Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Beechcraft E55 Baron, Sanbarcolluscom Inc and operated by California Aeronautical University, N711YK: Accident occurred January 31, 2017 at Meadows Field Airport (KBFL), Bakersfield, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Sanbarcolluscom Inc., and operated by the California Aeronautical University: http://registry.faa.gov/N711YK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Bakersfield, California

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA059
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 31, 2017 in Bakersfield, CA
Aircraft: BEECH E 55, registration: N711YK
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 31, 2017, about 1640 Pacific standard time, a Beech E-55, N711YK, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an attempted go-around at the Meadows Field Airport (BFL), Bakersfield, California. The twin-engine airplane was registered to Sanbarcolluscom Inc., and operated by the California Aeronautical University under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight which originated from BFL about 1530.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to break the left engine in, which was being done at a full power setting. Following the uneventful flight, he entered the airport traffic pattern on an extended final for runway 30R. As the airplane crossed over the runway threshold, the pilot reduced power and the airplane began to settle into ground effect. The pilot stated that he thought the airplane settled lower than normal and that he decided to initiate a go-around in case something was wrong with the landing gear. The pilot further stated that upon the application of power, the left engine did not respond and the airplane immediately began rolling to the left. Despite reducing power and applying control inputs, the airplane continued to roll to the left and impacted terrain.


Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that both wings and the fuselage were structurally damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.



BAKERSFIELD, California --

UPDATE: Kern County Airports Director Richard Strickland says runway 30R at Meadows Field has reopened.   It reopened around 6:40 Tuesday night.  

The runway at Meadows Field Airport has been closed after a Beechcraft E55 Baron crashed there around 4:45 p.m.

The Kern County Fire Department is on the scene and one person was taken from the crash in an ambulance.

Director of Airports Richard Strickland says the runway is closed but this will not impact commercial flights.



A Beechcraft E55 Baron crashed at Meadows Field Tuesday afternoon, injuring the pilot, the plane's only occupant. The aircraft sustained major damage in the 4:45 p.m. crash.

Two Kern County Fire Department rescue units arrived at the scene moments afterward and spotted the pilot walking near the aircraft. Firefighters gave him medical care while simultaneously extinguishing a fire in the plane's right engine.

The unidentified pilot suffered moderate injuries and was transported by ground ambulance to a local hospital.

Hall Ambulance, the Kern County Sheriff's Office and Meadows Field airport police assisted with the incident.

Source:   http://www.bakersfield.com



BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - A Beechcraft E55 Baron crash was reported at Meadows Field Airport Tuesday afternoon.

The main runway was closed for a few hours afterward and no major flights were affected, according to airport officials.

Only one person was inside the Beechcraft E55 Baron, according to KCFD. They sustained moderate injuries.

The right engine was on fire but firefighters put it out quickly.

The cause of the crash is unknown.

Source:   http://www.turnto23.com

Peninsula Airport Commission: State transportation chief misinterpreted state policy

Peninsula Airport Commission board members and airport executives said Virginia Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne is misinterpreting state policies in calling foul at the use of $3.55 million of state taxpayer funds to help repay a loan.

The statements came during a special meeting on Tuesday at the airport. At the heart of the discussion was the repayment of a multi-million dollar loan made to People Express Airlines in 2014. The startup ceased operations later that year.

Some members also blamed reporting about the loan payment and use of the funds, as well as Layne's decision to cut off state funds, for Elite Airways' decision to postpone starting service from Newport News/Williamsburg International. The airline said Monday night it was doing so "due to the challenging perceptions surrounding" the airport. The airline was originally scheduled to begin flights in March.

"I don't think I've misunderstood anything," Layne said when reached by phone Tuesday night. "I think the misunderstanding is about the fiduciary responsibility of the commission."

Story and video:   http://www.dailypress.com

AERO SP Z O O AT-4 LSA: Incident occurred January 31, 2017 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Denver, Colorado

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — A single-engine plane crashed on takeoff at Centennial Airport on Tuesday morning, officials said.

