Monday, May 23, 2016

Spike In Small Plane Crashes Over Long Island Has Some Calling For Federal Intervention



NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — It has been a troubling year for Long Island aviation with small planes falling out of the sky in record numbers.

As CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reported, homeowners on the ground are fearing for their safety.

With seven small plane crashes already in 2016, a disturbing pace has been set — one that hasn’t been seen in almost two decades.

Debris from a Beechcraft showered down on a Syosset neighborhood.

Three people died when the plane broke apart mid-flight, the pilot radioed that he lost use of his instruments.

In February, there was another death when a Piper aircraft plunged into Setauket harbor.

Families have been asking if annual inspections are enough.

“Safety of the planes, that they are properly assessed to determined if they are safe to fly,” Woodmere homeowner Jane Carp said.

Recent crashes have involved home-built to vintage Cessnas coming down on highways and beaches.

Private fliers range from students to octogenarians who fly in greater numbers over the beautiful coast. Long Island is also home to more than a dozen active airfields.

“I fear some of these guys may just jump in the airplane and go, and they’re not ready. General aviation, they are not tested, they haven’t flown in a long time,” Michael Canders, Director of Aviation, Farmingdale State College said.

Senator Charles Schumer has demanded that the Federal Aviation Administration investigate a possible pattern.

“This is Long Island. This is not the Bermuda Triangle. Writing off these crashes as simple bad luck won’t fly,” Schumer (D-NY) said, “because if one of these hits a house or God forbid kills someone on the ground, there’d be an investigation. Well we want one now before other crashes occur.”

The NTSB said the final reports are not in, but it appears most are due to human error.

“We teach our students here at Farm State right from day one that they have to be prepared for an emergency. That they have to know exactly what to do, and then to execute those procedures exactly as they’ve learned,” Canders said.

New certification standards are to be issued next month. They include amplified focus on managing risks such as the dangers of flying in bad weather.

With 14,000 square miles, Long Island has a disproportionate number of airports for its size when compared to other areas.

Story and video:  http://newyork.cbslocal.com

Lawsuit alleges faulty repairs to blame for fatal plane crash: North American AT-6C Texan, N13372, accident occurred June 04, 2014 in Buckley, Pierce County, Washington

James “Jim” Cawley

Rod Richardson

Rod Richardson





The family of a man killed in a plane crash in 2014 near Buckley has sued a business that did work on the aircraft before the wreck.

James “Jim” Cawley, 62, and Rodney Richardson, 72, died when the North American AT-6C they were flying in went down June 4, 2014.


Cawley’s wife, Cheri Cawley, filed a lawsuit on behalf of his estate last week in Pierce County Superior Court. She alleges that improper repairs to the plane kept fuel from reaching the engine, causing the plane to crash.


According to the suit, which seeks unspecified damages:


Richardson bought the World War II-era aircraft, a former training plane for the U.S. military, in 1999.


He hired Gig Harbor-based Associated Aviation Enterprises to do repairs on it in 2012.


In the process, Cawley’s family alleges, someone improperly connected the plane’s fuel lines.


It wasn’t flown much after the repairs, until the wreck a couple years later.


Richardson sold Cawley the plane two days before the crash. When they took it up together, the engine lost a lot of power just after take off, and the plane went down in a wooded area nearby.


The suit names Ben Allyn Olson, president of Associated Aviation at the time, and Drew Luther Vickers IV, an owner of the business. The company became Narrows Hangars (doing business as Northwest Aviation), which Vickers took over.


Narrows Hangars is named in the suit as well.


Court records didn’t list attorneys for the businesses or individuals, and none was reachable Monday.


Original article can be found here: http://www.thenewstribune.com


James R. Cawley: http://registry.faa.gov/N13372 


NTSB Identification: WPR14FA226
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 04, 2014 in Buckley, WA
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN AT 6C, registration: N13372
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 4, 2014, about 1530 Pacific daylight time, a North American AT-6C, N13372, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain following a loss of engine power near South Prairie Airport (02WA), Buckley, Washington. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport rated pilot, who was seated in the front seat, and the airline transport pilot rated passenger who was seated in the aft seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight originated from 02WA about 2 minutes prior to the accident.

