Thursday, January 4, 2018

Piper PA-23-250, N499CR, Ace Tomato Company LLC: Incident occurred January 04, 2018 at Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston, West Virginia

Aircraft reported an engine out and landed. After landing safely the landing gear collapsed.

Ace Tomato Company LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N499CR

Date: 04-JAN-18
Time: 22:06:00Z
Regis#: N499CR
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 23 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: CHARLESTON
State: WEST VIRGINIA



CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- UPDATE 1/4/18 @ 8:25 p.m.

Yeager Airport is reopen Thursday night after a private plane had engine failure and landed without landing gear, the airport reports.

No one was hurt in the incident, which happened just after 5 p.m., but it temporarily halted airport traffic as the FAA investigated.

UPDATE 1/4/18 @ 6:10 p.m.

Yeager Airport is closed Thursday evening after a private plane had engine failure and landed without landing gear, the airport reports.

Around 5:05 p.m. the twin engine Piper Aztec aircraft landed without incident.

The pilot was the only person aboard and was not hurt.

Yeager Airport staff is awaiting clearance from the FAA to remove the aircraft.

Passengers should check with their airline before leaving for the airport.

ORIGINAL STORY

Yeager Airport is working to keep all flights running on time as the winter storm approaches the northeast.

Yeager Airport Director Terry Sayre announced Thursday morning that all scheduled departures are running on time. The only cancellation was a flight to Philadelphia.

If you are flying out of Yeager Airport, make sure to check in with your airline for updates.

Many airlines are offering travel waivers to passengers scheduled to travel Thursday and Friday due to the forecasted winter weather in the Northeast/Southeast and Mid-Atlantic regions, according to Yeager Airport officials.


"Yeager Airport's snow removal team is out in full force, and is diligently working to keep airport roads and the runway clear," said Sayre.


Story and photo:  http://www.wsaz.com



CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WCHS/WVAH) — Yeager Airport has reopened after it was temporarily closed after a small aircraft had to perform an emergency landing without its landing gear.

Yeager Airport is closed after a small aircraft had to perform a landing without its landing gear.

Just after 5 p.m., a twin-engine Piper Aztec aircraft with the tail number N499CR landed without a landing gear after it reported an engine failure, according to the airport.

The pilot was the only person on board and no injuries were reported.

The plane is currently on the runway and the airport is waiting for clearance from the FAA to remove the plane and open to the airport.

The airport said passengers should check with airlines before departing to see how their flights will be affected. 


Story and photo: http://wvah.com

CHARLESTON — A minor incident where a plane was forced to land without the use of its landing gear has closed Yeager Airport.

The plane, a twin engine Piper Aztec was attempted the landing after reporting engine failure.

There were no passengers on the plane, and the captain was the only crew onboard.

Currently, no injuries have been reported, but the plane is disabled on the runway awaiting investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The airport is closed until the investigation is complete and the plane can be moved.

Story and photo: https://www.wvnews.com

CHARLESTON, WV (WOWK) - No injuries are reported after a plane performed a landing without its landing gear at Yeager Airport.

According to a release from the airport at approximately 5:05 p.m., a twin engine Piper Aztec aircraft  performed a landing without landing gear after reporting an engine failure.

The pilot was the only soul onboard.

No injuries have been reported. The aircraft is currently disabled on the runway.

Yeager Airport staff are awaiting clearance from the FAA to remove the aircraft.

The airport is currently closed. Passengers should check with airlines before departing for the airport.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wvnstv.com

No injuries were reported Thursday after a small, twin-engine plane landed at Yeager Airport in Charleston without landing gear.

The pilot of the plane, a Piper Aztec, reported engine failure before landing at the hilltop airport, according to a news release from the airport. The pilot was alone aboard the aircraft.

The plane is registered to Ace Tomato Company LLC of Daytona Beach, Florida, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s online registry.

The plane was disabled on the runway Thursday evening, closing the airport to air traffic. Airport staff were awaiting clearance from the FAA to remove the plane.

