Monday, May 9, 2016

Van's RV-4, N999ZF: Fatal accident occurred October 17, 2015 in Cortland, Gage County, Nebraska

Jerry Allen Allder

Jerry Allen Allder, born August 21, 1947, died October 17, 2015. Jerry was an avid fisherman, talented woodworker, and enthusiastic pilot. He was in the U.S. Navy where he attended submarine school and served on the USS Forrestal in the Mediterranean during the Vietnam War.


David A. Schneider



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket Aviation - National Transportation Safety Board:https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Jerry Allen Allder: http://registry.faa.gov/N999ZF



Location: Cortland, NE
Accident Number: CEN16FA014
Date & Time: 10/17/2015, 0841 CDT
Registration: N999ZF
Aircraft: Zidek Vans RV-4
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 17, 2015, about 0841 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Vans RV-4 single-engine airplane, N999ZF, collided with terrain while maneuvering near Cortland, Nebraska. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The personal flight departed Crete Municipal Airport (CEK), Crete, Nebraska, at 0833, and the intended destination was Lincoln Airport (LNK), Lincoln, Nebraska.

According to available air traffic control radar track data, after departing CEK on runway 17, the airplane proceeded southeast and climbed to an altitude of about 2,600 ft mean sea level (msl). At 0836:30, the airplane turned south and descended to 2,400 ft msl. At 0837:44, the airplane turned east and continued to descend. Between 0839:23 and 0841:42, the airplane completed four low-altitude passes centered over a small lake located about 1/3 mile northeast of the intersection of West Ash Road and Southwest 29th Road. The small lake was located adjacent to a residence owned by the pilot's brother. The low-altitude passes and associated course reversals were completed within a 1/2 mile radius of the small lake. According to available topography data, the terrain elevation immediately surrounding the lake was about 1,470 ft msl.

According to radar track data, the airplane's first low pass over the lake was from southeast to northwest at an altitude at or below 100 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane then entered a climbing right turn to about 1,900 ft msl before it descended back toward the lake from north to south at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. The airplane then completed a 180° turn at 1,600 ft msl before it descended for a low pass from south to north at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. The airplane then entered a climbing right turn to about 1,800 ft msl before it descended for a fourth and final low pass from northeast to southwest at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. Following the fourth low pass, the airplane entered a climb on a southwest heading to about 2,000 ft msl before it entered a sharp right turn toward north. The final radar return was recorded at 0841:42 and showed the airplane at 1,700 ft msl and about 472 ft east of the initial ground impact point.

The pilot's brother stated that he witnessed the airplane complete several low-altitude passes over his property immediately before the accident. He stated that following the final low pass, the airplane pitched up into a climbing right turn. He stated that, during the climbing turn, the airplane suddenly pitched nose-down and descended rapidly. The airplane recovered briefly to a wings-level attitude before it quickly rolled wings-left and -right and entered a descending right turn into terrain.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification:
Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
11/01/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2014
Flight Time: 512.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 148.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 501.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 15.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 68-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on November 1, 2013, with a limitation for corrective lenses. On the application for his current medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 323 total hours of flight experience, of which 35 hours were flown within the previous 6 months.

The pilot's flight history was established using his logbook. The final logbook entry was dated October 14, 2015, at which time he had accumulated 512.5 hours total flight time. All logged flight time had been completed in single-engine airplanes. He had logged 501.9 hours as pilot-in-command, 3.4 hours at night, and 4.3 hours in simulated instrument conditions. He had flown 91.7 hours during the year before the accident, 47.8 hours during the 6 months before the accident, 15.8 hours during the 90 days before the accident, and 5.9 hours during the month before the accident. The pilot had accumulated 148.3 hours in the accident airplane make/model. His last flight review was completed in the accident airplane on July 16, 2014.
  
Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/04/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/18/2014
Flight Time: 245.8 hours (Total, all aircraft)

According to FAA records, the 54-year-old passenger held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 4, 2013, with a limitation for corrective lenses. The medical certificate expired on February 28, 2015. On the application for his expired medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 222.4 total hours of flight experience, of which 18.5 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. The pilot's flight history was established using his logbook. The final logbook entry was for a flight review on July 18, 2014, at which time he had accumulated 245.8 hours total flight time. The pilot had not logged any flight time during the year before the accident.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: Zidek
Registration: N999ZF
Model/Series: Vans RV-4
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1996
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 2407
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/15/2014, Conditional
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 590.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-320-D1C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The airplane, serial number 2407, was a single-engine, low-wing, fixed conventional landing gear, monoplane of conventional aluminum construction, configured to seat two occupants in a tandem seating arrangement. The airplane was powered by a 160-horsepower, 4-cylinder Lycoming IO-320-D1C reciprocating engine, serial number L-5910-55A. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, two-blade, Sensenich 70CM7S16-0-79 propeller, serial number 31698K. The airplane had a useful load of 628 pounds, a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 1,600 pounds, and a total fuel capacity of 32 gallons. A previous owner assembled the airplane from a kit. The FAA issued the airplane a special airworthiness certificate with an experimental classification and associated operating limitations on October 22, 1996. The pilot was the registered owner of the airplane, and FAA records indicated that he purchased the airplane in November 2013.

The airplane's recording tachometer was destroyed during the postimpact fire, which precluded a determination of the airplane's total service time at the time of the accident. According to the maintenance logbooks, the last condition inspection was completed on November 15, 2014, at 590.5 total airframe hours. At the time of the condition inspection, the engine had also accumulated 590.5 hours since new. The final logbook entry, dated October 8, 2015, was for an engine oil change at 674.5 total airframe/engine hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LNK, 1219 ft msl
Observation Time: 0854 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.49 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):

Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Crete, NE (CEK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lincoln, NE (LNK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0833 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

At 0854, the LNK automated surface observing system located about 25 miles north of the accident site reported: wind 120° at 9 knots, a clear sky, 10 miles surface visibility, temperature 8°C, dew point -1°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.49 inches of mercury.




Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  40.495000, -96.764722

The accident site was in a harvested soybean field. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a 265° magnetic heading and measured about 92 ft long. The initial impact crater contained the propeller and the right main landing gear. The impact crater also exhibited a well-defined propeller slash mark in the terrain. The estimated angle between the propeller slash mark and the surrounding terrain was about 30°. The two-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches near both blade tips. One propeller blade exhibited significant S-shape bending along its span.  A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the post-impact fire. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress or damage caused by prolonged exposure to fire.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The internal oil pump discharged oil in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The mechanical fuel pump exhibited fire damage and did not function. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The fuel metering assembly had separated from the engine and exhibited impact related damage. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Douglas County Coroner's Office, located in Omaha, Nebraska, performed autopsies on the pilot and pilot-rated passenger at the request of the Gage County Attorney. The cause of death for both individuals was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during each autopsy. The pilot's toxicology results were negative for ethanol. Ibuprofen was detected in the urine. Ibuprofen, sold under multiple brand names, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic drug that is not considered impairing.


The pilot-rated passenger toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Oxymetazoline was detected in urine but not in blood. Oxymetazoline, sold under multiple brand names, is an over-the-counter topical decongestant that is not considered impairing.


Friends and family gather at the scene of the plane crash on October 17th, 2015.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 17, 2015 in Cortland, NE
Aircraft: Zidek Vans RV-4, registration: N999ZF
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 17, 2015, about 0841 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zidek model Vans RV-4 single-engine airplane, N999ZF, was destroyed during a postimpact fire after colliding with terrain while maneuvering near Cortland, Nebraska. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the accident site. The personal flight departed Crete Municipal Airport (CEK), Crete, Nebraska, at 0833, and had the intended destination of Lincoln Airport (LNK), Lincoln, Nebraska.

