Monday, September 5, 2011

Police: Welfare check for an overdue pilot at Tracy Municipal Airport (KTCY), California.

Tracy Press - Police Log

Saturday
8:16 p.m.: Police were asked to do a welfare check at Tracy Municipal Airport, 5749 S. Tracy Blvd., for an overdue pilot. The caller said he never closed his flight plan and they needed to know if he arrived in Tracy. The caller canceled the check, telling police the plane had been located.

http://www.tracypress.com

Sky Shuttle fleet grounded

September 6, 2011 09:55:00 Vítor Quintã

Four of the five helicopters operated by Sky Shuttle are grounded due to a mandatory “precautionary inspection and quarantine” directive issued by the European Aviation Safety Agency after a deadly accident in Brazil.

With only one helicopter available Sky Shuttle had to cut its flights between Hong Kong and Macau to one every hour instead of two and suspend its services between the MSAR and Shenzhen, South China Morning Post (SCMP) reported.

The order calls for an inspection of the tail rotor blades of all AgustaWestland (AW) 139 helicopters, the same part that caused an emergency landing in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour in July 2010.

Sky Shuttle operates exclusively with an AW139 fleet.

The order was issued on August 25 and calls for the inspection to be carried out “within 25 flight hours”. It also imposes a shorter life limit of 600 flight hours on tail rotor blades, which forces Sky Shuttle to replace this part on four of its helicopters.

“According to the local aviation laws and regulations, the air operators must carry out the Airworthiness Directives issued by the state of manufacturer,” the MSAR aviation regulator told Macau Daily Times.

As the manufacturer is based in Italy the safety operation is under the supervision of the European Aviation Safety Agency, the Civil Aviation Authority of Macau (AACM) explained.

The aviation regulators in US, Canada and Australia later adopted this directive, causing a global shortage of spare parts for AW139s.

The Irish Air Corps and Queensland Emergency Units have grounded their entire fleet of AW139s. Only one of six AW139s run by Irish Air Corps has been allowed to fly again, the Independent reported.

Spain-based INAER has also suspended all their flights starting August 25, says daily Ceuta Al Día.

One Sky Shuttle helicopter could be ready to resume operations this weekend, a Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department (CAD) official told SCMP.

Nine deaths

On August 29 an AW139 crashed into the sea near Rio de Janeiro killing two crewmembers and two passengers.

“While the investigation is ongoing and waiting for additional information/analysis, as a precautionary measure this Bollettino prescribes inspection and quarantine of the tail rotor blades,” Italy-based manufacturer Agusta Westland wrote.

“In the meantime collection of all necessary evidence is going on in order to isolate the root cause and determine the final corrective actions,” AW added.

According to SCMP five accidents involving AW139s worldwide have been reported so far this year, killing nine people.

In February a South Korean Coast Guard helicopter crashed into the sea leaving one female officer dead. In May a tail rotor gearbox came off a Gulf Helicopter AW139 while on the ground in Doha.

A month later the entire tail section of Weststar AW139 detached while landing in Kuala Lumpur. In August four people died when a Beijing police AW139 fell during a training flight.

On July 2010 a Sky Shuttle ditched at sea near Victoria Harbour. All 13 people on board, including two male aircraft crew members and 11 passengers were plucked to safety with no serious injuries.

A preliminary report released by the CAD that same month said the direct cause for the helicopter losing control seconds after it took off was a tail rotor failure.

The full investigation “is expected to take more than one year to complete,” CAD said at the time.

“As the emergency landing accident took place in Hong Kong airspace, therefore, the investigation is being carried out by HKCAD with the participation of AACM, the territory of registry of the aircraft,” AACM told MDTimes.

CAD has “sent some wreckage to a research and development company in UK last September for analysis,” the regulator added. “The accident investigation work is on-going to determine the causes relating to the accident.”

http://www.macaudailytimes.com

Mumbai: Turbulence above, traffic below deal twin blow

Sumitra Deb Roy, TNN | Sep 6, 2011, 06.56AM IST

MUMBAI: As my flight took off from Hong Kong Airport on Sunday evening, the opening lines of the pilot were, "We hope we can fly you to Mumbai in time provided the congestion is less. Mumbai is always a busy city or rather has the busiest airport!"

The sarcasm in the pilot's tone was hard to miss. But in the end his prediction turned out to be true.The flight had left Hong Kong at around 6 pm and was in the city within the scheduled six hours, entering Mumbai's skies right at around 12 am. But no sooner did the pilot announce that it was only a matter of time before people would head home, came the Air Traffic Controller's signal that the aircraft couldn't land before 50 minutes.

A passenger, whose restless child refused to have the seat belt on (necessary due to massive turbulence), was told by a crew member the delay could be more than an hour. The kid refused the candies and drink offered and announced he wanted to get off right then.

As passengers glanced at the child with amusement, came another announcement. It was the pilot informing us the plane would hover over Mumbai for close to an hour, a delay the ATC apparently attributed to bad weather. But a few minutes later, the pilot again informed us the delay was because of logjam on the runway. A foreigner on board quipped, "Mumbai's runways are clearly jinxed" .

The air hostesses returned with drink carts but few were interested. Finally, the pilot was back with the announcement everyone was waiting to hear: "Crew be seated for landing" . Touchdown came at 1.20 am. 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Fatal British Columbia glider crash may have been result of pilots blinded by sun

By Sherri Zickefoose, Calgary Herald September 5, 2011 8:03 PM

CALGARY — The death of a Calgary glider pilot and another man, whose aircraft collided mid-air, may have been caused by sun blindness.

Keith Watson, a 50-year-old Calgarian, died Saturday near Invermere when his sailplane collided while in flight south of Invermere, B.c., shortly before 3:30 p.m. Saturday, according to Columbia Valley RCMP.

The other pilot, Ray Perino of Kelowna, B.C., also died.

RCMP are investigating the cause of the fatal crash, but fellow Calgary pilot Mel Blackburn says it appears glare from the sun may have caused the two gliders to touch wings.

“One of the questions we had was, could this have been avoided? I know myself from experience from flying into the sun (that) you’re largely blinded. The other glider would have been flying out of the sun and they simply didn’t see each other,” Blackburn said.

“Had one been 10 feet higher or lower, this may have never happened.”

Watson, a well-known sound technician, had a vacation home in near Invermere and enjoyed the well-known sailplane culture there.

He lived in Calgary with his elderly, widowed mother.

Blackburn, also a member of the Canadian Rockies Soaring Club, remembers Watson as having an adventurous spirit.

“He was very passionate about flying. He learned very quickly. He mastered the sport quickly and went on to simply enjoy it.”

Colliding sailplanes are a rare occurrence, according to Phil Stade, executive director for the Alberta Soaring Council.

“It’s very infrequent. I’ve never heard of a crash of this particular nature. We have very few collisions between gliders,” he said.

Glider pilots have specific training requirements.

“We teach our students from the first day a lookout technique that we really drill home as a primary issue in every flight. Before we even move the controls to turn, we look under and over the wing. You stop and look carefully, all before we do the turn. It’s a technique that’s established during the training program.”