The crash of the GoBOSH 700GX happened on takeoff on the west side of the airport.

The pilot was the only person on board and was not injured.

South Metro Fire Rescue responded to the crash, airport officials said.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Story and photos:   http://kdvr.com

Cessna 150: Incident occurred January 31, 2017 near Kokomo Municipal Airport (KOKK), Howard County, Indiana



KOKOMO – The pilot of a small airplane was forced to make an emergency landing a little after noon Tuesday on U.S. 31 south of Kokomo.

No injuries were reported.

According to officials with the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot was flying a Cessna 150 aircraft when he experienced a fuel problem and was forced to land on the southbound lanes of U.S. 31.

Emergency responders were on scene to control traffic while a mechanic from the Kokomo Municipal Airport arrived on scene to fix the problem.

The plane then took off from U.S. 31 sometime after 1 p.m., according to Kokomo Police Department Capt. Tonda Cockrell.

She said the pilot had taken off near Brownsburg, located around 55 miles south of Kokomo, before the problem. Officials did not have the name of the pilot and did not know his final destination.

The incident was reported to the Federal Aviation Administration, which said it plans to investigate the incident.


Source:  http://www.kokomotribune.com

HOWARD COUNTY, Ind. -- A small plane made an emergency landing Tuesday on US 31 in Kokomo.

Authorities say no one was hurt when the plane touched down near Center Road.

The pilot said he could not make it to the airport. 

A mechanic from the Kokomo Municipal Airport went to the scene, repaired the plane, and the pilot took off. 

The FAA has been notified about the incident.

Source:  http://www.theindychannel.com

HOWARD COUNTY, Ind.– An airplane made an emergency landing Tuesday on U.S. 31 in Howard County.

The plane landed in the southbound lanes of U.S. 31, just north of County Road 300 South, around noon. 

Police said the pilot took off from Brownsburg and experienced trouble in the air, forcing the landing. The plane was not damaged.

No injuries were reported, according to Howard County EMA Director Janice Hart. Kokomo Police are investigating and the FAA has been called.


Source:   http://cbs4indy.com

KOKOMO —   Travelers saw a scary sight on U.S. 31 today.

Police say a small plane made an emergency landing just south of Kokomo.

No one was hurt.

Police say the pilot took off from an Indianapolis suburb and had a problem in the air.

Source:  http://wsbt.com

Cessna T210L Turbo Centurion, Atlantic Group LLC, N732JE: Incident occurred January 31, 2017 at Clay Center Municipal Airport (KCYW), Clay County, Kansas

ATLANTIC GROUP LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N732JE

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR-UP.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: WICHITA, KS

Date: 31-JAN-17
Time: 14:43:00Z
Regis#: N732JE
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CLAY CENTER
State: KANSAS



CLAY COUNTY – A small plane made an emergency landing just after 8:30a.m. on Tuesday in Clay County.

The Kansas Highway Patrol reported a 1976 Cessna single-engine aircraft piloted by Jeffrey M. Clarke, 35, Fort Myers, FL., was having engine trouble, and made an emergency landing at the airport with no landing gear.

Despite the belly landing, Clarke and a passenger Dane M. Messex, 36, Harvest, AL., were not injured.

The incident remains under investigation.

Source:  https://www.hayspost.com

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N2810X: Fatal accident occurred January 31, 2017 in Price, Rusk County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Eagle Sky Patrol; Deadwood, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2810X


 Cody Stewart


Location:Price, TX 
Accident Number: CEN17FA095
Date & Time: 01/31/2017, 1540 CST
Registration: N2810X
Aircraft: CESSNA 177
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

Analysis 

The commercial pilot was conducting an aerial observation flight of pipelines in visual meteorological conditions. According to the operator, the pilot was transitioning the airplane to the east between two pipelines, which were about 112 miles apart. During the flight the airplane's left wing contacted the top guy-wire of a 449-ft tall communications tower. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed the airplane.

