Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Fifth suspected drug plane found abandoned on Progresso Road, Belize




The San Estevan Road in the Orange Walk District is currently being monitored by police officers and BDF personnel who are on the scene of another suspected drug plane landing.

The discovery was made just after 5:00 a.m. on April 24th on a feeder road leading from San Estevan Village to Progresso. In an amateur video, the aircraft was abandoned on the side of the feeder road and appears to be intact, without any cargo.

Police have not issued any details or confirmation on this latest find, which is now recorded as the fifth incident since the beginning of the year.

A week ago, residents of Hattieville, Belize District also reported a low flying aircraft in their area, and according to reports, the aircraft landed and unloaded unidentified cargo. When asked about the incident, the police department was stumped and said they did not have information on that incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.reporter.bz

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort responds to Lowcountry woman's threat to 'shoot down' planes

BEAUFORT, SC (WCSC) -  The Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort responded Tuesday to a report that a Colleton County woman threatened to shoot at military planes.

Deputies say the woman complained about what she described as low-flying aircraft flying over her property in Yemassee.

She said the planes were frightening her horses and causing them to run off, telling deputies she would have to shoot the planes down, an incident report states.

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort released the statement Tuesday afternoon: 

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort recently received two inquiries regarding aircraft noise in which an individual threatened to shoot at our aircraft. We take threats to aircraft and personnel seriously which is why we contacted the Colleton County Sheriff's Office to request their assistance in responding to the threat. We appreciate their assistance in communicating with the individual.

Our jets have been operating over the skies of Beaufort and the surrounding area since 1960. It is imperative that our training be conducted to certify that we are the most prepared to defend our country when the nation calls on us. We apologize for any inconvenience that our training causes but it's what ensures mothers, fathers, husbands, wives and children all over this country that their family member in uniform comes home.

The Colleton County Sheriff's Office says the case was turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the military.

The woman was not charged, according to Colleton County Sheriff's Lt. Tyger Benton.

Story and video ➤ http://www.live5news.com

Accident occurred April 24, 2018 at Gaines Valley Aviation Airport (NY06), Albion, Orleans County, New York



Carlton, N.Y. (WHAM) - The pilot of a homemade helicopter was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital Tuesday afternoon after crashing in a field across a small airport in Orleans County.

This happened at the Gaines Valley Airport in Carlton around 2 p.m.

The Gaines Valley Airport is located on State Route 279, approximately 40 miles northwest of Rochester.

Orleans County Sheriff Randy Bower said the helicopter was a small, private chopper called a "mosquito." It was reportedly flying for about 10 minutes before crashing and only went as high as power lines.

Sheriff Bower said the pilot was maybe 100 feet up in the air when a witness heard a pop and the helicopter came down, immediately catching fire.

“I came around the corner of the back of my house and looked out and saw the fire," said Irene Drennen who lives next to the airport. “It was way high. I said, oh my God. That’s a crash."

After calling 911, Dirk Climenhaga, who lives next to the field where the crash happened, ran to the scene to help.

"The fire started getting worse and worse, and all I could see was a ball of fire and smoke rising up," said Climenhaga.

Climenhaga said his friend Mark arrived on scene right before him and helped to put the fire out on the pilot's back.

"He grabbed him out of the helicopter and put him on the ground," he said. "That’s when I got to Mark and the person in the helicopter and looked to see what his condition was."

The pilot of the helicopter, a man in his 60s, suffered burns to his back, according to Orleans County Sheriff's deputies. There was no one else on board the helicopter at the time of the crash.

A small, white pile of debris is all that is left of the private helicopter in a farmer's field.

There is no word on what might have caused the crash, but the FAA is investigating and is reportedly looking into whether there was an issue with the engine.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://13wham.com



ALBION, N.Y. — A man in his 60s crashed his homemade helicopter at the Gaines Valley Aviation Airport in Albion just before 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to the Orleans County sheriff.

He says the pilot normally flies the helicopter but doesn't go too high. Today, he did, heard a bang and the chopper starting going down. It crashed into a field and caught fire.