Family members of both the pilot and passenger reported to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) that the airplane had recently been sold to the pilot by the passenger, and the flight was part of a local checkout flight. Family members further reported that the pilot and passenger had conducted a local flight earlier in the day of the accident, which lasted about 1 to 1.5 hours before they had returned for lunch.

Multiple witnesses located in the vicinity of the departure airport and accident site reported observing the airplane takeoff from runway 34, and the engine sounded normal. About 15 to 30 seconds after the airplane had passed the departure end of the runway, witnesses heard the engine begin to sputter. Witnesses stated that they continued to observe the airplane initiate a right turn to an easterly heading followed by a left 270-degree turn while ascending and descending erratically. Witnesses further stated that throughout the turn, the engine seemed to have been powering up and losing power shortly thereafter. As the airplane completed the turn to a southerly heading towards the departure airport, the engine lost complete power, and the airplane descended into trees.

Review of a 24-second recorded video provided by a witness was reviewed by the NTSB IIC. The video showed the accident airplane depart runway 34, and continued in an ascent until the video ended as the airplane passed over the departure end of the runway. Throughout the entire video, the airplane appeared to be operating normally with no evidence of smoke originating from the engine or any engine abnormalities.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

It was not determined which one of the two pilots, an airline transport rated pilot seated in the front seat, or an airline transport rated pilot seated in the aft seat, was manipulating the flight controls when the accident occurred.

Front Seat Pilot / New Owner

The pilot, age 62, held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane multiengine land and airplane single-engine land ratings. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with single-engine and multiengine ratings. A first-class airman medical certificate was issued to the pilot on August 10, 2012, with the limitations stated "must wear corrective lenses." The pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application that he had accumulated 26,250 total hours of flight time. Review of the pilot's logbooks revealed that the most recent logbook entry was dated June 4, 2014, which was for 0.7 hours in the accident airplane. Further review revealed that the pilot had logged 19.1 hours within the previous 90 days and 8.3 hours within the previous 30 days.

Rear Seat Pilot / Former Owner

The rear seat pilot, age 72, held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane multiengine land and airplane single-engine land, and rotorcraft helicopter ratings. A third-class airman medical certificate was issued to the rear seat pilot on July 23, 2013, with the limitations stated "must wear corrective lenses, not valid for any class after." The rear seat pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application that he had accumulated 24,660 total hours of flight time. Review of the pilot's logbooks revealed no entries since his most recent biennial flight review dated April 25, 2013.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear tailwheel equipped airplane, serial number (S/N) 88-13372, was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN engine, serial number ZP-101599, rated at 550 horsepower. The airplane was also equipped with a Hamilton Standard variable pitch propeller. The airplane was equipped with dual flight controls, which allowed for persons in either the forward or aft seats to fly the airplane. However, the airplane is typically flown from the front seat due to the landing gear position handle location. The airplane featured two 55.2 gallon fuel tanks, located on both sides of the wing center section. The left fuel tank was equipped with two different fuel delivery ports, which allows for two fuel selector positions, left main, placarded at 35.2 gallons, and the reserve position, placarded at 20 gallons.

Review of the Flight Operation Instruction Chart revealed that an hourly fuel burn varies from 26 gallons per hour at sea level with power settings of 1,600 rpm and 26 inches of manifold pressure and the mixture in a lean setting to 65 gallons per hour at a power setting of 2,250 rpm and 36 inches of manifold pressure and the mixture in a rich setting. Maximum continuous power settings of 2,200 rpm, 32.5 inches of manifold pressure, and the mixture in a rich position result in a fuel burn of about 51 gallons per hour.

The family of the former owner reported that the airplane had 30 to 35 gallons of fuel per side and 31 gallons of fuel was added the day prior to the accident according to fuel logs.

Information provided by a family member of the former owner, revealed that about 1 to 1.5 years prior to the accident, a new fuel selector valve was installed by a mechanic, and since then, the airplane had not flown much. The family member further stated that initially there were two fuel selector valves replaced, as the initial replacement did not operate as expected. In addition, they reported that the airplane did not fly much since the fuel selector valve replacement; however, numerous ground runs were conducted.