Original article can be found here: https://www.wvgazettemail.com

Robinson R44 II, N590GG, registered to and operated by Wagonhound Land and Livestock Co LLC: Accident occurred June 09, 2017 in Douglas, Converse County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N590GG




Location: Douglas, WY
Accident Number: CEN17LA219
Date & Time: 06/09/2017, 0820 MDT
Registration: N590GG
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Settling with power/vortex ring state
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On June 9, 2017, about 0820 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N590GG, impacted terrain near Douglas, Wyoming. The pilot and two passengers were not injured, the third passenger received serious injuries, and the helicopter was substantially damaged during the accident. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Wagonhound Land and Livestock Co, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Aviation Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported that he topped the fuel off at the Converse County airport (KDGW); then he and one other person departed the airport with calm winds. They traveled about 25 miles to a lodge to pick up two additional passengers. The pilot shut the helicopter down, for the passengers to board; while there, he estimated there was a steady west wind at 12-15 knots. They then departed the lodge and did some sightseeing en route to a ranch/stockyard. The pilot reported that he climbed to 1,000 ft as they passed KDGW. The automated weather station located at the KGDW was reporting wind, variable at 3 knots.

As they approached the cattle stockyards, they looked at crop status, fields, building irrigation machinery, etc. During that time, the pilot looked at trees, pond surfaces, and ground track which indicated a calm wind condition. The pilot then selected an approach course for a landing, which would avoid a barn and work crews; aiming for clear sport near water tanks.

During the approach, the pilot noted that the power and glide path indications were normal, he noticed the last airspeed was at 30 kts and 100 ft agl. The pilot added that "somewhere below 50 ft agl" there was a sudden, abrupt, high rate of descent; he manipulated the controls and the helicopter's low rpm light illuminated and the warning horn sounded. He continued, saying there was no time or altitude to lower the collective and regain rpm. The helicopter impacted terrain and rolled to the side when the left skid failed. The pilot added that after the accident, the engine continued to run and there was no prior mechanical malfunction/failure with the helicopter. He noted there was a steady northwest wind estimated at 15 kts.

Based on the conditions at the time of the accident, the calculated density altitude was 7,015 ft, and the helicopter was near the maximum gross weight of 2,500 lbs.

Helicopter Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-21A,


Chapter 11, Helicopter Emergencies and Hazards


Settling with Power (Vortex Ring State)


Vortex ring state describes an aerodynamic condition in which a helicopter may be in a vertical descent with 20 percent up to maximum power applied, and little or no climb performance. The term "settling with power" comes from the fact that the helicopter keeps settling even though full engine power is applied.

Tip vortices generate drag and degrade airfoil efficiency. As long as the tip vortices are small, their only effect is a small loss in rotor efficiency. However, when the helicopter begins to descend vertically, it settles into its own downwash, which greatly enlarges the tip vortices. In this vortex ring state, most of the power developed by the engine is wasted in circulating the air in a doughnut pattern around the rotor.

A vortex ring state may be entered during any maneuver that places the main rotor in a condition of descending in a column of disturbed air and low forward airspeed. Airspeeds that are below translational lift airspeeds are within this region of susceptibility to settling with power aerodynamics.

Some of the situations that are conducive to a settling with power condition are: any hover above ground effect altitude, specifically attempting to hover OGE [out-of-ground-effect] at altitudes above the hovering ceiling of the helicopter, attempting to hover OGE without maintaining precise altitude control, pinnacle or rooftop helipads when the wind is not aligned with the landing direction, and downwind and steep power approaches in which airspeed is permitted to drop below 10 knots depending on the type of helicopter. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 66
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane; Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Gyroplane; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/05/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/15/2017
Flight Time: 17457 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4848 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
Registration: N590GG
Model/Series: R44 II II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture:2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 13973
Landing Gear Type: Ski;
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/24/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 112.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDGW
Observation Time: 0853
Distance from Accident Site: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 19 knots, 240°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Douglas, WY
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Douglas, WY
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.836667, -105.409722 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA219
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 09, 2017 in Douglas, WY
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N590GG
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 9, 2017, about 0820 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N590GG, impacted terrain near Douglas, Wyoming. The pilot and two passengers were not injured, the third passenger received serious injuries. The helicopter was substantially damaged during the accident. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Wagonhound Land and Livestock Co, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Aviation Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. 

