Sunday, July 31, 2016

Rockwell 112TC, New Rides LLC, N4605W: Incident occurred July 31, 2016 at Ashland Regional Airport (KDWU), Worthington, Greenup County, Kentucky

NEW RIDES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4605W

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Louisville FSDO-17

Date: 31-JUL-16
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N4605W
Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL
Aircraft Model: 112
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ASHLAND
State: Kentucky

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, ASHLAND, KENTUCKY.

GREENUP COUNTY, Ky. (WSAZ) -- A plane has crashed at the Ashland Regional Airport in Worthington Sunday evening.

According to Greenup County 911, the plane nosedived into the runway. No one was injured.


The Raceland Police Department, Worthington Fire Department, and Kentucky State Police all responded to the scene.


Source: http://www.wsaz.com

Piper PA-28-180, N5305L: Incident occurred July 31, 2016 near Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N5305L

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Date: 31-JUL-16
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N5305L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: COLORADO SPRINGS
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED .25 MILE FROM MEADOW LAKE AIRPORT, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO.



PEYTON, Colo. — Fire crews responded to a small plane that made a hard landing on Sunday afternoon.

Falcon Fire Department responded to the area near Judge Orr Road and Highway 24 around 1 p.m.

Officials said all four people aboard were able to exit the aircraft; there were no reported injuries.

Authorities are investigating.

Source:  http://fox21news.com

Fresno police’s Skywatch copter helps catch DUI suspect

The Fresno police Skywatch helicopter helped take a fleeing DUI suspect into custody early Sunday morning, Sgt. Tony Bustos reported.

The incident took place about 1 a.m. as a traffic officer near Fresno Street and Herndon Avenue tried to pull over a man for a minor traffic infraction. Bustos said the driver, identified as Alejandro Cedillo, 20, fled south on Highway 41 as one of the occupants of the car tossed away a beverage.

The officer did not pursue and instead called for help from the helicopter.

The car was followed as it left the highway at Ashlan Avenue before stopping at an apartment complex in the 3500 block of North Pleasant Avenue. Three people were detained by officers on the ground.

Cedillo was found to be the driver and he was booked on DUI charges as well as evading charges.

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N211FC: Incident occurred July 31, 2016 in Newark, Kendall County, Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N211FC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA W. Chicago-DuPage (NON Part 121) FSDO-03


Date: 31-JUL-16
Time: 16:35:00Z
Regis#: N211FC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City: NEWARK
State: Illinois

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD AND STRUCK A BERM, NEAR NEWARK, ILLINOIS.




Sunday morning at approximately 11:39 a.m., Kendall County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to the 9000 Block of Millbrook Road, just north of Route 71, for a report of a small airplane crash.

Contact was made upon arrival with the pilot, Kurt Englemann, who was uninjured. Englemann was the sole occupant of the plane.

Englemann was flying from Wisconsin.  He told Kendall County Sheriff's deputies that his plane lost power, prompting him to attempt a landing in a field.

Representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have been notified, and will complete an investigation.

Source:  http://www.wspynews.com




A pilot made an emergency landing in a farm field in the 9000 block of Millbrook Road south of Plano at approximately 11:38 a.m. today, according to the Kendall County Sheriff's Office.

Police said the pilot, Kurt Englemann, age and address not given, was the sole occupant of the plane and was not hurt.

Englemann told police he was flying from Wisconsin when his plane lost power, prompting him to make the emergency landing.

Representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have been notified, and will complete an investigation, police said.

The 9000 block of Millbrook Road is located south of Silver Springs State Park.

Source:  http://www.kendallcountynow.com

Trick Trikes Storm, N4367X: Accident occurred July 31, 2016 at Valkaria Airport (X59), Malabar, Brevard County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

http://registry.faa.gov/N4367X

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA278
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 31, 2016 in Valkaria, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: TRICK TRIKES STORM, registration: N4367X
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the weight-shift-control aircraft reported that, during takeoff, he pitched upward excessively early for the aircraft’s weight. Several feet above the ground, the aircraft descended and bounced off the runway. The pilot tried to regain control and take off again, but the aircraft came back down and bounced on the runway. The left main landing gear collapsed, and the aircraft slid down the runway about 75 ft before coming to rest. The pilot reported there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the aircraft that would have precluded normal operation. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the fuselage was substantially damaged. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s premature rotation during takeoff, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and a hard landing.


BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - Two people were taken to the hospital after an ultralight small plane crash Sunday morning.

John Martinez, with the Brevard County Sheriff's Office, told Fox 35's David Williams, the call about the crash at Valkaria Airport came in at 7:10 a.m., Sunday.

According to Martinez, a caller said the plane started to take off, when the plane hit the ground hard and bounced.

Martinez said the caller told authorities both male passengers were ejected from the small experimental aircraft.

Both men, one in his late 60's, the other in his mid 50's were taken to Holmes Regional Hospital. One of the men was taken by helicopter, the other taken by ambulance.

Martinez said both men had non-life threatening injuries. A sheriff's deputy on scene told Fox 35 both men are expected to be okay Sunday.