Review of the airframe, engine, and propeller logbooks revealed that the most recent annual inspection was conducted on November 12, 2013, at a HOBBS time of 976.7 hours. A fuel selector valve was installed on August 31, 2012, at HOBBS time of 975.4 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 2 hours since the annual inspection and 3.3 hours since the fuel selector valve was replaced.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of recorded data from the Joint base Lewis-McChord Airport, Tacoma, Washington, automated weather observation station, located about 16 miles west of the accident site, revealed at 1523 conditions were wind from 270 at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 2,300 feet, temperature 18 degrees Celsius, dew point 11 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The South Prairie Airport is a private non-towered airport that operates in class G airspace. The airport features a single turf runway, 2,600-feet long and 50-feet wide, oriented on 160 and 340 degrees respectfully. The reported airport elevation is 690 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site by the NTSB IIC revealed that the airplane impacted trees and terrain about 1.25 miles northeast of 02WA within a heavily wooded area. An initial point of contact with trees, about 70-feet in height, was observed. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 147 degrees magnetic and was about 238 feet in length. All major structure components of the airplane were located within the wreckage debris path. The fuselage came to rest on its right side, partially inverted. The tailwheel was observed in an extended position. The engine remained partially attached to the fuselage and displaced downward into terrain.

The wing center section, which included the inboard portion of the left wing, was located just beyond the fuselage, and was found in an upright, leading edge high attitude, with both the left and right main landing gear extended. The right wing was separated at the center section attach point. The left fuel tank was visually inspected, and fuel was observed up to the area of the fuel quantity indicator, which was separated. The right fuel cap was removed, and no fuel was observed within the right fuel tank.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered wreckage revealed that the fuselage was bent and buckled throughout. The canopy structure was separated, and the roll bar was partially displaced. The left and right wings and center section were separated from the airframe. The inboard 5 feet of the right wing was separated from the center section. The outboard portion of the right wing was separated. The right flap and aileron remained attached. The left wing outboard 5 feet was separated from the wing. A circular impression was observed on the outboard left wing tip. The left aileron separated, and the left flap remained attached. Both the left and right main landing gear were found in the extended position. The right elevator and horizontal stabilizer were separated at the root. The left elevator and horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, and rudder remained attached and intact.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to all primary flight control surfaces. Multiple separations were noted on the elevator and aileron control cables. All areas of separation were consistent with tension overload.

The left wing fuel tank was breached where the fuel quantity gauge was separated. The right wing fuel tank was intact. The right main, left main, and left reserve fuel screens were removed, and found to be free of debris.

The fuel selector handles in the forward and aft seats were intact, and remained attached to the fuel control junction, which was separated from the fuel selector valve. Both the forward and aft fuel selector handle position indicator plates moved freely around the fuel selector valve handle shaft. Both screws that secure either plate to the handle assembly were in place.

The fuel selector valve assembly located in the wing center section was intact, and appeared to be undamaged. All fuel lines were intact and secure to the fuel selector valve. The right wing fuel line was found connected to the fuel selector valve outlet port. The engine fuel supply line was found connected to the right fuel tank position of the fuel selector valve. The fuel selector valve was removed and disassembled. The valve was observed in the left tank position, slightly away from the detent. The internal cork was intact and undamaged. The fuel selector valve gasket was intact. It was noted that if the right wing fuel tank line and the engine supply fuel line were installed as noted above, when the fuel selector valve was positioned to either the left main or left reserve positions, no fuel would be able to flow from the left fuel tank to the engine; however, fuel would flow from the left fuel tank to the right fuel tank. If the selector valve was positioned in the right fuel tank position, fuel would flow to the engine supply line. The left and right fuel vent lines were free of debris.

Residual fuel was removed from the left and right fuel tanks. The fuel was free of debris, and blue in color.

Throttle, mixture, propeller, and wobble pump control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the firewall. The forward seat primer was in the full in position, however, it was unlocked. It was not determined when or how the primer became unlocked.

Examination of the Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN engine, serial number ZP-101599, revealed that it was partially attached to the fuselage via its engine mounts and controls. All accessories remained attached to the engine. The forward spark plugs were removed, and rotational continuity was established throughout the engine and valve train. Thumb compression was obtained on all nine cylinders. The carburetor was removed from the engine, and exhibited impact damage to the float bowl. The throttle plates were observed in the "open" position. The engine driven fuel pump was removed from the engine, and the drive shaft rotated freely by hand.