The pilot reported to the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that he was approaching cattle stockyards for a landing. He added that he was conducting a steep approach to avoid the disturbing the cattle, when the helicopter got hit with a tailwind. The helicopter then dropped, impacting terrain, before rolling over on its side. 

The wreckage was relocated to a secure facility for further examination.

Cessna 170, N4189V: Accident occurred August 11, 2017 in Axtell, Marshall County, Kansas

***This report was modified on January 3, 2018. Please see the docket for this accident to view the original report.***

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N4189V


Location: Axtell, KS
Accident Number: GAA17CA489
Date & Time: 08/11/2017, 1302 CDT
Registration: N4189V
Aircraft: CESSNA 170
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

***This report was modified on January 3, 2018. Please see the docket for this accident to view the original report.***

The pilot reported that, during a go-around after a low approach, the left cabin door opened. He added that he reached back to close the door and that the airplane then aerodynamically stalled. The pilot was unable to recover, and the airplane impacted the ground and struck multiple fences.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during a go-around. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to attempt to close a passenger door during a critical phase of flight.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)
Passenger/crew doors - Related operating info (Factor)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Fence/fence post - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR go-around
Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 18, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/17/2017
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N4189V
Model/Series: 170 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18522
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: C145 SERIES
Registered Owner: BLONDEL, RONALD W.
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFNB, 980 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 68°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3700 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 20°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SENECA, KS (62K)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination:
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1301 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.870833, -96.259167 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents  

Prevent Aerodynamic Stalls at Low Altitude

While maneuvering an airplane at low altitude in visual meteorological conditions, many pilots fail to avoid conditions that lead to an aerodynamic stall, recognize the warning signs of a stall onset, and apply appropriate recovery techniques. Many stall accidents result when a pilot is momentarily distracted from the primary task of flying, such as while maneuvering in the airport traffic pattern, during an emergency, or when fixating on ground objects.

An aerodynamic stall can happen at any airspeed, at any altitude, and with any engine power setting. Pilots need to be honest with themselves about their knowledge of stalls and preparedness to recognize and handle a stall situation. Training can help pilots fully understand the stall phenomenon, including angle-of-attack (AOA) concepts and how weight, center of gravity, turbulence, maneuvering loads, and other factors can affect an airplane's stall characteristics. The stall characteristics may be different in each type of airplane, so learn them before you fly.

The stall airspeeds marked on the airspeed indicator (for example, the bottom of the green arc and the bottom of the white arc) typically represent steady flight speeds at 1G at the airplane's maximum gross weight in the specified configuration. Maneuvering loads and other factors can increase the airspeed at which the airplane will stall. For example, increasing bank angle can increase stall speed exponentially.

Reducing AOA by lowering the airplane's nose at the first indication of a stall is the most important immediate response for stall avoidance and stall recovery. This may seem counterintuitive at low altitudes, but is a necessary first step.

See https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/documents/SA_019.pdf for additional resources.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).
==========

AXTELL, Kan. (KWCH) - No one was hurt after a plane crash on Friday afternoon near Axtell.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, 18-year-old Nicholas Buessing was piloting the plane one mile west of Axtell when the door opened unexpectedly. Buessing tried to grab the door but ended up flying the plane into the ground.

The crash happened one mile west of Axtell on Jayhawk Road.

One other passenger was inside of the plane at the time.

Original article ➤  http://www.kwch.com

MARSHALL COUNTY – Two people avoided serious injury after an airplane accident just before 2p.m. Friday in Marshall County.

A 1948 Cessna 170 fixed wing aircraft piloted by Nicholas Buessing, 18, Axtel, was 600 feet above the ground with a ground speed of 90 mph in the 2900 Block of Jayhawk Road, one mile West of Axtell, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol.