Although the wreckage was significantly fragmented and damaged by fire, examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operations. Separated sections of the left wing were found between the communications tower and main wreckage. Portions of the wing exhibited wire strike markings consistent with the diameter of the tower guy-wire, and white paint marks consistent with the left wing's paint color were found on the top guy-wire about 430 ft above ground level (agl). GPS data indicated that, for the last 10 minutes of flight, the airplane's altitude varied between 219 and 552 ft agl. The last data point showed the airplane at 403 ft. GPS data and wreckage and impact information are consistent with the pilot failing to maintain clearance from the communications tower guy-wire while flying a long-distance transition flight at low altitude.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from a communications tower guy-wire. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to conduct a long distance transition flight at a low altitude. 

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Tower/antenna (incl guy wires) - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-low-alt flying
Low altitude operation/event (Defining event)

Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On January 31, 2017, at 1540 central standard time, a Cessna 177 single-engine airplane, N2810X, impacted wooded terrain after striking a communications tower guy-wire near Price, Texas. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Eagle Sky Patrol, Deadwood, South Dakota, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from Athens Municipal Airport (F44), Athens, Texas, at 1509.

According to the operator, the pilot departed from Houston Southwest Airport, Houston, Texas, on the morning of the accident to perform aerial observation of pipelines. After performing a portion of the planned aerial observation flight, the pilot refueled the airplane at F44. After departure and while transitioning to the east between two pipelines, which were about 112 miles apart, the airplane's left wing contacted the top guy-wire of a 449-ft tall communications tower. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed most of the airplane. GPS data showed that, for the last 10 minutes of flight, the airplane's altitude varied between 219 and 552 ft above ground level (agl). The last data point showed the airplane at 403 ft agl.

A witness, who was located at his residence adjacent to the accident site, reported he heard an airplane engine "rev up", an initial explosion, and a secondary explosion. Two additional witnesses reported observing the airplane "tumbling end over end" and crashing in a wooded area. 

 Cody Stewart

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification:  Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/18/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model) 

According to the operator, the pilot was hired in July 2016, and had flown about 200 hours per month since that time. Per the pilot's resume submitted at the time of his hire, the pilot had 715.5 total flight hours, 629.8 hours of which were as pilot-in-command. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2810X
Model/Series: 177
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17700210
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/06/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  5941.02 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: EAGLE SKY PATROL INC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: EAGLE SKY PATROL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RFI, 442 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 80°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots/ 15 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Athens, TX (F44)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frierson, LA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1509 CST
Type of Airspace:  Class G 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  32.130833, -94.954167 (est) 

Separated sections of the left wing were located between the communications tower and the main wreckage. Portions of the left wing, near wing station 110.00, exhibited wire strike markings consistent with the diameter of the tower guy-wire. A tower employee who responded after the accident to check the condition of the tower, observed white paint marks which were consistent with the left wing's paint color on the top guy-wire about 430 ft. agl. The main wreckage came to rest about 820 ft east of the tower in wooded terrain, and consisted of the right wing, a portion of the left wing, fuselage, empennage, and engine.

A majority of the main wreckage was consumed by a post-impact fire. The propeller had separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest adjacent to the main wreckage. One propeller blade exhibited twisting at the blade tip, and one propeller blade exhibited S-shape bending. A tree trunk, adjacent to the main wreckage, exhibited a 6-inch-wide cut consistent with contact from a propeller blade. The engine crankshaft flange was rotated by hand, and mechanical continuity was established throughout the engine and accessories. Thumb compression was noted on the Nos. 1 and 3 cylinders. The oil sump screen was absent of debris.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the elevator, rudder, right flap, and the left flap actuator. The left flap was disconnected from the flap actuator during the accident sequence. The aileron cables were attached to the aileron bell cranks in the wing. The left aileron cables exhibited broomstrawing features in the wing area that contacted the guy-wire. The flaps were in the retracted position based on the actuator measurement.