Stade said there are about 120 glider pilots in the Calgary area.

Mounties say the two planes were gliding in the same thermal lift and at one point clipped wings. The pilots lost control of the planes and crashed into the side of Mount Swansea.

Invermere is about 275 kilometres southwest of Calgary, just across the B.C. border.

Opinion: Engine failure of two Pakistan International Airlines aircraft.

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

It was alarming to hear the news of engine failure of two Pakistan International Airlines aircraft. The ATR planes, which were recently inducted in the PIA, have a good safety record the world over. The reason for these failures will be known in due course. It is, however, important that the maintenance and quality control standards of our national carrier are reorganised. It will only become possible if the cause factors of these failures are not conveniently labelled ‘material failures’.

The chances of human error, whether in terms of maintenance standards, logistics (procurement of parts or fuel quality) or even flight operations must be impartially looked into. Some best practices are being compromised, which can bear catastrophic results if not investigated or addressed honestly.

Muhammad Zeeshan

Wah Cantt

http://www.thenews.com.pk

Plane was third jet from same company to overshoot runway at Ottawa airport. Trans States Airlines Embraer ERJ-145, United Airlines, N840HK, Flight AX-3363 / UA-3363

OTTAWA — The United Express plane that slid into a field Sunday was the third Embraer 145 jet from the same company, Trans States Airlines, to overshoot the runway at Ottawa International Airport while attempting to land during rain.

Trans States Airlines is a regional carrier headquartered in Bridgeton, Missouri, that operates as United Express for United Airlines and US Airways Express for US Airways.

A 2008 Transport Canada report obtained by The Citizen indicated grooved runways and equipping planes with thrust-reverse engines can significantly the risk of aircraft overshooting a wet runway.

The runway surface at the Ottawa airport isn’t grooved, nor is the Embraer 145 equipped with thrust-reversers.

The report contained data gathered from accidents between 1990 and 2007 that indicated the risk of an accident by overshooting the runway is about seven times higher when the runway is wet. The rate in Canada is six times higher than the rate in the United States, while it is only three times higher for other countries.

The report indicated that landing on grooved runways, in which the tarmac is divided by perpendicular slats across the runway, or runways with a porous surface, can provide traction to reduce hydroplaning.

“Runways are either grooved or have (porous friction course) overlay at almost all airports with commercial jet service in the U.S., U.K., Australia and Japan, at most major airports in continental Europe, and at many of the major airports in other countries,” the report said. But only two of Canada’s airports had grooved runways in 2008, and both of those were small regional airports, the report said. An Ottawa airport spokeswoman confirmed Monday that the runways there are not grooved.

In addition to grooved runways to increase friction, the report recommended the use of airlines equipped with reverse thrust engines, to rapidly reduce speed, which can help avoid hydroplaning.

“The risks of landing overruns on wet runways for aircraft without reverse thrust are approximately six times greater than for aircraft with reverse thrust,” the report said.

In 2004, after the first Trans States Airlines plane overshot the runway, the operator’s fleet had 22 aircraft with thrust reversers, and 17 without. The plane on Sunday was also without thrust reversers.

On July 14, 2004, around 5 p.m., a US Airways Express Embraer 145 flight from Pittsburgh was attempting to land at the Ottawa airport during a light rain. It overshot the runway, stopping about 300 feet from the end, in a field. None of the 31 people on board the plane were injured.

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) investigation report determined that the plane was not equipped with reverse thrusters, and the runway at the Ottawa airport was not grooved. However, the report attributed the accident to human error and a faulty brake system.

Then, on June 16, 2010, a United Express flight, also owned by Trans State Airlines, was arriving from Washington when it skidded off the runway while landing in the rain. The crash left the plane nose-down 150 metres past the runway’s end in the airport’s southern field. Three people — the pilot, co-pilot and an elderly woman — were taken to hospital with minor injuries.

The TSB has not yet produced its final report for that incident, said Chris Krepski, a spokesman for the board. But if urgent recommendations are needed, they would have been communicated to the airport, Krepski said. To date none have been made.

While that investigation continues, TSB staff were at the Ottawa airport Monday investigating the scene of the most recent incident. Krepski said the investigators had already begun gathering evidence, including accessing the plane’s flight recorder. The plane was expected to be removed from the scene by Monday evening, and relocated for a more thorough investigation.

Krepski said it was too early to determine the cause of the accident, but that it is often caused by more than one factor. “Definitely it’s never just one thing. In general, it’s many causes,” he said. “There are so many different factors that can come into play that can cause an accident.”

The investigations can take anywhere from a year to four or five years, depending on the complexity of the situation, he said.

For the passengers on Sunday’s flight, all luggage was retrieved from the plane, and was being sent to the owners Monday. An airport spokeswoman said flights were currently operating off the second runway, and there were no delays in service. The airport was expected to return to normal operations once the plane had been cleared from the runway Monday evening.

Video Release: U.S. Coast Guard - A treacherous ocean rescue for 2 and a puppy off Cape Mendocino

Eleventh Coast Guard District
U.S. Coast Guard
Video Release
Date: September 5, 2011

MCKINLEYVILLE, Calif. – A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Astoria, Ore., rescued a man, woman and their pup from a sinking 58-foot sailing vessel 130 miles off the coast of Cape Mendocino in Northern California, Friday afternoon.

At approximately 4:10 a.m., Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay received a mayday call from an unknown location. After several hours of trying to re-establish communications, the Coast Guard successfully contacted two people aboard the sailing vessel Gypsy Soul, which was taking on water in 30-foot seas and 45-knot winds.

An airborne HC-130 from Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento responded and found the distressed mariners 130 miles offshore. Due to the distance offshore combined with dangerous sea conditions, the Rescue Coordination Center in Alameda, Calif., directed a medium-range HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Astoria in Oregon capable of operating in treacherous conditions.

"The level of professionalism and readiness of District Thirteen, Group Humboldt Bay, Air Station Astoria and Air Station Sacramento speaks volumes about the Coast Guard's ability to work together to get the job done safely, regardless of location," said Chief Petty Officer Michael Guerrero, command duty officer, Rescue Coordination Center Alameda.

Three survivors Chuck Fleer, and Taz Kai and their puppy Sadie were safely delivered to a waiting ambulance at Air Station Humboldt Bay in McKinleyville. Fleer and Kai declined any further medical attention and were released to go home.

Original article and video: http://www.d11.uscgnews.com

2 Injured in plane crash near Winsted Municipal Airport (10D), Minnesota.

WINSTED, Minn. (WCCO) — Two men have been taken to the hospital after a small plane crashed near the Winsted Airport Monday afternoon.

McLeod County authorities responded to the crash, which happened shortly before 4 p.m.

The plane was traveling from Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie to the Winsted Airport when it crashed into a cornfield about a 1/4-mile away from the airport, according to authorities.

One of the men is in critical condition.

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com


Editorial: National Labor Relations Board v. Boeing — and jobs. The agency's swerve to the left soon may stall.