The pilot’s side door opened unexpectedly. When the pilot reached to grab the door, he lost control of the aircraft and it struck the ground.

Buessing and a passenger Christian Buessing, 21, Axtel, were not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the incident, according to the KHP.

Original article ➤ https://www.hayspost.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N456SP: Incident occurred January 03, 2018 at Bowman Field Airport (KLOU), Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky -and- Accident occurred November 04, 2016 at Stuart Powell Field Airport (KDVK), Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aircraft on landing, veered off left side of runway and struck a runway light.

http://registry.faa.gov/N456SP

Date: 03-JAN-18
Time: 20:03:00Z
Regis#: N456SP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LOUISVILLE
State: KENTUCKY

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary / National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Danville, KY
Accident Number: GAA17CA069
Date & Time: 11/04/2016, 1600 EDT
Registration: N456SP
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 


The solo student pilot reported that, while on final approach following a cross-country flight, he experienced what felt like a down draft or wind shear. The airplane touched down hard on the runway, bounced, and on the second touchdown, the nosewheel impacted the surface first. The student pilot taxied the airplane to the ramp without further incident.

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed substantial damage to the firewall.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was 040° at 5 knots. The airplane landed on runway 30. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The student pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing. 

Findings

Aircraft 


Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on equipment

Factual Information


History of Flight


Landing

Hard landing (Defining event) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/14/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: (Estimated) 58 hours (Total, all aircraft), 58 hours (Total, this make and model), 3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N456SP
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S8320
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: RECORDS SERVICES INC.
Rated Power:
Operator: Mike Pratt
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Louisville Aviation
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDVK, 1024 ft msl
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 305°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 6°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 40°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.32 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LOUISVILLE, KY (LOU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Danville, KY (DVK)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1500 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: STUART POWELL FIELD (DVK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1022 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.573611, -84.762222 (est)

Executive Jet Management, Cessna 680 Citation Sovereign, N799MJ: Incident occurred January 03, 2018 at Westchester County Airport (KHPN), White Plains, New York


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aircraft blown tire after landing, exited runway, towed to gate without further incident.

JHA ACE LLC
MG ACE LLC
MOPO LEASING LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N799MJ

Date: 03-JAN-18
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N799MJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 680
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: EXECUTIVE JET MANAGEMENT
Flight Number: 242
City: WHITE PLAINS
State: NEW YORK

Cessna 210F Centurion, N1833F: Incident occurred January 03, 2018 at Corpus Christi International Airport (KCRP), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

During departure, aircraft went off taxiway. Experienced propeller strikes. Towed to ramp.

http://registry.faa.gov/N1833F

Date: 03-JAN-18
Time: 22:25:00Z
Regis#: N1833F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210F
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: CORPUS CHRISTI
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N6169R, Austin Academy of Aviation: Incident occurred January 03, 2018 at San Marcos Regional Airport (KHYI), Caldwell County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aircraft landed gear up.

Virgil C Kennedy dba Austin Academy of Aviation

http://registry.faa.gov/N6169R

Date: 03-JAN-18
Time: 20:40:00Z
Regis#: N6169R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172RG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN MARCOS
State: TEXAS

Delta Private Jets - Jet Card, Cessna 560XL Citation Excel, N233XL: Incident occurred January 02, 2018 at San Antonio International Airport (KSAT), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

While taxiing aircraft taxied over runway edge light.

Sakim Investments LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N233XL

Date: 02-JAN-18
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N233XL
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 560XL
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: DELTA PRIVATE JET
Flight Number: 726
City: SAN ANTONIO
State: TEXAS

Cessna R182, N1835R, registered to and operated by Meridian Flying Service: Accident occurred September 12, 2017 in Worland, Washakie County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Meridian Flying Services Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1835R

Location: Worland, WY
Accident Number: CEN17LA356
Date & Time: 09/12/2017, 1630 MDT
Registration: N1835R
Aircraft: CESSNA R182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On September 12, 2017, about 1630 mountain daylight time, a Cessna R182 airplane, N1835R, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Worland, Wyoming. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Meridian Flying Service as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Sloulin Field International Airport (ISN), Williston, North Dakota and was destined for the Worland Municipal Airport (WRL), Worland, Wyoming.

