Saturday, January 5, 2019

Accident occurred January 03, 2019 at Houma–Terrebonne Airport (KHUM), Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

Woman injured by airplane propeller at Houma–Terrebonne Airport

A 41-year-old woman suffered severe injuries Thursday night after being struck by a spinning airplane propeller at the Houma-Terrebonne Airport, authorities said.

According to Houma Police Sgt. Travis Theriot, the incident occurred about 11:45 p.m. 

The unidentified victim stood too close to a parked aircraft while its engine was running.

“The propeller struck her in the arm,” Theriot said. “She was transported to a medical facility in New Orleans with severe trauma injuries. The plane was stopped in place but the engine was still running.”

Joe Wheeler, Houma-Terrebonne Airport executive director, said the aircraft did not belong to the victim.

“A gentleman went out to check on his airplane that hadn’t been run in a while,” Wheeler said. “A lady who was with him got out of the truck and inadvertently walked into the propeller. From my understanding she’s in stable condition.”

Although such accidents are not common, spinning airplane propellers can be difficult to see in the dark, Wheeler said.

“I’m a pilot also,” Wheeler said. “When you’re running an airplane like that with a propeller it’s hard enough to see during the daytime, but at night you really can’t see it.”

The accident will help tighten safety precautions at the airport to prevent future incidents, Wheeler said.

“Speaking with my other tenants here, we’ve all grown up around airplanes and have been with them for a long time,” Wheeler said. “We sometimes take them for granted. My tenants are tightening up on how they operate. Once this type of incident happens, it creates a lot more respect for the airplane. It’s kind of like when you drive a car and haven’t had a blown tire for three or four years. You start to get complacent and take it for granted. It will be my job to mitigate this risk.”

The accident is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration, Wheeler said.

“It’s a very unfortunate event,” Wheeler said. “We’re hoping and praying everything comes out all right for her.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.houmatoday.com

Beechcraft C35 Bonanza, N241EE: Incident occurred January 03, 2019 at Venice Municipal Airport (KVNC), Sarasota County, Florida

https://registry.faa.gov/N241EE





According to the city of Venice, a single-engine plane had an emergency at the Venice Municipal Airport on Wednesday.

Shortly after 5 p.m. Wednesday, Venice Fire, Venice Police, Sarasota EMS and Venice Airport staff responded after a Beechcraft C35 Bonanza had a mechanical failure after landing at the airport. While braking to exit the runway, the plane’s forward landing gear failed, causing the nose to hit the pavement, according to airport staff. The pilot and sole occupant of the plane, Dan Gualandri, was not injured.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.heraldtribune.com



VENICE (WWSB) - No one was injured when a plane landed at Venice Airport and ended up on its nose when the landing gear failed.

Authorities say the Beechcraft C35 Bonanza landed without incident shortly after 5pm on Wednesday. When it was taxing to exit the runway, the pilot, Dan Gualandri, applied the brakes and his nose gear failed, causing the front to nose into the pavement.

Gualandri, who is the Director of Maintenance at Sarasota Avionics, was the sole occupant of the plane and was uninjured.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mysuncoast.com

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6872P: Incident occurred January 03, 2019 near Wilkes-Barre Wyoming Valley Airport (KWBW), Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

https://registry.faa.gov/N6872P 





FORTY FORT — Two occupants narrowly escaped injury when their small plane made an emergency landing on a recreational soccer field near the Wyoming Valley Airport Thursday afternoon.

“It could have been a lot worse,” said borough Mayor Andy Tuzinski, speaking in his role as emergency management director.

Tuzinski was at the scene with first responders after the aircraft came down at 4:12 p.m.

Aboard the aircraft were two men, a pilot and instructor, who had flown out of Towanda, Bradford County, and were preparing to land in Forty Fort for refuelling, Tuzinski said.

As they approached the airfield, the pair experienced a problem with the landing gear, he added. Unable to use the manual override, they opted to make a controlled crash-landing on the empty soccer field just south of the airport’s runway.

“They did everything they needed to do and they brought the plane down safely,” Tuzinski said. “There were no injuries and they were able to walk away from the plane.”

The plane will have to remain on the field until National Transportation Safety Board officials arrive to perform an investigation, Tuzinski said. Because no one was injured, that may take a few days.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records for the plane’s registration number, it is a 1960 single-engine Piper registered to an owner in Bradford County with a certificate valid through June 2020.

It is not the first plane to touch down on that soccer field.

In 1988 another small aircraft crashed there, resulting in the deaths of two people. Tuzinski, a longtime firefighter, was on the scene for that incident as well, he recalled Thursday.