The firewall fuel strainer was partially consumed by fire, and the filter was absent of debris. The fuel selector handle displayed thermal damage, but remained attached to the fuel selector valve, which was in the "both" position.

Due to the post-impact fire, no paperwork recognizable as visual flight rules (VFR) sectional maps, was found within the wreckage area. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Forensic Medical Management Services, Tyler, Texas, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The listed cause of death was "blunt impact injuries as a result of an accident."

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. The tests were negative in cavity blood for all screened drugs, carbon monoxide, and alcohol. 

Additional Information

The operator's representative, who responded to the accident site, stated that the company's minimum altitude was 500 ft agl during transitional flight between pipelines. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) requested copy of the operator's procedures manual; however, the company did not provide a copy for review.

According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Antenna Structure Registration, the communications tower that was struck was referenced as FCC Registration Number 1297752 and was constructed on January 4, 2016. Another tower, FCC Registration Number 1047526, which was located about 0.48 miles south-southwest of the accident tower, was dismantled on August 10, 2016.

The Memphis VFR sectional chart, effective from September 15, 2016, to March 30, 2017, depicted the FCC 1047526 tower obstruction and noted that the elevation of the tower's top was 873 ft mean sea level and 460 ft agl, but it did not depict the FCC 1297752 tower. The Memphis VFR sectional chart effective from March 30, 2017, to September 14, 2017, depicted tower information according to obstacle data available as of February 2, 2017, which included the FCC 1047526 and 1297752 towers.

The NTSB IIC and an NTSB air traffic control specialist asked the FAA about the Memphis VFR sectional chart and the procedures for updating sectional charts for new obstructions. The FAA responded, in part, that it received data from a large variety of sources. The data changes are then analyzed and processed until the information cutoff date, which is 56 days before the sectional chart effective date. The depiction of the tower information near the accident site on the Memphis VFR sectional chart effective from September 15, 2016, to March 30, 2017, was correct according to data that were provided at that time to the FAA for publication. The FAA was notified in November 2016 of a new tower (FCC 1297752) located about 1/2 mile north of the original tower depicted on the chart. However, at that time, the FAA had not yet received confirmation of the dismantlement of the FCC 1047526 tower.

The FAA added that the FAA's Obstruction and Evaluation Group (OEG) obtained notification of tower construction and dismantling from tower owners or sponsors, and the information was passed to the FAA's Charting Office (AJV-5). Per 14 CFR Part 77 section 11, Supplemental Notice Requirements, tower owners must file a supplemental notice with the FAA when the construction or alteration is higher than 200 ft agl at its site, within a time limit specified by the FAA, or if no time limit is specified, the notice of construction must be submitted within 5 days after the structure reaches its greatest height. AJV-5 received updates from many sources, not just OEG, for making changes to sectional charts. AJV-5 had a quality control process in place to ensure the accuracy of the changes to the charts, and because of that, there was a time delay.

For the FCC 1297752 tower involved in this accident, the FAA stated,


"The owner of this new tower notified the OEG via the supplemental form about the construction on November 2, 2016. This date is long past the construction date of January [2016] and well past the July 21 [2016] cutoff date for the September [2016] chart. The information on the supplemental form submitted in November was not completely correct so another supplemental form was submitted in February 2017 to correct the wrong information. OEG was aware of the tower because of [a] study back in October 2015, and the sponsor is to notify the OEG within 5 days of construction and that did not happen in this case. Once the OEG has the information for constructing or dismantling a tower, then that information is passed onto AVJ-5."



NTSB Identification: CEN17FA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 31, 2017 in Price, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 177, registration: N2810X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 31, 2017, at 1540 central standard time, a Cessna 177 single-engine airplane, N2810X, impacted wooded terrain after striking a cellular tower guy-wire near Price, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Eagle Sky Patrol, Deadwood, South Dakota, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed an unknown location at an unknown time.