According to available air traffic control (ATC) radar data, after departing CEK on runway 17, the accident flight proceeded to the southeast and climbed to an altitude of about 2,600 feet mean sea level (msl). At 0837:30 (hhmm:ss), the flight turned to the south and descended to 2,400 feet msl. About 19 seconds later, the flight turned to easterly course and started to descend. Between 0839:23 and 0841:42, the accident flight made multiple low-altitude passes centered over a small lake located 1/3 mile northeast of the intersection of West Ash Road and Southwest 29th Road, near Cortland, Nebraska. The low-altitude passes, and the associated course-reversals, were completed within a 1/2 mile radius of the small lake. According to available elevation data, the terrain immediately surrounding the lake was about 1,470 feet msl. The small lake was located adjacent to a residence owned by the pilot's brother.

The first low-pass of the small lake was from the southeast to the northwest at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the first low-pass, the flight entered a climbing right turn to about 1,900 feet msl before it entered a descent back toward the small lake on a south heading. The second low-pass was from the north to the south at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the second low-pass, the flight completed a 180-degree turn at approximately 1,600 feet msl before descending for a third low-pass over the small lake. The third low-pass was from the south to the north at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the third low-pass, the flight entered a climbing right turn to about 1,800 feet msl before it entered a descent for another low-pass over the small lake. The fourth and final low-pass was from the northeast to the southwest and was at an altitude at or below 100 feet agl. Following the final low-pass, the flight entered a climb on a southwest heading to about 2,000 feet msl before making a sharp turn toward the north. The final radar return was recorded at 0841:42 at 1,700 feet msl. The final radar return was located about 472 feet east of initial impact point with the ground.

The pilot's brother stated that he witnessed the accident airplane complete multiple low-altitude passes over his property immediately before the accident. He stated that following the final low-pass the airplane pitched-up and entered a climbing right turn. The witness stated that, during the climbing turn, the airplane suddenly pitched nose down and descended rapidly. The witness stated that the airplane recovered briefly to a level attitude before it quickly rolled wings left-and-right and entered a descending right turn into the terrain.

The main wreckage was located in a harvested soybean field. There was a wreckage debris path that measured about 92 feet long and was oriented on a 265-degree magnetic heading. The initial impact crater contained the propeller and the right main landing gear. The impact crater also exhibited a well-defined propeller slash mark in the terrain. The estimated angle between the propeller slash mark and the surrounding terrain was about 30 degrees. The two-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches near the blade tips. One propeller blade exhibited significant S-shape bending along its span. A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the postimpact fire. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress or damage caused by prolonged exposure to fire.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The internal oil-pump discharged oil in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The mechanical fuel pump exhibited fire damage and did not function. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The fuel metering assembly was found separated from the engine and exhibited impact related damage. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

At 0854, the LNK automated surface observing system, located about 25 miles north of the accident site, reported: wind 120 degrees at 9 knots, surface visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 8 degrees Celsius, dew point -1 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.49 inches of mercury.
========

The family of a Lincoln man who died in an Oct. 17 plane crash near Cortland in October claims the pilot was flying the aircraft recklessly before it crashed. 

In a lawsuit filed Thursday in Lancaster County District Court, the wife of David Schneider alleges pilot Jerry Allder was negligent and caused the wrongful death of his passenger.

Allder, 68 of Lincoln, and Schneider, 52, left the Crete Municipal Airport bound for the Lincoln Airport, the lawsuit said.

Halfway through the flight, the plane made low-altitude passes above a small lake on property owned by Allder before ascending after a final pass to 2,000 feet, the lawsuit said.

Suddenly, the suit says, the Zidek Vans RV-4 plunged nose down and hit the ground in a bean field near Cortland, about 25 miles south of Lincoln in Gage County. Both men died.

Skies were clear and winds low, according to the lawsuit.

Federal investigators found no evidence of engine malfunction or failure in the experimental, amateur-built airplane.