“I am glad everything went as well as it could have today,” he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.timesleader.com



FORTY FORTY, LUZERNE COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU-TV) A little excitement late Thursday afternoon in Forty Fort, Luzerne County when a small plane came in for a landing.


The plane came down in the middle of a soccer field.   


Eyewitness News was on the scene shortly after crews were called about the plane emergency.


Forty Fort Mayor Andy Tuzinski tells us the plane was on its way from Towanda to the Wilkes-Barre Wyoming Valley Airport when the plane experienced technical problems.


The pilot made an emergency landing on the nearby soccer field in Forty Fort. Mayor Tuzinski says the pilot and co-pilot were not injured.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.pahomepage.com




WYOMING, Pennsylvania  --  A small plane headed from Towanda to the Wyoming Valley Airport in Wyoming had a close call.

Two experienced pilots inside the plane realized the landing gear was broken as they were traveling on Thursday afternoon.

The pilots decided to land on the soccer fields near the airport.

They were able to successfully do so with no injuries after the emergency landing in Luzerne County.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wnep.com

Robinson R44 Raven I, N772MG: Accident occurred January 02, 2019 off Anna Maria Island, Florida

Sarasota Helicopter Services

https://registry.faa.gov/N772MG



Stan Lee
Commercial Helicopter Pilot and Flight instructor.


Pete Boden


Tom MacKnight

Updated January 6, 2019 – ANNA MARIA – A helicopter crashed into the Gulf of Mexico about two miles off Anna Maria Island on Wednesday, January 2nd, sending two men to the hospital, according to Manatee County emergency officials.

The helicopter was shooting video of a boat about 10-15 feet above the water a half-mile west of the Sandbar restaurant when the crash occurred around 11 a.m., said Steve Litschauer, acting chief of Manatee County Emergency Management.

Two men were transported to Blake Medical Center; the pilot, Stanley Lee, in his 60s, with trauma, and Thomas MacKnight, 58, with back injuries, according to the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO). The third occupant, photographer Peter Boden, refused treatment.

Lee was listed in stable condition on Friday; MacKnight was not hospitalized.

Emergency workers met the victims at the South Coquina boat ramp for transport to the hospital, said Robert Smith, Manatee County’s public safety director. The boat that was the subject of the video transported them from the crash site to the ramp.

The owner of the Robinson R44 Raven I helicopter is Sarasota Helicopter Services LLC, according to MCSO. Lee is listed as manager of the company, according to the Florida Division of Corporations.

The crew was working for North Carolina-based Fountain Powerboats, according to MacKnight’s Facebook page.

This evening, MacKnight posted on his Facebook page: “Hi Everyone. I want to just let you know that I am out of the hospital and back home. Wish I could say that for my pilot, Stan, who is in critical condition. Please say a prayer for him. We went down hard in the gulf around 11 am while shooting for Fountain Powerboats. I am pretty banged up like I just played a quarter with a pro football team but I am blessed to be here. Guess I am not done here on earth. I lost my camera, wallet, phone, keys but feel like I won the lottery of life today. I appreciate the messages and concern and will try to respond. But now, I am going to chill out. I kind of had a bad day. Again, please pray for Stan and thank you for well wishes and concern. More tomorrow.”

Pete Boden posted: “Just a quick update, I am a bit bruised, but fine! The inflatable Vest worked great, that’s why I wear them. Today God didn’t need us, and for that I am truly thankful. Thank you for all the kind thoughts and prayers!”

A GoFundMe account has been set up for Boden, who lost his camera equipment in the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.amisun.com



SARASOTA (WWSB) - Thomas MacKnight is thankful to be alive after the helicopter he was in crashed into the water about a mile offshore of Anna Maria Island on Wednesday.

It happened around 11am. MacKnight was one of three people in the Robinson R44 Raven I helicopter belonging to Sarasota Helicopter Services LLC.

MacKnight says the pilot, Stanley Lee, is one of the best in town and he’s flown with him many times. They were shooting video, hovering around 10-15 feet above the water like they normally do, when all of a sudden they hit the water.

“The second we hit, the water, because there’s no doors [on the helicopter when we’re shooting], threw me back into the back of the helicopter. At that point, I wasn’t even conscious of, I mean I didn’t know what was going on. You would never think that you had just crashed,” he said. “As soon as that happened, as soon as we hit, we went down like a rock.”

