Friday, February 12, 2016

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, N66801: Incident occurred February 12, 2016 at Tulsa International Airport (KTUL) Tulsa, Oklahoma

Date: 13-FEB-16
Time: 02:10:00Z
Regis#: N66801
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15
City: TULSA
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, TULSA, OK

http://registry.faa.gov/N66801

A single-engine plane was forced to make an emergency landing at Tulsa International Airport on Friday night, and when the landing gear collapsed the aircraft came to rest at a runway intersection, preventing commercial flights from landing.

The pilot of the V-tail Bonanza indicated to air traffic controllers that the plane was having alternator problems and needed to land at the airport, TIA spokeswoman Alexis Higgins said.

When the plane came in about 8:15 p.m., the landing gear collapsed at the intersection of the main runway and the crosswind runway, she said.

Until the plane could be moved, no commercial flights could land on the main runway, but some smaller planes could land on the west runway, Higgins said.

She said commercial planes could depart from the west runway.

According to the airport's website, about 15 flights were scheduled to land in Tulsa between 9 p.m. and midnight. One plane had already boarded to depart to Houston.

As of late Friday, airport staff did not anticipate any diversions, Higgins said.

Higgins did not yet know where the plane came from or where it was headed but said two people were on board and that neither was injured.

The airport received word from the FAA just before 9:30 p.m. that the plane could be moved — a process that would take only minutes once a wrecker arrived, Higgins said.

Source:  http://www.tulsaworld.com

Vortex M912, N911GW, Escambia County Sheriff's Office: Accident occurred February 12, 2016 in Brewton, Escambia County, Alabama




Escambia County Sheriff Grover Smith narrowly escaped injury Friday after his plane crashed near Alco Park.

Smith was flying the department’s gyroplane as part of the search for a missing Brewton teen.

Witnesses said it appeared Smith hit a pocket of air and clipped a treetop before crashing.

 Smith walked away from the wreckage, which landed in the backyard of a North Forest Hill Road home.

Burt Barton was working on his tractor and saw the crash happen.

“It was just flying over one side, and we were admiring it,” Barton said. “About that time, it hit the tree, and ‘bam.’”

Emergency personnel were at the lake as part of the search mission and responded quickly up the hill.

Story and photo: http://www.brewtonstandard.com

Allegiant Air, McDonnell Douglas MD-83, N405NV: Incident occurred February 12, 2016 at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport (KBHM), Birmingham, Alabama



Passenger Nick Janovsky realized something was amiss with Allegiant Air Flight 872 when he witnessed a scene that seldom occurs on a commercial aircraft cruising at 30,000 feet:

Flight attendants, looking upset, running in the cabin.

The crew told passengers they were making an emergency landing. Within minutes, the aircraft descended so abruptly and rapidly that children in the cabin began to wail. "Everybody was just freaking out," Janovsky said.

Flight 872, which departed St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport at 8:19 a.m. Friday bound for Omaha, Neb., made an emergency landing in Birmingham, Ala., because the crew noticed an unusual electrical odor, Allegiant told reporters. Janovsky said the crew told passengers the emergency was caused by "the smell of an electrical fire."

The Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating, said in a written statement the crew reported "smoke in the cockpit."

The aircraft, a 27-year-old MD-83, landed safely at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport with 153 passengers and six crew members. No injuries were reported.

The incident is the latest in a string of much-publicized emergency landings by the low-cost, Las Vegas-based airline that included five emergency landings on Florida flights in the last week of 2015. Allegiant aircraft made three emergency landings at St. Pete-Clearwater, one of the busiest airports on its schedule, during one month in the summer.

Allegiant, which did not respond to a request for comment by the Tampa Bay Times, told other media outlets passengers would receive a $100 voucher for future travel on the airline. The airline has said it is one of the safest in the industry.

Janovsky, 34, a St. Petersburg resident who is a real estate agent and a political consultant, was flying to visit family. A veteran flier, he was on his first Allegiant flight.

Seated in row 18 toward the front of the aircraft, Janovsky said he could not smell anything unusual at the time the emergency was declared, but he said other passengers in the back of the plane noticed the odd odor.

The plane, he said, shuddered uncomfortably during the rapid descent. At some point, all electricity to the passenger cabin appeared to go out. The small fans above passengers' heads stopped working, and even the seat belt sign went out. Flight attendants communicated with passengers using handheld megaphones rather than the plane's public-address system.

In about 10 minutes, the aircraft landed and stopped on the runway. Janovsky said he saw fire trucks and emergency vehicles surround the plane. Passengers, however, were not taken off. The crew said little to passengers as they waited for 20 minutes.

"That was a problem," he said. "Everybody assumed the airplane was on fire."

One passenger unbuckled her seat belt, Janovsky said, when a flight attendant yelled at her to sit down.

Passengers were frightened, Janovsky said, and some talked about opening the emergency doors themselves to get out of the aircraft. In they end, they decided against it.

Janovsky said the plane finally taxied to a gate, but he said it took another 30 minutes before passengers were allowed off.

As he walked off the aircraft into the terminal, Janovsky said he smelled the strong odor of something electrical burning. "It was like a hair dryer on fire," he said.

The flight, he noted, would be his last on Allegiant. "It was terrifying," he said. "Allegiant's like the Russian roulette of the skies."

A replacement aircraft from St. Pete-Clearwater flew to Birmingham to take the passengers to Nebraska several hours later.

Before leaving Alabama, Allegiant offered passengers a treat for their trouble — free pizza.

Source:  http://web.tampabay.com

Same aircraft made emergency landing less than 2 months ago in Chattanooga: http://www.wvtm13.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N405NV

Land lease agreements a focus of first Pittsfield Municipal Airport (KPSF) study group meeting

PITTSFIELD >> Leases involving Pittsfield Municipal Airport land generated considerable discussion during the first meeting of a study group examining how the facility is managed and weighing whether changes could make it more cost-effective.

