Saturday, April 25, 2020

Piper PA-28-151 Cherokee Warrior, N33005: Accident occurred April 25, 2020 at East Hampton Airport (KHTO), Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

 
https://registry.faa.gov/N33005


Location: East Hampton, NY
Accident Number: ERA20LA163
Date & Time: 04/25/2020, 1340 EDT
Registration: N33005
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries:3 None 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On April 25, 2020, about 1340 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-151, N33005, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near East Hampton Airport (HTO), East Hampton, New York. The pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, they departed Igor I Sikorsky Memorial Airport (BDR), Bridgeport, Connecticut about 1045. He landed at HTO about 1115 and parked the airplane. He subsequently returned to the airplane with the passengers about 1315. The pilot then reviewed the weather and performed a preflight inspection of the airplane with no anomalies noted.

The pilot started the engine and taxied to the delta intersection of runway 28, where he performed the engine run-up procedure and configured the airplane for takeoff. During the takeoff roll, the oil pressure was good, and the engine was running normally, but after rotation during the climb, the pilot noticed a vibration and diminished engine power, though the throttle was in the full throttle position. At 400 or 500 ft mean seal level (msl), the engine began sputtering. The pilot made a 180° turn to the right and entered the right downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 28 at an altitude of 300 to 400 ft msl.

As the airplane proceeded on the downwind, the engine continued to sputter and then incurred a total loss of power. The airplane descended and the pilot made a right turn toward runway 10, reduced the throttle to the idle position, pitched to 73 mph (best glide speed), and checked that the electric fuel pump, master switch, and magnetos were on. The airplane touched down about 3/4 down the runway, went off the end, through a deer fence and came to rest in a field.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The propeller displayed scratches on the leading edges of both blades with no curling of the blade tips. No visible damage was present in the engine compartment. No oil or fuel leaks were noted. Engine oil on the dipstick showed the correct level and appeared clean. Examination of the throttle, mixture and carburetor heat controls revealed that they were intact, displayed correct movement, and no evidence of binding. The left wing and right wing fuel tanks were sampled, and no debris or water contamination was visible. Examination of the fuel strainer showed no debris or water, and fuel was present in both wing tanks with the fuel quantities at a level just below the tabs. The drive train was rotated by turning the propeller and compression was evident on all four cylinders.

After the examination, the fuel selector was turned on, the engine was primed using the electric fuel pump and started. The engine was first idled at 1,200 rpm, and then power was increased to 1,500 rpm. The engine ran normally, and no vibrations or sputtering were noted. After 8 minutes, the engine was shut down.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make:Piper 
Registration: N33005
Model/Series: PA28 151
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HTO, 55 ft msl
Observation Time: 1355 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: East Hampton, NY (HTO)
Destination: Bridgeport, CT (BDR) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.959444, -72.251667 (est)



A small plane that had just taken off from the airport in East Hampton experienced engine trouble and the pilot turned the plane around, landed, and crashed off the runway Saturday afternoon. While the plane was damaged, the pilot and her two passengers were not hurt, officials said.

The Piper PA-28-151 Cherokee Warrior had just departed runway 28 and was about 400 feet up in the air when it made a sharp turn, according to Justin Ricks, a pilot who witnessed the April 25 incident. On Saturday evening, he said that he and three other former Sound Aircraft Services employees were riding their motorcycles and made a pit stop at the airport when they noticed the plane turn 180 degrees.

“We call that the impossible turn — it’s a real hard one to make at that altitude,” Ricks said. They knew the maneuver meant the plane had lost power and the pilot was trying to land the plane, though they did not hear the engine fail. “The pilot maneuvered excellently.”

The pilot, who he declined to name and whose name officials have not yet released, landed the plane on runway 10, and it went off the runway and crashed through a fence.

“She made an emergency return and she did exactly all the right things to make it back,” Ricks said. “Her aviation ability was beyond question.”

The plane traveled across Daniels Hole Road in Wainscott and came to rest in the field across from the airport. The crash was reported at about 1:50 PM.