MacKnight says he was immediately underwater. He had been through safety demonstrations before, so he knew what to do. First, he detached himself from his seat belt and started to try to get out of the helicopter, which had tilted in the water, so he was facing towards the sea floor.

“I got out of the helicopter but I got hung up on something and the helicopter was going down and I looked up and saw the sky going away. Honestly, I thought, ‘This is it,’” MacKnight recalled.

You would think that in a situation like that, MacKnight would have been terrified. But he says it was calm experience. He said he just felt “it was going to be done.”

“When I thought it was going to be my last breath, I wasn’t concerned or upset. As soon as I thought that, I popped away and came up to the top. I looked around for everybody and saw everybody was up. Then I pulled the cord on my life preserver,” said MacKnight.

He says he couldn’t see anyone and didn’t know where everyone else was until he reached the surface. It happened so quickly, it was hard to take anything in, even to understand what had happened to him.

“Stan was obviously in very bad condition. I went over to him. By that time, the boat that we were shooting had come back. They jumped in and were helping us. I told them to go get Stan,” he said.

The passengers on the boat were able to pull all three people from the helicopter out of the water. The U.S. Coast Guard from St. Pete responded, putting two of their crew onto the boat to help with first aid efforts and then escorting the boat Coquina Beach to have the victims transported to the hospital.

Stanley Lee of Sarasota was taken to Blake Hospital under a trauma alert and he is listed in critical condition. MacKnight was taken to Blake Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. Peter Bowden had only superficial wounds and refused treatment.

The day after the crash, MacKnight said he hurts all over, his back was hurt and everything is stiff. At the same time, he says he woke up this morning and looked at the ceiling, and thought, ‘Wow, here I am.’ "It’s a different day than it was yesterday. Life’s different.”

But he’s praying for his friend, Stanley Lee, who was hurt badly, and telling others to keep what’s really important at the forefront of their minds.

“Life is precious. We’re all here for some reason, I think. Respect the fact that you are here. Love the people that are closer to you and the people that are not. Every day is a gift and you should use it as you should. I almost didn’t have a today," said MacKnight. “Treat each bother. Let’s make life better while we’re here."

Multiple agencies responded to the scene, including Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Longboat Key Police, Sarasota Police and the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office, to assist the Coast Guard.

The sheriff’s office located the wreckage using sonar and marked the location. The FAA and NTSB will follow up with removal and further crash investigation. It’s still unknown why the helicopter crashed.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mysuncoast.com



MANATEE COUNTY — A vacationer was enjoying the view of the Gulf of Mexico with his wife on Manatee Public Beach when he saw a helicopter plunge into the water and disappear.

Steve Buso of Omaha, Nebraska says he caught a glimpse of the privately-owned aircraft on the horizon, miles offshore, circling alongside a boat.

“It looked like it was kind of hovering, then next thing you know I saw the tail of the helicopter go up and nose-dive right in the ocean,” Buso told SNN-TV. “I saw the spray of all the water going up and I heard a big boom — that caught most people’s attention.”

Moments later the aircraft’s tail sank beneath surface of the water and disappeared.

The pilot, Stanley Lee of Sarasota, was transported to Blake Medical Center in critical condition. Passenger Thomas MacKnight — a guitarist for The Verge and owner of a video production company — was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office said. A third person, Peter Bowden, had minor injuries and was not transported.

The Robinson R44 Raven I is registered to Sarasota Helicopter Services LLC.

The Sheriff’s Office located the wreckage and used sonar to mark its location.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified and will remove the helicopter from the sea, and investigate the crash.

Buso said there was commotion on the water he saw from his spot near the beach. The boat was still before it took off.

“It was close enough that I could see it was a helicopter and the tail go up,” Buso said. “I looked at my wife. That helicopter just went into the ocean. I know it did.”

The Sheriff’s Office said a boat that was being filmed from the helicopter, two miles offshore from The Sandbar, rescued the occupants of the helicopter and called 911 around 11 a.m. They met with a Coast Guard vessel that administered first aid on arrival.

“Through the coordination of the good Samaritans, local authorities and crewmen on our boat, we were able to rapidly and safely transport the crash victims to advanced medical care,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Jacob Lettington, the coxswain on the Response Boat-Small.

The Coast Guard escorted the boat to awaiting first responders, the Manatee County EMS, West Manatee Fire Department, Manatee County Beach Patrol, Longboat Key Police Department at the South Coquina boat ramp.

The helicopter was flying about 10 to 15 feet above the surface recording video when it crashed, said Robert Smith, the Director of Public Safety at Manatee County Government.

Smith said the helicopter departed from Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport earlier in the day.