The study group, which was appointed by Mayor Linda M. Tyer after a request from the City Council, held its organizational meeting Thursday at City Hall. The nine-member committee began to discuss how it will examine the airport operation in the coming months — aiming to produce a report in May.

Airport Manager Robert Snuck told the committee he found several questionable leases after beginning in the post last year and recently researching the issue as part of an Airport Commission effort to boost revenue while controlling expenses.

Snuck said some of the lease agreements he found — particularly concerning a 30-acre parcel carved out of the more than 550-acre airport site for the Westwood Business Center Park — seem to be out of compliance with Federal Aviation Administration or state regulations for airports. For instance the FAA has regulations concerning how revenue derived from airport property can be used, he said.

"I think things were done I'll say were under the table," Snuck said at one point.

He added that some leases were granted for much longer than the 20-year timeframe normally required in the regulations. Some were for 40 years at $1 per year, with an option for 40 additional years at the same nominal cost, Snuck said.

Airport Commission Chairman Christopher Pedersen, who is a member of the study group, said on Friday that it remains unclear exactly what agreements were reached when the Westwood park was created during the mid-1980s, but he believes additional paperwork might be found to clarify the situations. He said there is evidence that the several parties involved were discussing agreements at the time, but not all paperwork has been located.

Putting the matter into context, he said the two leases granted for 40 years at $1 a year were on the five acres of the Westwood park that is owned by the city, while another 25 acres is owned by the airport. Overall, he added, total revenue on leases there is low, "maybe $6,000 annually," and not a major potential source of income to support the operation.

Pedersen said it also is typical of many industrial or business park sites that incentives, such as a tax break or low lease figure, are used to lure a business to the area. All of the park parcels are now leased, he said. There are at least seven available business sites at the Barker Road park.

Thomas Sakshaug, chairman of the study committee, said the group will want to review all leases associated with the airport and asked for copies of that information, along with other financial details of the operation.

Former Ward 5 Councilor Jonathan Lothrop — who for many years represented the ward where the airport off Tamarack Road is located — asked for spreadsheets of the financial data on which categories could be added. He offered to put that part of the study together as a subtask, and that was agreed to by committee members.

Ward 4 Councilor Christopher Connell, current Ward 5 Councilor Donna Todd Rivers and Councilor at large Melissa Mazzeo petitioned the council last month to ask Tyer to launch a study. Connell and Mazzeo had in the past raised the issue of whether having the city manage the airport is cost effective compared to other arrangements, such as privatization.

Those three councilors were named to the committee, along with Lothrop and Sakshaug. Also selected by Tyer were Michael Lyon of Lyon Aviation, which acts as the fixed-base operator private firm at the airport, providing services like fueling and hanger space for craft using the facility; Pedersen, Ashley Sulock, and attorney C. Jeffrey Cook.

Connell and other members said they want to focus first on the financial details of the operation, including budget figures like revenue and expenses, staffing and long-term plans for airport upgrade work, in the pipeline or being discussed.

Snuck and Airport Inspector Brian Spencer, the two city employees, also attended the group's organizational session.

Sakshaug won agreement for a second meeting on Feb. 25 and tentatively set a third meeting for March 9. Both sessions were scheduled for Room 203 at City Hall at 7 p.m.

Pedersen said the airport offices also would be used for meetings if space is unavailable at City Hall. Sakshaug said he wanted to schedule one or more meetings there so that committee members can view details of the facility.

The airport dates to 1932, Snuck said, opening with only the smaller, unpaved runway that now runs at an angle across the main runway. The main runway was lengthened and the approaches cleared back during a multi-year, $21 million project that will conclude this spring with repaving for old sections of the runway.

The improvements, financed primarily through federal and state grant funding, were designed to allow larger craft to use the airport and meet updated FAA safety requirements. For most such projects, the city has supplied a small percentage of the overall cost, from 5 to 10 percent of the total.

Lyon said the facility is regularly used by people and businesses from around the county, such as second home owners and Williams College or Canyon Ranch visitors. The use "is definitely countywide," he said.

The Westwood Center park is managed by the Pittsfield Economic Revitalization Corp. PERC officials could not be reached Friday for comment.

Story and comments:  http://www.berkshireeagle.com

U.S. Air Carriers to Begin Competing for Cuba Flights: Agreement to be signed by nations next week to resume full service

The Wall Street Journal
By Felicia Schwartz
Updated Feb. 12, 2016 5:13 p.m. ET


WASHINGTON—U.S. air carriers will begin competing for routes and airport slots for travel to Cuba on Tuesday when an agreement takes effect to restore normal commercial air service between the two countries.

The U.S. and Cuba are expected to formally sign an agreement in Havana to resume air service between the countries. Once that happens, air carriers will have 15 days to submit applications to the Transportation Department for the routes they’d like to fly.

Senior U.S. officials said they expect to make a decision about which carriers get which routes this summer, and U.S. airline carriers will be able to sell tickets for them this fall.

“There’s no restriction on aircraft type or aircraft size, and so we expect to see additional analysis on what folks view the overall travel demand and traffic patterns between certain U.S. cities and certain U.S. regions to Cuba,” said Brandon Belford, deputy assistant secretary for aviation and international affairs at the Transportation Department.

The deal reached in Washington in December allows for up to 110 flights per day to Cuba, including 20 to Havana and 10 to each of Cuba’s nine other international airports.

U.S. officials expect there will be more demand than supply for the Havana flights, so that will generate intense competition for those routes. While the agreement allows for 110 flights per day, it is unlikely so many daily flights to Cuba will begin by the fall.

