of the jobs for which Green — and his drones — are hired are still tied to real estate, but they’re fast expanding into other areas, he said.

“Drone photography is very, very popular right now,” he said. “I’m still getting my highest volume of jobs from the area of real estate — I’ll fly over a property with a drone, shoot video — it’s like a virtual reality tour of a place, but we’re getting other jobs as well,” he said. “When Chick-fil-A opened (in Claremore), I flew a drone over the restaurant the night of the grand opening to have pictures and images as an idea for a marketing video. Sometimes I’ll fly (the drone) over an event or property to have an image to use later to show people or businesses the kind of pictures — which are taken with a special 4K camera, so the images are super clear — we can provide.

“Almost always, when people see the pictures the drone takes, they’re impressed — because of the camera, the clarity of the photos is so much higher than what others (photographs) are,” he said, “and even from 400 feet up, we can zoom in on a place or a person — the images are so clear you can almost see a person’s face perfectly. It’s really something.”

As to the future of his business, Green is optimistic.

“Drone photography is a niche market, and one that’s growing — you’re probably going to only see more and more people using drones for aerial photos or videos,” he said. “I’ve got a job this week in Pryor — one of my drones will be flying over some of the new buildings at NTC, and, depending on the memory card and battery, I can shoot up to 30 minutes of video, which is usually more than long enough for most people’s needs, not to mention the number of photos I can take in that time.

“Also, we take pictures for clients of their farms and homes so they can print them,” he said. “We have had clients say they’ve have never their my property from the air and this is a neat way to show someone where you live or to show off the farm.”

For more information about drone photography or to inquire about hiring Green on a project, contact him at e-mail levijgreen@gmail.com.

Read more here ➤ http://www.claremoreprogress.com

Starduster SA-100, N1356W: Accident occurred September 15, 2017 in Southfields, Orange County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saddle Brook, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1356W

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA338 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in Southfields, NY
Aircraft: PARKS RICHARD A STARDUSTER SA 100, registration: N1356W
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 15, 2017, about 1310 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Starduster SA-100, N1356W, was substantially damaged during a precautionary landing near Southfields, New York. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that departed Chester Airport (SNC), Chester, Connecticut, and was destined for Warwick Municipal Airport (N72), Warwick, New York. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he was flying on a short cross-country flight to N72, when during cruise flight at 2,500 ft mean sea level, he noticed smoke coming from the engine cowling. He was 7 miles from his destination, but decided to land immediately due to a possible fire. He saw an open field that the airplane could land in; however, during touchdown he noticed the grass was about 5 ft tall. The airplane immediately cartwheeled upon touchdown and came to rest at a 45° nose-down attitude.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane had sustained damage to the landing gear, right upper wing, rudder and vertical stabilizer.

The airplane was retained for further examination.




NEW YORK STATE POLICE
Major Pierce V. Gallagher
Troop F Commander
   
PRESS RELEASE

At aprox 1:20 pm this afternoon, DANA M HAGUE age 57 from Clinton, CT was flying his bi-plane from CT to Warwick, NY when he observed smoke coming from the nose of the place.  Hague attempted to make an emergency landing in a field located off of St-17 in the area of Arden Rd in the Town of Tuxedo.  The landing resulted in damage to the bi-plane but Hague was uninjured.  A witness in the area observed the event and believed the plane suffered some form of mechanical failure. Uniform Troopers and Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) are on scene.  FAA to be notified.



TUXEDO, NY — A plane made an emergency landing Friday in Town of Tuxedo. 

State Police said, at approximately 1:20 p.m., Dana M. Hague, 57, of Clinton, CT was flying his Starduster SA-100 plane from Connecticut to Warwick when he saw smoke coming from the nose of the plane.

Police said the landing resulted in damage to the plane, but Hague was not injured.

A witness in the area observed the event and believed the plane suffered some form of mechanical failure.

Uniformed Troopers and Bureau of Criminal Investigation were on the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be notified.

Story and video ➤ https://patch.com

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – A biplane made an emergency landing in a field in Tuxedo Friday afternoon.

The plane went down at around 1:20 p.m. in a field off Route 17 near Arden Road.

Authorities say the pilot, identified as 57-year-old Dana Hague, was flying from Connecticut to Warwick, New York, when he spotted smoke coming from the nose of the plane.

The landing resulted in some damage to the plane, but there were no injuries.

Story and video ➤ http://newyork.cbslocal.com

TUXEDO -   A pilot has survived a small plane crash in Orange County this afternoon.

Federal Aviation Administration officials say a Starduster SA-100 amateur-built aircraft went down in a marsh near Route 17A and the New York State Thruway in Tuxedo around 1 p.m. today. 

Emergency responders say the pilot was shaken up, but was not injured. He was the only person aboard the plane.  

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.news12.com 


TUXEDO – New York State Police report that a plane made an emergency landing in the area of Arden Rd. in the Town of Tuxedo on Friday afternoon.

Police said about 1:20 p.m., Dana M. Hague, age 57 from Clinton, Connecticut was flying his Starduster SA-100 plane from Connecticut to Warwick, New York when he observed smoke coming from the nose of the aircraft.

Hague attempted to make an emergency landing in a field located off of St-17 in the area of Arden Rd., added police.

The landing resulted in damage to the bi-plane but Hague was uninjured.

A witness in the area observed the event and believed the plane suffered some from mechanical failure.

Uniform Troopers and Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) are on scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be notified.

Original article  ➤ http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com

TUXEDO - A pilot flying a small plane from Connecticut to Warwick landed roughly in a field beside the Thruway in Orange County on Friday after having possible engine trouble.

State police say Dana Hague, 57, of Clinton, Connecticut, tried to make an emergency landing just north of Arden Road in the Town of Tuxedo at about 1:20 p.m. after seeing smoke coming from the nose of the aircraft.

He was uninjured. No other passengers were aboard.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.recordonline.com

Piper PA-28-140, N9869W, Lightning Aviation: Incident occurred September 08, 2017 at H. L. Sonny Callahan Airport (KCQF), Fairhope, Baldwin County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and struck a marker sign.

Lightning Aviation: http://registry.faa.gov/N9869W

Date: 08-SEP-17
Time: 15:10:00Z
Regis#: N9869W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FAIRHOPE
State: ALABAMA

Beech B90, N49GN, Gemair Inc: Incident occurred September 07, 2017 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft on landing, struck the propeller.

Gemair Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N49GN

Date: 07-SEP-17
Time: 21:45:00Z
Regis#: N49GN
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE90
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 170B, N1681D: Incident occurred September 14, 2017 near Front Range Airport (KFTG), Watkins, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft force landed in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N1681D

Date: 14-SEP-17
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N1681D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C170
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO