Sunday, June 11, 2017

Connecticut Parachutists Inc: Fatal accident occurred June 11, 2017 at Ellington Airport (7B9), Tolland County, Connecticut



SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – 22News has learned that the man killed in Sunday morning’s parachute accident in Ellington, Connecticut was a Detective Lieutenant at the Leyden Police Department in Franklin County. 

James Hansmann was 62 years old.

22News talked to Leyden Police Chief Daniel Galvis. He said Lieutenant Hansmann was a 14 year veteran of the police department. 

Chief Galvis described Hansmann as “outgoing and friendly and would do anything for you.” 

The Chief said he was always on call and available to drive from his home in West Springfield to the Police Department in Leyden.

James Hansmann is survived by his four children. He had one son and three daughters.

Hansmann was also engaged to be married.

Hansmann died Sunday morning around 11 a.m. after a parachuting accident at the Ellington Airport in Ellington, Connecticut.

He was critically injured when he landed hard in the parachute drop zone, despite his parachute functioning properly.

Dispatchers say Hansmann was in and out of consciousness and was taken by helicopter to Hartford Hospital where he died.

22News confirmed that Hansmann was a longtime member of Connecticut Parachutist Inc., which is a skydiving club that has been operating out of Ellington Airport for 40 years. 

Manager Pat Newman told 22News Hansmann jumped out of the plane alone, and there was nothing wrong with his equipment. 

Newman would not comment on what may have caused Hansmann to hit the ground so forcefully.

The drop zone where the parachutists land is at 75 Meadow Brook Road in Ellington.

Story and video:  http://wwlp.com

LEYDEN — James “Jim” Hansmann, a detective lieutenant of the Leyden Police Department, died on Sunday morning in a parachuting accident, according to the town’s police chief.

Hansmann, 62, of West Springfield had been with the department for more than a decade, according to Leyden Police Chief Daniel Galvis.

Hansmann was seriously injured while parachuting at Ellington Airport in Connecticut, according to a statement from the Connecticut State Police.

He was treated on the scene by emergency responders and then taken by helicopter to Hartford Hospital where he died. 

Connecticut state police said there was “no criminal aspect” to the incident and the parachute was working properly.

Galvis said Hansmann had been with the department since 2003.

“We’re devastated,” he said.

Galvis said beyond being well liked by all of his colleagues, he was continually getting certified in new areas that benefited the department.

“Everyone is in a state of shock,” he said.

Hansmann had broken several cases in Franklin County throughout his tenure, according to Galvis.

“He was a huge presence in this department and he’s really going to be sorely missed,” Galvis said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.recorder.com

ELLINGTON, Conn. (WTNH) — A man from Massachusetts has died after a parachuting accident in Ellington on Sunday morning.

Lifestar responded to reports of a parachuter who experienced a hard landing in Ellington.

According to Tolland County Dispatch, Ellington Fire and Ellington Ambulance were also at the scene of the parachute drop zone of Ellington Airport where the parachutist had a hard landing. Officials identified the parachuter as 62-year-old James Hansmann of Springfield, Massachusetts. He sustained serious injuries in the incident.

Dispatchers say Hansmann had lost consciousness, but became semi responsive. He was treated on the scene by emergency personnel.

LifeStar took the him to Hartford Hospital, where he passed away due to his injuries.

Police say the parachute was functioning properly and there is no criminal aspect to the incident.

Story and video:   http://wtnh.com

Letter: Responses to crash by Yeager Airport (KCRW) were unprofessional

Editor: 

The tragic crash at Charleston’s Yeager Airport the morning of May 5th took a strange and revealing turn the moment airport officials began issuing public statements.

Charleston’s airport leadership making an uneducated assertion the Air Cargo Carriers aircraft crashed due to “coming in hot and sideways, hitting the runway hard” demonstrates a disturbing level of ignorance and unprofessional behavior.

The additional statement that Yeager Airport (KCRW) is “on par” with airports in New York and Chicago, and Yeager Airport (KCRW) “isn’t a difficult airport for pilots” reinforces the gross lack of understanding the complexity of airport operations.

These assertions also raises the question of the qualifications of the officials who made these statements.

R.G. McMillan
Charlotte, North Carolina

- Original article can be found here: http://www.wvgazettemail.com

Bill English, Investigator in Charge
National Transportation Safety Board






Short SD-330, N334AC, Air Cargo Carrier - ACC Integrated Services Inc: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2017 at Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston 

ACC Integrated Services Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N334AC 

NTSB Identification: DCA17FA109 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Charleston, WV
Aircraft: SHORT BROS. & HARLAND SD3 30, registration: N334AC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017 at 6:51 a.m. eastern daylight time (EDT), Air Cargo Carriers flight 1260, a Shorts SD3-30, N334AC, crashed during landing on runway 5 at the Charleston Yeager International Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia. The airplane was destroyed and the two pilots suffered fatal injuries. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 135 as a cargo flight from Louisville International Airport (SDF), Louisville, Kentucky. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

Van's RV-6A, N32SN: Accident occurred January 14, 2015 at Pike County Airport (KPBX), Kentucky

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15CA100
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 14, 2015 in Pikeville, KY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/10/2015
Aircraft: SHANNON WILLIAM RV6A, registration: N32SN
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had purchased the airplane the day prior, and was returning to his home airport when he elected to stop at an intermediate airport for fuel. After crossing the runway threshold, the pilot reduced engine power and entered the landing flare. He felt the airplane "balloon up slightly, then stall and drop around 15 feet" onto the runway. The airplane impacted the runway, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane subsequently ran off the side of the runway, where it came to rest inverted, resulting in substantial damage to the rudder. Photographs of the airplane taken by the airport manager following the accident depicted the presence of rime ice along the leading edges of the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and vertical stabilizer. The pilot reported that he had not obtained a weather briefing, but had conducted a cursory review of enroute weather via an online vendor prior to the flight, and was not aware of icing conditions along his intended route of flight. He also stated there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during landing, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to obtain a preflight weather briefing, and his subsequent flight into icing conditions, which resulted in the accumulation of ice on the airframe.

Colombian trainee commercial pilot smuggling cocaine, arrested at Mumbai hotel

Columbia national Freedy Trujillo Renteria was held on Saturday. 



A Colombian national was arrested with cocaine worth Rs36 crore by the Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) officers from a South Mumbai hotel on Saturday. Freedy Trujillo Renteria, 32, stuffed the contraband in 12 packets and hid them inside two laptop bags. He had come to the Mumbai from Panama via Addis Ababa.

Renteria’s arrest comes just three days after a Bolivian national, Melger Claudia, 38, was arrested with cocaine worth Rs21 crore at the international airport. She too had arrived from Addis Ababa. The NCB suspects two work as carriers for the same handler. Renteria is a trainee commercial pilot.

“Renteria was paid handsomely for the job. His tickets and accommodation were arranged by the handlers,” Kumar Sanjay Jha, NCB zonal director for Mumbai and Goa region, who headed the operation, said.

Both the carriers were unaware of the person who was supposed to collect their consignments and were waiting for further instructions.

“The carriers were kept in different hotels and worked discreetly. They never booked pre-paid cabs and the hotels were booked online by their handlers,” said Jha.

Investigations revealed that Renteria had visited the country three times in the past and the agency is probing whether he smuggled drugs during his previous visits. The NCB is using a translator to communicate with Renteria, as he speaks only Spanish. Probe is on to trace involvement of local drug dealers as well. He was booked under relevant sections of the Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (NDPS) Act. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.hindustantimes.com

Diamond DA-40 Diamond Star, N4106G, CAE Oxford Aviation Academy: Accident occurred March 20, 2014 at Coolidge Municipal Airport (P08), Pinal County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered Owner: Aircraft Guaranty Corp Trustee
Operator: CAE Oxford Aviation Academy

http://registry.faa.gov/N4106G

NTSB Identification: WPR14CA140
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 20, 2014 in Coolidge, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/18/2014
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 40, registration: N4106G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a cross-country flight the pilot decided to divert to the accident airport due to personal needs. The pilot reported flying the normal pattern and making a stabilized approach. Upon touchdown the airplane veered to the left and the pilot corrected with right rudder. The airplane then started to rotate to the right and the left wheel departed the landing gear strut. 

The local police responded to the accident and spoke with the pilot. Officers examined the skid marks on the runway and made the following observations. The airplane touched down on the center of the runway and the skid marks veered towards the left side of the runway until the left main wheel went into the dirt. The pilot over corrected to the right and as the airplane veered to the right the left main tire broke off of the landing gear. The airplane then began to spin on its belly for another 50-70 feet before coming to rest facing to the southeast. The airplane sustained substantial to the left wing. The pilot reported no pre-accident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing.

Skydive DeLand: Incident occurred June 11, 2017 at DeLand Municipal Airport (KDED), Volusia County, Florida

DELAND, Fla. - A skydiver was taken to the hospital Sunday morning after he experienced a hard landing in DeLand, officials said.

Officials said a man's harsh landing around 10:40 a.m. at Skydive DeLand left him injured. 

The man's injuries were considered to be non-life-threatening, but officials said he was taken to Halifax Hospital as a precaution.

Original article can be found here: http://www.clickorlando.com

A hard landing while parachuting at Skydive DeLand put a man in the hospital Sunday morning, officials said.

The man, who has not been identified, was transported as a trauma alert to Halifax Hospital, firefighters said following the hard landing around 10:40 a.m.

City officials described the injuries as non-life-threatening and the transport to the hospital as a precaution.

Officials said they have no further details to release at this time.

Original article can be found here: http://www.news965.com

Hatz CB1, N39761: Accident occurred July 01, 2014 at Hysham Airport (6U7), Treasure County, Montana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N39761 

NTSB Identification: WPR14CA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 01, 2014 in Hysham, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/2014
Aircraft: JONES HATZ CB1, registration: N39761
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that after returning back from an approximate 45-minute local flight, he aligned the tailwheel equipped bi-plane for a landing on the active runway. The pilot noted there was an approximate 10-knot crosswind. During the landing roll, the airplane veered right and continued off the runway surface. The airplane ground looped which resulted in the collapse of the landing gear. As a result of the impact, the airplane incurred substantial damage to the wings. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll with a crosswind, which resulted in a ground loop.

Cirrus SR22 GTS, N592BC, M3 Aero Inc: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 near Bartow Municipal Airport (KBOW), Polk County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Cirrus; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

M3 Aero Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N592BC 

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Gordonville, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N592BC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2017, about 1200 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N592BC, was substantially damaged when it impacted a power pole, trees, and terrain while on approach to Bartow Municipal Airport (BOW), Bartow, Florida. The private pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight which departed Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV) about 1120. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot was not immediately available due to his injuries, but was later interviewed by a police detective. During that interview, the pilot stated that he had "disoriented" himself by holding the airport diagram "upside down" as the airplane approached BOW. Once oriented, he turned the airplane on to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, noticed he was "high" and disconnected the autopilot. During the final approach, the airplane was descending "rapidly" and the pilot added power to complete the landing, but "nothing happened" as he "hadn't reset [the] mixture." According to the pilot, he lacked the time and the altitude to "remedy the problem."

In a telephone interview, an air traffic controller stated that the accident airplane contacted the tower north of BOW and was instructed to report entering a left base for landing on runway 9L. Instead, the pilot reported the airplane was on a left downwind for runway 9L and was cleared to land. There were no further communications from the pilot. The final radar target was recorded about 1 mile from the threshold of runway 9L at 700 feet and 130 knots groundspeed. The airplane came to rest in a church yard about 1/2 mile from the threshold of runway 9L.

On-scene examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial impact damage to the entire airframe, but no fire damage. There was evidence of fuel, and control continuity was established from the cockpit to the flight control surfaces. Initial visual examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies. The engine was forwarded to the manufacturer for a detailed examination at a later date. Flight and multifunction displays, as well as components from the autopilot system were retained for examination in the NTSB recorders laboratory.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on March 9, 2011. The pilot reported 750 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 2005 and was powered by a Continental IO-550, 310-horsepower engine. The airplane's hobbs meter displayed 2101.6 aircraft hours.


At 1545, weather reported at BOW included a broken ceiling at 3,000 ft, wind from 050° at 4 knots, and 10 statute miles of visibility. The temperature was 27° C, the dew point was 21° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.15 inches of mercury.



BARTOW — A small plane crashed in a church parking lot shortly after noon Sunday, sheering off a utility pole and damaging six cars as it narrowly missed the sanctuary where 300 worshipers were gathered and an educational building where children were attending Sunday school.

Only the pilot, Robert Silva, 61, of Jensen Beach, was injured. Later Sunday afternoon, he was in critical but stable condition in Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center, according to the Polk County Sheriff’s Office.

“If the plane had hit the church, we could be dealing with horrible mass casualties,” said Kevin Watler, public information officer for Polk County Fire Rescue.

Congregants of Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church, at 3397 Old Bartow Eagle Lake Road, rushed to Silva’s rescue.

Two registered nurses who participated in the church’s medical ministry, Priscilla Sykes and Queen Morris, applied pressure to the pilot’s severely bleeding head wound and kept him conscious and calm until Polk County Fire Rescue paramedics arrived to provide advanced life support. He was taken by ambulance to nearby Bartow Municipal Airport, from which an Aernet 4 helicopter took him to Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center.

The Cirrus SR22, tail number N592BC, was approaching Bartow Municipal Airport from the north-northwest on a route small planes often take as they descend above the treetops to land at the airport about one mile away.

As Silva was coming in, his plane clipped a treetop across the street from the church and spun into the power pole, which broke, according to the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. The pole, which is less than 50 feet from the sanctuary, toppled onto a nearby car.

The plane went through the parking lot, with fragments hitting four more cars, until it crashed into a 2007 Jeep Passport, overturning it.

Kenneth Stephens of Lakeland, the church’s social pastor, said there was a loud boom about 12:15 p.m. As the preacher resumed his service, a deacon went outdoors to check, immediately returning to announce a plane was down in the parking lot.

“I am retired military, worked in flight safety, so seeing crashes is not new but the adrenalin started pumping. I jumped over the power lines and up on the wing and there was a person inside bleeding,” Stephens said. “I called to get the nurses.”

With a man from the neighborhood helping, Stephens said, “we asked him (Silva) where to turn off the fuel. He was cognizant and able to tell us how to reach down and turn off the fuel.”

Kenneth Stephens, social pastor, tells about responding when plane crashed in parking lot of New Hope Missionary Baptist Church during Sunday service.

Stephens said his main thought was to remove the injured pilot from the plane because of the danger of leaking fuel, but the nurses said not to move him.

“We followed the nurses’ lead. They did a phenomenal job,” he said.

After paramedics had removed the pilot from the plane, a Polk County Fire Rescue Haz-Mat team cleared up a small amount of aviation gas that had leaked onto the ground, Watler said.

“Avgas is extremely flammable; any little bit could ignite,” Watler said.

Morris, one of the nurses who assisted the pilot, said that while Sykes was applying pressure to try to stop the head wound from bleeding, “we were assessing him. We kept asking him lots of questions to keep him conscious. He was able to move his extremities, was alert and was able to tell me his date of birth.”

The pilot said there was a malfunction, Morris said.

“He said he was trying to steer it but it went down,” she said.

Larry L. Granger, the church administrator, said eight to 10 children, ages 10 to 13, were in the educational building about 30 feet from where the plane came to rest. 

They were finishing Sunday school and were about to walk across the lawn to the sanctuary when the plane crashed. They would have been walking away from the crash had they been outside.

Stephens said it was amazing no one on the ground was injured and no church property was damaged. The church’s van was parked in front of the power pole, but the sheared pole fell in another direction.

But a plane fragment hit Granger’s car, a white 2007 Cadillac, causing minor damage to the rear, he said. Information about the owners of the other five damaged vehicles was not available late Sunday afternoon.

Granger said he and the deacons worked to hold the crowd back from the plane and away from the power line that was down.

“We contained the crowd pretty good,” he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. According to the Federal Aviation Administration’s website, the 2005 Cirrus SR22 is registered to M3 Aero Inc. of Wilmington, Delaware.

Story and video:  http://www.theledger.com





BARTOW — Polk County deputies have identified the pilot involved in Sunday's plane crash as Robert Silva, 61, of Jensen Beach.

Silva was taken to the Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center with serious injuries, underwent surgery and is now in stable condition, according to deputies.

The plane went down about noon outside Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church in Bartow, about 12 miles southeast of Lakeland, fire officials said. Photos of the scene show the aircraft on top of an overturned white SUV.

The church pastor told firefighters he and his congregation were in the middle of a church service when they heard a loud bang. Someone went outside to check it out and saw the plane.

Two nurses who are members of the church, Priscilla Sykes and Queen Morris, rushed out to help the pilot until paramedics arrived to provide emergency medical care.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tampabay.com




BARTOW, Fla. - A pilot suffered severely injuries after his plane crashed Sunday in Bartow. The aircraft narrowly missed a church, where 300 people were inside gathered for service.

The pilot apparently intentionally turned his aircraft when he knew a crash was imminent. The plane smashed into a power pole, then a parked vehicle before coming to rest against a tree.

The pilot managed to avoid slamming into Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church. People inside the church heard a loud boom during service. Someone told them a plane crashed and members started running outside to see what happened.

Two members, who are nurses, saw someone was inside the plane and bleeding. Even with downed power lines, the women knew they needed to help and stepped up into the plane.

They worked to stop the bleeding from the big gash on the pilot's head and tried to keep him alert and conscious.

Looking back, they're extremely grateful he dipped away from the church and they could be there to help save his life.

"As I sat over there and I put pressure on his head, I was praying for him and calming him down, and I'm just thankful that he did," said Queen Morris, one of the nurses who helped. "God is with him. And God was with us as well. That was just huge. It was so close."

The pilot was taken to the hospital with serious injuries. He told the nurses who came to his rescue that he is an experienced pilot from Gainesville and something went wrong with the plane causing the crash.  

It is not clear if the pilot was taking off or about to land. The area where the plane crashed is just two miles from the Bartow Airport. Federal investigators will be at the scene to piece everything together.


Original article can be found here: http://www.abcactionnews.com



A pilot was seriously injured Sunday when his plane struck several vehicles near a Polk County church that was holding services.

Two nurses from the church provided first aid to the pilot.

It happened around noon in the parking lot of Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church on Griffin Road off Old Bartow Eagle Lake Road in Bartow.

The plane cut through a utility pole, struck some vehicles and then hit and flipped a Jeep Passport, according to Kevin Watler, PIO for Polk County Fire Rescue.

The pastor said he thought it was a lightning strike, but then a church member told him that a plane had crashed, Watler said.

The pilot was taken to Lakeland Regional Medical Center with serious injuries.

At this point, there's no word of any other injuries.

Investigators are on the scene now, trying to determine why the plane crashed.

The Federal Aviation Administration is handling the investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wtsp.com



BARTOW, Fla. - A plane crashed into a car outside a church Sunday in Bartow, Polk County firefighters said.

The small plane crashed into the car in the parking lot of Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church shortly after noon.

The pilot of the single-engine aircraft was taken to the hospital with serious injuries, firefighters said.

The pastor of Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church said he and his church were in the middle of worship when they heard a loud bang. 

A member of the congregation went outside and said a plane had crashed in the parking lot. 

Two registered nurses in the congregation, Priscilla Sykes and Queen Morris, rushed out to assist the pilot.

They helped him until Polk County Fire Rescue arrived to take over emergency medical care.

There is no word yet on what caused the crash. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is taking over the investigation of the crash. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.wftv.com




















POLK COUNTY, Fla. (WFLA) —  Nearly 300 people were in the middle of worship at the Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church when they heard a loud bang — a plane had crashed into a utility pole and a vehicle in the church’s parking lot.

A pastor at the church, which is located on Griffin Road off Old Bartow Eagle Lake Road, says someone went outside and found a mangled Cirrus SR22, which had damaged six vehicles in total.

The unidentified pilot was seriously injured, according to officials. Two nurses inside the church rushed outside to his aid and stayed with the pilot until emergency crews arrived and transported him to Bartow Municipal Airport. He was later airlifted to Lakeland Regional Health.  His condition is currently unknown.

An investigation into the incident is ongoing.

Original article can be found here: http://wfla.com

Hawker Hunter Mk 58, N332AX, Airborne Tactical Advantage Company: Fatal accident occurred October 29, 2014 near Naval Air Station Point Mugu, Oxnard, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Aviation Administration; Van Nuys, California
ATAC; Newport News, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered Owner: Hunter Aviation International Inc.
Operator:  Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC)

http://registry.faa.gov/N332AX



NTSB Identification: WPR15GA030
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 29, 2014 in Oxnard, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: HAWKER AIRCRAFT LTD HAWKER HUNTER MK.58, registration: N332AX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was flying the single-seat turbojet airplane, which was owned and operated by a private company under contract to the United States Navy. The accident airplane was one of a flight of two airplanes that were returning to the airport to land at the conclusion of a training exercise. The accident airplane was to follow the lead airplane in an "overhead break" maneuver, which included overflying the runway, entering a descending, 270-degree turn to enter the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, then subsequently entering a descending, 180-degree turn to final approach. The recommended final approach airspeed was 150 knots (kts). 

Witnesses observed both airplanes during the approach, and noted that the accident airplane's approach appeared lower and slower than that of the lead airplane. They stated that they observed the accident airplane in a left-wing-low bank, the wings rocked from side to side, then the airplane entered a rapid roll to the right and pitched down until it impacted the ground.

Recorded data recovered from the airplane's primary flight display unit revealed that the airplane crossed the runway's extended centerline about 5,900 ft from the runway threshold in a 30-degree bank at an airspeed about 126 kts. At this time, the airplane was on a magnetic heading about 25 degrees from runway alignment, at an altitude of about 328 ft; field elevation was 13 ft. Although the airspeed was well below the target airspeed, the airplane was on a heading, and in a geographic location, that permitted capture of the final approach path with bank corrections. Stall onset occurred several seconds later when the airplane was at a bank angle of 45 degrees, an airspeed of 114 kts, and an altitude of 276 ft. Data indicated that the pilot did not increase thrust significantly in the approach until at, or possibly about 1 second before, stall onset. 

The stall was the result of the combination of an airspeed that was 46 knots below the minimum target value, and a bank angle that was significantly more than that required to capture the final approach path. Examination of the engine and flight controls did not reveal any mechanical deficiencies that would have adversely affected the performance or controllability of the airplane before impact.

The on-scene investigation revealed that the pilot did not attempt to eject from the airplane. Naval Air Systems Command simulations determined that a successful ejection could have been accomplished as late as 2 seconds before the end of the data (the data ended several seconds before impact).

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during the approach for landing, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall/spin at an altitude too low for recovery.




HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 29, 2014, at 1711 Pacific daylight time, a Hawker Hunter Mk 58, single-seat turbojet fighter aircraft, N332AX, crashed while on approach to Naval Air Station (NAS) Point Mugu, California (NTD). The airline transport pilot was killed, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postimpact fire. The airplane was registered to Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC) and the non-military public flight was operated under contract to Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in accordance with the provisions of 49 United States Code (USC) Sections 40102 and 40125. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the accident site and the flight was operated on a visual flight rules flight plan.

The purpose of the flight was to support adversary and electronic warfare training with Carrier Strike Group 15 (CSG15). The accident airplane departed NTD at 1500 as the wingman in a flight of two Hunters, intending to participate in an adversarial support air defense training exercise offshore in warning area W291. The flight's radio call sign was "ATAC 11," and the accident airplane was "ATAC 12."

The accident occurred during the "overhead break" arrival to land on runway 21. The procedures were to fly as a flight of two with ATAC 12 making a left break 4 seconds after the lead airplane, ATAC 11. ATAC 12 was to follow the lead in a descending, 270-degree turn to enter the downwind leg for runway 21. At the initiation of the base leg, the pilot was to make a continuous, descending, 180-degree turn, and roll out on final approach to land on runway 21. The normal final approach is flown at a recommended airspeed at or above 150 knots.

Witnesses reported watching both airplanes make the approach and noted that ATAC 12's approach appeared lower and slower than the lead airplane. ATAC 12 was observed in a left-wing-low bank, followed by the wings rocking from side to side, then a quick roll to the right, after which the airplane nosed down and impacted the ground.

A video recording of the accident sequence was recovered from a fixed location near the accident sight. The recording was consistent with witness observations.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The operator reported that the 45-year-old pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land and commercial pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. The operator reported that the pilot had a total flight time of 3,727.1 hours, with an estimated 15.1 hours in the accident airplane make and model. The pilot was recently retired from the United States Air Force after serving 21 years. He had most recently been assigned as a pilot in the Air Force, and was current in the F-16. The pilot was hired by ATAC on September 22, 2014, started his initial training on September 23, 2014, and completed it on October 7, 2014. The pilot then reported to ATAC at Point Mugu to begin his operational training.

The accident flight was the pilot's 5th flight with ATAC since reporting from his initial training. The pilot flew one mission on October 28 totaling 1.8 hours. On October 26, the pilot flew two missions totaling 3.7 hours. On October 23, the pilot flew one mission totaling 1.8 hours. The pilot had previously flown one overhead break approach prior to the accident flight.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate, issued on May 21, 2014, with a limitation that the pilot must wear corrective lenses.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Hawker Hunter Mk-58 is a single-seat, single-engine, multi-role combat airplane, first introduced into service in 1956; it was originally manufactured by Hawker-Siddley Corporation of the United Kingdom. The airplane has tricycle, retractable landing gear and a hydraulically-boosted flight control system. The airplane was powered by an Avon 203/7 turbojet engine rated at 10,150 lbs of thrust. The airplane was maintained in accordance with an approved aircraft inspection program. Its most recent inspection was completed on September 5, 2014, at a total aircraft time of 3,690.9 hours. 



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a strawberry field east of Highway 1 and north of the final approach path to runway 21.

Investigators examined the wreckage at the accident scene. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a ground scar with components of the right wing located in the ground scar. The debris path extended about 325 feet on a magnetic heading of 290 degrees. The FIPC was 0.7 NM from the approach end of runway 21, on a heading of 035 degrees.

Examination of the engine, which was still contained in the fuselage, exhibited signatures consistent with the engine operating at a high power setting at impact. The airframe flight control components were examined on scene with no abnormalities noted.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Ventura County Coroner completed an autopsy on October 31, 2014. The cause of death was blunt force injuries. The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on specimens of the pilot. Analysis of the specimens contained no findings for carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and tested drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

NAVAIR Flight Animation

The airplane was equipped with a single Garmin G3X panel-mounted display, which had a primary flight display with attitude/directional guidance, electronic engine monitoring, and moving map capabilities. The installed configuration recorded 57 parameters at 1 second intervals. The data card for the Garmin G3X was recovered at the accident site. Recovered data from the unit captured the accident flight, as well as the previous flights made by the accident pilot.

The NAVAIR Aeromechanics Safety Investigation Support Team (ASIST) used the G3X data to analyze the flight, and published its "Engineering Analysis and Supporting Data Quick Report" that concluded that the data was "of good quality and ... valid for the purposes of this investigation." Angle of attack (AOA or alpha) was not directly sensed on the airplane, and was not derived or recorded by the G3X, but the ASIST analysis used two different methods to calculate AOA. The accident flight data ended a few seconds short of impact, which the ASIST report attributed to G3X internal buffering activity. The ASIST report concluded that the airplane experienced an aerodynamic stall near the end of its turn from the downwind leg of the traffic pattern to final approach for landing.

The data from the Garmin G3X was submitted to the US Navy Safety Center, and a visual representation was produced of both the accident flight and the previous flight completed by the accident pilot. The visual representations are included in the public docket for this accident.

NTSB Airplane Performance Report 

An NTSB review of the ASIST report did not reveal any data or conclusions that warranted re-evaluation or independent verification. However, in an effort to gain additional insight into the accident, the NTSB analyzed data from the accident flight and two other flights, ATAC 11, and the pilot's previous flight on October 26, 2014.

The recorded data did not include any direct measures of throttle position or engine thrust but did include engine exhaust gas temperature (EGT). That parameter was used as an approximation of thrust setting. During the approach maneuver, the EGT remained at a level consistent with a relatively low thrust level, possibly flight idle. The EGT began an increase to near-takeoff value concurrent with the aerodynamic stall.

Depending on flap setting in the approach, the 180-degree turn should have been flown between 160 and 180 kts; recorded data showed that the airplane slowed through 160 kts shortly after the 180-degree turn began.

The target minimum speed until the wings-level rollout from the 180-degree turn onto final was 160 kts; however, the recorded speed was 126 kts when the airplane reached the extended runway centerline.

In both the 270- and 180-degree turns, the pilot lost significantly more speed than ATAC 11 did. In the 270-degree turn on both his previous flight and the accident flight, the pilot decreased his speed by about 110 knots, which was 35 knots more than the speed decrease by ATAC 11. In the 180-degree turn during the accident flight, the pilot decreased his speed by about 55 knots, compared to 38 knots by ATAC 11.

Airplane separation/spacing distances between ATAC 11 and ATAC 12 met the applicable criteria, and did not substantiate any need for the observed speed decreases of ATAC 12.

Following the aerodynamic stall, the airplane rolled from 45 degrees left-wing-low to 71 degrees right-wing-low in about 7 seconds, while descending to 92 feet, at which time the data ended. 

Ejection Seat

The on-scene investigation revealed that the pilot did not attempt to eject from the airplane; the ejection seat was activated upon impact. Navair-conducted simulations determined that a successful ejection could have been accomplished as late as 2 seconds before the end of the recorded data.