Witnesses say they saw the pilot roll over, putting out flames from his back.

The FAA says it is investigating.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://spectrumlocalnews.com




GAINES, N.Y. (WKBW) - The man who was operating a homebuilt helicopter that crashed Tuesday afternoon at the Gaines Valley has been hospitalized.

The crash happened at the Gaines Valley Airport just before 2 p.m.

According to ABC affiliate WHAM, the Orleans County Sheriff said the small helicopter, known as a "mosquito," was reportedly in the air for about 10 minutes before crashing. The sheriff told WHAM that the aircraft got no higher than power lines.

Deputies told WHAM the pilot and sole occupant was a man in his sixties, who suffered burns on his back. He was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester for treatment.

Investigators are now looking into what caused the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wkbw.com

Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket, N9281E: Accident occurred April 24, 2018 in McPherson County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9281E




A 57-year-old pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off  on a rural McPherson County road on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, Shannon Scot from Alma was attempting to take off in a Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket headed east on Smoky Valley Road. The plane hit a sign, lost control, and ended up in trees on the north side of the road.

Scot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at 1:40 in the afternoon Tuesday, a half-mile east of Roxbury just north of Smoky Valley Road.

ORIGINAL: The pilot of a small airplane was injured when he crashed while trying to take off in rural McPherson County on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Kansas Highway Patrol, the pilot was attempting to take off when the aircraft hit a sign and crashed into a tree line.

The pilot was transported to Salina Regional Health Center with non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened at around 2:00 in the afternoon Tuesday, east of Roxbury in McPherson County.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ksal.com

Beech G58 Baron, N485BB: Accident occurred April 13, 2018 at Easton Airport (KESN), Talbot County, Maryland

WPMCO LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N485BB

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA226
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, April 13, 2018 in Easton, MD
Aircraft: TEXTRON AVIATION INC G58, registration: N485BB

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Scamp experimental, N964TA: Accident occurred April 22, 2018 in Raymond, Pacific County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N964TA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA223
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 22, 2018 in Raymond, WA
Aircraft: KEN OLSON SCAMP, registration: N964TA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee 180, N83LM: Incident occurred April 23, 2018 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft damaged runway light.

Airshot Video LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N83LM

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N83LM
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 737-700: Incident occurred April 23, 2018 - Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Flight 366: Encountered moderate turbulence.

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 366
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Air India Boeing 787-800, VT-ANI: Incident occurred April 19, 2018 near Amritsar, India

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New Delhi, India 

Flight 462:  Encountered severe turbulence. 

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 02:52:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B787
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AIR INDIA
Flight Number: 462
City: NEW DELHI
State: INDIA




NEW DELHI:  The pilot commanding the Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner that hit severe air turbulence between Amritsar and New Delhi on Thursday reportedly had "never seen anything like this ever". The incident has been described as a "freak kind of severe turbulence". Three passengers were injured when flight AI-462, a 6-year-old Boeing 787, one of the most modern jets in civil aviation, carrying 236 passengers and six crew members, encountered an extended period of turbulence lasting approximately 15 minutes. A video shot by a passenger on board shows terrified passengers being consoled and assisted by the cabin crew.

One of the injured passengers received stitches after the jet landed safely at Delhi's Indira Gandhi International Airport. The video shows the inner layer of a passenger window having come loose while two overhead oxygen masks appear to have fallen when the Dreamliner hit turbulence. The strengthened outer passenger window at the same seat was not dislodged or damaged.

NDTV has learnt that preliminary data indicates that passengers on the airliner encountered upto three times the force of gravity, during the extreme turbulence which took place when the plane was climbing from 8, 000 feet to 21,000 feet, shortly after take off from Amritsar. So strong was the turbulence that the auto-pilot systems in the cockpit tripped after exceeding their design tolerances forcing the pilots to take manual control of the airliner.

The Dreamliner is also fitted with a state-of-the-art turbulence dampening system which is designed to counteract the effects of instability during a flight. Accelerometers in the nose of the jet register an unexpected change in the altitude of the aircraft and instantly (in nanoseconds) order the wing flaps to making adjustments to minimise the impact of unexpected turbulence. It is not known if the system was overloaded by the violent and unsteady movement of air that the 787 experienced.