In the suit, Dana Schneider alleges that Allder failed to maintain reasonable control of the plane and was engaging in aerobatic flight. 

Federal aviation regulations define aerobatic flight as intentional maneuvers involving abrupt changes in altitude, abnormal altitude or abnormal acceleration.

All of these actions violated federal aviation regulations, the lawsuit alleges.

David Schneider's estate is seeking damages from Allder's estate to cover the roughly $6,600 in funeral and burial expenses as well as other unspecified damages.

Attorneys for the estates of Allder and Schneider declined to comment on the lawsuit Monday.

Original article can be found here: http://journalstar.com

New fleet of planes brings more reliable flights to Aleutian chain

UNALASKA – A local air carrier is making air travel in southwest Alaska safer and more reliable. PenAir invested $27 million into a new fleet of Saab 2000 planes.

“It’s definitely, definitely a leap forward in technology,” said pilot and PenAir part owner Lloyd Seybert. “It flies like a real airplane should fly.”

Seybert says the new planes are safer, faster, carry more passengers and can handle the challenging weather conditions common in the Aleutian chain.

“It allows us to take a full load, from Anchorage non-stop to Dutch Harbor, above the weather and in comfort and speed,” he said.

That’s good news for the fishing community in the heart of the Aleutians, where air transportation is vital.

“We’ve had 40,000 people a year get on a plane and 40,000 people a year get off a plane, so that’s 80,000 people moving back and forth in a community of 5,000 people,” said Unalaska mayor Shirley Quardt.

She says in bad weather, only 65 to 70 percent of the scheduled flights actually made it, due to the limitations with the old planes PenAir was flying.

The new Saab 2000 planes don’t just mean a shorter flight to Anchorage. It means people living in southeast Alaska and the Aleutians can conduct business, go to the doctor or just get out of town on a more reliable schedule.

“For a community, it’s a real confidence booster as well, particularly when you’re trying to encourage people to move here and stay here full-time and bring their kids,” said Quardt.

PenAir’s $27 million investment in a new fleet comes at a financially challenging time for the state of Alaska, but CEO Danny Seybert says it was the right time for the company.

“I really believe strongly in our region,” he said. “I believe that we’re not going to have as much of an economic hardship as some of the other areas of the state and I believe in investing $27 million into our region because the return is going to be there.”

PenAir held its inaugural passenger flight with the Saab 2000 on Friday. The planes will continue regular service to Dutch Harbor and other Southwest communities.

Story and video:  http://www.ktva.com

Federal grant could expand airline services for Helena Regional Airport (KHLN), Lewis and Clark County, Montana

(HELENA) A Federal grant could be the key to increasing airline services in Helena.

The Airport Authority is pursuing a $550,000 Department of Transportation grant that is designed to increase air service for new or expanded routes.

The goal is to secure daily service to Seattle on Alaska Airlines with a morning out-bound flight to the Emerald City and an evening in-bound flight to Helena 7 days a week.

Officials said the grant, which guaranties three years revenue to the air carrier has strong support from the community.

It only took two weeks for the Airport Authority to raise a $50,000.00 match for the grant. 34 entities made donations from $100.00 to $10,000.00 to raise the funds.

Airport manager Jeff Wadekamper said the grant also has support from the airline itself.

“That is a huge deal,” said Wadekamper. “I mean a lot of times airports will apply for grants and try and lure airlines into doing the service but they have not gotten the airline there, partnered with you whether or not at the table yet. But the fact that they are willing to go towards this grant with us is a huge win and I think that makes it a little bit more, our chances are a lot more better for winning this grant.”

Wadekamper likes the airports chances, with Alaska Airlines’ recent purchase of Virgin Airlines and their purchase of new, 176 seat jet-liners. He also said the air carrier is working to increase its’ competition with Delta Airlines.

Wadekamper said the Airport Authority should know if they won the grant sometime in late June of 2016.

Currently Alaska Air flies out of Helena once a day.