According to Martinez, the pilot of the aircraft was experienced.

A Brevard County Sheriff's Deputy on scene said the Federal Aviation Administration is en route to investigate the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.fox35orlando.com




Two people were seriously injured when an ultralight aircraft crashed early Sunday near Valkaria Airport in Grant-Valkaria.

The crash was reported just after 7:20 a.m. at the airport, which is west of U.S. 1 on Valkaria Road in Grant-Valkiria, a mostly rural community southeast of Palm Bay.

Several fire-rescue crews from Brevard County and Palm Bay responded to the site.

The type of aircraft was described by authorities as an ultralight.

The cause of the crash was not immediately known but the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the incident.

Paramedics initially requested two medical helicopters. One of the flights was cancelled a short time later. One of the crash victims was airlifted to Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne. The second patient was taken to the hospital by ground transport.  An investigation is underway.

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Bellanca 17-30A Viking, N666RS: Incident occurred July 30, 2016 at Lawrence Municipal Airport (KLWM), North Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N666RS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boston FSDO-61

Date: 30-JUL-16
Time: 16:23:00Z
Regis#: N666RS
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 1730
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LAWRENCE
State: Massachusetts

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS.



NORTH ANDOVER (CBS) — A small plane made a hard landing at a North Andover airport on Saturday afternoon.

Officials say they were called about a plane coming in for a landing at Lawrence Municipal Airport around 12:15 p.m.

The front wheel gave out and the plane landed hard on the tarmac. No one was hurt during the incident.

A pickup truck towed the green-and-white plane to Eagle Aviation Complex.


Source:  http://boston.cbslocal.com


NORTH ANDOVER, Mass. —A plane's nose gear collapsed at Lawrence Municipal Airport Saturday afternoon, officials said.

Two people were on board when the incident occurred at the North Andover airport around 2 p.m.

No injuries were reported.

It's unknown what caused the nose gear to collapse.

Source: http://www.wcvb.com

Glasair III SH-3R, N718DH: Incident occurred July 30, 2016 in Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N718DH



A small plane made an emergency landing north of Santa Clarita due to engine trouble, landing on Texas Canyon Rd Saturday afternoon.

“It made an emergency landing,” said supervising fire dispatcher Art Marrujo. “No injuries and no fire were reported. There was no crash.”

The plane began to have engine trouble while it was flying, and was forced to land in an area with no residents or cars. The pilot of the plane chose Texas Canyon Rd., east of Bouquet Canyon Rd.

“He was having engine trouble and landed on a dirt road,” said Marrujo.

First responders received the call about the downed plane at 1:05 p.m. and were on scene shortly after.

“It was a hard landing,” said Sgt. Dan Peacock with the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station. “There was some minor damage to the plane.”

Peacock added that the damage was done to the landing gear of the plane, rendering it unflyable.

Officials believe the pilot took off from Fox Field airport in Lancaster. It is unknown at this time where the intended destination of the pilot was.

Source:  http://www.hometownstation.com

Ryan NAVION B, Rapier Aviation LLC, N5294K: Accident occurred July 30, 2016 at Manitowoc County Airport (KMTW), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA296
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 30, 2016 in Manitowoc, WI
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION B, registration: N5294K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2016, at 1230 central daylight time, a Ryan Navion B single-engine airplane, N5294K, impacted the runway during a forced landing following a loss engine power during initial climb from the Manitowoc County Airport (MTW), Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The private pilot sustained minor injuries, the passenger was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to Rapier Aviation LLC, Lewes, Delaware, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, prior to takeoff, the engine run-up, taxi to the runway, and takeoff were normal with no anomalies noted. After establishing a positive rate of climb, the pilot retracted the landing gear. Shortly after the gear retraction, the engine lost total power. The pilot quickly tried to restart the engine without success. The pilot performed a forced landing back to the remaining runway surface. The airplane impacted the side of the runway and came to rest upright.

Post-accident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector showed the left wing and forward fuselage were bent. The airplane was recovered to the pilot's hangar for further examination.

On August 8, 2016, the airplane and airplane records were examined at the pilot's hangar by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, a FAA inspector, and a representative from Continental Motors, Inc (CMI). During the examination, the airplane was resting on its fuselage with the landing gear retracted. Visual examination of the engine showed the fuel system throttle body and fuel metering unit, located on the underside of the engine, were damaged due to the impact. The throttle and mixture control arms were intact and operational. The engine fuel pump was removed and manually rotated with no anomalies noted. No fuel was expelled when the pump was rotated. The fuel pump drive coupling was intact. The engine fuel pump hoses were removed and no fuel was found in the inlet and outlet hoses. The fuel manifold valve was disassembled and a small amount of fuel was present. The fuel nozzles were removed and clear of contaminants. The six engine cylinders were examined with a lighted borescope. The examination did not reveal any damage or unusual wear issues in the cylinders. The engine was manually rotated and continuity of the crankshaft and valve train components was verified. Thumb compression was achieved on all cylinders. Both magnetos produced spark at the individual ignition leads when the engine was manually rotated. During the examination, the fuel selector was observed in the off position. When the fuel selector was selected to each tank position (main, left tip, right tip), fuel drained from the airplane.