The induction and exhaust system was impact damaged. No evidence of sooting was observed within the exhaust.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. One blade was bent aft about 90 degrees from the blade root. The outboard tip of the propeller blade was bent outward. The opposing blade was bent aft, and slightly twisted from midspan.

On August 4, 2014, the left and right magnetos were further examined and installed on a test bench. Both magnetos produced spark on all posts, and were unremarkable.

On December 19, 2014, the carburetor was further examined and partially disassembled by the NTSB IIC. The carburetor exhibited impact damage, with one of the two float bowl housings breached. One of the two metal carburetor floats was separated and crushed, consistent with impact damage. The other metal float remained intact and undamaged; however, it contained an unmeasured amount of liquid internally. No visible evidence of leakage from the float was observed. The venturies and the throttle plates were found intact. The fuel screen was free of debris.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Front Seat Pilot

The Pierce County Coroner conducted an autopsy on the front seat pilot on June 5, 2014. The medical examiner determined that the cause of death was "multiple blunt force injuries."

The cardiovascular exam identified a 450-gram heart; the average weight for heart of a man his weight is 362 grams (range 275-478 grams). The report identifies multifocal calcified atherosclerosis ranging between 30-50 percent in each of the three main coronary vessels.

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the front seat pilot. According to CAMI's report, carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and drugs were tested, and had positive results for 13 ug/ml acetaminophen detected in urine, and unspecified amounts of rosuvastatin detected in urine and liver.

According to FAA records, the airline transport pilot reported using lisinopril, rosuvastatin, and ezetimibe. Lisinopril is a blood pressure medication marked under a number of names including Zestril. Rosuvastatin and ezetimibe are cholesterol lowering medications marketed as Crestor and Zetia respectively. The pilot reported high blood pressure and elevated lipids treated with the aforementioned medications. Acetaminophen is a pain reliever marked under many names including Tylenol.

Rear Seat Pilot

The Pierce County Coroner conducted an autopsy on the rear seat pilot on June 5, 2014. The medical examiner determined that the cause of death was "multiple blunt force injuries."

CAMI, performed toxicology tests on the rear seat pilot. According to CAMI's report, carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and drugs were tested, and had positive results for unspecified amounts of desmethylsertraline detected in urine and blood (heart), unspecified amounts of salicylate detected in urine, 0.203 ug/ml sertraline detected in blood (heart), and unspecified amounts of sertraline detected in urine.

Review of FAA records, the airline transport pilot rated passenger reported using simvastatin, a cholesterol lowering medications marketed as Zocor. He reported a history of a retained kidney stone that was reported to be non-operative and stable. According to an interview with the pilot's wife by the NTSB IIC, the passenger had started taking an antidepressant about 2 months prior to the accident, and on the day of the accident he appeared "pretty happy."

According to the Pierce County Medical Examiner autopsy report, the cardiovascular exam identified a 310-gram heart; the average weight for the heart of a man his weight is 317 grams (range 240-419 grams). The report identifies multifocal calcified atherosclerosis greater than 50 percent in each of the three main coronary vessels, with 80 percent occlusion middle aspect of the left anterior descending artery. The report noted that the heart muscle was without evidence of a new or old infarct.

Salicylate is the primary metabolite of aspirin, a pain reliever also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past. Sertraline is an antidepressant also marketed as Zoloft.

Beech C23 Sundowner, N6697Y: Accident occurred May 23, 2016 in Waianae, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA119
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 23, 2016 in Waianae, HI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/25/2017
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N6697Y
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, during the climb-to-cruise portion of the cross-country interisland flight over open ocean water, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot applied carburetor heat, which resolved the engine roughness. The pilot decided to continue his flight. As the flight approached his destination, the engine began running roughly again, accompanied by a significant loss of engine rpm. The pilot applied carburetor heat and adjusted the mixture, but the engine power was not restored. He then ditched the airplane into the water just offshore of the island. The airplane wreckage was recovered from the water 3 days after the accident, and it had sustained significant damage from tidal forces. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Weather conditions in the area at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of carburetor icing at glide and cruise power and serious carburetor icing at glide power. If the pilot had either kept the carburetor heat on or applied it earlier, the loss of engine power and subsequent ditching could have been avoided.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power during cruise flight due to carburetor icing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s delay in applying carburetor heat during flight while operating in an area conducive to carburetor icing.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6697Y

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA119
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 23, 2016 in Waianae, HI
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N6697Y
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 23, 2016, about 1137 Hawaiian standard time, A Beech C23, N6697Y, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent ditching within the open waters of the Pacific Ocean near Waianae, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and his passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from the Lihue Airport, Lihue, Hawaii, about 20 minutes prior to the accident, with an intended destination of Kalaeloa Airport, Kapolei, Hawaii.