“We don’t expect the market to necessarily demand 10 per day to each of the other non-Havana destinations,” said Thomas Engle, deputy assistant secretary of state for transportation affairs. “We do expect…potentially more interest on the part of U.S. carriers, potentially exceeding 20 per day to Havana.”

For the routes to areas outside Havana, Mr. Belford said, the U.S. could decide to award those flights before the summer because there likely won’t be as much competition.

American Airlines Group Inc. said Friday it will apply to offer scheduled flights to the island nation that it has been serving for 25 years with charter flights. A spokesman for the largest U.S. airline by traffic said American will apply for permission to fly from Miami and other American hubs, which he declined to identify, to Havana and perhaps other Cuban destinations. Currently, American offers 24 weekly charters to Cuba from Miami; Tampa, Fla.; and Los Angeles.

JetBlue Airways Corp. also said they’d apply to offer regularly scheduled flights to Cuba, where it has operated charter flights since 2011.

“Our focus cities in New York and Florida are natural gateways to Havana and other Cuban destinations,” said Doug McGraw, a JetBlue spokesman.

Currently, there are about 10 to 15 daily charter flights to Cuba, primarily from Miami to Havana and other airports. American Airlines has charters from Miami; Tampa and Los Angeles, and JetBlue Airways Corp. flies from New York; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; and Tampa. Delta Air Lines Inc. has in the past offered charters from New York, Atlanta and Miami. Charter service will continue without any restrictions on the number of daily flights.

The coming restoration of normal commercial air service “provides for a very important sizable increase in travel between the two countries, and that reinforces the president’s objective,” Mr. Engle said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Cessna 152, FoxField Aviation, N47259: Accident occurred February 12, 2016 at Brookhaven Airport (KHWV), Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

MARS AEROSPACE INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N47259

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Farmingdale FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA124
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N47259
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that on his second landing he felt a "small" impact just before touchdown, and then the airplane pitched down and skidded to a stop. 

The pilot further reported that after the airplane came to a stop, he observed smoke coming from the lower left side of the cowling just forward of the firewall. 

As a result of the post-impact fire that ensued, the airplane was destroyed.

The pilot reported that he observed evidence of where the airplane's nose wheel impacted a snow berm located on the approach to the runway. He estimated that the snow berm was about five feet high and about twenty feet wide.

The airport manager reported that about four inches of snow accumulated on the ground prior to the accident, but that almost all of the snow had been plowed from the runway. He further reported that the accident airplanes nose gear impacted a snow berm that was about 10 feet off the end of the runway, and about 28 inches high. 

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate terrain clearance while landing, which resulted in a collision with a snow berm, nose gear collapse, and postimpact fire.





A small, private single-engine plane was significantly damaged by a fire that started after it touched down Friday morning at Brookhaven Calabro Airport in Shirley, officials said.

A spokesman for the Town of Brookhaven, which operates the airport, said the plane, a two-seat Cessna 152, had just landed and was “taxiing down the runway” when the engine caught fire.

The Federal Aviation Administration said its initial characterization of the incident was a crash-landing.

The incident was reported in a 911 call at 10:12 a.m.

The FAA and Suffolk County police said there were two people aboard the plane, which had earlier departed from Long Island MacArthur Airport. Neither person was injured.

Town spokesman Jack Krieger said indications are the pilot was scheduled to fly from MacArthur to Calabro.

Krieger said Calabro Airport had been closed as a result of the incident.

It was not immediately clear how long the airport would be closed.

Photos from the scene showed the high-wing Cessna off to one side of the runway, its wing collapsed and the cockpit section of the plane virtually destroyed.

Fire officials said that, in addition to Suffolk police, firefighters from the Mastic Fire Department responded.

The FAA said it would investigate the incident.

Source:  http://www.newsday.com

SHIRLEY, New York – A small plane with two people aboard crashed at Brookhaven Airport Friday, bursting into flames after the occupants managed to escape. 

The plane ignited after the pilot landed the aircraft on the northern end of the runway around 10:12 a.m., according to officials.

The pilot and the passenger of the Cessna 152, two men who haven't been identified, ran from the plane and weren't hurt.

Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board officials are investigating. 

Source: http://pix11.com



SHIRLEY - Police say a plane crashed this morning at Brookhaven Airport in Shirley.

According to police, two people were on board the single engine Cessna C-152 plane.

The plane took off from MacArthur and was heading to Brookhaven when it crashed there around 10:20 a.m.

Police say both people got out of the plane unharmed before it went up in flames.

The NTSB and FAA are investigating the crash.

Socata TB21TC, N2805R: Incident occurred February 12, 2016 in Tillamook County, Oregon

 Date: 12-FEB-16
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N2805R
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TB21
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TILLAMOOK
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. TILLAMOOK, OR

http://registry.faa.gov/N2805R

Deadly Plane Crash Results in $5.4M Judgment Against United States: Beech V35B Bonanza, N6658R and Piper PA28, N23SC, fatal accident occurred on May 28, 2012 in Warrenton, Virginia

James Michael "Mike" Duncan


Paul Gardella



A federal judge in Virginia has issued a $5.4 million judgment against the U.S. government after finding that an air traffic controller was negligent for a deadly midair crash involving three experienced pilots, including the former chief medical officer of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board.

Thursday’s judgment awarded damages to the widow of an FAA-certified flight instructor, who was conducting a flight training review of the NTSB official, James Duncan, when both were killed in the 2012 crash. The pilot of the other plane, Thomas Proven, who is an accident investigator for the FAA, survived.

“It’s one of the cases that continue to show you’ve got to be diligent as an air traffic controller because you really do have other people’s lives in your hands,” said Jim Beasley, managing member of The Beasley Firm in Philadelphia, who represented Joyce Gardella.

Lawyers from the Justice Department and the U.S. attorney’s office in the Eastern District of Virginia defended the air traffic controller in the case. Calls to both offices weren’t returned.