Senior Air India air safety experts looking into the incident say "clear air turbulence appears to the preliminary cause". Meteorological reports are being collected. No weather phenomenon of this sort was predicted on the charts." India's aviation watchdog, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) is part of the investigations and the Boeing 787 involved in the incident has been grounded. A preliminary engineering analysis suggests there is no structural damage to the aircraft.

"We want to get to the bottom of the severe turbulence to try and understand what happened.  An investigation is looking at this.  It appears that the actions taken by the pilots and the cabin crew in handling the situation were correct under the circumstances they encountered," said Harpreet AD Singh, the Head of Flight Safety at Air India.

In October 2014, a Singapore Airlines Airbus A-380 encountered a similar situation while descending to land at Mumbai's Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport. Sudden turbulence resulted in injuries to 22 passengers and crew members. Ten of them need to be hospitalised but were subsequently released. All the 3 passengers injured in the Air India incident chose to continue their onward flights from Delhi after being treated at Medanta hospital in Gurgaon, near the Delhi airport.

Story and video: https://www.ndtv.com

British Aerospace BAe 125-800A, N811AM: Incident occurred April 24, 2018 at Marshall Islands International Airport (PKMJ), Majuro Atoll

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu

Aircraft reported an engine fire and returned to Marshall Islands International Airport, landed safely.

AirMed International LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N811AM

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 06:30:00Z
Regis#: N811AM
Aircraft Make: BRITISH AEROSPACE
Aircraft Model: BAE 125 SERIES 800A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: NA
State: MARSHALL ISLANDS

Piper PA-25-235 Pawnee B, N7247Z: Incident occurred April 22, 2018 at Saratoga County Airport (5B2), Saratoga Springs, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York

Aircraft lost control on departure with glider attached, went off the side of the runway.

Adirondack Soaring Association Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N7247Z

Date: 22-APR-18
Time: 17:12:00Z
Regis#: N7247Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 25 235
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SARATOGA SPRINGS
State: NEW YORK

Cessna A185F Skywagon II, N6325E: Incident occurred April 23, 2018 in Perinton, Monroe County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aircraft landed in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6325E

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N6325E
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: A185F
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ROCHESTER
State: NEW YORK



A small airplane made an emergency landing in Perinton on Monday night, and federal investigators are now looking into whatever airborne crisis forced the pilot to make such a desperate measure.


According to the Monroe County Sheriff's Office, at around 6:40 p.m. Monroe County Sheriff's Deputies and the Egypt Volunteer Fire Department responded to a farm field in the area of Ayrault Road and Turk Hill Road, not far from the Perinton Community Center. 


According to the plane's registry number and online FAA records, the aircraft is a 1980 Cessna A185F owned by John A. Roessel of Webster. Roessel was not the pilot. 


Neighbors and other witnesses shot video of the Cessna as the pilot struggled then finally touched down in the field on Turk Hill Road.


Story and video ➤ http://www.whec.com



Owner of plane that made emergency landing in Perinton field meeting with owner of the farm. Jokes about renting a parking place.


PERINTON — A small airplane made an emergency landing in a Perinton farm field early Monday night, and federal investigators are now looking into whatever airborne crisis forced the pilot to make such a desperate measure.

According to the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, at around 6:40 p.m. Monroe County sheriff’s deputies and the Egypt Volunteer Fire Department responded to a farm field in the area of Ayrault and Turk Hill roads, not far from the Perinton Community Center.


According to the plane’s registry number and online FAA records, the aircraft is a 1980 Cessna A185F owned by John A. Roessel of Webster. Roessel was not the pilot.


Neighbors and other witnesses shot video of the Cessna as the pilot struggled and then finally touched down in the field on Turk Hill Road.


“That guy’s going down, this is it,” said Wendy Boyce as she watched the scene.


“When the engine was burping you can hear it vroom,” said Ryan Boyce, who lives nearby. “That’s when you know there was something really wrong.”