Ricks and his friends Michael Norbeck, Matthew Conrad, and Matthew Monk all drove over to the field where the plane came to rest. The plane was “banged up,” but Ricks said the pilot and her two passengers were not injured.

Those involved in the incident were able to get out of the plane on their own, though there was substantial damage to the wings and fuselage, East Hampton Fire Department Chief Gerard Turza Jr. said. The three women were checked by East Hampton Village Ambulance Association personnel, but refused medical attention.

Firefighters helped to secure the plane. They ran through a checklist to ensure there were no fuel leaks and that the electric power was turned off, which the pilot had already done. Turza said she was “very skilled and very knowledgeable.”

The fire department also stood by as airport personnel towed the plane back to the airport. It will be examined by the Federal Aviation Administration, which will investigate the cause of the accident, a normal procedure. Jim Brundige, the airport’s manager, who was reached earlier on Saturday afternoon, said the airport will put together an official report.

Daniels Hole Road, which was closed for about an hour, was reopened after the plane was towed.

https://indyeastend.com




A small plane overshot the end of a runway at East Hampton Airport on Saturday afternoon, knocking down a section of fence and crossing a road. There were no reports of injuries.

Howard Sherman of East Hampton said he had been on his way to buy gas, driving south on Daniels Hole Road, when he noticed the plane.

"I was intrigued and stopped.  As I got out of my car and started taking pictures, a guy on his bike started to ride by, I asked if he knew what had happened, and he said somebody overshot the runway and went through the fence, but nobody was hurt," he said.

The aircraft appeared to have suffered minor damage on its undercarriage, he said. "There was no indication of anything burning, everything seemed fine," Mr. Sherman said. "The pilot kept her wits about her."

An East Hampton Fire Department crash truck kept at the airport was summoned as a precaution.

https://www.easthamptonstar.com

IAI 1125 Astra SP, YV3427: Accident occurred April 24, 2020 at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida 
Gulfstream; Savannah, Georgia 
Honeywell; Phoenix, Arizona 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Accident Number: ERA20LA162
Date & Time: 04/24/2020, 1520 EDT
Registration: YV3427
Aircraft: IAI 1125
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2020, about 1520 eastern daylight time, an Israel Aircraft Industries 1125 Astra SP, Venezuelan registration YV3427, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The airline transport pilot, commercial copilot, and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that he was conducting a takeoff on runway 27 with the intended destination of Simón Bolívar International Airport (CCS), Maiquetía, Venezuela. During the takeoff roll, at rotation speed, the airplane did not respond when the pilot pulled back on the control yoke. He tried to rotate again, and the airspeed was in excess of V1, about 130 knots. With no response, he performed a rejected takeoff with maximum braking and full reverse thrust. The airplane departed the end of runway 27, proceeded through the overrun, and into the grass beyond the runway. The airplane pivoted to the left and came to a stop in the grass, near the perimeter access road. The crew and passengers exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

Inspectors with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The nose and right main landing gear collapsed during the accident sequence and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the forward fuselage and right wing. The passenger cabin was loaded with cargo, which was offloaded and weighed. First responders observed fuel leaking from the right-wing fuel tank.

The wreckage was retained for further investigation. The airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder; it was removed and shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC for readout. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: IAI
Registration: YV3427
Model/Series: 1125 Astra SP
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Inversiones SC 2012 C.A
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFXE, 14 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / 22 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)
Destination: Maiquetía (CCS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 26.197222, -80.170833 (est)





FORT LAUDERDALE, – A Venezuelan-registered Israel Aerospace Industries-manufactured twin-engine business jet ran off the end of the runway on April 24th at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport during a failed attempt to takeoff, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

According to Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration, three people were onboard the IAI 1125 Astra SP, which was headed to Simon Bolivar International Airport in Maiquetia, Venezuela.

Ft. Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Stephen Gollan said firefighters responded quickly because the plane was carrying 6,800 pounds of fuel.

“There was smoke coming from the right side of the IAI 1125 Astra SP,” Gollan said. “Our firefighters immediately put foam blankets down and extinguished any possibility for fire in the area."