Gardella’s husband, Paul Gardella, the passenger in a Beechcraft V35B Bonanza, and Duncan, the pilot, took off from Warrenton-Fauquier Airport in Warrenton, Virginia. Proven was heading to that airport in a Piper PA-28 Cherokee.

The air traffic controller, Shane Keenley, received a conflict alert involving the two aircraft but, determining that both were still 500 feet apart, did not warn the pilots.

In 2014, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, which investigated the crash due to the involvement of NTSB and FAA officials, concluded that the pilots had failed to see each other.

Joyce Gardella sued last year under Virginia’s Wrongful Death Act claiming the U.S. government was liable under the Federal Tort Claims Act. DOJ lawyers argued that her husband should have seen the other aircraft.

U.S. District Judge Liam O’Grady, who conducted a bench trial in November, disagreed.

“Mr. Keenley did not use his best judgment when he decided that issuing a safety alert was not necessary in this case,” O’Grady of the Eastern District of Virginia wrote.

O’Grady also concluded that Gardella’s own negligence did not contribute to his death—an important ruling that allowed his wife to get one of the highest damages amounts in a Virginia plane crash against the U.S. 
government, Beasley said

“The law in Virginia is very tough,” he said. “If you’re even remotely contributory negligent, that’s a bar to your recovery. That’s one reason why the government pushed so hard to claim contributory negligence.”

Damages included $1.2 million in lost income and $2.3 million in emotional damages to Gardella’s wife, plus $500,000 to each of his three adult children.

Proven, who sued last year for $250,000 in injuries and loss of his plane, settled with the U.S. government on Sept. 17.

Source: http://www.nationallawjournal.com

Accident occurred Monday, May 28, 2012 in Sumerduck, VA
Aircraft: BEECH V35B, registration: N6658R
Injuries: 2 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB Identification: ERA12RA367B 
Accident occurred Monday, May 28, 2012 in Sumerduck, VA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-140, registration: N23SC
Injuries: 2 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On May 28, 2012, about 1604 eastern daylight time, a Beech V35B, N6658R, and a Piper PA-28-140, N23SC, collided in flight in the vicinity of Sumerduck, Virginia. The Beech was destroyed, and the pilot and flight instructor were fatally injured; the Piper was substantially damaged, and the pilot was seriously injured. Neither of the local flights was operating on a flight plan, and both were being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The Beech departed Warrenton-Fauquier Airport, Warrenton, Virginia, on a flight review for the private pilot, and the Piper departed Culpeper Regional Airport, Culpeper, Virginia, on a personal flight.

The pilot/owner of the Beech was an employee of the NTSB, and the pilot/owner of the Piper was an employee of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Under the provisions of Annex 13 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation and by mutual agreement, the United States delegated the accident investigation to the government of Canada. The NTSB designated an accredited representative to the investigation on behalf of the United States, and the FAA designated an advisor to the accredited representative.

The investigation is being conducted by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada under its statutes. Further information may be obtained from:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Place du Centre
200 Promenade du Portage, 4th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 1K8

Tel: 1 (800) 387-3557
Fax: 1 (819) 997-2239
Email: airops@tsb.gc.ca
Web: http://www.tsb.gc.ca

Occurrence Number: A12H0001

This report is for informational purposes only, and only contains information released by or provided to the government of Canada.

Aviation Investigation Report A12H0001: http://www.tsb.gc.ca

Mid-air collision
between Beechcraft V35B, N6658R
and Piper PA-28-140, N23SC
Warrenton, Virginia, 6 nm S
28 May 2012

Summary

The Beechcraft V35B Bonanza (registration N6658R, serial number D-103232) was in a shallow climb, heading southbound, in the vicinity of Warrenton, Virginia. The aircraft was operated under visual flight rules for the purposes of a biennial flight review. The Piper PA-28-140 (registration N23SC, serial number 28-21217) was in level flight, also under visual flight rules, and was heading in a southeasterly direction. At 1604:45 Eastern Daylight Time, the aircraft collided approximately 1800 feet above sea level. The Beechcraft broke up in flight, and the pilot and flight instructor were fatally injured. There was a post-impact fire at the Beechcraft accident site. The pilot of the Piper, who was the sole occupant of the aircraft, conducted a forced landing in a pasture, approximately 6 nautical miles south of the Warrenton-Fauquier Airport. The pilot sustained injuries, which required examination at a local hospital.

The Piper was registered to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) employee, and the Beechcraft was registered to a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) employee. Given the unique circumstances surrounding the ownership and operation of the accident aircraft, the United States, as the State of Occurrence, represented by the NTSB, and Canada, represented by the Transportation Safety Board (TSB), respectively requested and accepted delegation of the accident investigation, in accordance with paragraph 5.1 of Annex 13 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (International Civil Aviation Organization).

Factual information

History of the flight

The pilot of the Beechcraft V35B Bonanza arrived at Warrenton-Fauquier Airport (KHWY) at 1515 Footnote 1 to pick up an instructor in order to complete a flight review.  Footnote 2 With the certified flight instructor on board, the Beechcraft departed at 1545, headed south, and climbed to 3000 feet above sea level (asl). No enroute air traffic services were requested by the pilots of the Beechcraft, nor were they required to do so in the airspace in which they were operating. The recorded radar data indicated that the Beechcraft was transmitting on transponder code 1200.  Footnote 3

At 1555, the northbound Beechcraft was 13 nautical miles (nm) south of the Culpeper Regional Airport (KCJR) at 3000 feet asl. At this time, the Piper PA-28-140 departed KCJR under visual flight rules (VFR) and was climbing eastward. At 1600, the Beechcraft started a descent (Figure 1). As the Beechcraft descended, their closest point of approach was 600 feet vertical and 0.9 nm lateral.


It is not known if either pilot saw the other aircraft, or if the 2 aircraft were on the same radio frequency.