The MCSO and Sarasota Police Department marine patrol units provided assistance, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission boat towed a piece of the helicopter to shore.

Sarasota police spokeswoman Genevieve Judge said SPD sent one marine unit to help with the crash.

MacKnight posted a statement on Facebook about eight hours later addressing the incident. He asked for prayers for Lee, the injured pilot.

“We went down hard in the gulf around 11 a.m. while shooting for Fountain Powerboats,” MacKnight said in his statement. “I am pretty banged up like I just played a quarter with a pro football team but I am blessed to be here. Guess I am not done here on earth. I lost my camera, wallet, phone, keys but feel like I won the lottery of life today. I appreciate the messages and concern and will try to respond. But now, I am going to chill out. I kind of had a bad day.

“Again, please pray for Stan and thank you for well wishes and concern. More tomorrow.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.heraldtribune.com





ANNA MARIA - It was a scary moment in the sky around 11:00 Wednesday morning.

"Once I seen it go down, I said, 'That helicopter just went down in the ocean and disappeared,'” Witness Steve Buso said. 

Buso, a Nebraska resident, was vacationing on the Suncoast. He describes the moment he saw a helicopter crash in the Gulf of Mexico, about a mile offshore of Anna Maria Island's Sandbar Restaurant. 

“I see the tail of the helicopter go up and nosedive right into the ocean, and I saw the spraying from all of the water that was coming up and heard a big boom, and that caught most people’s attention," Buso said. 

Manatee County Public Safety Director Robert Smith says the helicopter, owned by Sarasota Helicopter Services, LLC was flying just 10 to 15 feet above the water, filming a boat.

"We don’t know the circumstances of what caused the accident, but it was seen, and people in the boat transported the patients to the boat ramp,” Smith said. 

He says the pilot, Sarasota Resident Stanley Lee, was taken as a trauma alert to Blake Medical Center and is in critical condition. Another male passenger, Thomas McKnight, was also transported. The third passenger, Peter Bowden, refused treatment, having only superficial wounds, according to a release from the Manatee County Sheriff's Office. Smith says if the helicopter were higher, things could have been a lot worse.

"I think in this case, the fact that the helicopter was only 10 to 15 feet above the surface of the water played a big role,” Smith said. 

"That’s what caught my attention," Buso said. "It looked awful low, and kept getting lower and lower and obviously it went down."

Multiple agencies are investigating the cause of this crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.snntv.com

Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey, N24YD: Fatal occurred January 02, 2019 in American River, Sacramento, California

https://registry.faa.gov/N24YD 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Candace Marshall

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Candace Marshall, the woman who was a passenger in a seaplane that crashed into the American River on January 2nd, has died.

Marshall was flying in a Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey with pilot Keith Hezmalhalch when the plane crash-landed into the American River, leaving Marshall submerged in the river for an unknown amount of time.

Hezmalhalch managed to pull himself out of the plane with an abrasion on his head but walked away from the incident okay. He said in an interview with CBS13 after the crash that he thinks his plane crashed because its wheels were down for the planned water landing.

“Looked like one of my best water landings ever,” Hezmalhalch said. “Such a beautiful day, and then suddenly it wasn’t.”

Hezmalhalch fears the wheels were down because of his own pilot error.

“I feel a sense of failure, a sense of guilt, over not being the kind of pilot that we all are supposed to be,” Hezmalhalch said.

After finally making it above water, he dove down again and again to free his passenger, Marshall, who was now unconscious and still strapped in her seat.

“I can tell you, it looks just like it does in the movies,” Hezmalhalch said. “It was bad.”

Finally freeing her on his fourth dive, he performed CPR until first-responders arrived.

According to a Facebook page detailing Marshall’s medical journey in the hospital, she passed away two weeks after the crash on January 17th.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://sacramento.cbslocal.com



Keith Hezmalhalch

SACRAMENTO -- The pilot of the seaplane that crashed into the American River on Wednesday says he still beats himself up over his error in not checking to see if his landing gear was up before an attempted water landing.

Keith Hezmalhalch, a onetime Sacramento resident, flew out of Napa for what was to be a short boating trip up the river, but the plane hit hard.

His passenger, longtime friend Candy Huffman is still in critical condition at the UC Davis Medical Center and remains unconscious.

Hezmalhalch dove into the shallow water four times before he could release Huffman from her seatbelt. He performed CPR until rescuers arrived.

Hezmalhalch credited homeless people on the river for calling 9-1-1 almost immediately after the crash and for getting emergency responders to the scene quickly.