Gollan said the two men and a woman inside were able to step off the plane safely and were not injured

A Federal Aviation Administration employee was there to begin the investigation, Bergen said, adding that The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident.

https://www.local10.com

Beechcraft A35 Bonanza, N8743A: Fatal accident occurred April 24, 2020 in Currie, Elko County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N8743A 

Location: Currie, NV
Accident Number: WPR20LA131
Date & Time: 04/24/2020, 1300 PDT
Registration: N8743A
Aircraft: Beech 35
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2020, about 1300 Pacific daylight time, a Beech A35 airplane, N8743A, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Currie, Nevada. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Preliminary radar data showed the airplane departed runway 4L at Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD), Chandler, Arizona, about 0933 MST. After departure, the airplane flew west bound briefly before turning northwest where it continued to track for the remaining portion of the flight captured by surveillance data. The direction was consistent with a direct heading to the planned destination, as well as the reported accident site. The last track data on the accident flight was about 200 miles southeast of the accident site and showed the airplane at 8,125 ft mean sea level, and about 137 knots.

The airplane was subject of an ALNOT. The airplane wreckage was located early the following day. The airplane struck terrain and came to rest in a mountain valley. Local law enforcement responded to the accident site and all major components of the airplane necessary for flight were located at the accident site. There was no post impact fire.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for future examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N8743A
Model/Series: 35 A35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEKO, 5030 ft msl
Observation Time: 1356 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 65 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / 19 knots, 280°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Chandler, AZ (CHD)
Destination: Twin Falls, ID (TWF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.533889, -114.413889 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Tom and Daniel Kvanvig

Tom and Stacie Kvanvig 

Chief Deputy Coroner Nick Czegledi identified the victims as 48-year-old Thomas Kvanvig, 49-year-old Stacie Kvanvig and 8-year-old Daniel Kvanvig.

Officials say three people killed in a plane crash Friday in Nevada are from the valley.

FOX 10 is learning more about a father, mother and their young son as close friends remember them Sunday night.

Two sisters, Piper, 16 and Macyn, 20, lost their little brother and their parents in the tragic crash.

Loved ones say this family of five shared a beautiful life.

They are identified as 48-year-old Thomas Kvanvig, 49-year-old Stacie Kvanvig and 8-year-old Daniel Kvanvig.

Jason Siemer and Gregg Fuller met Tom Kvanvig back in 1989. They attended the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York.

Since then, a brotherhood lasted for decades.

“He really lived life with gusto," Siemer said of Tom. "He never lost his cool, he was calm and collected all the time and he just had a real propensity for going after things that he wanted.”

Fuller remembered Stacie fondly, too.

“Stacie was another super human being as well," he said. "Together they were quite the team.”

High school sweethearts in Idaho, Tom and Stacie got married and had three kids together.

Tom worked for Intel in Chandler and Stacie was a realtor for Keller Williams.

Siemer says it was “sweet to see them get married and have such a beautiful family together.”

On Friday morning, Tom, Stacie and their eight-year-old son flew their plane from Chandler airport headed to Twin Falls, Idaho to visit family.

Authorities say the plane tried to land for unknown reasons and crashed in Nevada near the Utah border.

“I saw that his aircraft was flight planned to do an intermediate fuel stop on his way up to Twin Falls to visit family and it was supposed to land in Colorado City, Arizona," Fuller explained.

The bodies of the Kvanvig family were recovered Saturday.

Friends of the family are devastated, saying Tom loved the outdoors and Stacie just hosted a virtual cocktail hour on Zoom. But most of all, they adored their kids.

“I’m still doing a little bit of research on my own to put some closure to this for my own self and I hope to reach out to his two daughters and help them in any way we can," Fuller said.

If you would like to donate to the family, visit their GoFundMe page.

https://www.fox10phoenix.com

Stacie Kvanvig

Thomas Kvanvig

ELKO – Three people were killed Friday night when the small plane they were traveling in crashed in Goshute Valley.

The Elko County Sheriff’s Office received a call from the Air Force about a possible plane down, according to chief deputy coroner Nick Czegledi. A REACH aircraft was sent out and spotted the wreckage within 100 feet of the coordinates provided by the Air Force.