According to the operator, the pilot departed from a Houston, Texas, area airport about "sunrise" on the morning of the accident to perform aerial observation of pipelines. After performing a portion of the planned aerial observation flight and prior to the accident, the pilot refueled the airplane at an unknown location. While transiting between two pipelines, which were about 112 miles apart, the airplane's left wing contacted the top guy-wire of a 445-foot tall cellular tower. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed the airplane. 

A witness, who was located at his residence adjacent to the accident site, reported he heard an airplane engine "rev up", an initial explosion, and a secondary explosion. Two additional witnesses reported observing the airplane "tumbling end over end" and crashing in a wooded area.

Separated sections of the left wing were located between the cellular tower and the main wreckage. Portions of the left wing showed wire strike markings consistent with the diameter of the cellular tower guy-wire. A cellular tower employee who responded to check the condition of the tower, observed white paint marks on the top guy-wire, which were consistent with the paint color of the left wing. The main wreckage came to rest about 820 feet east of the cellular tower in wooded terrain, and consisted of the right wing, a portion of the left wing, fuselage, empennage, and engine. A majority of the main wreckage was consumed by a post-impact fire. The propeller separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest adjacent to the main wreckage. One propeller blade exhibited twisting at the blade tip, and one propeller blade exhibited S-shape bending.

At 1555, the Rusk County Airport (RFI), Henderson, Texas, automated weather observing system, located about 5.5 miles east of the accident site, reported the wind from 190 degrees at 11 knots, gusting to 15 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 24 degrees Celsius, dew point 1 degree Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. 

The U.S. Naval Observatory reported the sunrise on the morning of the accident in Houston was at 0712. The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Eagle Sky Patrol; Deadwood, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2810X

Location:Price, TX 
Accident Number: CEN17FA095
Date & Time: 01/31/2017, 1540 CST
Registration: N2810X
Aircraft: CESSNA 177
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On January 31, 2017, at 1540 central standard time, a Cessna 177 single-engine airplane, N2810X, impacted wooded terrain after striking a communications tower guy-wire near Price, Texas. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Eagle Sky Patrol, Deadwood, South Dakota, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from Athens Municipal Airport (F44), Athens, Texas, at 1509.

According to the operator, the pilot departed from Houston Southwest Airport, Houston, Texas, on the morning of the accident to perform aerial observation of pipelines. After performing a portion of the planned aerial observation flight, the pilot refueled the airplane at F44. After departure and while transitioning to the east between two pipelines, which were about 112 miles apart, the airplane's left wing contacted the top guy-wire of a 449-ft tall communications tower. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed most of the airplane. GPS data showed that, for the last 10 minutes of flight, the airplane's altitude varied between 219 and 552 ft above ground level (agl). The last data point showed the airplane at 403 ft agl.

A witness, who was located at his residence adjacent to the accident site, reported he heard an airplane engine "rev up", an initial explosion, and a secondary explosion. Two additional witnesses reported observing the airplane "tumbling end over end" and crashing in a wooded area. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification:  Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/18/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model) 

According to the operator, the pilot was hired in July 2016, and had flown about 200 hours per month since that time. Per the pilot's resume submitted at the time of his hire, the pilot had 715.5 total flight hours, 629.8 hours of which were as pilot-in-command. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2810X
Model/Series: 177
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17700210
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/06/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  5941.02 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: EAGLE SKY PATROL INC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: EAGLE SKY PATROL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RFI, 442 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 80°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots/ 15 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Athens, TX (F44)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frierson, LA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1509 CST
Type of Airspace:  Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  32.130833, -94.954167 (est) 

Separated sections of the left wing were located between the communications tower and the main wreckage. Portions of the left wing, near wing station 110.00, exhibited wire strike markings consistent with the diameter of the tower guy-wire. A tower employee who responded after the accident to check the condition of the tower, observed white paint marks which were consistent with the left wing's paint color on the top guy-wire about 430 ft. agl. The main wreckage came to rest about 820 ft east of the tower in wooded terrain, and consisted of the right wing, a portion of the left wing, fuselage, empennage, and engine.