Emergency crews from Monroe County and Egypt discovered the lone pilot unharmed and the plane undamaged. The cause of the landing is still under investigation.


The pilot reported no injuries or damage to the aircraft. The FAA is conducting an investigation.


Still, neighbors said the final seconds were scary, even from the ground.


“He was coming down low, and then went back up high again and he came down again,” said Boyce.


“I swore he was going to crash and all of a sudden I heard him gun the engine and pull out,” said Robert Davis, another neighbor.


The plane apparently had engine trouble shortly after it took off from Rochester. Roessel, the plane’s owner, rushed to the scene, and then spent a few relieved minutes with the owner of the farm, who pointed out that the field could easily have been blocked by wooly obstacles — sheep.


Firefighters said the animals would have easily been able to upend the plane as it came in.


“The sheep will come up there,” said Chip Ellsworth, the farm’s owner. “The sheep are down there at that end. Yeah. Or two weeks later, the cows would’ve been out.”


Regardless, it was a new experience for Jack DeLissio, the Egypt fire chief.


“It’s the first time in the last 20 years I’ve seen a plane down,” he said. “Obviously, it could have been a mess. We are glad it wasn’t.”


The FAA and NTSB reportedly plan to come to the scene in the morning. Firefighters said then they’ll have to decide how to get the plane out of the field.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mpnnow.com






PERINTON, N.Y. (WROC-TV) - UPDATE, 10:04 PM:

A pilot's snap decision helped avoid tragedy this evening in Perinton. 

Faced with potential engine failure, a small plane made the difficult decision to make an emergency landing in a field near Ayrault and Turk Hill Road.    

"We heard the airplane circling around the neighborhood cutting in and out struggling obviously with mechanical issues and came down in the field behind us" said eyewitness Kevin Twitchell.

One couple didn't know what to think when they saw the plane hovering nearby.

"First, we thought it was a big, really big RC plane that someone was flying around for fun" said eyewitness Ryan Boyce
    
"Suddenly, my husband looks out the window and says, that guy is going down. The plane is about to land and sure enough, we didn't hear anything so it couldn't of been a crash? But then we heard all of the lights and sirens right away" said eyewitness Wendy Boyce.

The Egypt Volunteer Fire Department arrived on scene at 6:40 p.m. to a pilot shook up but thankful to be alive after a scary encounter.

"He was certainly nervous and concerned but he was handling it well, very professionally and he was a great help with us in making the aircraft safe" said Egypt Fire Chief Jack DeLesio

The pilot was not injured and the plane was not damaged in the landing.

It was left to stay in the field until the FAA could get a good look.

UPDATE: 

On Monday, at approximately 6:40 p.m. Monroe County Sheriff's Deputies and the Egypt Volunteer Fire Department responded to the area of Ayrault Road & Turk Hill Road in Perinton for the report of an airplane that landed in a farm field.

Deputies say the cause of this unscheduled landing is still under investigation but the pilot, who was the sole occupant of the aircraft, reported no injuries or damage to the aircraft.

At this time the Monroe County Sheriff's Office is holding the scene for the FAA who will be conducting an investigation.

ORIGINAL:

Emergency crews are on scene in the area of Ayrault Road and Turk Hill Road in Perinton where a small plane made an emergency landing in a field. 

According to officers, the pilot was able to land the plane safely and no one was injured. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.rochesterfirst.com







Perinton, N.Y. - A small plane made an unexpected landing in a Perinton field Monday night.

This happened around 6:30 p.m. in the area of Ayrault and Turk Hill Roads.

Calls to 911 reported a low-flying plane in the area with an engine that sounded as if it were sputtering.

Firefighters say the pilot was able to get out of the plane and was walking around by the time they arrived. They say, other than being shaken up, he was OK.

The investigation into the incident is ongoing.

Story and video ➤ http://13wham.com

Monday, April 23, 2018

Mysterious cockpit problems continue, but Air Force trainers still fly




The Air Force says pilots flying its T-6A Texan II, a trainer that was grounded this year because of oxygen system problems, have reported 12 additional unexplained physiological episodes since March 1.