During conversations with the pilot, he stated that he started the engine using normal airframe electric fuel boost pump operation (high position to fuel flow peak) and needed to leave the fuel boost pump in the "low" position to keep the engine running after start. The pilot added that the low position was necessary to keep the engine running smoothly during taxi and engine run-up. He stated that after the engine reached normal operating temperature, the fuel boost pump could be turned off and was not required for a smooth running engine. After the accident, the airplane was recovered by local airport personnel to the pilot's hangar. Fuel was noted to be leaking from the airplane and the fuel selector was turned to the off position. The position of the fuel selector prior to being turned off was not determined. The pilot stated he only used the main tank fuel selector position for takeoff and landing phases of flight.

A review the airplane checklist provided by the pilot showed the following related to the fuel boost pump:

Starting Engine:

Fuel Pump On High to Fuel Flow Peak

Fuel Pump Off

The checklist did not indicate any other uses for the fuel boost pump for airplane operation. The source of the checklist was not determined.

On September 15, 2016, the airplane was examined at the pilot's hangar by the NTSB investigator-in-charge and a FAA inspector. An airplane recovery service was used to access the underside of the airplane to examine the fuel system components. The airframe electric fuel boost pump outlet and inlet lines were removed. No fuel was found in the pump outlet line (which connected to engine fuel pump), and fuel drained from the the boost pump inlet line when the fuel selector was moved to each tank position (main, left tip, right tip). Forced air was applied to all fuel lines within the fuel system, and the lines were clear of debris and contaminants. Fuel flowed freely from all tanks to the gascolator to the electric fuel boost pump, and to the engine fuel pump. Approximately 11 gallons of fuel was drained from the main tanks, and an unmeasured amount (more than several gallons) was drained from each tip tank.

The fuel selector and gascolator were removed and vacuum tested for leaks. The gascolator exhibited fuel staining on the top of the casting. Koehler 2201B, ASSY K22 0B was cast in the top cover of the gascolator. The fuel selector vacuum test revealed no leaks or anomalies. The gascolator vacuum test revealed air leaking from the top seal and the gascolator could not achieve a vacuum of 24" (only get to 20") and the bleed down exceeded 5" in less than one minute. The top and bottom seals were comprised of rubber gaskets which were meshed to a wire screen by a glass cylinder. When assembled, the glass cylinder was tightened between two caps which each contained the rubber gaskets and wire mesh. The gascolator was disassembled and the rubber gaskets were hard and immalleable.

On October 26, 2016, at the facilities of Continental Motors, Inc., under the supervision of a NTSB investigator, the engine fuel pump was examined and functionally tested. The fuel pump had been field overhauled as indicated by the non-CMI impression on the lead seal. The fuel pump turned freely and there were no abnormalities present. The fuel pump was flowed on a CMI test bench and functioned through its full range of operation. No adjustments were made to the fuel pump during the test. At 2,600 RPMs, the specification fuel flow (PPH) and specification fuel pressure (PSI) were 149.00 - 150.00 PPH and 33.70 - 34.30 PSI, respectively. The observed PPH and PSI were 149.69 and 29.84, respectively. CMI noted the following for the functional test:

"Fuel System Component Flow/Pressure Test: The "Observed" fuel flows and/or pressures are recorded without adjustment (unless noted) of the fuel system component. The additional values in each table are engineering specifications for the original calibration of the component to insure desired performance within the full range of operation. These tests and adjustments are carried out in an environment of controlled fuel supply pressures and calibrated test equipment.

When engines are installed in aircraft, they are subjected to a different induction system, fuel supply system and operating environment and may require further adjustments to compensate for these differences. It is these differences that may be present in the following test bench recorded values and CMI flow/pressure specifications. These tests are conducted to confirm that the fuel system components will function adequately within its' designed limitations."

CMI's analytical report stated, "The fuel pump assembly was intact and demonstrated the ability to function normally on the test bench."

Sierra Hotel Aero, Inc. (SHA) currently holds the type certificate for the Ryan Navion. In May of 2007, SHA issued Navion Service Bulletin (SB) 106A - Fuel System - Inspection of the fuel system continued safe operation. The purpose of the SB was to require accomplishment of one time inspection of entire fuel system. This included from firewall aft for condition of all fuel lines installed including tip tanks, metal lines, fittings, hoses, vent system, vapor return, boost pump, and fuel strainer. The SB further states, inspect fuel strainer for evidence of fuel staining and leaking. Disassemble strainer and clean fuel screen. Inspect for damage and reassemble. Perform vacuum test of gascolator to include: connect hand operated vacuum pump and apply 24" of vacuum, verify bleed down does not exceed 4" over one minute, replace gaskets, fuel drain and/or gascolator as needed to ensure proper operation.