September 6, 2011

You have to wonder about a federal agency that sticks it to an American manufacturer creating thousands of good-paying jobs inside the nation's borders instead of overseas.

Fortunately, we hope, you won't have to wonder about it for long. We suspect the end is near for the brief reign of an overbearing pro-union majority on the National Labor Relations Board. That should help to lift an economy in dire need of job creation. It also should lift Chicago's Boeing Corp., the manufacturer targeted in an outrageous NLRB complaint earlier this year.

Pakistan International Airlines planes wither but Civil Aviation Authority doesn’t care

KARACHI - The recent incidents of emergency landings by passenger aircraft of the national flag carrier happened due to poor maintenance but the aviation regulatory authority has turned a blind eye to the problem, putting thousands of innocent lives at risk.

The alarming situation has also created confusion among thousands of passengers who board Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flights everyday, without having any idea that their safety is being compromised; however, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has been found compromising and provides no information to the passengers about potential risks of flying with poorly-maintained aircraft.

On August 3, Muscat-bound PIA flight PK-501 via Karachi to Turbat made an emergency landing at Jinnah International Airport in Karachi as one of its engines break down after half-an-hour of takeoff. The plane, carrying twenty passengers besides crewmembers, returned to Karachi airport and was able to land safely.

The same day another PIA flight, PK-508, en route to Karachi from Punjgur made an emergency landing at the Jinnah International Airport as one of its engines broke down.

Last month, PIA flight PK-734, Airbus A-310, returning from Milan via Paris-Lahore was detained at the Charles de Gualle Airport in Paris, when the Safety Assessment of Foreign Aircraft (SAFA) inspectors reported over 30 safety issues with the aircraft. The passengers were later flown back to Pakistan through PK-702 from Manchester-Islamabad flight via Paris.

The PIA’s Avion de Transport Regional (ATR) 42-500 twin turbo-prop aircraft are manufactured by a joint venture between European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company NV (EADS) and Alenia Aeronautica, an Italian-French company with its headquarters in Toulouse, France. The national flag carrier currently has seven ATR planes in service that were inducted in the fleet to replace the obsolete Fokker planes. The ATR 42-500 can carry up to 50 passengers.

In March 2007, due to violation of aviation safety standards, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) exempting only seven aircraft had banned 35 Boeing 777s series planes of the PIA from flying over the 27-nation bloc of the European Union (EU). The restriction was imposed after a number of accidents were reported about PIA’s outdated Fokker fleet. Consequently, the national airline made a large cut in its domestic and Middle East operations and grounded its ageing Fokker fleet.

Pakistan’s image of air safety compliance has already been badly affected by the recent tragic disasters of Airblue, JS Air and Sun Way.

With the responsibility of developing an internal mechanism and institutional culture to address aviation safety violations lying with the CAA, industry experts and passengers demand that there are serious issues related to flight standards and airworthiness of aircraft that need to be addressed by the CAA in order to ensure safety and security of passengers and reduce the probability of plane crashes.

Talking with Pakistan Today, Advocate Shah Murad said the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) is charged with the regulation of civil aviation worldwide, having 190 contracted countries.

“It is impossible for the ICAO to be responsible for safety of each and every commercial flight; therefore, within the Chicago Convention, 1944 framework, the organisation promotes technical and operational safety of civil aviation through establishment of safety oversight responsibility and security audit programmes for verifying state compliance with International Standard and Recommended Practices (SARPs).”

The ICAO Universal Safety Oversight Audit is a function by which members ensure effective implementation and compliance of safety related SARPs, he added.

The CAA, however, is not doing enough to ensure compliance of ICAO’s safety oversight and protect air passengers at high risk due to violations in aviation safety procedures.

When contacted, official PIA spokesperson Mashhud Tajwar was of the view that fleet maintenance is ‘satisfactory under the given resources.’

He also claimed the national carrier to be one of the best airlines in the world. “We do not operate flights even with a miniscule problem that shows our commitment to the safety of passengers.” On the issue of flight delays, he claimed that about 80 percent of the recent flight delays were due to bad weather, resulting in consequential delays of other flights.

http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk

VIDEO: Small sleeping room at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport

A prototype Sleepbox room for tired airline passengers has been installed at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport. Designed by architects from Moscow, this private room is intended for people who want a quiet place to relax after passport control.

Guam Agenda: FAA Opportunity for Design-Build Small Contractors, Plus Contracts for Gymnastics Equipment, Utility Work Machine, Generator Load Banks and Binocular Range Finders, Deadline in Weeks Ahead

Written by GBN Staff
Tuesday, September 06, 2011

GUAM – Following is a list of events expected in the coming weeks in Guam related to Department of Defense and other federal contracts on the island.

Sept. 6 – Bids to supply a preschool gymnastics circuit and sports kit for Andersen Air Force Base, Guam are due to the Pacific Air Forces Office of the U.S. Air Force by 4 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 6. The equipment includes durable, high-shock absorbency dance/exercise mats, an uneven bars set, parallel bars, rings and a FlagHouse Preschool Gymnastics kit or brand name equivalent, according solicitation number N41557711RC182FS.

Sept. 6 – Vendor price bids to supply crash and recovery support equipment for Andersen Air Force Base, Guam are due via e-mail by 4 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 6. The Pacific Air Forces solicitation, number F1C2MX1217A001, is seeking eight 5-ton Loadlink Plus load indicators, two 50-ton Radio Link Plus load indicators, and eight sets of tethering kits for heavy aircraft.

Sept. 6 -- Pacific Air Forces has issued a solicitation for a 5600 Turbo Toolcat Work Machine F Series along with a pallet fork frame and teeth, a trencher, and spare tires for Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Price quotations for solicitation number F1C0CR1194A910 must be received via e-mail by 4 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 6.

Sept. 6 -- Pacific Air Forces Office is looking for a vendor to supply eight generator load banks for Guam's Andersen Air Force Base. The procurement is a total set-aside for woman-owned small businesses, according to solicitation number F1C0CR1236A001. Responses to this request for quotes must be received by 4 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Sept. 6.

Sept. 7 -- Pacific Air Forces is seeking a small business vendor to supply a total of 88 ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers, along with fire extinguisher plastic cabinets, to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. The bidding deadline for solicitation number N41557711RC193FS is 4 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 7.

Sept. 7 – 4 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 7 is the bidding deadline for vendors interested in supplying Guam's Andersen Air Force Base with two 10 x 50 mm military BRF binocular rangefinders. The Steiner or brand equivalent binocular rangefinder should have a built-in FDA Class 1 laser rangefinder with a maximum ranging distance of 1,600 yards and high definition military specification optics, according to solicitation number EVANS1237A001. It also must be nitrogen-filled and waterproof to a depth of 16 feet and have a built-in tripod adapter mount.