Experts are investigating but so far have found no root cause for the incidents. The plane, flown by the San Antonio-based Air Education and Training Command, was idled in February after 21 episodes were reported earlier in the year.

The Air Force said it was not considering another grounding of the plane “at this time,” expressing confidence that ongoing efforts — including an accelerated inspection and cleaning schedule for the Onboard Oxygen Generation System, or OBOGS — will ensure that the T-6 is safe to fly.



A series of in-air oxygen system failures in a variety of military aircraft over the past several years have raised concerns in the Pentagon about pilot safety, but until a sudden spike in January, the T-6, the Air Force’s principal trainer for novice pilots, had seen few such episodes.

Inspections found that the OBOGS’ shut-off valve, inlet filter and drain valves failed at rates much higher than expected. Air Force Materiel Command spokesman Derek Kaufman cautioned that experts could not directly link these failures to the unexplained physiological episodes and don’t believe that they caused a failure in the OBOGS or a separate backup emergency oxygen system.

“While our mission is to produce pilots, the safety of our pilots has been and always will be our number one priority,” AETC spokesman Dan Hawkins said in a statement released in response to questions about the newest incidents. “Proactive maintenance mitigation practices and inspections based on flight hours have been created and are being accomplished on a much more aggressive timeline.”



A physiological event takes place when aircrew experience symptoms that can hinder a pilot’s ability to fly safely. It can result from hypocapnia, hypercapnia or other factors. Hypocapnia is a state of reduced carbon dioxide in the blood. Hypercapnia is excessive carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by inadequate respiration.

Maj. Gen. Patrick Doherty, commander of the 19th Air Force at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, grounded the T-6 fleet after a cluster of such events occurred in planes flying out of Columbus AFB, Mississippi; Vance AFB, Oklahoma; and Sheppard AFB in Wichita Falls in late January.

The Air Force statement said that more than 400 planes in the 444-strong T-6 fleet have seen complete evaluations of the aircrew breathing system. In all, 85 percent of the shut-off valves, which allow air from the engine to bleed into the OBOGS, failed in the open position, allowing unrestricted air flow. Inlet filters, which capture water and contaminants from incoming “bleed air” from the engine, failed at the same rate.



One in every five drain valves, used to remove moisture from the system, was found to not fully close. The Air Force said that contributed to small amounts of bleed air leakage and added that components “have been mitigated or replaced as necessary to ensure continued safe system operation.”

“We’re finding issues with some of the parts. … We’re finding moisture in the condensers that shouldn’t be there,” Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, who heads the Air Force Materiel Command, said last month. “We’re finding valves that are sticking. All of those things are things that we’re fixing, and we’re looking at what’s the right cycle, the number of hours before we replace the different components in them.”

Similar events last year caused the Navy to idle its T-45 Goshawk trainer for three months and have occurred in recent years in the F-22A, one of the Air Force’s newest fighters, and the F-15C/D, a much older plane.



The T-6, a single-engine, two-seat plane designed for joint primary pilot training in the Air Force and Navy, began flying at Randolph around 18 years ago. Its troubles have left turbulence beyond the flight line, prompting a personnel shakeup in the T-6 System Program Office. While the Air Force didn’t directly address a claim made in an online pilot forum that six people in the office were shuffled into less-visible jobs elsewhere, it did say in response to a question that “limited personnel shifts and additions were made to align experience with the magnitude, impact and difficulty of this challenge.”

The program office “remains keenly focused on ensuring the T-6 remains an operationally safe, suitable and effective platform,” the statement said.

February’s delay in training aviators came as the Air Force has been shedding veteran pilots at an alarming rate. Last year, it was 1,300 pilots below its goal of 5,300. AETC had projected that it would train about 1,200 during the current fiscal year, 1,300 in fiscal year 2019 and 1,400 for 2020. During the month the plane was grounded, the Air Force said it lost flying time for more than 100 pilots.



