Saturday, July 31, 2021

Truckee Tahoe Airport District Board decides to cancel Air Show and Family Festival due to plane crash: Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 605, N605TR


The Truckee Tahoe Airport District Board reached a consensus Wednesday to cancel the 2021 Air Show & Family Festival due to the plane crash that occurred Monday, July 26.

A special board meeting date will be set to put this item on the Airport District Board Meeting agenda for official action to be taken, a video of the meeting shows.

The event, titled Truckee Tahoe Air Show & Family Festival: A Day of Remembrance, was set to take place September 10 through 12, the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

The next regularly scheduled meeting of the board is August 25.

The Airport District Board of Directors are Kathryn Rohlf, Mary Hetherington, Teresa O’Dette, David Diamond, and Rick Stevens.

Mt. Rainier seeks public input on air tour plan

What should the rules look like for flight tours over Mt. Rainier? The Park Service wants to hear your opinion.

A proposal by park staff and federal aviation authorities would formalize rules on commercial sightseeing flights around the mountain. Advocates of those limitations say that commercial flights can disturb wildlife and disrupt the visitor experience when they fly too low or too frequently.

The National Park Service (NPS) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s draft Air Tour Management Plan would create new training standards, as well as limit commercial flights around the park to once-per-year on a pre-determined route during the late morning and early afternoon. The act would also limit how low pilots can fly and incentivize them to fly quieter aircraft.

Commercial flights over the park wouldn’t look much different under the plan, National Park Service Planning and Compliance Lead Teri Tucker said. Only one tour goes around the park per year on average, and pilots already follow the guidelines that the draft would make official, she said.

A public comment period on the proposal is now open through August 28. You can visit https://parkplanning.nps.gov/MountRainierATMP to share comments or concerns. A virtual public meeting is scheduled for August 16 from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., and will be live streamed at https://youtu.be/dVqpZ_X5vww.

A copy of the proposal is attached to this story online. Here’s the gist of what the agencies have in mind:

The draft Air Tour Management Plan would require all commercial air tour operators at the park to obtain permission from the FAA in areas within the park or up to half a mile outside of it, and at elevations up to 5,000 feet.

Only one tour per year would be allowed. Additionally, tour operators would:

• Have to follow a single pre-determined route.

• Be required to fly above 3,000 feet except during emergencies.

• Operate only from 10 a.m. through 3 p.m. (If they use “quiet technology aircraft,” they can instead operate from one hour after sunrise to one hour before sunset during certain times of the year.)

• Take at least one training course per year (if offered by Park Staff).

According to the Park Service, only two air tour operators currently have permission to run a combined total of 34 flights over the park each year. One of the companies, Classic Helicopter Corp., has not reported any flights since 2013, and the other, Rite Bros Aviation, Inc., conducts an average of only one per year, the NPS said.

That means the once-per-year limitation would simply maintain the current reported use levels, Tucker said. Additionally, the pre-determined flight path is the same path that pilots already use, Tucker said, and pilots already fly at or above 3,000 feet.

The limit is intended to “protect Park soundscapes, visitor experience, wilderness character and wildlife by limiting the number of potential disturbances caused by commercial air tours,” according to the proposal. Height and time limits on the flights protects birds like the marbled murrelet and northern spotted owls, which are sensitive to noise, and other wildlife which are highly active at dawn.

National Parks, including Rainier, are required to seek input on their air tour plans based on the now 20-year-old National Park Air Tour Management Act of 2000, which required parks to set limits on their flight routes and hours to protect parks and their visitors.

In May last year, a federal judge ordered the NPS and FAA to complete their air tour plans for about two dozen parks within the next two years. The Mount Rainier National Park is one of them, and the goal is for each park to complete their air tour plans by the end of Aug. 2022. Other parks under that order include the Everglades National Park in Florida, Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota and the Olympic National Park in Washington.



Bell OH-58A Kiowa, N63097: Incident occurred July 29, 2021 in Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida

Hernando County Sheriff's Office

https://registry.faa.gov/N63097

 


Hernando County Sheriff's Office

HCSO Rotorcraft Makes Unplanned Landing During Patrol Flight

On 07-29-21 at approximately 10 p.m., Hernando County Sheriff’s deputies, with assistance from the Aviation and K-9 Units, were in the Brooksville area attempting to locate a wanted person.