Sept. 29 – The Federal Aviation Administration is trying expand its pool of certified small business contractors to provide design-build services for modernizing and sustaining its 21 air traffic control centers, its radar approach facilities in Puerto Rico and Guam, and its fit-for-purpose next generation modular facilities. The FAA has set aside approximately $31 million for projects to be fulfilled by small businesses. Projects awarded under the so-called Basic Ordering Agreements may include design-build services for new and existing FAA facilities, strategic facilities planning, cost estimating, construction support, hazardous materials abatement and related services.

While the FAA is not soliciting proposals yet, it does require interested businesses to respond with their qualifications by 2:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Sept 29, according to presolicitation notice number 11026.

http://guambuildupnews.com

British Columbia: Kelowna man dead after midair crash. Two gliders collided while in flight in the Mount Swansea area of Windermere, south of Invermere Saturday.

By Kathy Michaels - Kelowna Capital News
Published: September 05, 2011 11:00 AM
Updated: September 05, 2011 12:01 PM

Friends within an Invermere based flying club are grieving Kelowna resident Ray Perino and Calgarian Keith Watson, following a midair crash that took their lives.

"They will be very missed," said Trevor Florence, a member of the gliding club that operates out of the Invermere Soaring Centre.

The two were considered experienced sailplane pilots, which makes their fatal Saturday afternoon crash all the more upsetting.

"Ray was a retired school principal, who was methodical, organized and very safety minded," said Florence, adding he was actively involved in the club and valued by every member for being so dedicated.

"There's no one to blame if you bump wings together in the sky … I'm sure they didn't see each other."

Columbia Valley Mounties were called at around 3:24 p.m., Sept. 3, to attend the report that two sailplanes, piloted by Watson, 50, and Perino, 59, collided while in flight in the Mount Swansea area of Windermere, which is located just south of Invermere.

"The two planes were gliding in the same thermal lift and at one point contacted wings, causing both to lose control and crash into the side of Mount Swansea," said Cpl. Dan Moskaluk, in a statement.

"This accident was witnessed by another sailplane pilot as well as several other people hiking on the mountain."

The hikers were able to quickly locate however neither pilot survived the crash. Columbia Valley RCMP, Search and Rescue, and BCAS attended the scene which was accessible by vehicle, it was confirmed that both men were deceased.

Moskaluk confirmed that both were experienced pilots familiar with the area. They had reportedly departed the Invermere airport, as they'd done many times before, earlier in the afternoon.

Perino's wife is en route to Invermere, said Florence, and it's likely a service of some sort will be put together to pay tribute to the two men, although it's too early to know the details as of yet.

http://www.bclocalnews.com

Two airlines keen to operate regional flights in Peru

Lima, Sep. 05 (ANDINA). Two international airlines have expressed interest in operating inter-regional flights in Peru, Foreign Trade and Tourism Minister Jose Luis Silva said on Monday.

He said his ministry had commisioned Spanish consulting firm ALG to conduct a preliminary study on the possibility of developing regional air routes in the Peruvian market and the document was delivered to ten interested companies.

"Ten private companies have come to see the possibility of investing in the commercial aviation industry and they were given the study, which is fairly complete. Two of them have expressed interest," he said.

The study, conducted in 2010, shows that it is profitable for a company to operate regional flights on small planes without the need for state subsidies, he stated.

The minister said he will meet on Tuesday with the chairman of Porter Airlines, a Canadian short-haul carrier, to introduce him to the advantages of investing in Peru.

He reiterated that Mincetur (Peru's Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism) is in talks with various international airlines to encourage them to operate in Peru and thus contribute to the goal of receiving 3.5 million foreign tourists by 2016.

Silva added that less than a week ago he had a meeting with the Ambassador of the Republic of Korea in Lima, who invited him to his country, where Silva is expected to meet with the president of Korean Air.

Moreover, he announced that the regional director of German airline Lufthansa will visit Peru in a month to explore the Peruvian market.

http://www.andina.com.pe

Aruba Airport Authority N.V. reports strong increase of 5.3% in traffic figures for the first 6 months of 2011

Aruba Airport Authority announced traffic results over the first six (6) months of 2011 which showed a strong increase in traffic. Compared to January-June 2010, the figures for commercial passengers were up (5.3%) and flights were up (3.6%) accounting for a total amount of 25,000 more passengers compared to January-June 2010, indicating strong demand for seats to the island .

Airports Council International’s World Annual Traffic Report released this month’s details: a “strong rebound from the two-year industry slump,” the organization noted, pointing out that worldwide airport passengers increased 6.6% in 2010, 6% in the first half 2011. ACI noted that "69% of airports worldwide registered positive passenger growth at an average of 8.6%, while 30% of airports lost traffic at an average rate of -4.1%."

The North American market has been overall flat compared to 2010, whilst the Netherlands Antilles grew by 19.4%. The European market showed a strong increase of 8.0% compared to 2010 mainly due to the satisfactory performance of the Dutch market. In addition the, Italian charter between Milan and Aruba is performing well and is increasing in amount of passengers. The Latin American Market, especially the Venezuelan market, is experiencing a steady recovery with a growth of 25.4%. Flights on major gateways like Bogota and Panama City saw strong load factors, whilst flight to Brazil and Venezuela improved significantly.

‘Strong increase in traffic for the six (6) months of 2011, and also July, gives us a reason for further optimism about the remainder of the year’ said Peter Steinmetz, Chief Executive Officer of AAA. “We are in constant contact with our airline partners in order to ensure that we retain our air service and route network. Demand for the destination is pivotal in this equation and we work closely with our tourism partners supporting their marketing and efforts to increase bookings.”

Experts assure plane crash caused by 'severe icing,' other factors. Saab 340A, SOL Líneas Aéreas. Prahuaniyeu, Río Negro, Argentina.

The Board of Investigations tendered Bariloche’s Federal Judge Leonidas Moldes with a preliminary report on the May 18th. Sol Airlines plane crash in Río Negro that killed 22 people.

The document points at icing as the cause of the crash, and orders the police to comb the area where the airplane hit the ground again. They also highlighted “probable” mistakes made by the pilot and the aircraft and presented a transcript of the conversation between the pilot and copilot inside the cockpit a few minutes before the crash.

The report, drafted by the Board of Investigations of Civil Aviation Accidents and which looks to determine what elements led to the crash, described several conclusions that explain why the accident took place.

Experts maintain that the aircraft suffered “severe icing while flying” which led the plane to plummet to the ground.

They decided, however, that the pilot had probably failed at outlining an appropriate flight plan since he apparently ignored the severe weather conditions ahead and the alternative routes available.

It also concludes that “the pilot’s only decision consisted of descending, which worsened the situation.”

The Board also concludes that there were several technical problems that contributed to the crash. “Even tough it was not the reason why the plane fell, the aircraft was not in optimal flying condition, since it had failed to comply with two mandatory inspections of its propellers.”

Judge Moldes also received the transcript from the cockpit, which includes the conversation between pilot and copilot in the 32 minutes before the Saab 340A flying from Río Negro to Comodoro Rivadavia crashed, killing 22 people.

http://www.buenosairesherald.com

Plane crash at Lake Hood Strip Airport (Z41), Anchorage, Alaska

Lake Hood Crash
(Photo courtesy of Tamara Carlton / September 5, 2011)


Just after 12:30 p.m. Monday afternoon,first responders answered a call at the Lake Hood Strip Airport. After landing without incident, a Cessna 170 was rolling out to take one of the intersections off runway 31 when the pilots brakes went to the floor.