Besides inspecting and cleaning the OBOGS, the Air Force has conducted a root-cause evaluation that includes a comprehensive assessment of all aircraft encountering unexplained physiological episodes.

AETC and the T-6 System Program Office will launch a feasibility study this month into the possibility of including an automatic backup oxygen system in the plane. In the meantime, it has bought new testing equipment and increased the frequency of existing maintenance work. It also is educating pilots about physiological events.

Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson “has asked for a belt-and-suspenders approach,” said the Materiel Command’s Pawlikowski. “The OBOGS is an important system, and the engineers have confidence in it. There is no single point of failure, but it doesn’t hurt to have a backup, since no root cause has been determined.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.expressnews.com

Students protest University of Kansas use of private jets; school says they're an investment



TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - A group of KU students say the school's use of private jets is one of the reasons tuition costs are rising.

The group KU Against Rising Tuition was at the Chancellors house Monday afternoon, protesting the use of the jets. They say since they operate with state dollars, it takes millions from the school's general funds.

The group says the jet costs more than 10 times as much as flying coach.

"Considering this jet is used typically within a 300 mile radius, so say from here in Lawrence to Wichita, to Salina," Christian Espinosa said, "this is completely inefficient for a $5.6 million jet that costs almost $1 million in maintenance fees per year."

Espinosa says they aren't protesting for the school to completely get ride of the jet, they just want to find a more efficient way to get the same job done.

However, KU says the jets are an investment for the school. In a statement to 13 NEWS, the school says, "We appreciate our students taking an interest in the university’s business operations. The university has owned a plane for more than 40 years, and we use it because it is an efficiency tool with a clear return on investment for the university. We encourage students to learn more about KU’s aviation strategies by viewing the KU Aviation Services face sheets available online."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wibw.com

Fire destroys plane at former Rantoul museum

A worker who was part of a salvage crew that was dismantling an old C-47 plane Monday, April 23, 2018, on the grounds of the former Chanute Air Museum in Rantoul watches as flames engulf it. 



RANTOUL — Rantoul Fire Department Capt. Dewey Shreves remembers training for aircraft fires at the former Chanute Air Force Base many years ago.

Twenty-five years after the base closed, he and other members of the department got to put that training into practice Monday morning.

Fire engulfed a C-47 plane on the grounds of the former Chanute Air Museum that was being dismantled by a salvage crew.

Fire Chief Ken Waters said the plane was a total loss.

“It was fully involved when they got there,” Waters said.

Firefighters were on the scene for about an hour after receiving the 9:22 a.m. call.

Shreves said the training the department received in fighting airplane fires was valuable in putting out the blaze.

“There’s a lot of magnesium in those planes,” Shreves said. “It’s mostly aluminum, copper and steel,” but the presence of magnesium means a fire can’t be put out using just water.

Waters said a 6 percent mixture of foam and water has to be used.

“If you use water only, it flares up because it’s magnesium,” said Waters, who was also part of that training when the base used to be open.

“In the ‘70s and ‘80s, Chanute Air Base Fire Training Command conducted joint training exercises with the Rantoul Fire Department on aircraft fire suppressions so that we could provide mutual aid to them in the event of an aircraft fire,” Shreves said. “Today, 25 years after they left, we used that training to put out a fire on one of their aircraft.”

Shreves said it was the first time there has been an aircraft fire on the former base.

The C-47 is the military version of a DC-3, according to Corky Vericker, Rantoul airport office supervisor.

“There had to be some fuel residue that was left inside (the plane),” Vericker said. “The acetylene torch ignited it. Everything on the inside is so old and rotten ... that it just don’t take much for it to ignite.”

Allen Jones Sr., former air museum operations manager, said the plane was one of “seven or eight” that are being cut up for salvage, as contracted by the Air Force.

The salvage operator said he lost $2,000 as a result of the fire, Waters said.  

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.news-gazette.com

Man cited after attempting to bring loaded handgun onto plane at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF)



A man was cited by police last Friday after he tried to bring a loaded semi-automatic handgun onto an airplane at Buffalo-Niagara International Airport.