It was a traumatic experience for him because he feels he's responsible for placing his friend's life in danger.

"She's not out of the woods, so any prayers anybody can bring are so need...that's all that matters to me," said Hezmalhalch.

Huffman's family has set up a GoFundMe account to help with expenses.


Original article can be found here ➤  https://fox40.com



SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — The pilot of the Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey plane who crash-landed into the American River Wednesday is speaking out about the moment of impact and the struggle to escape the submerged plane alive.

Pilot Keith Hezmalhalch still has a bloody forehead from the crash.

“It’s an abrasion from where my head… and my hat was still on… was forced into the windscreen on the airplane,” Hezmalhalch said.

Hezmalhalch says he is okay.

“Physically, I am fine,” Hezmalhalch said.

Hezmalhalch believes his seaplane crashed because its wheels were down for the planned water landing.

“Looked like one of my best water landings ever,” Hezmalhalch said. “Such a beautiful day, and then suddenly it wasn’t.”

Hezmalhalch fears the wheels were down because of his own pilot error.

“I feel a sense of failure, a sense of guilt, over not being the kind of pilot that we all are supposed to be,” Hezmalhalch said.

Hezmalhalch recounted the terrifying first moments under water. His self-inflated life vest, intended to save him, had instead trapped him and pushed him into the back of the plane, a dark cargo area.

“I was frantic to try and figure out what was going on because I was very aware that I was holding my breath and the air was 5 or 6 feet above me,” Hezmalhalch said.

After finally making it above water, he dove down again and again to free his passenger, who was now unconscious and still strapped in her seat.

“I can tell you, it looks just like it does in the movies,” Hezmalhalch said. “It was bad.”

Finally freeing her on his fourth dive, he performed CPR until first-responders arrived. She is still in critical condition.

A crash landing, and a harrowing underwater escape. Now this pilot, with his love for flying, is focused on his passenger making a complete recovery.

“It all seemed so simple until it didn’t go that way at all,” Hezmalhalch said.

Hezmalhalch credits the homeless camped along the American River who watched his plane go down for calling 9-1-1. He says if first-responders had not arrived so quickly, his passenger may not have initially survived.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://sacramento.cbslocal.com


New details emerged Thursday about the plane crash on the American River near Discovery Park, amid an investigation complicated by the federal government shutdown.


The crash was a failed water landing in a Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey, Sacramento County authorities said.


Sacramento County Deputy Director of Parks Liz Bellas said Thursday that according to a direct pilot statement, one of the wheels of the plane failed to retract upon landing.


“So when the wheels hit the water, it caused the plane to tumble,” Bellas said.


The crash injured the plane’s two occupants, the male pilot and a woman. Both were transported to UC Davis Medical Center, and the man suffered non-serious injuries while the woman was listed in critical condition Wednesday. Sacramento Fire Department spokesman Capt. Keith Wade said no update on the woman’s status was available Thursday morning.


Sacramento County’s Regional Parks Department was charged with the early investigation and evidence-gathering phases after the plane crashed, even though that stretch of the American River falls under state jurisdiction.


As Bellas explained, response to a major incident like a plane crash into the river would typically be handled by the Coast Guard. But the ongoing federal government shutdown means that both the Coast Guard and the investigating National Transportation Safety Board are unavailable.


“We do not frequently have plane crashes into the river, so it is outside of the norm most definitely,” Bellas said. “We wanted to make sure that we did our best to document the incident so we could forward the information to what would typically be a responding agency.”


Bellas said authorities believe the man piloting the plane was its registered owner.


Federal Aviation Administration registry information available online shows the Progressive Aerodyne Inc SeaRey, with a certificate issued in April 2015 to Keith Hezmalhalch. According to public Facebook posts by Hezmalhalch, the Sacramento-born man has worked in aerial photography and for a local TV news station.


According to a 2017 Facebook post, Hezmalhalch nicknamed his SeaRey “’lil stinker.” It is emblazoned with insignias of the U.S. Air Service, the post-World War I-era precursor to the Air Force that operated from 1918 to 1926. The SeaRey, though, was manufactured in 2007, and is classified as an “experimental” craft.


The plane crashed into the water less than a half-mile from the Interstate 5 crossing and nearby Jibboom Street Bridge.


Dozens of personnel, including park rangers, firefighters, Drowning Accident Rescue Team (DART), county Office of Emergency Services and private contractors, worked for about three hours Wednesday afternoon to drain the amphibious plane of most of its oil and tow it to shore.