During this time, the HCSO Aviation Unit “Air-1,” flown by Deputy Pilot Roy McLaughlin and Tactical Flight Officer B.J. Hart, advised the dispatcher they were having issues and would be attempting to land.

Deputy Pilot McLaughlin immediately left the heavily populated area of Brooksville, flying toward an area where he could safely land the aircraft without endangering citizens.

At approximately 10:15 p.m., Deputy Pilot McLaughlin landed the aircraft in a field near Brooksville Elementary School.

Hernando County Fire and Emergency Services responded to the scene to check on McLaughlin and Hart.  Both men were treated on scene and released.

The rotorcraft, an OH-58, remained on scene overnight.  Early this morning the Aviation Mechanic and Chief Pilot responded back to the scene to determine the cause of the malfunction.  If repairs cannot be made on scene, the rotorcraft will be trailered back to the HCSO Hangar.




BROOKSVILLE, Florida (CBS12) — Dramatic video shows the pilot of a law enforcement helicopter making a nighttime emergency landing near an elementary school near Brooksville on Thursday.

The aviation unit with the Hernando County Sheriff's Office had to pull away from a search for a wanted person due to "issues."

The sheriff's office said the crew of Air 1, Deputy Pilot Roy McLaughlin and Tactical Flight Officer BJ Hart, searched for a place to land safely without endangering anyone on the ground.

At one point, the pilot couldn't see because his goggles fogged up.

Florida helicopter pilot makes nighttime emergency landing near school. (Hernando County Sheriff's Office)

The helicopter touched down in a field near Brooksville Elementary School.

The crew was treated and released at the scene.

As for the OH-58 helicopter, crews are looking into what caused the malfunction.

‘The jetpack guy is back’: Los Angeles sighting draws an inquiry, again

A pilot flying a Boeing 747 on Wednesday night looked toward the right wing of the plane and reported a strange figure zooming over Los Angeles.

“Possible jetpack man in sight,” the pilot said, sounding weary, if not annoyed.

It was unclear if the object spotted Wednesday was the same “jetpack man” American Airlines pilots said they saw last year, flying at 3,000 feet around Los Angeles International Airport, or the reported jetpack user seen six weeks later by crew members on another commercial flight.

But the sighting this week was enough to draw warnings from aviation officials and another inquiry by federal investigators, who have now looked into several reports of someone in a jetpack flying around Los Angeles.

Federal officials who have investigated the sightings said they have not been able to confirm that a person in a jetpack actually flew into controlled airspace.

This week, however, air traffic controllers who warned other pilots in the vicinity appeared to believe the mystery flyer had returned.

“Use caution,” an air traffic controller said. “The jetpack guy is back.”

This time the sighting was made at 5,000 feet, 15 miles east of the airport at about 6:12 p.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency said the airline involved was Kalitta Air, a cargo carrier.

Air traffic controllers and pilots discussing the sighting sounded somewhat exasperated, according to an audio recording of their exchanges posted on LiveATC.net, which shares live and archived recordings of air-traffic-control radio transmissions.

“We’re looking for the Iron Man,” a pilot said after air traffic controllers broadcast the sighting.

The FAA and the FBI investigate every potential jetpack sighting report, they said.

“The FBI will work with the FAA as we have in the past to investigate the most recent report,” said Laura Eimiller, a spokeswoman for the FBI. “We’ve worked with the FAA on each of the past sightings and thus far, we have not been able to validate any of the reports.”

In a statement, the FAA said that no unusual objects were spotted by radar on Wednesday night.

The incident in August 2020 occurred at about 6:35 p.m., when the pilot of American Airlines Flight 1997 from Philadelphia reported, “We just passed a guy in a jetpack.” Another sighting, last October, was reported to have occurred at an altitude of 6,000 feet, when a China Airlines crew called it in at about 1:45 p.m. roughly seven miles northwest of the airport.