According to NTSB Spokeman Clint Johnson the pilot of the plane was unable to maintain directional control of the plane and rolled off the left side of runway.

The plane, registered to Joseph Gugel of Anchorage nosed over and sustained substantial damage. Alone in the plane, the pilot was not hurt. The Runway was open again to air traffic by 4 p.m.

The FAA and the NTSB are continuing the investigation.

http://www.youralaskalink.com
ANCHORAGE, Alaska—  Authorities responded to a plane crash Monday afternoon at Anchorage’s Lake Hood Strip Airport.

According to Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA Pacific Division, the single engine Cessna 170 flipped over after landing and came to rest upside down at around 12:40 p.m. The pilot was the planes only occupant and walked away from the incident unharmed.

The runway will be closed while the NTSB and FAA conduct their investigation, Gregor said.

The identity of the pilot has not been released, but the aircraft is registered to Joseph Gugel of Anchorage.

http://www.ktuu.com

‘Up-skirt’ photos snapped at Canadian International Air Show: police.

Police believe there may be more victims and ask anyone with information to contact them at 416-808-1400. Crime Stoppers can be contacted anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477). 

Bruno Lombardi, 57, appears in this photo provided by Toronto police on Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011.

Toronto police have issued a public advisory after a 57-year-old man was accused of taking up-skirt photos of at least two females at the Canadian International Air Show at the CNE.

Police said the photos were taken Sunday.

While spectators watched planes soar through the sky, a man took "surreptitious up-skirt type photographs" of two females while they were distracted by the air show, police said.

Investigators believe there may be additional victims.

Somehow, police learned of the incidents and arrested a suspect.

Bruno Lombardi is charged with two counts of voyeurism for a sexual purpose.

The Richmond Hill resident is white, 5-foot-10, has brown eyes, black hair and speaks with a British accent, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call police at 416−808−1400 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416−222−TIPS (8477).

http://www.cp24.com

Published On Mon Sep 05 2011
Aleysha Haniff Staff Reporter

A man has been charged after two women had “up-skirt type” photographs snapped of them at the CNE Sunday.

The man attended Sunday’s air show, police said in a release. While spectators watched the planes fly above Ontario Place, the man secretly took photos of two women.

Bruno Lombardi, 57, of Richmond Hill, has been charged with two counts of voyeurism for sexual purpose.

Police believe there may be more victims and ask anyone with information to contact them at 416-808-1400. Crime Stoppers can be contacted anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477). 

http://www.thestar.com

Air Attack: Are Private Planes Al Qaeda's Next Weapon?


By JOHN HENDREN
Sept. 5, 2011

Security experts worry that private planes could become al Qaeda's next weapon. An intelligence bulletin from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI said:

"Violent extremists with knowledge of general aviation and access to small planes pose a significant potential threat to the homeland."

Although there is no information a specific attack is in the works, there are 228,000 general aviation planes at 4,000 airports across the nation -- too many to monitor.

The government is using signs that read "Warning: Pilots Report All Suspicious Activities" to keep pilots vigilant.

Intelligence experts say al Qaeda is no longer determined to pursue only massive 9/11-style attacks.

"They have sort of taken on this view of death by a thousand cuts, that if they try a lot of smaller attacks they are just as effective as the fear factor, so they really get more bang for their buck to do smaller attacks," said ABC News consultant and former FBI investigator Brad Garrett.

There are thousands of small planes in nearly every state. In College Park, Md., as soon as one plane lifts off it's in view of the Capitol, the Pentagon and about 10 miles away from the White House.

Last year, a man with a grudge against the federal government flew his plane into an Internal Revenue Service office in Austin, Texas.

The State Department has issued a worldwide travel alert and the threats go beyond small planes. Documents captured at Osama bin Laden's compound show that he was obsessed with plotting attacks around the 9/11 anniversary, including derailing a train over a brdige in the U.S.

Federal officials are also concerned about the threat of passengers implanted with body cavity bombs, deadly and nearly impossible to detect. And the threats go on.

"If seven or ten individuals came together and conducted a Mumbai, India, attack, you could go into a mall and kill more people potentially than at 9/11 in 15 minutes," said Garrett.

Then there is always the unknown. Al Qaeda, authorities warn, has shown an imaginative approach to terror.

http://abcnews.go.com

Cathay Pacific marketing campaign to highlight service staff–the ‘sparkling jewel’ in airline’s crow

05/09/2011 10:29

The FINANCIAL -- Cathay Pacific Chief Executive John Slosar today said the airline will push ahead with its marketing campaign that puts its staff “front and centre” across the world.

Speaking at a lunchtime gathering as part of the British Chamber of Commerce’s “Captains of Industry” series, Mr Slosar said that the airline’s staff and flight crew “really are the heart and soul of Cathay Pacific. They provide a level of friendly, helpful and sincere service I contend is unmatched by any other airline.

“That’s why we have no hesitation in featuring them in our marketing campaigns. And we certainly intend to carry on with the campaign featuring our staff because it has been a clear winner. I believe the next phase of the campaign, which is to be rolled out from the beginning of next month, will be a winner, too.”

Mr Slosar said that when it launched last year, the campaign was hailed in the media as an advertising coup, with one paper reporting that: “Cathay Pacific has deployed a new weapon in the battle for the hearts, minds and wallets of international air travellers: its employees”.

In a broad-ranging and upbeat speech, Mr Slosar connected the campaign to some of the many positive developments at Cathay Pacific, ranging from new products and destinations to a fleet upgrade that will see 95 fuel-efficient aircraft, with a list price of HK$200 billion, added before the end of the decade, and the airline’s new cargo terminal at Hong Kong International Airport being built at a cost of HK$5.5 billion.

“We are delighted and proud to be investing in Hong Kong and the local community – and we think every dollar will be worthwhile and bring its own rewards. At Cathay Pacific, we are unashamed true believers in Hong Kong and bulls on China,” Mr Slosar said.

Among the new product developments at the airline, Mr Slosar highlighted the plan to introduce a Premium Economy Class product on Cathay Pacific’s long- and medium-haul fleets from the second quarter of next year.

“I can promise you that this will be an outstanding product, with seats more like regional Business Class seats and upgraded meal and cabin services that I believe will convince our passengers that they are getting real value for the extra money it will cost them to fly the new class,” he said.

http://finchannel.com

Two water bombers were busy dumping foam on trees at the Hay River Airport recently: However, there was no forest fire to be fought

The activity - 10 drops on Aug. 19 and 20 - was to compare the effectiveness of the Canadair CL-215 air tanker and the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss, two different kinds of skimmer water bombers.

"We want to collect data on canopy penetration and ground coverage by the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss and the CL-215," said Duane Sinclair, manager of aviation services with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR).