Visible amounts of oil spilled into the river, but Wade said it was contained and cleaned up by hazardous materials teams.


Fire crews were tasked with mitigating the incident and the danger it presents, but getting the plane out of the water is not technically their responsibility, Wade explained.


Once the plane was towed closer to shore, private salvage workers using a winch in a Ford F-350 truck hauled the from the sand to a boat launch under the Jibboom Street Bridge, with some help from emergency personnel.


“Once the hazmat was dealt with, removal of the plane doesn’t really fall under the purview of the Fire Department,” Wade said. “We just assisted to be a good custodian to the community.”


The NTSB says on its website it is still accepting submitted accident reports, but it does not specify when they would be received. NTSB’s day-to-day operations and information notices are limited due to the government shutdown. Investigations can take anywhere from six weeks to more than two years to complete depending on complexity, according to the website.


Wade said the Fire Department has sent its incident reported to the NTSB and the FAA.


Bellas said except for the immediate area during the recovery of the aircraft, no part of the river or Discovery Park was closed by the incident.


Bellas encouraged anyone who may have witnessed the crash to call the parks’ department’s main line at 916-875-6961 and to ask to speak with Sgt. Nelson.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sacbee.com

Cessna 180 Skywagon, N4934A: Accident occurred January 02, 2019 in Broadwater County, Montana

Kestrel Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/4934A




The two occupants of a plane that crashed near Townsend are in critical condition.

Broadwater County Sheriff Wynn Meehan reported the passengers sustained life-threatening injuries.

The plane crashed into a creek bank about two miles south of Townsend between the Missouri River and Highway 287, according to Meehan.

Sheriff’s deputies arrived on scene after 6 p.m.

At the time, both occupants in the plane were conscious and speaking to authorities. They were taken to the hospital by helicopter.

Meehan said earlier he was waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration before taking further action.

NorthWestern Energy also reported an outage in the area affecting about 135 customers.

The names of those involved have not yet been released.

(1st Report, 7:05 p.m.) Broadwater County Sheriff Wynn Meehan said a small plane crashed into a creek bank about two miles south of Townsend between the Missouri River and Highway 287.

Sheriff’s deputies arrived shortly after 6 p.m.

Two occupants were in the plane and both were conscious and speaking to authorities. Meehan said they sustained serious injuries, but they are not life-threatening.

The occupants were taken by medical helicopter.

Meehan is waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration before taking further action.

NorthWestern Energy has reported a confirmed outage in the area affecting about 135 customers.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://kxlh.com





HELENA – Broadwater County Sheriff’s Office deputies continued to interview witnesses Thursday as they investigated a small plane crash that left two men critically injured Wednesday.


Sheriff Wynn Meehan said both men were from Gallatin County and in their mid-30s. One of the men was flown to Helena, then transferred to a hospital in Salt Lake City for treatment. The other was taken to Great Falls. Meehan did not have an update on their conditions.

Meehan said the plane took off from Belgrade around 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, then landed briefly at an airstrip near Townsend before taking off again. It hit power lines and crashed near the Hahn Ranch, about two miles south of Townsend. Northwestern Energy crews reported finding the plane while looking for the cause of a power outage.

Meehan said the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration’s website, the plane, a Cessna 180, was registered to Kestrel Leasing LLC, a company in Belgrade.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://ktvh.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N12181: Incident occurred January 02, 2019 at Appleton Municipal Airport (KAQP), Swift County, Minnesota

Wild River Flying Club Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N12181






APPLETON – A Wisconsin man escaped injury after his plane crashed Wednesday afternoon while attempting to land at the Appleton Municipal Airport.

According to Police Chief Sedrick Borsgard, the pilot, who was only identified as a 42-year-old man from Clear Lake, Wisconsin, was attempting to land a Cessna 172M Skyhawk around noon Wednesday when the plane slid off the icy runway.

The plane attempted to take off again, but was unable to regain speed.

Borsgard said the plane ran off the runway and the tires connected into the snow causing it to flip over.

The pilot was checked out by local EMS and didn’t sustain any injuries from the crash, Borsgard said, but the plane sustained major damage to its top, wings and wheels.

The crash is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Appleton Police Department was assisted by Appleton Ambulance, Appleton Fire Department and Swift County Sheriff’s Department.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wctrib.com

Incident occurred January 03, 2019 at Prescott Regional Airport (KPRC), Yavapai County, Arizona



A small aircraft came to rest upside down at the Prescott Regional Airport after a poorly-executed maneuver Thursday, January 3rd.