Investigator in Charge John Lee and three other investigators from the Transportation Safety Board of Canada will conduct a probe and write a report about May 28, 2012 mid-air collision over Sumerduck in Fauquier County, Virginia. "Over the next few days, we'll be looking at the man, the machine and the environment," Lee said, giving a general description of the "field investigation." Because the accident involved private planes, flown by pilots employed by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, the heads of those agencies requested outside investigators.


Transportation Safety Board of Canada Inspector in Charge John Lee conducts a press conference at the Hampton Inn in Warrenton.

   

 Two Transportation Safety Board of Canada investigators examining the wreckage from the Beechcraft BE-35. On May 28, 2012, at approximately 1621, a Piper PA-28 and a Beechcraft BE-35 collided in flight just over 6 miles from Warrenton-Fauquier Airport in Sumerduck, VA. After the collision, the Piper PA-28 crash landed in a field and the BE-35 crashed vertically in a lightly wooded area. The sole occupant of the Piper PA-28 survived, but the two occupants of the BE-35 were fatally injured


 The crashed Piper PA-28. On May 28, 2012




Plane crash site in Fauquier County. 



Piper PA-28-140, N23SC


 
Investigator Brad Vardy inspects the Piper PA-28 that collided with another plane near Sumerduck.







Air taxi' business sees promise at Westchester County Airport (KHPN), White Plains, New York

Andrew Schmertz, CEO of Hopscotch Air, has seen enough demand in Westchester to add two planes to the fleet and base them primarily out of the county airport.



If Andrew Benerofe forgets something at home before hopping on a flight, he can just run home to get it.

It's not just one of the perks of flying out of Westchester County Airport, just a few minutes from his home in Purchase, it's one of the selling points of flying on Hopscotch Air, an air taxi service that provides travelers with private, on-demand, short-distance flights to regional airports across the Northeast and parts of Canada.

Like the company says on its website: "Get to the airport. Get on the plane. Get to where you’re going."

"Over the last couple of years, I’ve been using Hopscotch pretty exclusively," said Benerofe, who flies all over New England for his work managing summer camps and to see family. “They really are the most convenient and most economic."

While Westchester County Airport is no stranger to smaller-scale flights, travelers like Benerofe are helping Hopscotch carve out a niche by offering flights cheaper than traditional charters (priced in the mid-$2,000 range for a day trip), faster than driving and able to be booked on short notice.

“It’s private aviation at a far more affordable price, and reaching more people than we would consider a traditional charter," said Hopscotch CEO Andrew Schmertz, who noted his company brings in flyers from all over the Lower Hudson Valley and southwestern Connecticut.

His 9-year-old company does 70 percent of its New York area business out of Westchester County Airport and plans to add two planes to its fleet — a 30 percent increase — by May, right before the service gets busy with fliers looking to go on their summer vacations.

Hopscotch's planes seat no more than four passengers, helping to keep costs down compared to their private aviation competitors. Customers who use the service go through a private hangar at the airport, bypassing the cattle call of the main terminal.

The company has no fixed routes. Customers can book a flight online, Schmertz said they ususally hire his planes with two days' notice or even less. Flying into smaller airports often gets travelers closer to their intended destinations, especially vacation destinations like Block Island and Nantucket, which amount for about 75 percent of the company's customers' preferred routes.

“You’ll never hear the world 'charter' out of my mouth as the type of business we are. We’re really an air taxi service," Schmertz said. "Everything about it matches what a taxi is, except it doesn’t pull up to your house. It pulls up pretty close to your house.”

Brett Snyder, who covers the airline industry on The Cranky Flier blog, believes the market for an air taxi-style service is generally confined to places where people can pay.

“The convenience factor is huge. If you live in Westchester and you want to go to Martha’s Vineyard, do you really want to sit in traffic or go to JFK (airport)? It’s a pain, right?” Snyder said. “The problem is, the cost factor is still there."

“It’s a niche... but it’s a niche that can work," he added.

Air taxi services can also help solve the problem of ensuring smaller markets retain air travel links, Snyder said.

Many airlines have begun pulling out of smaller airports, and Westchester is no different. According to data from the Federal Aviation Administration, the number of flights taking off and landing there has dropped from nearly 184,000 in 2007 to 144,634 last year.

Westchester gets a revenue cut from every commercial plane that takes off and leaves.

"The more flights that come in and out of Westchester is good for us,” said county spokesman Ned McCormack. “Any extra business that they bring there will be additional revenue for us.”

For Benerofe, the Hopscotch customer, anything that lets him stay away from the area's major airports — JFK, LaGuardia or Newark — is welcome.

“It’s just a nice environment and it’s a nice atmosphere to be in when you’re flying," he said. "It’s very relaxed."

Story and photos: http://www.lohud.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, N2209W, Electrical Training USA LLC: Fatal accident occurred February 12, 2016 in Destin, Okaloosa County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Piper Aircraft Inc; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Electrical Training USA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2209W

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Destin, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/23/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2209W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was flying along a shoreline of the Gulf of Mexico in dark night conditions, with a tailwind, on an extended left base leg for landing at the airport. Witnesses reported the pilot announced a go-around on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Radar track data depicted the airplane crossing the approach end of the runway and then turning upwind on the far side of the runway. The airplane continued in a left circuit around the airport, and its altitude varied between 500 and 700 ft above ground level.

Radar then depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for a second attempt at landing; however, the airplane stopped its turn early and flew through the final approach course a second time as it tracked parallel to the coast. Instead of completing another left circuit around the airport, the airplane turned right, away from the lighted airport and out over open, dark water with no visible horizon. The last radar targets showed the airplane over the water in a descending right turn toward the airport, with the last target at 175 ft above the water, and 128 knots groundspeed.