Three more flights a week will be added next month.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ktvh.com

Incident occurred May 09, 2016 at San Diego International Airport (KSAN), California

SAN DIEGO – A United Airlines flight to Houston made an emergency landing at Lindbergh Field Monday after hitting a bird shortly after takeoff.

United Flight 1451, a Boeing 737, took off from San Diego shortly after 7 a.m., investigators said. About 10 minutes into the flight after the plane had climbed to about 14,000 feet, a bird hit the windshield of the plane. The pilot turned around and landed back at Lindbergh Field at about 7:25 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Passenger got off the plane, while a maintenance team inspected it. They determined that it had not sustained any damage from the bird strike.

The passengers reboarded the plane, and it took off just before 8:30 a.m.

On its way to Houston, the pilot made another unexpected landing -  this time in Phoenix - due to mechanical issues, a passenger's husband told FOX 5.  An FAA spokesman confirmed there was an "unscheduled landing," but said a maintenance inspected the plane and cleared it for takeoff.

The plane took off to Houston soon after.

Story and video:  http://fox5sandiego.com

Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (KYNG) director stays positive amid new turbulence

VIENNA TWP., Ohio -

More competition and another delay in daily service. The future of the Youngstown-Warren Regional airport hinges on options for future flyers and the airport's director remains confident those options will come to the area.

"With the daily service, you'll notice more and more that there are less direct flight options opportunities out of Akron, Canton, Cleveland, Pittsburgh," Dan Dickten said, airport aviation director.

Dickten says passengers appreciate connecting to another flight by flying out of their own backyard. He remains positive that the airport will have a viable future.

Allegiant Air operations are under review by the Federal Aviation Administration and the wait continues for daily service to and from Chicago out of Youngstown.

The U.S. Department of Transportation wants to review tests from the FAA on its proving flights and financial records before allowing Aerodynamics Inc. to run domestic flights through the windy city.

"It's the same red tape that any other airline goes through to get the certification approved," Dickten said. "We'll get there, we just need some additional assistance from the owner of ADI and I believe he will step up and provide that."

A start date of June 13 for the commercial Chicago flights isn't concrete. Dickten says he could learn in the coming days of a more exact take of schedule.

With $250,000 in interior and exterior improvements, the airport is moving in the direction of preparing for more consistent crowds.

The addition of Allegiant flights out of the Akron-Canton Airport and Pittsburgh International Airport isn't making a huge dent in sales for YNG, but Dickten says they have noticed a small impact.

"Our flights had been consistently 90-percent, however, since they did implement the service at the two other airports, that's dropped to between 80, 85-percent and it fluctuates," he said.

Story and video: http://www.wfmj.com

Runway crash at Nellis during Red Flag nearly killed pilot, cost $71M

LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — An August 2015 runway crash involving two F-16C jets at Nellis Air Force Base caused nearly $71 million in damage and nearly killed a pilot.

A reported issued today by the Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia said one pilot's landing, lack of comprehensive braking and flight path deconfliction, combined with a second pilot's delayed transition to the correct side of the runway led to the collision of two aircraft on a Nellis runway on Aug. 15, 2015, according to an Accident Investigation Board report.

The mishap occurred during landing procedures following an orientation flight in association with a large-force exercise held at Nellis.

One pilot sustained life-threatening injuries, but survived. The second pilot in the mishap was uninjured.

One aircraft, valued at $64 million, was destroyed and the second aircraft sustained approximately $5.4M in damages. Total loss to the U.S. Government is nearly $71 million.

According to the Accident Investigation Board president, rescue personnel responded to the mishap in approximately one minute. The first responders freed the injured pilot.

Both pilots and aircraft were assigned to the 457th Fighter Squadron, 301st FighterWing, Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas.