The department currently has four CL-215 air tankers.

The test drops were made on two grids - each 100-by-800 feet and about 200 feet apart - in a forested section of the Hay River Airport.

After each drop, a sample of the foam making its way down through the trees was collected on the forest floor by 231 plastic cups distributed throughout the grid. The cups were then numbered and capped, and placed in a bin.

Sinclair said there were at least four hours between each drop to allow the dripping of the foam to cease.

Over the two days, there were four drops by the CL-215 and six by the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss.

During each drop, evaluators were watching from a helicopter, and six evaluators were on the ground.

The testing does not mean ENR is currently considering buying the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss, Sinclair said.

"All it is is just to provide us information on what the aircraft, both the CL-215 and the 802 Fire Boss can do in standing timber," he said. "It was strictly a comparison and a straight evaluation of both aircraft."

However, he noted the CL-215 uses aviation gas.

Only one or two companies make aviation gas, he added. "It's harder to get."

On the other hand, the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss uses Jet B fuel, which Sinclair noted is very accessible.

Another difference is the CL-215 has two engines, while the Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss is a single-engine aircraft.

Sinclair noted the CL-215 has two tanks on board, which each hold about 600 Imperial gallons for a total drop of roughly 1,200 gallons.

The Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss has a tank that can hold more than 600 Imperial gallons.

On Aug. 20, two Air Tractors following one another dropped their loads on a grid.

"We were assessing two drops versus the one drop in a 215," Sinclair explained.

Along with ENR, there were several other organizations involved in the study, including the U.S. Forest Services, the Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada, and FPInnovations of Hinton, Alta.

Sinclair said FPInnovations and the U.S. Forest Services, which each had personnel in Hay River for the test, will analyze the data and get information back to the GNWT.

"We should see something I'm hoping in October," he said.

ENR brought in personnel from several communities to help with the study.

Chile enlists psychic in search for plane crash victims. CASA C-212 Aviocar 300DF. Isla Robinsón Crusoe Airport, Chile.

Chilean authorities have called in a psychic to find the bodies of 17 people still missing after a military plane crash near the remote Robinson Crusoe Island in the Pacific Ocean.

"We are working with a person who is on one of the (search) boats," Defence Minister Andres Allamand told national Chilean TV in response to a question of whether a medium was taking part in recovery efforts.

"Not only are we using all of our technological capabilities, but also all the human and superhuman abilities that may exist," he said.

Mr Allamand, who has been on the island since Saturday (local time), earlier sought to lower expectations that all the victims' bodies will be recovered.

"We must prepare for the possibility that we will not find some of the bodies," he warned.

The Chilean government has organised a huge search in waters off the island where the plane went down late on Friday (local time) carrying 21 people.

On Sunday (local time), officials declared two days of national mourning, while only four bodies and a small amount of aircraft debris have been found so far.

The search continued on Sunday even though the government said there was no hope anyone survived the crash.

The air force plane had made two abortive attempts to land at Robinson Crusoe before radio contact was lost.

The victims included one of the country's best-known television personalities.

Thousands gathered at state broadcaster TVN to remember daily morning talk show host Felipe Camiroaga, who was travelling to the island with a crew to report on reconstruction efforts after a massive earthquake and tsunami caused devastation last year.

Robinson Crusoe, believed to have been the setting for the famous novel by 18th century British author Daniel Defoe, is the main island of the Juan Fernandez archipelago, which lies in the Pacific about 700 kilometres west of the South American coastline.

The Chilean navy is using sonar equipment to try to locate the fuselage of the aircraft, which officials believe may hold the remaining crash victims.

http://www.abc.net.au

VIDEO: Pilot expected to be OK after experimental plane crash. Michael J. Smith Field Airport (KMRH), Beaufort, North Carolina.

BEAUFORT, N.C. -- Crews are on the scene of a plane crash in Beaufort. It happened at the Michael J. Smith Airfield on Airport Road Monday around 11 a.m.

Airport officials said an experimental plane was taking off from the airfield when the engine went out. The pilot tried to land safely but the plane went off the runway into the grass area.

The pilot was not seriously injured and is expected to be OK.

VIDEO: Fatal Accidente de Felipe Camiroaga - Como choco el avion (IMPACTANTES IMAGENES) CASA C-212 Aviocar. Isla Robinsón Crusoe Airport, Chile.



by TheTruth4free1 on Sep 2, 2011

El avión CASA 212 en que viajaba Felipe Camiroaga se accidento este Viernes 2 de septiembre en los que corresponde al peor accidente aereo en la historia de chile en los ultimos 30 años. Esto, al intentar aterrizar en la Isla de Juan fernandez y tras dos fallidos intentos de aterrizaje el avion en el que viajaba el famoso y conocido animador del matinal buenos dias a todos de tvn que iba junto a otras 20 personas entre ellas el empresario Felipe Cubillos, fue victima de los vientos con rachas (rafagas) fuertes y se precipito al mar, dejando presumiblemente 21 personas fallecidas.

La lista oficial de personas fallecidas:

De Televisión Nacional de Chile viajaban Felipe Camiroaga, Roberto Bruce, Sylvia Slier, Carolina Gatica y Rodrigo Cabezón.

Del Desafío Levantemos Chile: Felipe Cubillos, Sebastian Correa, Joel Lizama, Catalina Vela Montero, Jorge Palma y Joaquín Arnold.

Del Consejo de Cultura: Galia Carolina Díaz Riffo y Romina Isabel Irarrázabal Faggiani.

De la FACh: el periodista José Cifuentes y Rodrigo Fernández.

De la tripulación: la teniente Carolina Fernández (piloto), el cabo 2° Flavio Olivo, el teniente Juan Pablo Mallea, el sargento 1° Eduardo Jones, el cabo 1° Eduardo Estrada y el cabo 1° Erwin Núñez.

Que en paz descanse el halcon de chicureo.

English Description:

The CASA 212 plane he was traveling crashed Felipe Camiroaga this Friday September 2 while trying to land on the island of Juan Fernandez. After two failed attempts at landing the plane carrying the famous and renowned host of the morning good morning to all of TVN was going along with 20 others including the employer Felipe Cubillos, was a victim of the gusting winds (gusts) strong and plunged into the sea, presumably leaving 21 people dead.

The official list of deceased persons:

De Televisión Nacional de Chile viajaban Felipe Camiroaga, Roberto Bruce, Sylvia Slier, Carolina Gatica y Rodrigo Cabezón.

Del Desafío Levantemos Chile: Felipe Cubillos, Sebastian Correa, Joel Lizama, Catalina Vela Montero, Jorge Palma y Joaquín Arnold.

Del Consejo de Cultura: Galia Carolina Díaz Riffo y Romina Isabel Irarrázabal Faggiani.

De la FACh: el periodista José Cifuentes y Rodrigo Fernández.

De la tripulación: la teniente Carolina Fernández (piloto), el cabo 2° Flavio Olivo, el teniente Juan Pablo Mallea, el sargento 1° Eduardo Jones, el cabo 1° Eduardo Estrada y el cabo 1° Erwin Núñez.