A witness, who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane, reported that he heard the accident pilot announce his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot's last radio call announced he would be "circling somewhere." There were no further communications from the accident airplane.A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation of the airplane.

The tailwind encountered on the base leg of the traffic pattern likely contributed to the pilot flying the airplane through the final approach course on two consecutive approaches. The rapid turn and descent at low altitude away from the lighted airport at night, over dark water, with no visible horizon, was consistent with the noninstrument-rated pilot experiencing spatial disorientation and a loss of airplane control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The noninstrument-rated pilot's decision to turn the airplane away from the lighted airport at low altitude, over water, with no visible horizon, in dark night conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a loss of airplane control.

On February 12, 2016, about 1850 central standard time, a Piper PA-28-181, N2209W, was destroyed during collision with water while maneuvering to land at Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida. The private pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. The flight departed Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 1715. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to radar data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane approached DTS from the west, and transitioned along the shore on the south side of the airport for landing on runway 32. The radar track depicted the airplane crossing the approach end of runway 32, then turning upwind on the east side of the runway. The airplane continued in a left circuit around the airport, and its altitude varied between 500 and 700 feet mean sea level (msl).

The radar depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for landing on runway 32. Instead of continuing to an approximate ground track of 050 degrees for the base leg of the traffic pattern, the airplane rolled out on an approximate ground track of 090 degrees, and flew through the final approach course, west to east, as it tracked parallel to the coast. The airplane then turned 90 degrees to the south and tracked out over the water. The last radar target showed the airplane at 175 feet msl at 128 knots groundspeed.

A witness, who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane, reported he heard the accident pilot announce his go-around and his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot's last radio call announced he would be "circling somewhere." There were no further communications from the accident airplane. The witness reported windy conditions as he approached DTS, and that conditions were "extremely bumpy" below 300 feet.

A witness who was jogging in an easterly direction along the beach reported to an FAA inspector that his attention was drawn to the airplane as it crossed the beach and headed south over the water. He stated that the engine was running, but the front of the airplane was illuminated as if the engine was "on fire." The witness stated he thought the airplane was in a wings-level attitude, not turning, but descending rapidly. He said that when the airplane struck the water, he heard an explosion and the light at the front of the airplane "went out."

The weather reported at DTS at the time of the accident included clear skies and wind from 240 degrees at 7 knots gusting to 15 knots. Official sunset was at 1731, and the end of civil twilight was at 1755. The moon was illuminated 13 percent in the western sky.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on March 3, 2014. The pilot reported 306 total hours of flight experience on that date. The pilot did not possess an instrument rating.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Results were negative for all tested-for drugs. The Office of the Medical Examiner, District I, Florida, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1979, and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series reciprocating engine. The maintenance logbooks for the airplane were not recovered, but copies of logbook entries revealed the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed May 8, 2015, at 2,239 total aircraft hours. On February 9, 2016, the engine oil was changed at 2,272 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was recovered from the Gulf of Mexico and moved to a secure facility for a detailed examination. According to the FAA inspector on site during the recovery, the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. Except for a large section of the right wing, all major components of the airplane were accounted for. The engine, with the propeller attached, was completely entangled with the instrument panel, control cables, and wiring. All damage appeared consistent with impact and overload-type separation. There was no evidence of pre- or post-impact fire.

The engine was removed from the airframe, and could not be rotated by hand at the propeller. Examination of the cylinders with a lighted borescope revealed that each contained sediment and corrosion from salt water immersion. The engine accessories and all four cylinders were removed, and the crankshaft rotated freely by hand.

The propeller spinner was fragmented. The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft flange. One propeller blade exhibited scratches on the front and rear surfaces but was otherwise intact. The other blade was curved aft about 90 degrees and exhibited twisting, leading edge gouges and trailing edge "S" bending.

Impact damage and saltwater immersion precluded testing of engine accessories. The vacuum pump was disassembled and the carbon rotor, carbon vanes, and the composite drive coupling were intact.

The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation of the airplane.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Spatial Disorientation

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-4A, "Pilot's Spatial Disorientation," tests conducted with qualified instrument pilots indicated that it can take as long as 35 seconds to establish full control by instruments after a loss of visual reference of the earth's surface. AC 60-4A further states that surface references and the natural horizon may become obscured even though visibility may be above VFR minimums, and that an inability to perceive the natural horizon or surface references is common during flights over water, at night, in sparsely-populated areas, and in low-visibility conditions.

According to the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3), "Night flying is very different from day flying and demands more attention of the pilot. The most noticeable difference is the limited availability of outside visual references. Therefore, flight instruments should be used to a greater degree.… Generally, at night it is difficult to see clouds and restrictions to visibility, particularly on dark nights or under overcast. The pilot flying under VFR must exercise caution to avoid flying into clouds or a layer of fog." The handbook described some hazards associated with flying in airplanes under VFR when visual references, such as the ground or horizon, are obscured. "The vestibular sense (motion sensing by the inner ear) in particular tends to confuse the pilot. Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated; leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Destin, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2209W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 12, 2016, about 1850 central standard time (CST), a Piper PA-28-181, N2209W, was destroyed during collision with water while maneuvering to land at Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida. The private pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. The flight departed Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 1715. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91.

According to preliminary radar data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as well as witness accounts, the airplane approached DTS from the west, and transitioned along the shore on the south side of the airport for landing on runway 32. Witnesses reported the pilot announced a go-around on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), and the radar track depicted the airplane crossing the approach end of runway 32, then turning upwind on the east side of the runway. The airplane continued in a left-hand circuit around the airport and its altitude varied between 500 and 700 feet mean sea level (msl).