A mission to recover the bodies was launched around 12:30 Saturday morning.

Czegledi said the occupants were Thomas A. Kvanvig, 48, of Chandler, Arizona; Stacie M. Kvanvig, 49; and Daniel Kvanvig, 8.

A posting on LinkedIn.com lists Thomas Kvanvig as an engineer with Intel Corp.

It appeared their Beechcraft A35 Bonanza was trying to land for unknown reasons and came down hard, nose down, Czegledi said.

The wreckage was about 20-25 miles from the Utah border.

Czegledi said the bodies were recovered. 

The Elko County Sheriff’s Office is cooperating with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board on the investigation.

https://magicvalley.com


On April 24th 2020, Tom, Stacie and Daniel(8) Kvanvig passed away in a plane crash located in Nevada. Piper(16) and Macyn(20), the daughters of Tom and Stacie, were fortunately not on the plane.


Thomas A. Kvanvig

Keuthan Buccaneer II, N43310: Incident occurred April 24, 2020 in Mobile, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft made a forced landing on the beach.

https://registry.faa.gov/N43310

Date: 24-APR-20
Time: 15:38:00Z
Regis#: N43310
Aircraft Make: KEUTHAN
Aircraft Model: BUCCANEER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MOBILE
State: ALABAMA







MOBILE, Alabama (WKRG) –

UPDATE (12:15 p.m.) – The following is information from the Federal Aviation Administration:

An experimental Keuthan Buccaneer II aircraft landed on the beach in Mobile, Alabama, at 10:40 a.m. CDT today. The pilot was the only person onboard. He reported no injuries to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the accident.

UPDATE (11:50 a.m.) —

MOBILE, Alabama (WKRG) – A small aircraft has crashed on Bellingrath Road at the AL 188 Bridge (Fowl River Bridge) Friday morning. The Mobile County Sheriff’s office reports the pilot of the plane took out a few power lines but is okay.

We are told the FAA is investigating the crash.

The Coast Guard also confirmed the plane crash, but are not involved as it is not currently a search and rescue.

(ORIGINAL STORY) – Mobile Traffic reports a small aircraft has crashed on Bellingrath Road.

The report says the aircraft struck the AL 188 bridge over West Fowl River.

They confirm the pilot made it out of the aircraft.

https://www.wkrg.com

Fire (Non-Impact): Beechcraft 60 Duke, N60RK; fatal accident occurred May 15, 2019 near Fort Collins-Loveland Airport (KFNL), Larimer County, Colorado








The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Lycoming Engines; Milliken, Colorado
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N60RK

Location: Loveland, CO
Accident Number: CEN19FA143
Date & Time: 05/15/2019, 1248 MDT
Registration: N60RK
Aircraft: Beech 60
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Fire/smoke (non-impact)
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry

On May 15, 2019, at 1248 mountain daylight time, a Beech 60, N60RK, was destroyed when it collided with terrain during an emergency landing at Northern Colorado Regional Airport (FNL), Loveland, Colorado. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Majeste Air LLC, and was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the accident site at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the flight which originated from Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (BJC), Broomfield, Colorado, about 1230, was destined for FNL.

The airplane had been at BJC since July 2017 for the installation of new avionics which included a primary flight display (PFD); multi-function display (MFD); a backup to the electronic flight instrument system (EFIS); two navigation, communication, and GPS units, a transponder, audio panel, and associated wiring.

According to individuals who performed work on the airplane, a Hobbs meter oil hose was installed, as well as a longer fuel line in order to use the same mounting locations for the fuel flow transducers. This was only required on the right engine because of the location of air conditioning compressor.

Three engine runs were conducted after the work was completed. The first test run revealed an oil leak in the left engine oil pressure transducer. The line was retorqued and the two subsequent engine runs revealed no anomalies. In a telephone conversation about 2 weeks before the accident, the pilot stated that he was applying for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ferry permit because the airplane's annual inspection had expired. The pilot arrived at the airport about 1130. He did not have a ferry permit and no ferry permit inspection was conducted.