On the day of the accident, the pilot intended to continue a pipeline surveillance patrol that began the previous day. The initial flight of the day was from the Sidney-Richland Regional Airport (SDY) to ISN to pick-up a passenger. After departing from ISN, two sections of the pipeline system near ISN were observed and then the flight proceeded to the Stanley Municipal Airport (08D) to obtain fuel. After fueling, the pilot departed for ISN to drop off the passenger. After departing ISN again, he planned to fly directly to the next pipeline system near WRL. However, smoke from forest fires prevented a direct flight as planned. He deviated as required, ultimately arriving at the start of the pipeline patrol route.

About 1620, approximately halfway through the patrol, the engine lost power. The pilot turned toward a road in the area in preparation for a forced landing. The engine regained power momentarily, but it quit again. He turned toward a highway and during that time the engine regained power and quit three or four more times. He recalled thinking that plenty of fuel should have been onboard as he attempted to determine the source of the problem. When he was unsuccessful restoring engine power, he setup for a forced landing to a dirt road. To clear a set of power lines, he "stretched" the glide causing the airspeed to decay and the airplane began to stall. He ultimately executed a forced landing to the dirt road with the landing gear retracted.

The pilot noted that the airplane fuel gauges were unreliable. Attempts to repair the gauges in the months before the accident were not successful and replacement of the entire gauge cluster was required; however, the airplane owner reportedly did not have the financial resources to complete the work. To compensate, the pilot had adopted the practice of completely filling the fuel tanks during each refueling and tracking the intervening flight time. Two days before the accident an individual refueling the airplane informed the pilot that the left fuel cap seal was torn. The pilot was in the process of obtaining a new fuel cap seal but had not been able to have one installed.

The pilot stated that the airplane was fueled at SDY the preceding night. He assumed that the fuel tanks were full upon his departure from SDY the morning of the accident. The airplane fuel capacity was 75 gallons useable. When the airplane was subsequently fueled at 08D, the self-service fuel pump required prior input of the desired amount of fuel. As a result, he decided to dispense 40 gallons based on the anticipated burn that morning. However, he did not recall visually confirming the fuel level. The pilot reported that the flight time from SDY until refueling at 08D was 2.7 hours. An additional, 4.1 hours elapsed from the time the airplane was refueled at 08D until the accident.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the airplane sustained firewall and fuselage damage. The upper surface of the left wing exhibited fuel staining aft of the fuel cap. The upper surface of the right wing was clean. The left and right fuel tanks appeared to be empty; no fuel was present when the sump drains were opened. The left fuel cap seal was worn; the right fuel cap seal appeared to be intact. The fuel selector was set to both tanks at the time of the examination. No other anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction were observed.

FAA regulations (14 CFR 91.205) required an operable fuel gauge indicating the quantity of fuel in each tank for any powered civil aircraft with a standard category airworthiness certificate. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Commercial
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/30/2017
Flight Time:  2067 hours (Total, all aircraft), 661 hours (Total, this make and model), 1957 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 138 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 61 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N1835R
Model/Series: R182
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: R18200576
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 24 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2083.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-540-J3C5D
Registered Owner: Meridian Flying Services Inc.
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: Meridian Flying Services Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: WRL, 4252 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Williston, ND (ISN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Worland, WY (WRL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: Worland Municipal (WRL)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 4252 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.962778, -107.950556 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA356
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 12, 2017 in Worland, WY
Aircraft: CESSNA R182, registration: N1835R
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 12, 2017, about 1600 mountain daylight time, a Cessna R182 airplane, N1835R, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Worland, Wyoming. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Meridian Flying Service as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Sloulin Field International Airport (ISN), Williston, North Dakota and was destined for the Worland Municipal Airport (WRL), Worland, Wyoming.

The pilot stated that the engine lost power during pipeline surveillance flight and he executed a forced landing to a dirt road. The airplane sustained damage to the fuselage.