But some of the companies that make jetpacks have expressed skepticism that what pilots have seen in the air is a person, and not a large drone.

Most jetpacks lack the fuel efficiency to fly for more than a few minutes, which makes it difficult for them to get very high.

The packs are largely used as tourist attractions for thrill-seekers who want to experience a few minutes of flight, typically over open fields or water.

In recent years, the FAA has enacted rules and restrictions regarding objects flying close to airports, as the number of aerial vehicles, primarily drones, has increased around airports. The FAA requires authorization to fly in controlled airspace.



Piper J3C-65 Cub, N42522: Fatal accident occurred July 31, 2021 near Hartford Municipal Airport (KHXF), Washington County, Wisconsin

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin


Location: Hartford, WI
Accident Number: CEN21FA345
Date & Time: July 31, 2021, 11:30 Local 
Registration: N42522
Aircraft: Piper J3C-65 
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On July 31, 2021, about 1130 central daylight time, a Piper J3C-65 airplane, N42522, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hartford, Wisconsin. The flight instructor was fatally injured and the pilot receiving instruction was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 instructional flight.

The pilot receiving instruction reported that they had been practicing touch-and-go takeoffs and landings from runway 27 at the Hartford Municipal Airport (HXF) and had performed about 10 before the accident occurred. On the accident takeoff, when the airplane reached about 400-500 ft. agl, the instructor said, “engine failure, turn around for 09”. Both pilots were on the controls at this time and started a turn for runway 09 when the airplane entered a “graveyard spin”. He reported that he remembered about one to two seconds of the spin and had no further recollection of the accident.

The airplane impacted a bean field about 1,100 ft. west of the departure end of runway 27 at HXF. Based on impact signatures, the airplane impacted in a left-wing low, nose low attitude, with the airplane coming to rest about 35 ft west of the initial impact point. A postaccident examination of the airplane confirmed control system continuity from the cockpit controls to all control surfaces. There were no separations in any of the flight control cables.

The left-wing spars were broken at the wing root, but the remainder of the wing remained predominately intact. Both left lift struts were bent and remained attached at the fuselage and wing. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage with little damage. Both right lift struts were bent and remained attached to the fuselage and wing. The forward lower fuselage at the firewall was pushed rearward. The engine remained attached to the fuselage. One propeller blade was bent aft and under the engine, and the crankshaft was partially separated just aft of the propeller flange. 

Examination of the engine confirmed rotation, thumb compression, valve train continuity, and ignition on all spark plug leads. All spark plugs were examined, and no anomalies were noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N42522
Model/Series: J3C-65 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KETB,884 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2800 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / 8 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hartford, WI
Destination: Hartford, WI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 43.350781,-88.400281 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.





Washington County, Wisconsin Sheriff's Office

Date: July 31, 2021
Case: Plane Crash 21-26015
Authority: Sgt. Chad Beres

On today’s date at 11:22am the Sheriff’s Office was notified of a plane crash in a corn field west of Cty Tk U south of Arthur Rd in the Town of Hartford.  This area is directly west of the Hartford Municipal Airport which is located at 4200 Cty TK U.  Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to the scene along with Officers from the Hartford Police Department and personnel from Hartford Fire & Rescue.

A caller reported the plane was occupied by 2 subjects; a male and a female.  According to the caller the male was conscious and appeared to be in shock.  The female subject was not conscious.  Upon the first officers arrival it was determined the female would need to be extricated from the plane.  It was determined that the male subject is a pilot and was receiving instruction/supervision by the female subject who is an instructor.  

The male subject was transported from the scene via ambulance to AMC Hartford and then transported via Flight for Life to Froedtert Hospital in Wauwatosa.  The female subject was extricated from the plane and taken to the Life Net hangar at the airport and then to AMC Summit by the Life Net helicopter.    

This is an active investigation and the FAA Milwaukee Office is currently on scene.  At this time there is no update in regards to the status of the plane occupants.  