The radar depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for landing on runway 32. Instead of continuing to an approximate heading of 050 degrees for the base leg of the traffic pattern, the airplane rolled out on an approximate heading of 090 degrees, and flew through the final approach course, west to east, as it tracked parallel to the coast. The airplane then turned 90 degrees to the south and tracked out over the water. The last radar target showed the airplane at 175 feet msl at 128 knots groundspeed.

A witness who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane reported he heard the accident pilot announce his go-around and his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot's last radio call announced he would be "circling somewhere." There were no further communications from the accident airplane. The witness reported windy conditions as he approached DTS, and that conditions were "extremely bumpy" below 300 feet.

A witness who was jogging in an easterly direction along the beach reported to an FAA inspector that his attention was drawn to the airplane as it crossed the beach and headed south over the water. He stated that the engine was running, but the front of the airplane was illuminated as if the engine was "on fire." The witness stated he thought the airplane was in a wings-level attitude, not turning, but descending rapidly. He said that when the airplane struck the water, he heard an explosion and the light at the front of the airplane "went out."

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on March 3, 2014. The pilot reported 306 total hours of flight experience on that date. The pilot did not possess an instrument rating.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1979 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series engine. The maintenance logbooks for the airplane were not recovered, but copies of logbook entries revealed the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed May 8, 2015, at 2,239 total aircraft hours. On February 9, 2016, the engine oil was changed at 2,272 total aircraft hours.
Electrical Training USA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2209W

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 12, 2016 in Destin, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2209W
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 12, 2016, about 1850 central standard time (CST), a Piper PA-28-181, N2209W, was destroyed during collision with water while maneuvering to land at Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida. The private pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. The flight departed Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Pearland, Texas, about 1715. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91.

According to preliminary radar data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as well as witness accounts, the airplane approached DTS from the west, and transitioned along the shore on the south side of the airport for landing on runway 32. Witnesses reported the pilot announced a go-around on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), and the radar track depicted the airplane crossing the approach end of runway 32, then turning upwind on the east side of the runway. The airplane continued in a left-hand circuit around the airport and its altitude varied between 500 and 700 feet mean sea level (msl).

The radar depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for landing on runway 32. Instead of continuing to an approximate heading of 050 degrees for the base leg of the traffic pattern, the airplane rolled out on an approximate heading of 090 degrees, and flew through the final approach course, west to east, as it tracked parallel to the coast. The airplane then turned 90 degrees to the south and tracked out over the water. The last radar target showed the airplane at 175 feet msl at 128 knots groundspeed.

A witness who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane reported he heard the accident pilot announce his go-around and his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot's last radio call announced he would be "circling somewhere." There were no further communications from the accident airplane. The witness reported windy conditions as he approached DTS, and that conditions were "extremely bumpy" below 300 feet.

A witness who was jogging in an easterly direction along the beach reported to an FAA inspector that his attention was drawn to the airplane as it crossed the beach and headed south over the water. He stated that the engine was running, but the front of the airplane was illuminated as if the engine was "on fire." The witness stated he thought the airplane was in a wings-level attitude, not turning, but descending rapidly. He said that when the airplane struck the water, he heard an explosion and the light at the front of the airplane "went out."

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on March 3, 2014. The pilot reported 306 total hours of flight experience on that date. The pilot did not possess an instrument rating.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1979 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series engine. The maintenance logbooks for the airplane were not recovered, but copies of logbook entries revealed the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed May 8, 2015, at 2,239 total aircraft hours. On February 9, 2016, the engine oil was changed at 2,272 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was recovered from the Gulf of Mexico and moved to a secure facility for a detailed examination at a later date. According to the FAA inspector on site during the recovery, the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. Except for a large section of the right wing, all major components of the airplane were accounted for. The engine, with the propeller attached, was completely entangled with the instrument panel, control cables, and wiring. All damage appeared consistent with impact and overload.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



Jim Shumberg & Sheryl Roe were killed in small plane crash near Destin, Florida.





Family members of the Texas couple killed in Thursday’s plane crash near Destin have someone they want to thank.


They just don’t know who he is.


A man who identified himself as a runner on the beach at the time of the crash called 911, alerting authorities that a plane had crashed into the Gulf of Mexico.


Within two hours, crews had found the body of Sheryl Roe. Less than an hour later, they recovered the body of her long-time companion and pilot, Jim Shumberg.


“We were so blessed that he just happened to be there at that moment,” said Tina Brewster, Roe’s sister, of the 911 caller. “If he hadn’t, we never would have known what happened.


“I personally feel that it was fate that he was there.”


Brewster said they’re hoping to personally thank the man, who was apparently staying at Silver Beach West. Public record law prohibits the release of the man’s name, or the contents of the recording of the 911 call.


Roe and Shumberg were frequent visitors to the area, with Roe having acupuncture offices in Navarre and Fort Walton Beach. The two had been together for more than 20 years, according to family members.

Brewster said her sister loved to fly with Shumberg.


“Jim was a seasoned pilot,” she said. “I let him take my children up in that plane. Absolutely none of us think that this was something he did.”


The National Transportation Safety Board has not released its preliminary findings of the crash. Brewster said family members are awaiting additional information anxiously.


“There’s a lot of people drumming their fingers, waiting for that report,” she said. “That small plane was his baby. He absolutely loved that plane.”



The plane went down in clear weather near Henderson Beach State Park just before 7 p.m. Thursday.

The couple, who were in their 60s, met at what family members recall as an Eagles concert more than 20 years ago.


Shumberg had been flying for about five years, Roe said.


“Jim was an amazing man,” she said. “After all Sheryl had been through, she had some big walls up, but in the end they were perfect for each other.


“It’s one small consolation that they were together when this happened, because neither could have made it without the other.”


Story and photo: http://www.nwfdailynews.com



















A couple with ties to both the Emerald Coast and Texas were killed Thursday when their single-engine plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico.