A majority of the main wreckage was consumed by a post-impact fire. The propeller had separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest adjacent to the main wreckage. One propeller blade exhibited twisting at the blade tip, and one propeller blade exhibited S-shape bending. A tree trunk, adjacent to the main wreckage, exhibited a 6-inch-wide cut consistent with contact from a propeller blade. The engine crankshaft flange was rotated by hand, and mechanical continuity was established throughout the engine and accessories. Thumb compression was noted on the Nos. 1 and 3 cylinders. The oil sump screen was absent of debris.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the elevator, rudder, right flap, and the left flap actuator. The left flap was disconnected from the flap actuator during the accident sequence. The aileron cables were attached to the aileron bell cranks in the wing. The left aileron cables exhibited broomstrawing features in the wing area that contacted the guy-wire. The flaps were in the retracted position based on the actuator measurement.

The firewall fuel strainer was partially consumed by fire, and the filter was absent of debris. The fuel selector handle displayed thermal damage, but remained attached to the fuel selector valve, which was in the "both" position.

Due to the post-impact fire, no paperwork recognizable as visual flight rules (VFR) sectional maps, was found within the wreckage area. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Forensic Medical Management Services, Tyler, Texas, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The listed cause of death was "blunt impact injuries as a result of an accident."

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. The tests were negative in cavity blood for all screened drugs, carbon monoxide, and alcohol. 

Additional Information

The operator's representative, who responded to the accident site, stated that the company's minimum altitude was 500 ft agl during transitional flight between pipelines. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) requested copy of the operator's procedures manual; however, the company did not provide a copy for review.

According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Antenna Structure Registration, the communications tower that was struck was referenced as FCC Registration Number 1297752 and was constructed on January 4, 2016. Another tower, FCC Registration Number 1047526, which was located about 0.48 miles south-southwest of the accident tower, was dismantled on August 10, 2016.

The Memphis VFR sectional chart, effective from September 15, 2016, to March 30, 2017, depicted the FCC 1047526 tower obstruction and noted that the elevation of the tower's top was 873 ft mean sea level and 460 ft agl, but it did not depict the FCC 1297752 tower. The Memphis VFR sectional chart effective from March 30, 2017, to September 14, 2017, depicted tower information according to obstacle data available as of February 2, 2017, which included the FCC 1047526 and 1297752 towers.

The NTSB IIC and an NTSB air traffic control specialist asked the FAA about the Memphis VFR sectional chart and the procedures for updating sectional charts for new obstructions. The FAA responded, in part, that it received data from a large variety of sources. The data changes are then analyzed and processed until the information cutoff date, which is 56 days before the sectional chart effective date. The depiction of the tower information near the accident site on the Memphis VFR sectional chart effective from September 15, 2016, to March 30, 2017, was correct according to data that were provided at that time to the FAA for publication. The FAA was notified in November 2016 of a new tower (FCC 1297752) located about 1/2 mile north of the original tower depicted on the chart. However, at that time, the FAA had not yet received confirmation of the dismantlement of the FCC 1047526 tower.

The FAA added that the FAA's Obstruction and Evaluation Group (OEG) obtained notification of tower construction and dismantling from tower owners or sponsors, and the information was passed to the FAA's Charting Office (AJV-5). Per 14 CFR Part 77 section 11, Supplemental Notice Requirements, tower owners must file a supplemental notice with the FAA when the construction or alteration is higher than 200 ft agl at its site, within a time limit specified by the FAA, or if no time limit is specified, the notice of construction must be submitted within 5 days after the structure reaches its greatest height. AJV-5 received updates from many sources, not just OEG, for making changes to sectional charts. AJV-5 had a quality control process in place to ensure the accuracy of the changes to the charts, and because of that, there was a time delay.

For the FCC 1297752 tower involved in this accident, the FAA stated,


"The owner of this new tower notified the OEG via the supplemental form about the construction on November 2, 2016. This date is long past the construction date of January [2016] and well past the July 21 [2016] cutoff date for the September [2016] chart. The information on the supplemental form submitted in November was not completely correct so another supplemental form was submitted in February 2017 to correct the wrong information. OEG was aware of the tower because of [a] study back in October 2015, and the sponsor is to notify the OEG within 5 days of construction and that did not happen in this case. Once the OEG has the information for constructing or dismantling a tower, then that information is passed onto AVJ-5."