Enstrom 280 Shark, N754MH: Accident occurred July 30, 2021 in Colchester, Chittenden County, Vermont

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Portland, Maine
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Enstrom Helicopters; Menominee, Michigan 
Beta Technologies; South Burlington, Vermont

Beta Air LLC


Posted on Kathryn's Report
Location: Colchester, VT
Accident Number: ERA21LA309
Date & Time: July 30, 2021, 16:25 Local 
Registration: N36DK
Aircraft: Enstrom 280FX 
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Business

On July 30, 2021, about 1625 eastern daylight time, an Enstrom 280FX helicopter, N36DK, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Colchester, Vermont. The commercial pilot incurred serious injuries. The helicopter was operated by Beta Air LLC. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight.

The pilot reported that he departed for a flight from Plattsburgh International Airport (PGB) Plattsburgh, New York to Burlington International Airport (BTV), Burlington, Vermont. While enroute to BTV the pilot “smelled something burning and then observed smoke in the cockpit.”  He initiated a precautionary landing; however, he then experienced a partial and then full loss of engine power in “rapid succession.” He added that the loss of engine power began with a rising exhaust gas temperature. The pilot subsequently completed an autorotation landing on the Lake Champlain Causeway.

Photographs provided by the operator and the Federal Aviation Administration showed that the helicopter came to rest partially on the road and rocks that lined the causeway. The airframe was destroyed by fire. The helicopter was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Enstrom
Registration: N36DK
Model/Series: 280FX NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BTV,340 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C /7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 22 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Plattsburgh, NY (PBG)
Destination: Burlington, VT (BTV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: Both in-flight and on-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 44.568671,-73.313212 
Posted on Kathryn's Report


COLCHESTER, Vermont  (WCAX) - The Colchester Causeway is back open after a helicopter crashed into it Friday afternoon. The pilot, who was the only one on board, was able to climb out of the fiery wreckage.

Bikers were stranded on opposite ends of the causeway, the air smelled like gasoline, and crews were on scene trying to piece together what happened. Three hours after the helicopter crashed into the Colchester Causeway, the wreckage was hauled away on a trailer, but the investigation continues. “There’s fragments of it spread in the area, so it looks like it broke apart,” said Colchester Assistant Fire Chief Seth Lasker.

Photos from witnesses show the moments the plane burst into flames. Officials on scene said it appears mechanical issues are to blame.

“The NTSB is interested in this and has been consulted,” Lasker said. “We’re waiting for word on them as to how we’re going to proceed further.”

Lasker said the rotorcraft was on fire when they arrived. The pilot, 31 year-old Nathaniel Fortin, was walking toward them. Lasker says Fortin suffered minor to moderate injuries and was transported to UVM Medical Center.

The helicopter was owned by BETA technologies. In a statement, they said the rotorcraft was a conventional gas-powered helicopter. According to them, Fortin is a certified flight instructor. They say this was a ‘precautionary emergency landing.’

“I don’t know what the circumstances of the helicopter were but he’s alive, so I’d have to say he did pretty well,” Lasker said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.


Nathaniel Fortin





Federal Judge Blocks Town Ban On ‘Special VFR’ Flight Operations




An automated radio announcement that has been warning pilots all summer that no “Special VFR” operations are permitted at East Hampton Airport disappeared from the airwaves after a federal judge on Friday, July 30, ordered the Town of East Hampton and the controllers at the airport tower to suspend their unilateral policy barring the operations.

“Special VFR” is an option available to pilot across the country under federal aviation regulations that allows them to approach an airport and land when the ceiling and visibility are below Visual Flight Rules (VFR) minima, as long as the pilot can stay clear of clouds and visibility is at least one mile.

Declaring the procedure unsafe because it encourages pilots to fly low over populated areas on bad-weather days, Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc announced in April that the town had instructed its FAA-approved and regulated control tower contractor, Robinson Aviation, not to grant special VFR clearance requests.

The announcement advising pilots of the ban was immediately added to the airport’s automated weather observation system, which continually broadcasts ceiling, visibility and other weather information for the airport.