At 1217, the pilot contacted BJC ground control and requested a "high-speed taxi" before takeoff. The request was granted, and the pilot made the high-speed taxi on runway 12L. He was subsequently cleared for takeoff at 1226.

At 1247, the pilot reported on the FNL common traffic advisory frequency that he was on the left downwind leg for runway 15 and that he had "an engine out [and] smoke in the cockpit." The pilot of another airplane advised that he could see the fire and that the runway was clear. The accident pilot replied, "I've got a fire. I'm gonna land it pretty darn quick. Please have the trucks come on out." There were several ground witnesses, one of which said that the airplane's right wing was on fire before the accident.

A video taken by an airport security camera showed the airplane on a base leg for runway 15. Fire could be seen on the right side of the airplane. The airplane completed two full rolls as it descended before impacting a dry retention pond about ¼-mile from the approach end of the runway.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/14/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  7000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

The 69-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single- and multiengine land and instrument ratings. He also held a third-class airman medical certificate, dated March 14, 2018, that contained the restriction, "Must wear corrective lenses for distant vision and have available glasses for near vision." At the time of his medical certification, he reported civil flight experience of 7,000 total hours with 50 hours in the previous 6 months.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N60RK
Model/Series: 60 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: P-79
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6775 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3119.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-541-E1C4
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The accident airplane (serial number P-79), was manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation in 1969. It was powered by two Lycoming TIO-541-E1C4 fuel-injected reciprocating engines (serial numbers RL-1143-59, left; L-1676-59. right), each rated at 310 horsepower, and each with Hartzell 3-blade, all-metal, constant speed propellers (model number HC-F73YR-2UF).

According to the maintenance records, the last annual inspection occurred on September 1, 2017, when the airframe had accrued 3,119.9 hours on the tachometer (the Hobbs meter read 1,754.0 hours). At that time, the left engine had accrued 3,337.5 total hours and 902.9 hours since major overhaul, and the right engine had accrued 3,467.3 total hours and 827.7 hours since major overhaul. Review of FAA records confirmed that the pilot had not obtained a ferry permit for the accident flight.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FNL, 5016 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1256 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Broomfield, CO (BJC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Loveland, CO (FNL)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1230 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

The recorded weather conditions at FNL about the time of the accident included wind from 210° at 7 knots, variable between 180° and 240°; 10 miles visibility; clear sky; temperature 28°C; dew point 01°C; altimeter setting, 29.96 inches of mercury.

Airport Information

Airport: Northern Colorado Regional (FNL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5016 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight and On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.464722, -105.085556

The airplane came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of 072° at an elevation of 4,869 ft mean sea level (msl).

The right engine was located about 40 ft northeast of the main wreckage. The right wing was separated just outboard of the right nacelle and came to rest on a heading of 192°. Fire had consumed the inboard right wing, which was oriented on a heading of 020°. The left wing was also destroyed by fire; it was oriented on a magnetic heading of 204°.

The rudder and right elevator were destroyed by fire, but the left elevator was intact and oriented on a magnetic heading of 090°. The fuselage and instrument panel were destroyed by fire. Control cable continuity was established to all flight controls from their attach points through tensile overload failures. The flap actuators were consumed by fire. The left main landing gear was found in the retracted position. The nose landing gear and right main landing gear were separated during the impact sequence. The actuating arm indicated that the landing gear was extended.

Continuity and compression were established on the right engine except for cylinder Nos. 1, 3 and 5 due to impact damage, A significant area of thermal damage was observed in the vicinity of the engine-driven fuel pump. The fuel line from the pump to the fuel flow transducer was loose and could be moved by hand. The fuel strainer screens clean, but each bowl contained burnt material. Both fuel selector valves were positioned on the main tanks. Continuity and compression were established on the left engine. The magnetos were thermally damaged and did not spark.

The right propeller remained attached to the engine and was in the feathered position. Two blades were straight and unremarkable; the third blade exhibited S-bending. The left propeller remained attached to the left engine. One blade remained attached to the hub and was bent slightly forward at midspan. The other two blades separated from the hub; one blade was straight, the other was fractured at midspan.