In April of 2008, the FAA issued an AD 2008-05-14 Sierra Hotel Aero, Inc. The purpose of the AD is to "detect and correct fuel system leaks or improperly operating fuel selector valves, which could result in the disruption of fuel flow to the engine. This failure could lead to engine power loss." The AD allows the owner/operator to follow the SB's issued by SHA or the field service bulletin number one issued by the American Navion Society.

A review of the aircraft records revealed the most recent annual inspection was completed on July 7, 2016, at a hobbs time of 88.9 hours, 3,033.0 total airframe hours, and 1,019.3 total engine hours. According to a major repair and alteration form (FAA Form 337), on June 19, 2009, the original fuel shut off valve was removed and replaced with a new ANS Ltd. fuel valve (part number 145-48000-ANS3) in accordance with the American Navion Society, Ltd, instructions ANS 201 as an alternate means of compliance for airworthiness directive (AD) 2008-05-14. There was no record of compliance with SB 106A.

RAPIER AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5294K

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA296
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 30, 2016 in Manitowoc, WI
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION B, registration: N5294K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2016, at 1230 central daylight time, a Ryan Navion B single-engine airplane, N5294K, impacted the runway during a forced landing following a loss engine power during initial climb from the Manitowoc County Airport (MTW), Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The private pilot sustained minor injuries, the passenger was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to Rapier Aviation LLC, Lewes, Delaware, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, prior to takeoff, the engine run-up, taxi to the runway, and takeoff were normal with no anomalies noted. After establishing a positive rate of climb, the pilot retracted the landing gear. Shortly after the gear retraction, the engine lost total power. The pilot quickly tried to restart the engine without success. The pilot performed a forced landing back to the remaining runway surface. The airplane impacted to the side of the runway and came to rest upright.

Postaccident examination of the airplane showed the left wing and forward fuselage were bent. The airplane was retained for further examination.



MANITOWOC COUNTY, Wis. (WBAY) – Two people were taken to a hospital after their single-engine airplane made a hard landing at the Manitowoc County Airport.

Lt. Karl Puestow, of the Manitowoc Police Department, says it happened at about Noon on Saturday.

On scene, crews found a man and his teenage daughter in the grass, conscious and alert, after they climbed out of the plane.

Their injuries appeared to be minor, but they were taken to a hospital as a precaution.

Witnesses told police they saw the plane take off and then landed hard or crashed shortly after takeoff. They told police the plane was about 40-50 feet in the air when the engine stalled.

The plane is damaged.

One runway at the airport was closed after the incident.

The FAA and NTSB have been notified of the incident.

Source:  http://wbay.com

Bell 206B, N1087N: Accident occurred July 29, 2016 in Mabton, Yakima County, Washington

J R HELICOPTERS LEASING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1087N 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Spokane FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA405
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, July 29, 2016 in Outlook, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: BELL 206, registration: N1087N
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a helicopter performing aerial application reported that his loader laid the water hose across the skids due to the location of the helicopter's fill port and the ground water tank. After the loading was complete, the pilot reported that during takeoff, "the helicopter felt like the skids were dragging through the dirt even though I knew I was at least 5 [feet] above the ground." The pilot further reported that he realized the water hose nozzle had snagged on the helicopter's skid and he attempted to abort the takeoff. As soon as he began the abort, the helicopter nosed down, impacted terrain, and rolled over to the right.

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. 

The loader, who also witnessed the accident, reported that this was the last load of the day for this spray location. He further reported that as the helicopter entered a hover, he noticed a hose lying over the right skid and he "waved and screamed" to the pilot, but he had already turned out of view. The loader subsequently observed the "dry lock nozzle" hook onto the right skid and the helicopter "lurched to the right" and impacted terrain. 

The loader assisted the pilot in an emergency evacuation, as they both observed a post-crash fire. The nearby water truck was empty and the helicopter was destroyed by the post-crash fire.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot and ground crew's failure to visually inspect the helicopter's skids before takeoff, which resulted in a water hose becoming entangled on the right skid, a loss of control, an impact with terrain, and a post-crash fire.


YAKIMA COUNTY, Wash. - A pilot suffered minor injuries after the crop-spraying helicopter he was flying crashed within seconds of taking off and catching fire in Outlook Friday.

Yakima County Sheriff's deputies say the pilot was taking off in a JR helicopter for agricultural spraying Friday in the 100 block of Floral Lane when it crashed and caught fire. The undeveloped field the helicopter landed in also caught fire said deputies.

The pilot was able to escape the aircraft before it caught flame said deputies.

Yakima County Fire and Rescue and deputies responded to the area around 7 a.m. Friday morning and put out the fire.

The pilot was taken to Sunnyside Community Hospital for evaluation and treatment according to deputies.

The helicopter was a total loss and is estimated at around $300,000.

The Federal Aviation Administration, (FAA) is investigating the incident.

Source:  http://kimatv.com

Martin JRM-3 Mars, Coulson Flying Tankers, C-FLYL: Incident occurred July 29, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

The Martin Mars drops water showing its skill to the AirVenture crowd on Wednesday. The water bomber was damaged during an emergency landing Friday and sidelined from the AirVenture.