It was gone by Saturday morning, July 31, following U.S. Eastern District of New York Judge Gary R. Brown’s decision to grant a temporary restraining order sought by Zip Aviation, a New York City helicopter tour operator. Zip argues in a suit filed against the town and Robinson Aviation on July 22 that the policy violates federal aviation law because it discriminates against the use of the airport by helicopter operators.

Judges may issue temporary restraining orders before ruling on the merits of a case when the plaintiff has a likelihood of success and the continuation of a contested policy is likely to cause the plaintiff financial harm.

Supporting Zip in the lawsuit are the National Business Aviation Association, the Eastern Region Helicopter Council and the Helicopter Association International.

The FAA’s acting eastern regional administrator, Marie Kennington- Gardiner, wrote airport director Jim Brundige in late June that “as a matter of law, HTO lacks the authority to deny all requests for special VFR clearances …”

She added that “to the extent that you are continuing to ban all Special VFR clearances at HTO” when the tower is operating, “you should remain aware that your decision is neither consistent with FAA policy nor federal law.”

She wrote that there are regulatory procedures for seeking permission to limit Special VFR operations at any particular airport but that the town had not followed them.

Mr. Brundige replied in a July 1 letter that “Special VFR clearances are not appropriate at HTO under any circumstances” when the tower is in operation. “I will be reviewing your letter with the East Hampton Town Board and our aviation counsel. Please be advised there will be no changes to the HTO Airport Operating Procedures at this time.”

The disappearance of the announcement warning pilots there is no “Special VFR” at the airport confirmed that the town’s Special VFR ban has been suspended in compliance with the TRO. The weather has been good since then, so there has been no reason for any pilots to request a Special VFR clearance to takeoff or land.

Seaplanes and helicopters arriving at East Hampton Airport in past seasons made regular use of the Special VFR option — which is much simpler and less time-consuming than obtaining an “Instrument Flight Rules” (IFR) clearance — when fog from the ocean rolls in over the south side of the airport or other conditions lower ceiling and visibility below the VFR minima of 3 miles visibility and a ceiling of 1,000 feet above ground level. Jet crews do not normally use the Special VFR option, opting instead to fly strictly controlled instrument approaches.

Until now, the ban on Special VFR reduced the frequency of low-flying seaplanes and helicopters on low-weather days this summer. Many of them are not equipped or certified for instrument approaches, making Special VFR their only option when ceilings are low and visibility is limited.

“The East Hampton Town Board and the airport manager have been opposed to the practice,” Mr. Van Scoyoc commented in the April press release announcing the ban, “as it [Special VFR] increasingly became standard operating procedure when the weather is overcast on the East End, resulting in flights at very low altitudes.”

“The safety of the residents of East Hampton Town and other communities under the flight paths cannot be compromised by East Hampton Airport users,” Mr. Van Scoyoc said.

Two Kansas Aircraft Companies Sentenced for Using Illegal Software




WICHITA, Kansas – In separate court cases, two Kansas-based companies have been sentenced for operating with pirated computer software. Lightning Aerospace, LLC, and Fly Manufacturing, LLC, had previously pleaded guilty to one count of Circumvention of Protected Copyrighted Work.

Dassault Systèmes owns the copyright to a software called Computer Aided Three-dimensional Interactive Application or CATIA. According to court documents, Lightning Aerospace and Fly Manufacturing admitted to intentionally acquiring unlicensed versions of CATIA and using the illegal software for years. During that time Lightning Aerospace and Fly Manufacturing didn’t purchase software from Dassault Systèmes or pay for licensing. 

“Defendants involved in these types of crimes like to claim them as victimless,” said Katherine Greer, special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) in the Kansas City area of operations. 

“The offenses in this case are aggravated by the fact that the accused used unlicensed software to design and test parts for aircraft-actions that could have grave consequences to consumers,” said Greer. “Not to mention the billions of dollars legitimate companies are losing each year to cybercriminals engaged in digital thefts, costs likely being passed along to customers.”

During sentencing, the court ordered Lightning Aerospace to pay $46,002 in restitution to Dassault Systèmes and pay approximately $28,000 in court fines. Fly Manufacturing was ordered to pay $67,272 in restitution and approximately $8,000 in fines. 