According to a press release from the Transportation Security Administration, the East Amherst man was caught with a .380 caliber handgun in one of his carry-on bags. The weapon was loaded with seven bullets, including one in the chamber. 

A TSA officer contacted the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Police after spotting the gun in a checkpoint x-ray machine. They confiscated the firearm and cited the man on weapon charges.

There was no impact on the airport's operations. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.whec.com

Bellanca Citabria, N8737V: Accident occurred April 23, 2018 at Aeroflex-Andover Airport (12N), Sussex County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft went off the runway into a lake and submerged in water.

United Aerial Advertising of Delaware Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N8737V

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N8737V
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 7GCBC
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: ANDOVER
State: NEW JERSEY
























ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — A single-engine plane that crashed into Lake Aeroflex at Kittatinny Valley State Park on Monday morning is expected to be pulled out of the water sometime today, authorities say.

The pilot, identified by Chief Eric Danielson of the Andover Township Police Department as John Wells, was taking off from the airstrip at Aeroflex-Andover Airport, located within the park, when he crashed into Lake Aeroflex at approximately 11:50 a.m. The lake borders the runway of the airport.

The plane, identified by the Federal Aviation Administration as a two-seat Bellanca CH7A, landed in the middle of the 119-acre lake and was completely submerged within minutes, eyewitnesses said.

"This was a single-engine plane with no other passengers," Danielson said. "The pilot was able to get himself out of the plane and start swimming."

Wells was rescued by police who were able to row out to the pilot and take him to the shore. He was then airlifted from a nearby helipad to Morristown Medical Center where he was treated for back and ankle injuries, Danielson said.

Once the pilot was out of harm's way, efforts began to remove the plane from the water.

Dive teams from Picatinny Arsenal and Jefferson Fire Department Co. No. 2 attempted over the course of several hours to attach a line to the plane so that it could be hauled to shore with the use of a tow truck parked nearby.

At about 7 p.m., Danielson said salvage operations had to be terminated for the day.

"There was some trouble stabilizing the plane, and two of the divers were starting to show signs of hypothermia," Danielson said, adding that workers were also running out of daylight. "Safety is our top priority, so we decided to call it off."

Danielson said a professional salvage team would be called out to remove the plane today.

Justin Leyman, of Wantage, said he was unloading some fishing gear from his truck when he saw the plane fly overhead.

"I heard the engine cut out when it was about halfway across the lake," Leyman said. "I watched it make a sharp left bank and then come down in the water."

The plane landed "belly-down" as opposed to taking a nose dive, Danielson said.

"We're glad the pilot is all right, that was the main thing," Danielson said. "Now we just have to get this plane out of the water."

As the pilot had just taken off from the airstrip with a full tank of gas, Andover Township Fire Department Capt. Kyle Wilson estimated that 30-40 gallons of fuel were on the plane at the time of the crash.

Wilson noted that the fuel may spill into the water when it is pulled to the surface.

Larry Hajna, spokesperson for the Department of Environmental Protection, said the department's Borough of Emergency Response had been called to the scene and would continue to monitor the situation.

A statement issued by the Federal Aviation Administration indicated that the cause of the crash is currently unknown and the incident will remain under investigation.

Andover Township Police Department, the Andover Township Fire Department, the Lakeland EMS squad, New Jersey State Park Police, New Jersey State Police, representatives from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and paramedics from Saint Clare's all responded to the scene throughout the course of the day.

The National Transportation Safety Board has also been notified of the crash.

http://www.njherald.com






ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — A light, single-engine plane ran off the runway at Aeroflex-Andover Airport and plunged into Lake Aeroflex on Monday morning, authorities said.

The 49-year-old pilot, the only occupant of the Citabria plane, was able to extricate himself and was swimming to shore when he was rescued by township police, authorities said.

His name has not been released, said Larry Hajna, spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection which manages the lake. He said the pilot complained of back and neck injuries.

The airport was closed down late Monday afternoon and not expected to reopen until Tuesday at 4:24 p.m.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane, manufactured by Bellanca, is registered to United Aerial Advertising of Delaware, Inc. The company is involved in towing advertising banners, authorities said.