Oshkosh — A historic water bomber was damaged in an emergency landing on Lake Winnebago Friday evening and was scheduled to miss an airshow Saturday night as crews made repairs.  

Mayco Noel, operations manager for the Canada-based Martin Mars aircraft, said that at about 6:30 p.m. Friday, crews noticed an engine problem during a flight from the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture convention. The crew opted to land on Lake Winnebago to inspect the bomber.


Once on the water, the 160,000-pound plane struck an ob
ject under the surface, punching a hole in the aircraft.

The bomber, a Hawaii Mars JRM-3, owned by Coulson Flying Tankers of Port Alberni, British Columbia, was built in 1946 as a cargo plane that ferried troops to Hawaii and casualties back to the mainland. The bomber was later used as a fire-fighting plane. The aircraft was fully loaded with 7,200 gallons of water when it landed Friday.

It is the world's largest water bomber and one of only two planes of its kind.

Martin Mars began taking on water from the rupture, estimated at three inches in diameter, Mayco said. The crews began pumping water from the plane, and with help from the Appleton Fire Department, the plane flew back to the EAA seaplane base.

On Saturday, a crew of divers inspected the damage.

"It's a little disappointing," Mayco said. "But I guess we'll just have to come back next year and redeem ourselves."

Source:  http://www.jsonline.com



A massive firefighting seaplane that was supposed to fly over Oshkosh Saturday was damaged Friday night and will not make its scheduled flight.

Dubbed “the world’s largest water bomber,” EAA AirVenture officials tell Action 2 News that the Hawaii Martin Mars had taken off when its engine light came on, prompting them to land unexpectedly in Lake Winnebago.

Action 2 News has learned that the pilots did not realize the “shallow depths of the water” and the plane—which weighed 160,000 pounds—hit an object at the bottom of the lake. When engineers went to check on the engine, they saw a basketball-sized hole taking in water.

The Appleton Fire Department helped assist with pumps that were used to get the water out of the plane. The leak has been fixed and tours will continue.

Learn more about the Hawaii Martin Mars HERE.

Source:   http://wbay.com

Incident occurred July 30, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

OSHKOSH, Wis. (WBAY) – A helicopter made an emergency landing at EAA AirVenture Saturday afternoon.

Dick Knapinski, an EAA spokesman, says it happened at around 4:00 p.m.


A helicopter with three people on board, a pilot and two passengers, had to make an emergency landing at Wittman Regional Airport, although we don’t know why they had to make that landing.


The pilot set the chopper down on the runway. No one was hurt and everyone got out safely.


Knapinski says the groups was on a sightseeing tour.


The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the incident.


Source: http://wbay.com

North American P-51D Mustang, N1451D, Bridgewood Holdings LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 04, 2014 in Durango, Colorado

This picture, taken in April 2014, shows pilot John Earley and flight instructor Michael Schlarb on a training flight in the iconic 1944 World War II fighter plane. It was discovered recently that when the plane crashed on July 4, 2014, killing both men, Earley’s blood tested positive for THC.


Michael Schlarb, CFI


 Levels of marijuana above the legal driving limit were found in the blood of a Durango pilot who crashed a World War II aircraft on July 4, 2014, killing two, a recently-released investigation report from the National Transportation Safety Board found.

“It obviously makes this a whole different type of crash,” said Mona Schlarb, whose husband, Michael, was teaching Durango resident John Earley how to fly the rare and difficult-to-operate aircraft. “This was a terrible chance to take with two lives at stake.”

According to the report, Earley’s blood tested positive for 6.3 nanograms of tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly known as THC, the active compound in marijuana. The legal driving limit for THC levels in Colorado is 5 nanograms.

Also, a total of 30.8 nanograms of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH, an inactive metabolite of marijuana) were found in Earley’s blood. Jann Smith, La Plata County Coroner, said that level usually indicates the drug was used fairly recently before the blood was tested.

Michael Schlarb’s blood tests were negative for any alcohol or other drugs.

“It was very disheartening to hear that someone would be this careless on their first flight (at the helm) on a P-51 (Mustang, a World War II fighter plane),” Schlarb’s wife of 29 years said Wednesday.

A certified private pilot, Earley, 51, had recorded 263 total flight hours, with 53 of those in the 1944 airplane, which he purchased for more than $1 million in 2013.

According to NTSB reports, local flight instructor Michael Schlarb, 53, had helped Earley get his private pilot license, mostly flying a Beechcraft T-6 Texan, a single-engine aircraft designed for flight training.

To learn how to fly the notoriously difficult 1944 aircraft, Earley in June 2013 again hired Schlarb, who held multiple instructor certificates and had logged more than 12,000 flight hours.

“I’ve been a flight instructor for 20 years, but this was kind of a special case,” Schlarb told The Durango Herald in April 2014. “It commands a lot of respect. It’s no toy.”

On July 4, 2014, Earley was set to take the helm of the iconic aircraft from the front seat. It’s unclear if it was Earley’s first time manning the fighter plane, the NTSB’s lead investigator Courtney Liedler said. The plane had been modified to add flight controls in the rear seat as well, according to the report.