The left side of the right engine sustained heavy impact damage. The turbocharger pipes were displaced to the right, and the flange bolts were sheared off to the right. The air conditioning hoses were completely consumed by fire. There was evidence of fire aft of the engine-driven fuel pump. The fuel pump was discolored by fire. The fire sleeves on both the fuel pump inlet and outlet hoses were burned away. The fuel outlet hose to the flow transducer was loose. 

Medical And Pathological Information

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Larimer County Chief Medical Examiner in Loveland, Colorado. The cause of death was attributed to blunt force and thermal injuries.

Toxicological screening performed by FAA's Forensic Sciences laboratory found no evidence of carboxyhemoglobin or ethanol in blood, or drugs in urine. A cyanide test was not performed.

Ted Smith Aerostar 601B, N601X: Fatal accident occurred April 23, 2020 in Moffat County, Colorado

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

https://registry.faa.gov/N601X

Location: Craig, CO
Accident Number: CEN20LA160
Date & Time: 04/23/2020, 2139 MDT
Registration: N601X
Aircraft: Piper PA60
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 23, 2020, at 2139 mountain daylight time (MDT), radar contact was lost with a Piper Aerostar 601X, N601X. The airplane was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Craig, Colorado. The uncertificated (student rated) pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane was not equipped with automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B), which was required for operations in airspace that included class E airspace at or above 10,000 ft. The flight had not been operating on a flight plan and had no communications with air traffic control as required when it operated in class A airspace above 18,000 ft. Aircraft maintenance logbooks showed that the airplane received it last regulatory annual inspection dated November 21, 2019, and its last altimeter inspection, up to 30,000 ft, was dated June 27, 2014.

Radar track data indicated that N601X departed Jersey Shore Airport (P96), Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, about 1119 MDT, flying westbound at a cruise altitude of about 3,500 feet msl and had an average ground speed of about 180 - 190 kts until stopping at Findlay Airport (FDY), Findlay, Ohio, about 1251 MDT. Track data indicates N601X departed FDY about 1337 MDT, flying westbound at an altitude of about 3,500 ft, climbed once to about 5,500 ft, then descended to about 3,500 ft until later climbing to a cruise altitude of between 8,500-9,500 ft before descending into and landing at Red Oak Municipal Airport (RDK), Red Oak, Iowa, about 1618 MDT. Track data indicates N601X likely departed RDK about 1708 MDT, continuing westbound again, climbing to a maximum cruise altitude of about 9,500 ft, then descended and landed at Northern Colorado Regional Airport (FNL), Ft Collins/Loveland, Colorado, about 1949 MDT.

A line service technician employed by a fixed base operator (FBO) at FNL stated that he was sitting in the line shack when he saw N601X taxi from the runway. He said the airplane's right engine was not running, and the pilot was trying to start it. The engine did not restart, and the airplane continued to taxi to the ramp. He asked the pilot if everything was "okay," and the pilot said, "yeah cut it a little close on fuel." He said the airplane was leaning "quite a bit" toward the right, which he attributed to a fuel imbalance. The line service technician said there was "a lot" of fuel staining under the right wing and on top of the wing. He did not look at the left wing and did not know if the left wing had fuel stains. He said he looked in the airplane and did not see it equipped with ADS-B; he said that he did not know how the pilot was going to fly over the mountains. He said the airplane was equipped with a panel mounted Garmin 430 and a transponder with round knobs. He said he saw an oxygen tank in the airplane and did not know the amount of oxygen that was present in the tank. The line service technician said the airplane did not have a pressurization system. The line service technician said he topped off all three fuel tanks: left wing, right wing and fuselage tank. He said during fueling of left tank, he had to push up the right wing up because it was leaning downward. The pilot told him to make sure that the fuel tank cap on the fuselage was on tight because "the thing leaks." The line service technician said he double checked the fuselage fuel tank cap, and it was on "tight." The line service technician said the engines sounded fine except for the pilot running out of fuel during the after-landing taxi. He did not think the airplane was in "very good" condition.