Skydive Monroe: Fatal accident occurred June 10, 2017 at Monroe-Walton County Airport (D73), Georgia



WALTON COUNTY, Ga. - A Gwinnett County man was killed in a freak skydiving accident at a skydiving facility where he is also an instructor.

For 20 years, Joe Bennett, 49, jumped out of planes and soared through skies, landing safely each and every time.

But Saturday afternoon, the expert skydiver made a mistake that likely cost him his life.

"He just misjudged his turn from final approach to landing. Started in too low," close friend and Bennett's boss Bill Scott told Channel 2’s Nefertiti Jaquez.

Scott owns SkyDive Monroe at the Monroe-Walton County Airport where Bennett worked as an instructor.

“It's very rare. You say, 'Wow you never saw that one coming,' with someone who has that kind of experience," Scott said.

The duo met in 1993 and instantly hit it off.

On Saturday, Scott was by his friend’s side after the tragedy and called 911.

Scott said Bennett miscalculated the landing and was seriously hurt.

"He was conscious and breathing and aware," Scott said.

But an hour after he was airlifted him to Grady Memorial Hospital, Bennett died from his injuries.

While grief-stricken, his skydiving family lowered the flag outside of the facility at half-staff and made a jump in Bennett's honor Sunday.

They glided through the skies because that is how they honor their friends.

"He as a good guy, skydiver, friend," Scott told Jaquez.

Friends and family have set up a GoFundMe account for Bennett’s family

Story and video:  http://www.wsbtv.com



MONROE, Ga -- At the Monroe-Walton County Airport, a group of skydivers boarded a plane from Skydive Monroe on Saturday.

This walk is the same one Joseph Bennett made thousands of times before. 

"The public doesn't understand why we do this sometimes - except we love jumping out of airplanes and the freefall," Skydive Monroe's owner Bill Scott said.

Scott had known Bennett for more than 20 years. And he witnessed Saturday's jump.

"The weather was clear, we had about a four mile an hour wind," he said. "Eighty-five degrees, it was excellent for skydiving."

He said Bennett completed around 6,800 jumps - often teaching others to dive or with cameras strapped to him capturing the jumps of Skydive Monroe customers.

"Good skydiver and what are you going to say," Scott said. "He became an instructor, tandem instructor, all the ratings you do for teaching students."

But despite being extremely meticulous about skydiving safety, Saturday would prove to be Bennett's last jump.

Normal opening, flew back, came in and just started his turn to come in," Scott said. "Final approach for landing and just started too low and h it the ground at a high rate of speed."

Medical staff at Skydive Monroe ran to help Bennett. He was airlifted to Grady Memorial Hospital where fire officials said he ultimately died of his injuries.

Scott said Bennett's wife is devastated.

"She has good family support - all of her family is around and friends," he said. Close friends are being very supportive of her and what's gone on. It is a hard thing to do.

And Scott is remembering his good friend of more than two decades.

"We jumped all over the country together," he said. "Real NASCAR fan. Loved going to Daytona. Just an all-around good guy. Just a lot of fun, always enjoyable - a lot of fun."

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.11alive.com





MONROE, Ga -- A veteran Gwinnett County skydiver was killed Saturday at the Monroe-Walton County airport. 

Bill Scott, owner of Skydive Monroe, said Joseph Bennett "made a hard landing" on impact and was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital.

Monroe Fire Department officials responded to the incident just after 2:30 pm. Bennett later died from his injuries, the department said. 

"Everything seemed normal," Scott told 11Alive's Joe Henke, who added that Bennett had some 6,000 jumps to his credit.

Bennett, 49, worked for Skydive Monroe.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.11alive.com

A Gwinnett County skydiver died Saturday during a parachute landing at Monroe-Walton County Airport, police said.

The accident that killed skydiving instructor Joseph Bennett happened just before 2:40 p.m., Monroe Police Chief Keith Glass said.

Fellow skydivers gave Bennett first aid until Monroe fire, police and Walton County Emergency Management Services arrived, Glass said.

He was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital, where he later died.

Bennett, 49, of Buford, was an experienced skydiver who worked for Skydive Monroe, owner of the business Bill Scott said.

He said Bennett, who he had worked with in plumbing and skydiving for more than 20 years, had made more than 6,000 drops.

There were no equipment failures or missteps in the drop Saturday, Scott said after watching the accident. 

“He just misjudged his landing approach,” Scott said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ajc.com