“It was never clear as to what the intent was to that flight,” she said.

However, moments after the powerful airplane lifted off about 9 a.m. from the Durango-La Plata County Airport, it banked left and crashed about 90 feet north of County Road 309A, in a hayfield just outside the airport perimeter fence.

Liedler said the NTSB will adopt a “probable cause” of the crash in the coming weeks.

Schlarb’s wife, Mona, for her part, was at a loss for words on Wednesday.

“I don’t know what to do or say at this point,” she said. “I guess I would like to say: People need to be aware that just because something is legal to do in one state, it does not mean it’s the right thing to do whenever you are in a situation with something with that much power.”

Schlarb is survived by his wife and two children, Shane and Amber Brown, both of Durango; his parents Bill and Sharon Schlarb who live in Canada; and sisters Cathy Stewart, of Tucson, Arizona, and Beverly Coke, of California.

According to previous statements made by his family, Schlarb moved to Durango in 1979 and became the youngest firefighter hired by the Durango Fire Department at that time.

He spent 18 years with the department before he pursued a second career as a pilot and instructor, including flying for TriState CareFlight.

“Everyone who knew Mike admired his personality traits and respected his impeccable integrity,” his family said. “He had a calming and patient demeanor that served his life well in both of these demanding career choices that require a cool head under pressure.”

Earley, also a Durango resident, was CEO of Saddle Butte Pipeline, and is survived by his wife, Jodi, and two daughters. He told The Durango Herald in a 2013 feature his grandfather had flown similar bombers during the war.

“It’ll put a smile on your face every time you fly it,” he said of the antique plane, of which only about 120 remain.

Attempts to reach his wife, Jodi, were unsuccessful; it is unclear if Earley used marijuana for medicinal purposes.

Source: http://www.cortezjournal.com


John Earley
North American P-51D Mustang (N1451D)
  An icon takes flight








North American P-51D Mustang, N1451D 
  

http://registry.faa.gov/N1451D

Flight Standards District Office:   FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

NTSB Docket Management System: http://dms.ntsb.gov/N1451D 

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 04, 2014 in Durango, CO
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS P 51D, registration: N1451D
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT 

On July 4, 2014 at 0927 mountain daylight time, a North American P-51 Mustang airplane, N1451D, impacted terrain near the Durango-La Plata County Airport (DRO), Durango, Colorado, shortly after takeoff. The airplane was owned and operated by Bridgewood Holdings, LLC, Durango, Colorado. The airplane was substantially damaged. The flight instructor, who occupied the rear seat, and the pilot, who occupied the front seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instructional flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In statements provided to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC) by local law enforcement, and written statements provided to the IIC, witnesses reported the airplane departed runway 3 and entered a hard left bank to approximately 90 degrees. The nose pitched up slightly and continued to bank past 90 degrees to an inverted position, and then the nose pitched down to approximately a 45 degree angle. The witnesses stated they lost sight of the airplane when their view was blocked by a hangar, unable to see the ground impact. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor, age 53, held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane single and multi-engine, and glider airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate for airplane single and multi-engine land, glider and instrument airplane. Additionally, he held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. 

His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class airman medical certificate was issued on April 10, 2014, with the limitation: must have available glasses for near vision.

The flight instructor reported on his medical certificate application that he had accumulated 12,400 total flight hours, with 130 hours in the previous 6 months. The flight instructor's pilot logbook indicated he had 12,414 total flight hours as of July 1, 2014, with 3,609 in single-engine land airplanes and 26 flight hours in the accident airplane. 

The flight instructor began instructing the accident pilot in June 2013, providing training for completion of his private pilot certificate in September 2013 and high performance airplane check out in October 2013. He last flew in the accident airplane with the accident pilot receiving instruction on June 24, 2014 during a 4-hour flight.

A review of the instructor's log book noted an entry dated February 1, 2014 which annotated he was 'competent to act as pilot-in-command of a North American P-51D.' 

Pilot

The pilot, age 51, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His FAA third-class airman medical certificate was issued on March 29, 2013, with the limitation: must wear corrective lenses. The pilot did not report total flight hours accumulated on his medical certificate application. The pilot's logbook indicated he had 263 total flight hours as of June 31, 2014, with 53 of those flight hours being in the accident airplane. His last flight in the accident airplane was on June 24, 2014 during a 4-hour flight with the accident instructor pilot. A review of the pilot's log book noted the pilot recorded 71 flight hours in a Beechcraft T-6 Texan. 

A review of the P51's operating limitations revealed that, in order to act as pilot-in-command; a log book endorsement was required. The review of the pilot's log book did not reveal an endorsement for the P51.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a P-51D Mustang, serial number 44-74446A N1451D. The airplane's Special Airworthiness Certificate was issued on October 9, 1975. The airplane was manufactured in 1944, and was a two-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, and was powered by Packard Merlin V-1650-7 engine, rated at 1,490 horsepower. This super-charged reciprocating engine had 12 cylinders and was liquid cooled. The engine drove a metal, 4-blade Hamilton Standard 24D50-105 variable pitch propeller. 