Original article can be found here: http://news3lv.com

American Champion 8GCBC Scout, Parker GCBC LLC, N326JH: Accident occurred May 09, 2016 at Hale County Airport (KPVW), Plainview, Texas

PARKER GCBC LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N326JH

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Lubbock FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA227
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 09, 2016 in Plainview, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2016
Aircraft: AMERICAN CHAMPION AIRCRAFT 8GCBC, registration: N326JH
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the takeoff roll in gusty wind conditions, the airplane encountered a strong wind gust. He further reported that shortly after takeoff, the right wing dropped, followed by the left wing; and the left wing impacted the ground. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, at the time of the accident, conditions were wind 260 degrees at 29 knots, wind gust 40 knots. The airplane was departing on runway 22.

The pilot attempted to takeoff with about an 18 knot right crosswind component.

According to the airplane manufacture the maximum demonstrated crosswind component for takeoff and landing is 15 knots. 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004) discusses operations in crosswind conditions and states in part:

Takeoffs and landings in certain crosswind conditions are inadvisable or even dangerous. If the crosswind is great enough to warrant an extreme drift correction, a hazardous landing condition may result. Therefore, the takeoff and landing capabilities with respect to the reported surface wind conditions and the available landing directions must be considered.

It is imperative that pilots determine the maximum crosswind component of each airplane they fly, and avoid operations in wind conditions that exceed the capability of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during gusty wind conditions. Contributing to the outcome was the pilot's exceedance of the maximum crosswind component during takeoff.




Strong wind gusts were being blamed for a small plane crash that left one person injured but another unscathed Monday afternoon in Hale County.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash of the single-engine plane that was attempting to take off about 1:30 p.m. from the Hale County airport, according to FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford and the Texas Department of Public Safety.

The plane had two occupants. One suffered minor injuries and the other was not injured.

Texas DPS Cpl. John Gonzalez said the plane’s pilot suffered minor injuries, mostly to his face, due to the plane crashing into the ground just after take off. He said the plane was departing the Hale County airport after refueling when a strong gust of wind forced triggered the crash. Neither he nor Lunsford had additional details about the plane’s occupants.

The plane is listed as an American Champion 8GCBC Scout manufactured in 2008 and registered out of Dover, Delaware, according to its FAA registry information provided by Lunsford.

Lunsford said FAA investigators were en route to the scene late Monday and a full investigation would commence.

The Plainview Daily Herald reported the two men in the plane had stopped for fuel at Rocket Aviation before taking off for New Mexico.

Airport officials said their particular type of Scout airplane was built for soft, short takeoffs. Going west into the wind, the plane attempted to take off on an area of grass adjacent to the runway.

Wind gusts up to 41 mph reportedly caused the pilot to lose control once the plane left the ground, according to the Herald.

The plane made a hard landing, snapping the left wing. The pilot and passenger were able to walk away from the plane and call for help.

Original article can be found here:   http://lubbockonline.com

Two airplane occupants appeared to have suffered only bumps and bruises after their single-engine airplane crashed immediately after take-off Monday afternoon at the Hale County Airport. 

Though the Department of Public Safety has yet to release names of the pilot and passenger, the two men had reportedly stopped for fuel at Rocket Aviation before taking off for New Mexico. 

Airport officials said their particular type of American Champion 8GCBC Scout was built for soft, short takeoffs. 

Going west into the wind, the plane attempted to take-off on an area of grass adjacent to the runway just before 1:30 p.m. 

Wind gusts up to 41 mph reportedly caused the pilot to lose control once the plane left the ground.

The plane made a hard landing, snapping the left wing.

The pilot and passenger were able to walk away of the plane and call for help. 

DPS officers were at the scene Monday afternoon awaiting arrival of a team from the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here:http://www.myplainview.com

Cessna 182G Skylane, N24RE: Incident occurred May 08, 2016 in Reno, Washoe County, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N24RE

Date: 08-MAY-16
Time: 23:32:00Z
Regis#: N24RE
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11
City: RENO
State: Nevada

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A LIGHT, RENO, NV.