A customer service representative at the FBO stated the pilot told her he purchased the airplane in New York and was "going to try to get over the mountains." The pilot said he flew on a commercial flight from California and on the same day he purchased the airplane. He said he had to go over the mountains and through Utah and was destined to California. She said the pilot was "really tired" and did not have cash to buy Red Bull, so she made him coffee. The pilot told her that he left New York later than he wanted too because he was talking with the former airplane owner. He told her the airplane was his fifth airplane that he owned.

Radar track data indicates N601X departed FNL about 2037 MDT turning westbound, climbing through about 12,000 ft, and made a left, almost 360° turn, continuing to climb throughout the turn, then flying west/southwest bound and reaching about 16,000 ft. The airplane continued west/southwest for a little over 40 miles climbing again and reaching about 22,000 ft, then turning right about 90° flying northbound, momentarily, before turning left and heading west/northwest and descending to about 20,000 ft, then back up again to about 22,000 ft, briefly, then back down to about 20,000 ft. The airplane then turned left to the southwest, then southbound, entering erratic flight climbing to over 23,000 ft, momentarily, before beginning to descend, entering a tight looping turn to the left and losing altitude rapidly, then showing a west/northwest heading in the final segment before track data was lost at about 2139 MDT.

An alert notice was issued, and the airplane wreckage was located by the Colorado State Highway Patrol on April 24, 2020, about 0336 MDT, about 15 miles west of Craig, Colorado.

Aircraft registry records showed that the pilot also owned a Cessna 310Q, N7742Q, which was based at San Martin Airport, near San Martin, California. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N601X
Model/Series: PA60 601
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: CAG, 6198 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / , 270°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ft Collins, CO (FNL)
Destination: , CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.951944, -108.340278 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.
 
Scott Dewayne Mendez
June 8th, 1979 – April 24th, 2020

On April 24th, 2020, Scott Mendez, who was 40 years old, passed away suddenly in a plane accident chasing his dreams while flying. Scott was born June 8th, 1979, and was from San Jose, California. Scott will be forever remembered by his wife, parents, brother, nephew, partner, and precious children. A Funeral Service and a Celebration of life in memory of Scott will be held in the future.


Memorial for Scott Mendez

https://www.gofundme.com

It’s with a heavy heart we come together to mourn the loss of Scott Mendez. Scott was only 40 years old. He leaves behind the love of his life Inez (her kids), his step children- Adrianna and Ben and his three small children- Savannah 9, Memphis 7 and Falynn 5. His death was very much unexpected. Scott was a pilot and lost his life in Colorado while doing what he loved best, flying. On behalf of my sister and Scott’s children, we ask for your support in raising funds to return Scott back home, funeral arrangements and other financial burdens that Inez will have to face. I understand times are very tough right now, especially with what's currently going on in the world but anything you can give would be greatly appreciated. Please continue to keep my sister and the kids in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time. Please feel free to share this page. Thank you.

From the office of the Moffat County Coroner's Office:

The pilot who perished in the Thursday evening plane crash near Powder Wash, Rural Moffat County, Colorado has been identified as Scott Dewayne Mendez, 40, of San Jose, California. An autopsy is scheduled at 1:00 p.m., Monday, April 27, 2020, at Community Hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado.

Jesse Joe Arthurs, Moffat County Coroner

MOFFAT COUNTY, Colorado — The pilot of a small plane that took off from the Northern Colorado Regional Airport was killed when the plane crashed in western Moffat County around 10 p.m. Thursday night.

Denver Air Traffic Control notified the Moffat County Sheriff's Office about the possible crash in the Powder Wash area off Moffat County Road 4 at 9:50 p.m.

The Powder Wash area is just south of the Wyoming border and about 60 driving miles northwest of Craig.

Deputies responded to the area and located a crashed fixed-wing aircraft at about 3:20 a.m on Friday.

The preliminary investigation indicates that the Ted Smith Aerostar 601 plane crashed into the ground, killing the pilot.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration said the plane had taken off earlier Thursday from the Loveland airport earlier in the evening.

The identity of the pilot will be released by the Moffat County Coroner’s Office after appropriate notifications have been made. 

Craig is located in northwest Colorado about 198 driving miles from Denver.

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