According to the airplane's logbooks, the most recent annual [condition] inspection of the airframe and engine was accomplished on September 12, 2013, at a Hobbs time of 630.0 hours and airframe total time of 2,381.3 hours. The airplane tachometer was not located in the wreckage; therefore, the airframe's total time at the time of the accident could not be determined.

The aircraft was modified with a dual flight control system to enable the rear seat passenger to manipulate the primary flight controls. The dual flight control system consisted of a rear control stick, elevator controls, rudder controls and throttle quadrant. In August of 2011, a mechanic (inspector authorization (IA)) approved this major repair and alteration of the aircraft.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0853, the DRO automated weather reporting facility reported wind from 100 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, temperature 19 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 07 degrees C, and an altimeter reading of 30.39 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Durango-La Plata County Airport is a non-towered airport operating under Class-E airspace. The airport is equipped with one runway. Runway 3/21 is 9,201 feet in length and 150-feet wide. The reported field elevation of the airport is 6,689 feet mean sea level.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a public road on the northwest side of the airport at a nose-down angle. The wreckage path continued into a field at an approximate 290 degree orientation from the initial impact and was approximately 120 feet long. The entire airplane was fragmented. The wreckage was examined at the accident site on July 5, 2014, all of the major airframe components were contained within the wreckage distribution path. The entire fuselage was crushed and almost unrecognizable.

The airplane was recovered and taken to a storage facility where a detailed examination of the airframe and engine was completed on August 21, 2014. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies. A layout of the main airframe pieces confirmed all of the major airframe parts and flight controls were present. Although the engine was impact damaged, the gearing system for the magnetos and cam shaft were intact and able to be rotated. The propeller blades exhibited curling at the blade tips with chordwise scraping consistent with power at the time of impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The FAA Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing for the flight instructor and the pilot. 

The flight instructor's toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide, alcohol and drugs. 

The pilot's toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and alcohol. His toxicology tested positive for 0.0063 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the active compound in marijuana) and 0.0308 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH, an inactive metabolite of marijuana) in cavity blood. In addition, 0.0743 ug/g of THC and 0.0133 ug/g of THC-COOH were identified in lung tissue. No other tested-for substances were identified.

Although now available for medicinal use in some states and decriminalized in limited amounts in Washington and Colorado, marijuana continues to be labeled as a Schedule 1 Controlled Substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration. Marijuana's primary psychoactive compound, THC, has mood altering effects including inducing euphoria and relaxation. In addition, marijuana causes alterations in motor behavior, perception, cognition, memory, and learning. Specific performance effects include decreased ability to concentrate and maintain attention, impairment of hand-eye coordination is dose-related over a wide range of dosages. For additional details, refer to the NTSB Medical Officer's Factual Report in the public docket for this accident.

Post mortem examinations of the flight instructor and pilot were conducted under the authority of Rocky Mountain Forensic Services, PLLC, Loma, Colorado on July 7, 2014. The cause of death for both pilots was attributed to "multiple injuries consistent with an airplane accident."

TESTS AND RESEARCH

After the aircraft accident a fuel quality inspection was completed by the local fixed-based operator on the airport that regularly refueled the accident airplane.

Separate samples of aviation gasoline were tested from the above-ground fuel storage tank and two fuel trucks containing aviation gas (avgas). The above-ground storage tank was tested from the filter sump and the tank drain. The first fuel truck was tested at both sump drains, the filter sump, and both fuel delivery nozzles. The second fuel truck was tested at the single sump drain, the filter sump, and the fuel delivery nozzle. 

The most recent bulk delivery of avgas was approximately 8,500 gallons of fuel received on 7/2/2014. Additionally, the fuel filters indicated the most recent filter change for the fuel storage tank was 10/17/2013, and the two fuel trucks 10/10/2013 and 10/15/2012, respectively.

There was no evidence of debris or other contamination. The color of the fuel was absent indication of contamination from jet fuel or diesel fuel.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Excerpt from the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Information, FAA- H-8083-25A, Chapter 4:

Torque Reaction

Torque reaction involves Newton's Third Law of Physics—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. As applied to the aircraft, this means that as the internal engine parts and propeller are revolving in one direction, an equal force is trying to rotate the aircraft in the opposite direction. 

When the aircraft is airborne, this force is acting around the longitudinal axis, tending to make the aircraft roll. To compensate for roll tendency, some of the older aircraft are rigged in a manner to create more lift on the wing that is being forced downward. The more modern aircraft are designed with the engine offset to counteract this effect of torque.

NOTE: Most United States built aircraft engines rotate the propeller clockwise, as viewed from the pilot's seat. The discussion here is with reference to those engines.

Generally, the compensating factors are permanently set so that they compensate for this force at cruising speed, since most of the aircraft's operating lift is at that speed. However, aileron trim tabs permit further adjustment for other speeds.