Kitfox 7, Veatch, James F., N624JS: Accident occurred September 04, 2011 in Caldwell, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR11FA428
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 04, 2011 in Caldwell, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2014
Aircraft: VEATCH KITFOX, registration: N624JS
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The builder/owner/pilot of the kit-built experimental airplane and his non-pilot-rated passenger flew from California to Idaho in order to attend the kit manufacturer’s fly-in and visit relatives. Two days before the accident, they flew to Idaho, and the next day they flew 4 hours. On the third day, the airplane was taxied from its parking spot on the ramp about 0740, and the pilot conducted a takeoff to about 50 feet, before landing straight ahead on the remaining runway. The investigation was unable to determine the purpose of this flight, or whether the passenger was on board at that time. The airplane was then taxied back to the ramp. About 13 minutes later, the airplane left the ramp again, taxied to the opposite runway, and began another takeoff roll. When the airplane was about 200 feet above the runway, the engine stopped developing power. The airplane stalled and spun to the ground, impacting on airport property near the departure end of the runway.

Weight and balance calculations indicated that the airplane was likely 60 to 100 pounds above its maximum allowable weight, and that the center of gravity was about 1.7 inches forward of the aft limit, which would have increased the airplane pitch up tendency following the loss of engine power. Because the airplane was experimental and the pitch trim setting was unable to be determined during postaccident examination, the investigation was unable to determine whether there was sufficient control authority to prevent the stall and also what the required control forces would have been.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the two installed air filters had flow capacities well below the minimum value specified by the engine manufacturer, which would have limited the engine’s ability to develop its full rated power. However, this was not a factor in this accident, because the airplane had been flown successfully in the previous days.

The engine was not equipped with carburetor heat, even though it was required by the engine manufacturer. When plotted on a carburetor icing chart, the ambient air temperature and dew point values indicated that conditions for serious carburetor icing at cruise power existed. The engine-driven fuel pump was too damaged to test, but the engine manufacturer noted that it should have been replaced in accordance with a 2007 Service Bulletin, which warned that excessively high fuel pressure could result in “engine malfunction and/or massive fuel leakage.” Although the possibility exists that the engine experienced a total loss of power due to carburetor icing, excessive fuel pressure, or a combination of the two, the investigation was unable to conclusively determine whether either caused the loss of engine power.

Finally, no evidence of an angle-of-attack or stall warning system was observed in the wreckage. Although not required, such a system might have alerted the pilot of the impending stall and helped him avoid the stall and subsequent spin.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s failure to prevent a low-altitude stall and spin following a complete loss of engine power during the initial climb after takeoff.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 4, 2011, about 0830 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Kitfox 7, N624JS, was substantially damaged when it impacted airport property shortly after takeoff from Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The certified private pilot/owner and his wife, the passenger, received fatal injuries. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight.

The pilot and airplane were based at Rio Vista Municipal Airport (O88), Rio Vista, California. The pilot and his wife departed O88 on September 2 for Idaho, where they visited relatives, and attended a Kitfox fly-in. According to information provided by Lockheed Martin Flight Services (LMFS), the pilot telephoned LMFS for a weather briefing, and he reported that he planned to depart EUL at 0830 on September 4, with a planned stop in Lovelock, Nevada, and a final destination of O88. A pilot in a Cessna who taxied out behind N624JS stated that at "exactly 0800" he observed N624JS take off from runway 12, climb to about 50 feet, and then heard the pilot announce he was making a "short landing" on the remaining runway. He observed N624JS land and turn off onto the runup area for runway 30. The Cessna pilot then departed runway 12. About 20 to 30 minutes later, the Cessna pilot heard the pilot of N624JS announce a "straight out" departure from runway 30.

Review of track log data extracted from the accident pilot's handheld GPS unit confirmed the takeoff-landing observed by the Cessna pilot. The data indicated that after that takeoff-landing, the airplane stopped briefly on the runup ramp at the end of runway 30, and then taxied back to the ramp where the airplane had been parked. About 13 minutes later the airplane began a second taxi-out from that ramp, and proceeded to runway 30 for another takeoff. The GPS data indicated that the takeoff roll began about 5 minutes later. The data indicated that the airplane reached a maximum altitude of about 200 feet above ground level. Witnesses reported that the airplane then began a spin to the left, and impacted the ground in a near-vertical trajectory.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the 69-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine airplane land rating. A review of his personal flight log and other documentation indicated that he had a total flight experience of about 315 hours at the time of the accident, including about 162 hours in the accident airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in December 2010. His most recent flight review was completed in the accident airplane in February 2011.

According to the pilot's autopsy conducted by the Canyon County Coroner, the cause of death was "massive, traumatic deceleration injuries involving the head, torso, and upper and lower extremities." Both Canyon County and the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute conducted forensic toxicology examinations on specimens from the pilot, and reported that no carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, or any screened drugs, except salicylate (aspirin), were detected.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

FAA records indicated that the pilot finished building the airplane in 2008. It was equipped with a Rotax 912ULS 100 hp engine.

The maintenance records indicated that the most recent annual condition inspection was completed on November 17, 2010. At that time, the airplane had a total time in service of 119.27 hours. The records indicated that on August 27, 2011, the propeller hub bolts were re-torqued. The records indicated that on August 29, 2011, the oil, oil filter, fuel filter and spark plugs were replaced, when the airplane and engine had a total time in service of 162.15 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The EUL 0835 automated weather observation included winds from 110 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear skies; temperature 9 degrees C; dew point 2 degrees C; and an altimeter setting of 30.12 inches of mercury.

Temperature and dew point values for the approximate time and location of the accident indicated that the relative humidity was approximately 60 percent. When the intersection of the two temperature values was located on a chart that depicted carburetor ice envelopes, the point was in the envelope labeled "Serious Icing at Cruise Power."

AIRPORT INFORMATION

FAA records indicated that the EUL elevation was 2,432 feet above mean sea level, and that the single asphalt runway, designated 12/30, measured 5,500 feet by 100 feet. The airport was not equipped with an air traffic control tower, nor was it equipped to record communications on its common traffic advisory, or any other radio, frequencies.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest in a near-vertical nose-down attitude, on an approximate magnetic heading of 270 degrees, about 850 feet northeast of the threshold of runway 12. The wreckage was tightly contained, and except for the propeller and hub, no major components, including flight controls and surfaces, were found separated from the wreckage. The propeller reduction gearbox was fragmented, and the propeller hub was under, but separated from, the engine. All three blades of the composite propeller were cracked, but remained attached to the hub, consistent with lack of rotation at impact. The propeller spinner was found in the baggage compartment, and its appearance was consistent with it not being installed at the time of the accident. The engine cowl, nose gear, cockpit, and the leading edges of the wings exhibited significant crush damage in the aft direction. The aft fuselage exhibited moderate buckling. Both wing fuel tanks were ruptured.