“Not only did these two businesses defraud a software company, they also gave themselves an unfair financial advantage over competitors who obeyed the law by paying for software and licensing fees,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Duston Slinkard. “Hopefully these convictions will deter other companies from engaging in intellectual property theft.” 

This case was investigated by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Kansas City.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Alan Metzger prosecuted the case.

Piper PA-28-235, N284M: Accident occurred July 19, 2020 at Campbell Airport (C81), Grayslake, Lake County, Illinois




This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greater Chicago, Illinois


Location: Grayslake, IL 
Accident Number: CEN20CA302
Date & Time: July 19, 2020, 19:02 Local 
Registration: N284M
Aircraft: Piper PA28 
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N284M
Model/Series: PA28 235
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire:
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:
Total Injuries: N/A 
Latitude, Longitude: 42.34053,-88.029388 (est)

Collision During Landing: Robinson R44, N350DM; accident occurred July 24, 2020 in White Hall, Maryland






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Whitehall, Maryland
Accident Number: ERA20CA260
Date & Time: July 24, 2020, 18:30 Local
Registration: N350DM
Aircraft: Robinson R44 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Positioning

Analysis

The pilot of the aerial application helicopter had sprayed hundreds of acres earlier in the day and was positioning the helicopter at another farm site for spraying the following day. He said he selected a landing site next to a grain trailer to remain clear of on-going farm operations. The pilot stated he began his approach at the end of a 7-hour duty day, hovered adjacent to the trailer, and focused his attention on the position of the spray booms as he descended over the landing spot. As he lowered the collective control to complete the landing, the main rotor blades struck the top and side of the grain trailer which resulted in substantial damage to the
helicopter’s main rotor blades and tailboom. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical deficiencies with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

In the NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report the pilot offered several safety recommendations to prevent similar accidents from happening in the future. Among them, he suggested a "higher level" of aeronautical decision making, improved fatigue awareness, better obstacle awareness, and maintenance of landing area scan and avoidance of "fixation" on any one item or obstacle.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate clearance from a known obstacle while landing from a hover.

Findings

Personnel issues Identification/recognition - Pilot
Environmental issues Ground equipment - Response/compensation
Personnel issues (general) - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Collision during takeoff/land (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Helicopter Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): 
Helicopter Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Helicopter Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: December 19, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2298 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1662 hours (Total, this make and model), 2018 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N350DM
Model/Series: R44 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted (Special)
Serial Number: 0366
Landing Gear Type: N/A; Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: January 9, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 3869 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 11 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-540-F1B5
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 260 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDMW,789 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 22:15 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 257°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: New Freedom, PA 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Whitehall, MD
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 18:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.677223,-76.609443(est)

Abnormal Runway Contact: Piper PA-28R-201T Cherokee Arrow III, N31720; accident occurred July 25, 2020 at Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (KFHB), Nassau County, Florida









Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Fernandina Beach, Florida
Accident Number: ERA20CA265
Date & Time: July 25, 2020, 09:40 Local
Registration: N31720
Aircraft: Piper PA28R 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that the airplane had just undergone an annual inspection, and this was the first flight since the work had been completed. After a normal preflight and run-up, the pilot departed, raised the landing gear, and during the initial climb, he felt an "intermittent shudder" from the engine. He reported that all of the engine parameters appeared normal, and when he reduced power in the climb the shudder stopped. The pilot subsequently decided to land immediately; he reported that on downwind in the airport traffic pattern, abeam the runway numbers, he recalled that he lowered the flaps and landing gear. He further reported that the approach was stable, and that the airplane touched down on the left main landing gear first, and as the airplane settled to the runway, the "right wing tip dropped to the runway." The airplane subsequently skidded off the runway and into terrain where the left main landing gear collapsed. The left wing and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that throughout the traffic pattern, he was "intently watching the engine monitor" and could not recall observing the three green landing gear down annunciator lights prior to landing, however, he recalled that the gear unsafe warning light directly in front of him was not red at any point during the flight. He reported that after the accident, when the airplane was lifted up for recovery, the right main landing gear was found retracted in its well.