When the aircraft's wheels are on the ground during the takeoff roll, an additional turning moment around the vertical axis is induced by torque reaction. As the left side of the aircraft is being forced down by torque reaction, more weight is being placed on the left main landing gear. This results in more ground friction, or drag, on the left tire than on the right, causing a further turning moment to the left. The magnitude of this moment is dependent on many variables. Some of these variables are:

1. Size and horsepower of engine,

2. Size of propeller and the rpm,

3. Size of the aircraft, and

4. Condition of the ground surface.

This yawing moment on the takeoff roll is corrected by the pilot's proper use of the rudder or rudder trim.

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA339 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 04, 2014 in Durango, CO
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS P 51D, registration: N1451D
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2014 about 0930 mountain daylight time, a North American P-51 Mustang, N1451D, was substantially damaged when the airplane impacted terrain near Durango-La Plata County Airport (DRO), Durango, Colorado, shortly after takeoff. The airplane was owned and operated by Bridgewood Holdings, LLC, Durango, Colorado. The certified flight instructor, who occupied the back seat, and the pilot receiving instruction, who occupied the front seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instructional flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In statements provided to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator in charge (IIC) by local law enforcement, and written statements provided to the IIC, witnesses saw the airplane takeoff and enter a hard left bank to approximately 90 degrees. The nose pitched up slightly and it continued to turn past 90 degrees to an inverted position when the nose pitched down to approximately a 45 degree angle. The witnesses stated they lost sight of the airplane as it went behind a hangar and did not witness the airplane impact the ground.

At 0853, the DRO automated weather reporting facility reported wind from 100 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, temperature 19 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 07 degrees C, and an altimeter reading of 30.39 inches of mercury.














 North American P-51D Mustang, N1451D

Tim Alfred of Avtronics, Inc., climbs toward the cockpit of John Earley’s P-51 Mustang while working on avionics at Stevens Field in Pagosa Springs.


Tim Alfred of Avtronics, Inc., examines wiring of a North American P-51D Mustang. He is replacing and updating avionics in a hangar at Stevens Field in Pagosa Springs.




NTSB Identification: LAX94LA178. 
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Monday, April 04, 1994 in CHINO, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/07/1994
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN P-51D, registration: N1451D
Injuries: 2 Minor.


NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot departed with the intention of circling the airport several times to check the aircraft prior to departing on a cross-country to Prescott, Arizona. The airplane was undergoing a major rebuilding and restoration after a previous accident and had not flown for several years. Postcrash examination revealed that two oil cooler lines had been inadvertently crossed. One of the oil cooler lines failed as a result of the incorrect line installation and the engine oil was pumped overboard. The engine subsequently sustained a catastrophic internal failure. The last logbook entry and documented annual inspection for the airplane was dated 1987. The pilot's last flight physical was dated 1981. Ground witnesses stated that the pilot did not go through the normal preflight ground power checks prior to flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
the pilot's decision to fly an unairworthy and uncertificated airplane, his failure to perform an adequate preflight, and the improper installation of the oil cooler lines.

On April 4, 1994, at 1749 hours Pacific daylight time, a North American P-51D, N1451D, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at Chino, California. The forced landing was precipitated by a loss of engine power. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal cross-country flight and no flight plan was filed. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The flight originated at Chino at 1745 hours as a local test flight with a planned continuation to Prescott, Arizona.

This was the first flight since completion of a major rebuild and restoration. The pilot planned to circle the airport area several times to check the operation of the aircraft prior to departing for Prescott. Ground witnesses stated that they do not recall seeing the airplane go through normal ground power checks prior to flight.

While maneuvering in the airport area, the pilot reported that he experienced an oil mist in the cockpit. The pilot declared an emergency and the Chino Air Traffic Control Tower cleared the aircraft to land on runway 21. The aircraft collided with terrain in a cow pasture about 1/4 mile north of the airport.

During the postcrash examination of the engine and the oil system, it was observed that the inlet and outlet oil lines to the oil cooler had been inadvertently crossed. An aluminum beaded oil line with a rubber hose and clamp was found disconnected from the cooler on the inlet side. According to a mechanic familiar with the aircraft and engine types, the crossing of these oil lines will cause a pressure build up and can force the hose to uncouple.

Examination of the airplane fuselage revealed a trail of engine oil from the oil cooler aft along the belly to the tail.

PILOT INFORMATION

Review of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman record and medical files revealed that the pilot's last flight physical of record was dated March 23, 1981. At the time of that examination, he reported a total flight time of 8,000 hours with 200 in the last 6 months.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

According to the airframe logbook, the last documented aircraft maintenance was performed on April 12, 1987, at a total airframe time of 1,751.3 hours. According to an engine logbook, the engine installed at the time of the accident had been overhauled on May 3, 1983, and had accrued 456.3 hours of operation. The last documented annual inspection was dated April 12, 1987.

The airplane was being rebuilt at Chino after a previous accident. The work had been in progress for several years. No inspection, repair, or overhaul data was recovered regarding the restoration or rebuilding of the airplane.