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 31, 2017 in Price, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 177, registration: N2810X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 31, 2017, at 1540 central standard time, a Cessna 177 single-engine airplane, N2810X, impacted wooded terrain after striking a cellular tower guy-wire near Price, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Eagle Sky Patrol, Deadwood, South Dakota, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed an unknown location at an unknown time.

According to the operator, the pilot departed from a Houston, Texas, area airport about "sunrise" on the morning of the accident to perform aerial observation of pipelines. After performing a portion of the planned aerial observation flight and prior to the accident, the pilot refueled the airplane at an unknown location. While transiting between two pipelines, which were about 112 miles apart, the airplane's left wing contacted the top guy-wire of a 445-foot tall cellular tower. The airplane impacted terrain and a post-impact fire consumed the airplane. 

A witness, who was located at his residence adjacent to the accident site, reported he heard an airplane engine "rev up", an initial explosion, and a secondary explosion. Two additional witnesses reported observing the airplane "tumbling end over end" and crashing in a wooded area.

Separated sections of the left wing were located between the cellular tower and the main wreckage. Portions of the left wing showed wire strike markings consistent with the diameter of the cellular tower guy-wire. A cellular tower employee who responded to check the condition of the tower, observed white paint marks on the top guy-wire, which were consistent with the paint color of the left wing. The main wreckage came to rest about 820 feet east of the cellular tower in wooded terrain, and consisted of the right wing, a portion of the left wing, fuselage, empennage, and engine. A majority of the main wreckage was consumed by a post-impact fire. The propeller separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest adjacent to the main wreckage. One propeller blade exhibited twisting at the blade tip, and one propeller blade exhibited S-shape bending.

At 1555, the Rusk County Airport (RFI), Henderson, Texas, automated weather observing system, located about 5.5 miles east of the accident site, reported the wind from 190 degrees at 11 knots, gusting to 15 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 24 degrees Celsius, dew point 1 degree Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. 

The U.S. Naval Observatory reported the sunrise on the morning of the accident in Houston was at 0712.






RUSK COUNTY, TX  -   Investigators are going through the charred wreckage of a plane crash that claimed the life of its pilot.

Just after 3:30 Tuesday afternoon, officials say the Cessna Cardinal 177 came crashing down near County Road 497, bursting into flames just west
of Henderson, in the community of Price.

The pilot is identified as 25-year-old Cody Stewart of Oklahoma. Investigators are trying to figure out what led to his impact of the guy wires of a cell phone tower.

FAA and DPS investigators were on scene, going through the broken and burned pieces of the aircraft to determine what happened.

"We've got information, we believe we know what it is, but we haven't found the serial number plate to positively identify the aircraft," said Rusk County Sheriff Jeff Price.

It was a commercial aircraft, actually making aerial passes.

"It was a company aircraft that flies pipelines and high-lines," Price says.

"We get a call for an explosion. We discovered there was an aircraft down, and that changed the whole game. With a situation like that, you don't know what’s going to happen next," says Carlisle VFD Fire Captain Joseph Avalos.

Authorities say the plane appears to have clipped a guy wire on the tower, which, depending on impact, would have brought it down. What investigators are looking into now is the flight-path, to find out how it happened that the aircraft got so close, to be able to clip the wires of the tower.  Stewart died in the crash.

Investigators say it’s possible Stewart may have missed seeing the tower while he was checking ground level.

"We've got theories, but we don't have anything concrete at this point," says Price.

The pilot's body has been transported to Southwest Forensics Science Center in Tyler for an autopsy. 

Story and video:  http://www.kltv.com



Investigators say a pilot has been killed when his small plane used to inspect pipelines clipped an East Texas cellphone tower guy wire and crashed into some trees.