The impact positions of the flaperons and the pitch trim tabs could not be determined. The airplane was equipped with a ground-adjustable incidence horizontal stabilizer. The stabilizer was found to be at the maximum stabilizer leading edge down incidence, which corresponds to maximum airplane nose up setting. No evidence of any pre-impact flight control failures was observed.

Impact damage and susceptibility to disturbance by first responders precluded definitive determination of the pre-impact settings of all the controls, switches, and valves, but no pre-impact failures or deficiencies were noted. A detailed wreckage examination report is contained in the public docket for this accident.

No evidence of any angle of attack or stall warning system was observed in the wreckage.

The engine was significantly impact-damaged. The propeller gearbox was fractured, and witness marks from the gear teeth in the case were consistent with lack of rotation at impact. Both carburetors were fracture-separated from the engine. The intake and exhaust manifolds, oil filter, and muffler were crushed and fractured. The ignition units remained partially attached to the engine and wiring harnesses, but were successfully function-tested. There was no evidence of fire, thermal damage, or smoke/sooting on any engine components.

The installed air filters were significantly smaller, and had less flow capability, than those recommended by Rotax. The airplane was not equipped with a carburetor heat system for induction air. The Rotax 912 Series Installation Manual (para 16.2) stated that "provisions for preheating the intake air have to be made to prevent formation of ice in the intake air system."

Non-metallic fuel lines were date-stamped " 3Q 04," and the lines were no longer flexible. The possibility that the lines may have desiccated and/or loosened with disuse since the accident could not be ruled out. The line material, its compatibility with autogas, and its recommended service life were not able to be determined.

The fuel pump was fractured-separated from the engine. The diaphragm was intact, and the interior of the pump, including the internal screen, was clean and free of contamination and corrosion. The fuel pump was sent to Rotax Austria for additional evaluation. The condition of the pump precluded any testing, but Rotax did note that the pump should have been replaced in accordance with a 2007 Service Bulletin (SB-912-053). The stated reason for that SB was that excessively high fuel pressure could result in "engine malfunction and/or massive fuel leakage."

Cylinders, valves, and spark plugs all exhibited yellow crystalline deposits that appeared to be sulfur from the fuel. Internal engine examination revealed clean oil throughout, with no scoring, brinelling, thermal distress, or non-impact related failures noted.

The only unknown weight was that of the fuel on board at the time of the accident. For the accident flight, in order to avoid exceeding the maximum allowable weight, the airplane would have been limited to about 10 gallons of fuel. If the fuel tanks were full, the airplane would have exceeded the maximum allowable weight by 100 pounds, and the center of gravity (CG) would have been about 1.7 inches forward of the aft limit. Based on the best estimate of the fuel quantity, the airplane takeoff weight was about 60 pounds over the maximum allowable weight, and the CG was again about 1.7 inches forward of the aft limit.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Handheld GPS

A handheld Garmin GPSMap 396 device was recovered from the wreckage, and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory in Washington, DC, for download of track log data. A total of 9 flights, including the accident flight, were recovered from the device. Correlation of the data with geographic information indicated that the first recovered flight was from Carson City, Nevada (NV) to Lovelock, NV on September 2, 2011.

The data indicated that on the morning of the accident, the device was activated at 0739, and the airplane made a very brief liftoff from runway 12 before returning to the ramp at 0812. Thirteen minutes later, the device was again powered up, the airplane taxied out to runway 30, and the takeoff roll began at 0830. Detailed information is available in the public docket for this accident.


  NTSB Identification: WPR11FA428
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 04, 2011 in Caldwell, ID
Aircraft: Veatch Kitfox, registration: N624JS
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 4, 2011, about 0832 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Kitfox 7, N624JS, was substantially damaged when it impacted airport property shortly after takeoff from Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho. The certificated private pilot/owner and the passenger received fatal injuries. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight.

The pilot and airplane were based at Rio Vista Municipal Airport (O88), Rio Vista, California. The pilot and his wife departed O88 on September 2 for Idaho, where they visited relatives, and attended a Kitfox fly-in. According to information provided by Lockheed Martin Flight Services (LMFS), the pilot planned to depart EUL at 0830 on September 4, with a planned stop in Lovelock, Nevada, and a final destination of O88. A pilot in a Cessna who taxied out behind N624JS stated that at "exactly 0800" he observed N624JS takeoff from runway 12, climb to about 50 feet, and then heard the pilot announce he was making a "short landing" on the remaining runway. He observed N624JS land and turn off onto the runup area for runway 30. The Cessna pilot then departed runway 12. About 30 minutes later, the Cessna pilot heard the pilot of N624JS announce a "straight out" departure from runway 30.

The airplane came to rest in a near-vertical attitude, about 750 feet northeast of the threshold of runway 12. The wreckage was tightly contained, and except for the propeller and hub, no major components, including flight controls and surfaces, were found separated from the wreckage. The propeller reduction gearbox was fragmented, and the propeller hub was under, but separated from, the engine. All three blades of the composite propeller were cracked, but remained attached to the hub. The engine cowl, nose gear, cockpit, and the leading edges of the wings exhibited significant crush damage in the aft direction. The aft fuselage exhibited moderate buckling. Both wing fuel tanks were ruptured. The positions of the flaps and the pitch trim tab could not be determined. When the aft fuselage was lowered to the ground, the airplane was aligned on an approximate magnetic heading of 270 degrees.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the airplane was built by the pilot in 2008. It was equipped with a Rotax 912ULS 100 hp engine. FAA records indicated that the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in December 2010. Review of the pilot's personal flight log indicated that his most recent flight review was completed in the accident airplane in February 2011, and that as of the date of the accident, he had about 160 hours in the airplane.

FAA records indicated that the EUL elevation was 2,432 feet above mean sea level, and that the single asphalt runway measured 5,500 feet by 100 feet. The EUL 0835 automated weather observation included winds from 110 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear skies; temperature 9 degrees C; and an altimeter setting of 30.12 inches of mercury.



Two people died Sunday morning after taking off in their Kitfox, a single-engione airplane at the Caldwell Industrial Airport. The investigation about the cause of the crash is ongoing.




CALDWELL — An airplane crashed at the Caldwell Industrial Airport Sunday morning, killing both passengers.

A man and a woman from out-of-state were taking off in a two-person Kit Fox experimental airplane when they apparently lost power and crashed nose-first into the ground, according to airport manager Rob Oates.

Rescue workers were called in at 8:32 a.m., and the passengers were found dead on arrival. Their names were not released by press time Sunday night, pending notification of families.

The airport closed briefly while workers secured the crash site and recovered the bodies.

The Federal Aviation Administration conducted an initial investigation Sunday, and investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board will study the crash site today.

Oates said that the airplane was a home-assembled kit model deemed “experimental” by the FAA.

A factory manufactures the major components of such a plane, and the owner assembles those parts from a kit using an instruction book.

“It’s labeled as experimental. That does not mean that the aircraft are less safe or less meticulously assembled. My experience is that people are very cautious and meticulous. They follow instructions to the letter because they are going to be flying around in the aircraft,” Oates said.