A witness that was located on airport property reported that he observed the airplane on short final, and the right main landing gear appeared to be retracted, but the left and nose landing gear appeared to be down. He subsequently observed the airplane touch down on the left main landing gear and roll for "quite some time" before the right wing contacted the runway.

Examination of the landing gear system by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector following the accident found that the nose and right main landing gear functioned normally through multiple cycles. The respective green landing gear annunciator lights functioned normally, and the nose and right main landing gear fell and locked into place through the activation of the emergency gear
release handle as well. The left main landing gear was disconnected from the system prior to the tests due to damage sustained in the runway excursion. The investigation was unable to duplicate any operational discrepancies with the landing gear system.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The failure of the right main landing gear to extend prior to landing, which could not be duplicated during postaccident tests.

Findings

Aircraft Main landing gear - Not specified

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Abnormal runway contact (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 59,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 6, 2015
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: April 18, 2019
Flight Time: 215 hours (Total, all aircraft), 17 hours (Total, this make and model), 150 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N31720
Model/Series: PA28R 201T 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 28R-7803297
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: July 24, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5267 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-360-FB
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 201 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FHB,15 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 09:35 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 110° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 26°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fernandina Beach, FL (FHB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fernandina Beach, FL (FHB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:35 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Fernandina Beach Muni FHB 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 15 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5152 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop; Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.613056,-81.46611(est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, N2629V; accident occurred July 26, 2020 at Lakeland Linder International Airport (KLAL), Polk County, Florida










Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

EYW Flying LLC

Location: Lakeland, Florida
Accident Number: ERA20CA276
Date & Time: July 26, 2020, 15:05 Local
Registration: N2629V
Aircraft: Cessna 177RG 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that, while preparing to start the engine, he felt stressed and rushed because he was departing later than planned, and the weather forecast along his intended route was forecast to deteriorate as the day progressed. He followed the checklist, though after the accident he was unsure if he had properly set the parking brake or he may have inadvertently disengaged the brake with his leg/knee, which had occurred previously. After the engine did not start on the first attempt, he followed the flooded engine procedure, which included setting the throttle to the ½ position. When the engine started on the second attempt, the airplane began rolling forward. He attempted to stop using the brakes, but his sandals, which were wet, slipped off the rudder pedals. He further stated that “in a panic, I rapidly advanced the throttle instead of retarding it.” The airplane struck a building and sustained substantial damage to the right wing and engine mount. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during the attempted engine start.

Findings

Aircraft Surface speed/braking - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Standing-engine(s) start-up Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: October 15, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: June 26, 2020
Flight Time: 168 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18 hours (Total, this make and model), 112 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2629V
Model/Series: 177RG No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 177RG0635
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 25, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4123 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-A1B6D
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 200 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LAL,142 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 14:50 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 294°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4400 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 180° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lakeland, FL (LAL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Key West, FL (EYW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 15:00 Local 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: LAKELAND LINDER INTL LAL
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 142 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.987499,-82.01889 (est)

Air Tractor Inc AT-401, N9190Q: Accident occurred July 27, 2020 in Burlington, Kit Carson County, Colorado




This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Burlington, CO
Number: CEN20CA311
Date & Time: July 27, 2020, 11:08 Local 
Registration: N9190Q
Aircraft: Air Tractor AT 401
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Air Tractor
Registration: N9190Q
Model/Series: AT 401 Undesignated 
Aircraft Category:
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held:
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire:
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion:
Total Injuries: N/A
Latitude, Longitude: 39.300971,-102.270538 (est)

Quest Kodiak 100, N856TC: Accident occurred July 28, 2020 in Hunts Point, King County, Washington





This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

CLY Aviation LLC


Location: Hunts Point, WA
Accident Number: WPR20CA243
Date & Time: July 28, 2020, 07:45 Local 
Registration: N856TC
Aircraft: Quest KODIAC 100 
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Quest 
Registration: N856TC
Model/Series: KODIAC 100 
No Series Aircraft Category:
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 
Aircraft Damage:
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire:
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:
Total Injuries: N/A
Latitude, Longitude: 47.6095,-122.209159 (est)