Rusk County officials say the Cessna 177 Cardinal crashed and burned Tuesday afternoon near Price, about 120 miles southeast of Dallas. The victim's name wasn't immediately released.

Emergency management spokesman Patrick Dooley said Wednesday that the pilot was alone in the single-engine aircraft when the plane hit the wire and part of a wing sheared off. The plane crashed in a residential area about 100 yards from the tower.

A Federal Aviation Administration statement says the aircraft was used for pipeline patrol. Dooley says officials believe the pilot planned to refuel at Rusk County Airport when the accident happened on a clear afternoon.



Update: One person died after Rusk County officials said a small plane clipped a tower and crashed just west of Carlisle on Tuesday afternoon.

The identity of the person and the owner of the plane are still being investigated, Rusk County Office of Emergency Management Public Information Officer David Chenault said.

"Everything was burned," he said. "Everything was burned real bad."

The plane went down at about 3:45 p.m. On County Road 497, and Chenault said the working theory is that the plane hit a wire off of a tall, metal tower. Witnesses who saw the crash reported it was flipping and spinning, Chenault said.

Pedro Garza, speaking through a translator, said he was out feeding his goats when he heard a plane making a funny sound.

"It was just coming straight down," he said.

About 30 seconds after the plane hit the ground, it exploded into flames, Garza said. He ran to a neighbors house to call 911, and by the time they went back out to see if they could help the pilot, the fire had already grown too dangerous.

Ximena Lares was headed home at the time of the crash when her husband texted her to say something had fallen down behind her brother's house and had caught fire.

"Something had fallen, there was booming and a big fire," Lares said.

The plane had crashed about 200 feet behind the house. By the time Lares got there, the plane had begun to spark and boom.

"The fire was going big," she said. "I got scared thinking 'Oh my god, it's going to get the house.'"

Carlisle firefighters, Henderson firefighters, Rusk County Sheriff's Office officials and the Texas Department of Public Safety were at the scene immediately after the crash.

"The plane was on fire; it was a crumpled mess," Chenault said. "There's not a whole lot of it left."

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified, and the incident remains under investigation. FAA and NTSB investigators are expected to be at the scene Wednesday morning to determine the cause of the crash.

Chenault said officials do not yet know where the plane was headed when it crashed.

Rusk County Justice of the Peace Darlene Childress pronounced the pilot dead at the scene. The body was taken to Crawford A. Crim Funeral Home in Henderson.

Previous Story:

One person is dead after a small airplane crashed in Rusk County west of Carlisle, the Rusk County Office of Emergency Management said Tuesday.

The plane went down at about 3:45 p.m.

Rusk County OEM said the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and the incident remains under investigation.

Rusk County Sheriff’s Office spokesman David Roberts said the crash occurred off County Road 497 in a wooded area.

Rusk County OEM spokesman David Chenault said officials do not yet know where the plane was headed. He said officials believe the plane clipped a metal tower and spun out of control before hitting the ground.

Officials have not released the name of the pilot or a plane ID number. Chenault said the aircraft was badly burned when officials arrived on the scene.

Carlisle firefighters, Rusk County Sheriff's Office officials and the Texas Department of Public Safety were at the scene, Roberts said.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are expected to arrive Wednesday morning to investigate. 

Original article can be found here:  https://www.news-journal.com





RUSK COUNTY, TX  -  Local first responders are on the scene of a small airplane crash in Rusk County officials say, near the city of Price. 

The crash happened at around 3:45, the Office of Emergency Management says. It is located on CR 497, west of the intersection of FM 13 and Hwy 42 in the county. 

FAA officials say that the Cessna hit a cell phone tower and then crashed into trees. The pilot was the only person on board the plane, they confirm.

According to officials at the Rusk County Airport, the plane did not take off from there, but was possibly coming in for fuel. 

The FAA will respond to the scene Wednesday, and the National Transportation Safety Board will handle the investigation, according to officials. 

Story and video:   http://www.wdam.com