A first responder on scene said the plane took a few minutes to sink. Police grabbed a rowboat from the shore and paddled out to the pilot, the first responder said.

A township police dispatcher confirmed the pilot was rescued from the lake and flown by helicopter to Morristown Medical Center. The incident was reported at 11:50 a.m. Monday.

The plane remains in the lake, said FAA spokesman Jim Peters, who added it is the responsibility of the plane owner to remove it from the lake. Once the plane is out, FAA investigators will examine it to reach a decision on cause of crash.

Citabria planes, which seat two people and are m, are used for flight training and personal reasons, authorities said.

The dispatcher said he did not immediately know whether the pilot was landing or taking off at the time.  

Hajna said the accident happened close to the shore.

Winds were reported as light at Andover today with few clouds in the area, making for an ideal flying day for recreation pilots.

The picturesque airport in Kittatinny Valley State Park is laid out between two lakes: the larger Lake Aeroflex to the north and Gardners Pond to the south. Runway 21 is to the north is 21, and runway 3 south. There is also a grass strip adjacent to the paved runway used for taking off and landing.

Aeroflex Lake is a popular spot for fishing and kayaking, surrounded by trails used heavily on weekends.

The small non-towered airport is used by a close-knit aviation community where several plane owners keep their smaller single-engine aircrafts.

The runway, 1,981 feet long and 50 feet wide, is ideal for tailwheel planes such as the iconic yellow Piper J-3 Cub. Several of those models can be spotted parked at the field. Tailwheel airplanes are often used for banner towing operations.

The FAA was notified. New Jersey State Forest Service, Andover Police, Andover fire, EMTs, and New Jersey Park Police were also involved, Hajna said.

The public airport and lake are part of Kittatinny Valley State Park and run by the New Jersey Forest Fire Service, which is part of the NJDEP's Division of Parks and Forestry.  

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailyrecord.com



ANDOVER TOWNSHIP - Authorities say a small plane crashed into a lake near a small airport in Sussex County Monday morning.

Officials say that the pilot was the sole occupant of the plane, and that he freed himself from the wreckage and swam away before a police rowboat plucked him from the water.

The single-engine plane went down shortly before noon near the Aeroflex-Andover Airport. It ended up in Lake Aeroflex in Newton, which is the state's deepest natural lake.

Authorities say the pilot was taking off from the airport when the crash occurred. He was taken to a hospital, but his name and further details on his injuries were not disclosed.

The airport is in Kittatinny Valley State Park and is owned by the state's Forest Fire Service.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Story and video ➤ http://newjersey.news12.com









A pilot who crashed his Bellanca Citabria into a lake next to a Sussex County airport on Monday got out before it sank and was swimming toward shore when a police rowboat plucked him from the frigid water, authorities said.

The 49-year-old pilot was alone in the plane and complained of neck and back pain upon being rescued from Lake Aeroflex, state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said.

He was flown to Morristown Medical Center with what were described as non-life threatening injuries.

No one else was on the lake at the time of the 11:50 a.m. crash, but at least one person witnessed it and called 9-1-1, Andover Police Chief Eric Danielson said.

"The plane had taken off, went up, banked hard to the left and then went down -- not a straight nosedive, but landed more so on the belly of the plane and then tipped over and went down," Danielson said. 

Danielson said the plane was between 100 to 150 yards from shore when it crashed and sank to the bottom in at least 50 feet of water.

"The plane is totally submerged. You can't even see the tail," Danielson said.

Recounting the rescue, Danielson said Andover Township police officers Richard Then and Alex Price were rowing toward the pilot within 5 minutes of the 9-1-1 call.

The Federal Aviation Administration spokesman is investigating. FAA spokesman Jim Peters describe the plane as a Bellanca CH7A model.

Aeroflex-Andover Airport is in Kittatinny Valley State Park and is owned by the New Jersey State Forest Fire Service. The runway is 1,981 feet long and there is water at both ends of the runway.

The airport is owned by the New Jersey State Forest Fire Service.

Story and video ➤ http://www.nj.com