While practicing touch-and-go landings, the rated pilot took too sharp a turn and rolled off the side of the airstrip at about 1:15 p.m., said Prescott Airport Operations Supervisor Doug Whitney.


“Nobody was injured, no fires, no airport property damage, kind of a routine little thing really,” Whitney said.


The pilot was the sole occupant of the plane, which was quickly righted and removed from the runway without interrupting commercial air traffic.


“It was on our small general aviation runway, so it did not affect the airlines,” Whitney said. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dcourier.com

Cessna 180 Skywagon, N7757C: Accident occurred December 29, 2018 at Bend Municipal Airport (KBDN), Deschutes County, Oregon

https://registry.faa.gov/N7757C




BEND, Oregon -   A single-engine plane with four people aboard crashed when a gust of wind hit as it landed at the Bend Municipal Airport on Saturday afternoon, ending up well off the runway and partially atop a mound of gravel. But despite significant damage, police said no serious injuries were reported.

Bend police and Deschutes County sheriff's deputies responded shortly before 2:30 p.m. to the crash of the Cessna 180, reported just off the north end of the runway at the airport along Powell Butte Highway east of Bend.

Bend police Lt. Brian Beekman said pilot John Bentley Jr., 58, of Bend was landing the plane, returning from a flight of about three hours, when the gust of wind hit. Bentley said he tried to gain control of the plane, but Beekman said "it made contact with an embankment and crashed just east of the runway." 

Sgt. Robert Jones said the pilot "tried to power back up (and) tried to power out of it and couldn't recover, spun around" and came to rest against a pile of gavel and dirt.

A juvenile on the plane was taken by Bend Fire ambulance to St. Charles Bend for evaluation of minor injuries, Jones said.

"This was really a miracle," Jones said, "because it went quite a ways off the runway. I was watching a plane come in later, and the wind throws them all over the place."

"A lot of it went well, considering," the sergeant added.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Gregory Martin confirmed preliminary reports from first responders that there were four people aboard the plane and that the crash caused a minor fuel leak but no major injuries. 

One person was still in the plane, which ended up east of the runway, when police arrived. Two others were reported to be at the fixed-base operator office and the fourth was at a hangar.

The airport didn't halt operations, as another plane landed a short time later during the blustery afternoon.

The plane was significantly damaged in the crash. FAA records show it is owned by Bentley and was built in 1961.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktvz.com

Cessna 172K Hawk SP II, N1095V: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2018 near Howard Nixon Memorial Airport (50G), Chesaning, Michigan



William "Bill" Charles Burns
June 9, 1935 - December 29, 2018

William "Bill" Charles Burns, age 83 of Vernon, passed away Saturday, December 29, 2018. Funeral services will be held at 1:00 pm Sunday, January 6, 2019 at Watkins Brothers Funeral Homes, Durand Chapel with burial to follow in Greenwood Cemetery, Vernon. Family will receive friends at the funeral home Saturday from 2-4 & 6-8 pm.

Bill was born on June 9, 1935 in Saginaw County to the late George and Lucy (Richardson) Burns. He served his country faithfully in the United States Army, being honorably discharged in 1957. He had attended Bluffton college in Ohio in his early years. Bill married Linda Jane Teichman on June 29, 1989 while flying in a plane over Vernon.

Bill was a machinist and a foreman for Simplicity, working over 30 years there before retiring in 1997. Over the years while working for Simplicity, Bill would own the Tasty Freeze in Durand, a small convenient store as well as other enterprises.

Bill loved to fly. He obtained his pilot's license in 1952 when he was 17 and has been an instructor since the early 70's. He also enjoyed motorcycles and traveling. He loved his family dearly and would do anything for anyone.

Mr. Burns is survived by his wife of 29 years, Linda, the mother of 2 of the 5 children: Brenda Lee Burns, Bill (Lesley) Burns, Jr., Scott Derald Burns, Mark William Burns, Julieann Katherine (Andrew Konen) Burns; 6 grandchildren: Angela Burns, Jennifer Burns, Ashlyn Burns, Cameron Burns, Tyler Burns, Eriella Burns; 1 great grandson, Liam Wallace; his 1st wife and the mother of 3 of his children, Rosemarie (Behnke) Rulason; brother, Thomas (Marci) Burns; 3 sisters: Marylee Humphrey, Rosie (Eugene) Culp, Connie (Charles) Stroub; 3 sisters-in-law, Wanda Burns, Vicki Grumley,and Patti (Matt) Hoddy; 4 brothers-in-law: Wayne Robinson, Dick Perkins, Dave (Robert Fields) Teichman and Lee (Kim) Teichman and many nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents and step-parents: George (Billy) Burns, Lucy (Ellsworth) Osborn; 4 sisters: Lucy Ann Levay, Donna Perkins, JoAnn Chandler, Ruth Robinson; 3 brothers: Lewis Burns, Dick Burns and Arthur Burns.