James Shumberg, 67, whose primary address is in Alvin, Texas; and Sheryl Roe, 60, an acupuncturist with offices in Navarre and Fort Walton Beach, were flying a PA-28-181 Piper Archer aircraft when it went down in the Gulf around 6:52 p.m. The plane was registered to Electrical Training USA, a vocational school for which Shumberg, a licensed pilot, was listed as the owner.

Emergency responders from numerous agencies responded to the coastline between Henderson Beach State Park and the Walton County line after a man called 911 to report seeing a small plane go down while he was jogging on the beach. Rescue personnel on the shore, in the water and in the air searched the area for more than two hours before recovering Roe’s body around 9 p.m. Shumberg’s body was located approximately 45 minutes later.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash. FAA officials told The Log the flight departed Jack Brooks Regional Airport in Beaumont, Texas enroute to Destin Executive Airport.

According to employees at the Destin Executive Airport, Shumberg was a frequent visitor to the facility and a veteran pilot.

In a Facebook post, Roe’s daughter, Sibbian Roe, indicated that her mother and Shumberg, whom she referred to as her stepdad, were on their way to a week-long vacation in the Florida Keys.

Mary Esther businesswoman Susan Gadd was shocked to learn about the accident on Friday morning. For many years, Roe worked in a building near Gadd’s hair salon on Mary Esther Boulevard.

“Oh my God - I can’t believe this,” she said. “She and James had been together for more than 20 years. They were always going back and forth to visit each other between Texas and Florida. Sometimes she would drive, and sometimes he would pick her up in the plane.”

Gadd said that Roe, a former nurse, loved living in Florida.

“She had a beautiful family - children and grandchildren,” she said.

According to Michele Nicholson, a spokeswoman for the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office, debris from the crash washed ashore over an extensive area. On Friday morning, two men walking along the beach west of the Crab Trap restaurant located what appeared to be a flotation device with the tail number of the airplane.

“We heard the roar of a plane go overhead last night, but didn’t really pay much attention to it,” said Ross Aldrich, who is visiting Destin from Terrace Park, Ohio. “It started getting busier outside, so we came out and saw trucks on the beach, and vehicles with lights flashing. We knew they were looking for something.”

Mary Beth Coleman, a snowbird from Canada, was taking her usual early morning walk on the beach when she came across what appeared to be debris from the plane.

“I hadn’t heard about this,” she said of the crash. “I come out here every morning to see the sun come up. It’s so sad to think those people will never enjoy another sunrise.”

Source: http://www.thedestinlog.com

DESTIN — The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office announced early Friday morning that two bodies have been recovered in connection with the crash of a single-engine plane in the Gulf of Mexico just offshore of Destin on Thursday evening.

A 911 call was received by dispatchers at 6:52 p.m. from a man who said he saw a small prop plane go down near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area as he was running on the beach. First responders converged on the area and began searching along the coastline while the Coast Guard searched the water.

They located debris and personal items scattered along the coast from the area between Henderson Beach and the Walton County line.

Officials at the Destin Executive Airport reported that a Piper Archer was overdue.

The plane was registered in Texas. Walton County Sheriff’s deputies assisting with the search reported finding the first victim, a female, in the water around 9 p.m. A male victim was found approximately 45 minutes later. No other individuals were believed to be on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash.

A winter visitor to the area, Ross Aldrich of Terrace Park, Ohio, found an item on the beach from the plane wreckage with its FAA Registry number — N2209W.

According to a search of FAA records, the plane is registered to Electrical Training USA LLC, located in Alvin, Texas. The plane was a Piper PA-28-181, model year 1979. The identities of the victims have yet to be announced.

Original Report

The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office confirmed that a small airplane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area in Destin on Thursday night.

Emergency personnel reported a significant amount of debris had been located that is connected to the crash. First responders were at the scene searching both land and water for possible survivors.

The first 911 call was received at 6:52 p.m. from a runner on the beach, according to a press release from OCSO.

According to the statement, OCSO, Coast Guard, area firefighters and other local emergency agencies have responded to the reported crash site. An aerial search is underway from the state park to the Walton County line.
Investigators at the scene say a plane that may have been involved in the crash was overdue at Destin Airport.

Corey Dobridinia, public information officer for the Walton County Sheriff’s Office, told the Daily News that the initial report involved a SWC Piper aircraft.

 When reached for comment, Arlene Salac, a representative from the Federal Aviation Administration, provided the following statement to The Destin Log:

"A Piper PA28 crashed 300 yards off of the coast near Destin, FL tonight. The FAA will investigate. Contact local authorities for information on aircraft passengers."

According to Coast Guard Heartland out of New Orleans, watchstanders with Coast Guard Sector Mobile received a report at approximately 8 p.m. that a single-engine aircraft crashed into the water about one-half mile off Henderson Beach. They directed the launch of a Coast Guard Station Destin 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boatcrew and an Air Station New Orleans MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew.

The Coast Guard Cutter Kingfisher also was directed to aid in the search.

As of midnight, no survivors of the crash had been reported.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.nwfdailynews.com




Two bodies have been recovered in connection with the crash of a single engine plane in the Gulf of Mexico just offshore of Destin Thursday evening. 

A 9-1-1 call was received by dispatchers at 6:52 p.m. from a man who said he saw a small prop plane go down near Henderson Beach State Recreation Area as he was running on the beach. 


First responders converged on the area and began searching along the coastline while the Coast Guard searched the water. 


They located debris and personal items scattered along the coast from the area between Henderson Beach and the Walton County line. 


Officials at the Destin Airport reported that a Piper Archer was overdue.


The plane was registered in Texas. Walton County Sheriff’s deputies assisting with the search reported finding the first victim, a female, in the water around 9 p.m. A male victim was found approximately 45 minutes later. 


No other individuals were believed to be on board. 


The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash. 


The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the many agencies and individuals who provided assistance.