Beech C23, N6566R: Accident occurred May 07, 2016 in Yucca Valley, San Bernardino County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N6566R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA228
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 07, 2016 in Yucca Valley, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N6566R
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the student pilot, during the takeoff on runway 24, the wind was variable at 10 knots. He reported that he departed runway 24 and as the airplane began to climb, "a sudden crosswind gust" made the airplane drift to the right of the runway centerline. He reported that the flight controls became unresponsive, the airplane descended and the left wing struck the ground, then the right wing struck the ground. The airplane was resting on a sand berm, and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings. 

A post-accident inspection by an NTSB Air Safety Investigator revealed that there were no flight control anomalies.

The nearest weather reporting station, 19 miles south of the accident site, at the time of the accident reported that the wind was from 330 degrees true at 12 knots gusting to 18 knots. Furthermore the wind direction was variable from 310 degrees true to 020 degrees true. A postaccident examination of the flight controls showed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain airspeed and a positive rate of climb during takeoff in gusty wind conditions, resulting in a loss of directional control, an uncontrolled descent and collision with terrain.

Hawaiian Airlines, Boeing 767-332, N594HA: Incident occurred May 07, 2016 in Sacramento, California

HAWAIIAN AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N594HA

Date: 07-MAY-16
Time: 14:14:00Z
Regis#: N594HA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 767
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: HAL-Hawaiian Airlines
Flight Number: HAL19
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25
City: SACRAMENTO
State: California

N594HA HAWAIIAN AIRLINES FLIGHT HAL19 BOEING 767 AIRCRAFT SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE TO THE NUMBER 2 ENGINE WITH MINOR DAMAGE, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, SACRAMENTO, CA

Bell UH-1, N486SA: Accident occurred May 07, 2016 in Maxwell, Colusa County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N486SA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA104
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, May 06, 2016 in Maxwell, CA
Aircraft: BELL UH 1B, registration: N486SA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 6, 2016, about 1700 Pacific daylight time, a Bell UH-1B, N486SA, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of main rotor and engine RPM during takeoff from a private staging area near Maxwell, California. The helicopter was registered to a private individual and operated by Jones Flying Service, Biggs, California, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the helicopter, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local aerial application flight which was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that after loading 300 gallons of chemical within the hopper, he conducted a pre takeoff checklist, noting all instruments indicated normally. The pilot initiated takeoff from the truck, and as it climbed over the tree canopy, the rotor and engine RPM began to decay rapidly. The pilot initiated a right turn and attempted to gain airspeed and recover the rotor RPM, however, was unsuccessful, and initiated a landing within an almond orchard. Subsequently the helicopter landed hard and came to rest upright.

Examination of the helicopter by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the fuselage and tailboom were structurally damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Arion Lightning LS-1, Arion Aircraft LLC, N341AL: Fatal accident occurred August 02, 2016 at Van Nuys Airport (KVNY), Los Angeles, California -and- incident occurred May 06, 2016 in Camarillo, Ventura County, California

ARION AIRCRAFT LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N341AL

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01 
 
NTSB Identification: WPR16FA157 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Van Nuys, CA
Aircraft: ARION AIRCRAFT LLC LIGHTNING LS-1, registration: N341AL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 2, 2016, about 1322 Pacific daylight time, an Arion Lightning LS-1, N341AL, was substantially damaged after it collided with a building during a touch and go at Van Nuys Airport (VNY), Van Nuys, California. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Santa Monica Municipal Airport (SMO), Santa Monica, California at 1315. 

According to an acquaintance, the pilot had planned to complete several touch and go maneuvers at VNY on the day of the accident. Preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control audio indicated that the pilot requested to land on runway 16L. After a touch and go, he reported that he heard something "banging around" and asked the tower controller if he could see it. The controller informed the pilot that his left main landing gear was "dangling" from the airplane. After some further discussion, the pilot stated that he wanted to land at VNY, which was his final radio communication. 