Memorial contributions given in Bill's name are suggested to the Owosso Airport Association or the Corunna Educational Foundation. Online condolences may be sent to his family by going to www.watkinsfuneralhomes.com

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Fly Ride

https://registry.faa.gov/N1095V




The Saginaw County Sheriff's Office has identified the victim that was killed in a small plane crash in Chesaning.

Deputies from the sheriff's office arrived at Showboat Park about 10:23 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 29 to investigate.

The plane struck a building during the crash.

Witnesses told deputies the engine cut out and the plane came nearly  straight down.

The plane is owned by Fly Ride in Owosso.

The sheriff's office identified the pilot as William Charles Burns, an 83-year-old man from Vernon.

"Just last week he did a little jump in the air, clicked his heels, and that was Bill," said Richard Mussom.

Burns was a pilot, an instructor, and a friend. He had a passion for flying planes.

The Owosso Airport was a second home to him.

"He taught me how to fly," Mussom said. "I spent a lot of hours with Bill. He was a true gentleman. A friend and somebody you enjoyed flying with."

"Even if he wasn't going to fly, he was out here in the morning just to see what was going on," said Richard Sack.

Saturday morning, Burns flew his plane for the final time.

"We happened to be out on the taxiway when Bill took off," Sack said. "I had a student and we watched Bill take off and little did we know this was the last time we'd see Bill."

The aviation community was hit hard by the news of Burns' death.

But his friends at Owosso Airport will continue remembering and honoring him as a great pilot.

Burns was the only person inside the plane.

At this time, the sheriff's office is preserving the scene until the FAA is able to send investigators to access the crash.

Agents are furloughed until the government shutdown ends. The sheriff's office is using extra manpower to keep the crash site secure.

"Because of the government shutdown the FAA said, 'don't touch anything. Guard the scene,'" Saginaw County Sheriff William Federspiel said.

That's what deputies from the sheriff's office have been doing around the clock. The crash investigation is at a standstill until dollars from the feds start flowing again.

"It puts a little more strain and stress on our agency because we have a task to do. We must provide protection from the scene and make sure that the scene doesn't get contaminated so that all the evidence is preserved and protected," Federspiel said.

The sheriff said shutdown or no shutdown, it doesn't change his deputies' will to do their job 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

"There are some people who have been called in to do some overtime. Deputies that won't be spending their New Year's Eve the way they thought they would or New Year's Day. But that's just the nature of the business that we're in," Federspiel said.

He said his department was allowed to remove Burns' body from the scene.

Federspiel said it will be Wednesday at the earliest before he will hear from FAA officials again.

In the meantime, he will work to find a way for Saginaw County to get reimbursed for performing the work the federal government is responsible for.

"It would be nice if they would. Obviously that's the right thing to do. So hopefully they will," Federspiel said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wnem.com





Police have identified the victim that was killed in small plane crash in Chesaning.

Saginaw County Deputies arrived at Showboat Park at about 10:23 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 29.

The plane struck a building during the crash.

Witnesses told deputies that the engine cut out and the plane came nearly  straight down.

The plane is owned by Fly Ride in Owosso.

The sheriff's office identified him as William Charles Burns, an 83-year-old man from Vernon.

"Just last week he did a little jump in the air, clicked his heels, and that was bill," said Richard Mussom.

Burn was a pilot, an instructor, and a friend. He had a passion for flying planes.

The Owosso Airport was a second home.

"He taught me how to fly," Mussom said. "I spent a lot of hours with Bill. He was a true gentleman. A friend and somebody you enjoyed flying with."

"Even if he wasn't going to fly, he was out here in the morning just to see what was going on," said Richard Sack.

Saturday morning, Burn flew his plane for the final time.

"We happened to be out on the taxi way when Bill took off," Sack said. "I had a student and we watched Bill take off and little did we know this was the last time we'd see Bill."

The aviation community is hit hard by the news of Burn's death.

But his friends at the Owosso Airport will continue remembering and honoring him as a great pilot.

Lt. Gomez with the Saginaw County Sheriff's Office said with the government shut down in place, FAA has been contacted and said it will have a plan in place for what it can do.

Burns was the only person inside the plane.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wnem.com