Several witnesses reported that the airplane was flying erratically during its departure from runway 16L. Two witnesses listened to the exchange between the pilot and the controller after they observed a wheel fairing hanging from the left main landing gear of the departing airplane. Seconds after the pilot's final communication, they observed the airplane enter a hard left turn. One witness described the turn as a "fighter pilot maneuver." The airplane's nose dropped through the horizon during the steep turn, which was immediately followed by a quarter spin to the left and then a nose down attitude. According to the FAA, the accident site features indicated that the airplane impacted a utility pole, a truck, and then slid on the ground into a section of alleyway between two buildings where it came to rest. 

The airplane came to rest about one eighth of a nautical mile from VNY. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by a broken wooden utility pole and multiple severed wires. The end of the debris path was marked by the main wreckage, which came to rest in fragments about 15 feet beyond the IIP. An odor of fuel was detected at the accident site, which was accompanied by a large fuel stain on the ground beneath the main wreckage. One wooden propeller blade remained attached to the propeller hub and the other blade was sheared at the propeller root. 

A wreckage examination will take place at a later date.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

AIRCRAFT, ARION LIGHTNING LS-1 LSA, ON LANDING SUSTAINED MINOR DAMAGE, CAMARILLO, CA

Date: 06-MAY-16
Time: 18:41:00Z
Regis#: N341AL
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01
City: CAMARILLO
State: California










VAN NUYS (CBSLA.com) — One person was killed after a small plane has crashed into the side of a building near Van Nuys Airport. 


Desmond Shaw, an airborne traffic reporter for KNX NEWSRADIO and CBS2/KCAL9, says he witnessed the crash just after it took off at about 1:15 p.m. into a building at 16145 W. Hart Street, just a block away from the busy commuter airport.

“Before they could clear him to land, he turned really hard to the left and was sideways,” Shaw said. “He started losing altitude, and my pilot was like, ‘He’s going to crash. He’s going to crash’ … He just nosedived, slammed into an industrial building. It all happened in about 15 seconds.”

“Never in all my time in the skies have I actually watched a plane crash…rather shaken up up here. Sometimes we forget the risks we take,” Shaw tweeted.

Authorities confirmed one person was killed in the crash. The building was not structurally damaged and there were no other injuries.

“Basically, we heard a loud crash, but it didn’t sound like a plane crash. It sounded more like a car crash, and we started hearing people screaming, saying, ‘That way! That way,’ ” said Brenda Dykstra, a witness.

The plane was believed to be an Arion Lightning, a light-sport kit-type aircraft, according to Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

According to Gregor, the pilot was apparently performing “touch-and-go” practice maneuvers at Van Nuys Airport when the crash occurred.

Shaw described the plane as a lite sport aircraft and that the pilot complained of something banging around upon take-off, and that the tower said his landing gear was loose.

Just before impact, the pilot radioed in for help:

Pilot: “I have something banging around. Can you see what it is?”

Controller: “Your left main gear appears to be dangling. Uh, it appears to be broke.”

Pilot: “Great. What should I do?”

Controller: “Do you want to attempt landing here? Or it’s up to your uh … it’s your discretion.”

Pilot: “Uh, yeah. I’ll attempt landing here.”

Unknown: “I think that plane went down. I just saw it. I think that plane went down.”

The last time the pilot had filed a flight plan was back in Dec. of 2015, when he flew out of the Santa Monica Airport to Camarillo.

The pilot has not been identified. He was the only one on board.

Story and video:  http://losangeles.cbslocal.com

Surf Air, Pilatus PC12: Incident occurred May 07, 2016 in Santa Barbara, California

Date: 07-MAY-16
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: URF61
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commuter
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: SURF AIR
Flight Number: URF61
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01
City: SANTA BARBARA
State: California

SURF AIR FLIGHT URF61, PILATUS PC 12 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, AFTER TAKEOFF SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE TO THE WING, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NO INJURIES, SANTA BARBARA, CA.