The pilot reported that during the climb to cruise portion of the flight, the engine began to run rough. The pilot applied carburetor heat, which resolved the roughness, and he continued his climb to 5,500 feet mean sea level. As the flight was approaching the shores of Oahu Island, the engine began running rough in addition to a reduction of engine rpm to about 1,700. The pilot applied carburetor heat and adjusted the mixture, however, was unsuccessful at restoring engine power. The pilot initiated a forced landing into the ocean waters just off shore of the island of Oahu.

The airplane came to rest nose low partially submerged within about 20 feet of water, about 50 to 75 feet from the shoreline. Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the forward portion of the fuselage was damaged. The wreckage was recovered from the water three days after the accident. Following removal from the water, the engine was rinsed with fresh water and subsequently filled with diesel fuel in an attempt to preserve the engine.

Examination of the recovered airplane on June 30, 2016, revealed that it was mostly fragmented into multiple pieces from the ocean tidal action. The engine remained attached to the firewall structure. Corrosion was observed throughout the engine and firewall. The carburetor was separated from its mounts. The magnetos and fuel pump remained secured to their mounting pads. The bottom spark plugs were removed and exhibited corrosion and debris consistent with ocean water and salt. The magnetos were removed. Partial rotational continuity was obtained when the propeller was rotated about ¼ of a turn and mechanical continuity was obtained at the rear of the engine. The right magneto drive shaft rotated however did not produce spark at the lead terminals. Disassembly of the magneto was not performed due to the corrosion on the cap bolts. The left magneto drive shaft would not rotate by hand. Disassembly of the magneto was not performed due to the corrosion on the cap bolts.

The carburetor was removed and disassembled for inspection. The internal float was intact and the needle valve was intact. A significant amount of salt and other ocean vegetation debris was observed throughout the float bowl and screen.

The right side exhaust remained partially attached to cylinders one and three. No nuts were observed on the cylinder number one exhaust mount and only one nut remained attached to the cylinder number three cylinder exhaust mount. It could not be determined if the missing nuts were displaced prior to the accident or during salvage and subsequent engine preservation methods. No evidence of any preexisting anomalies that would have precluded normal operation and production of power was observed.


The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) CE-09-35 on June 30, 2009, regarding carburetor ice prevention. The conditions encountered in this accident (ambient temperature 84 degrees F, dew point 63 degrees F) were in the area of icing at glide and cruise power, and in the area of serious icing at glide power.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA119

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 23, 2016 in Waianae, HI
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N6697Y
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 23, 2016, about 1137 Hawaiian standard time, a Beech C23, N6697Y, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent ditching within the open waters of the Pacific Ocean near Waianae, Hawaii. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and his passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from the Lihue Airport, Lihue, Hawaii, about 20 minutes prior to the accident, with an intended destination of Kalaeloa Airport, Kapolei, Hawaii.

The pilot reported that during the climb to cruise portion of the flight, the engine began to run rough. The pilot applied carburetor heat, which resolved the roughness, and he continued his climb to 5,500 feet mean sea level. As the flight was approaching the shores of Oahu Island, the engine began running rough in addition to a reduction of engine rpm to about 1,700. The pilot applied carburetor heat and adjusted the mixture, however, was unsuccessful at restoring engine power. The pilot initiated a forced landing into the ocean waters just off shore of the island of Oahu.

The airplane came to rest nose low partially submerged within about 20 feet of water, about 50 to 75 feet from the shoreline. Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the forward portion of the fuselage was damaged. The wreckage was recovered from the water on May 26 and has been moved to a secure location for further examination.


Eric Kawamoto





MAKAHA, OAHU (HawaiiNewsNow) -  Eric Kawamoto and his wife were headed back to Honolulu on Monday in their small airplane when they suddenly encountered engine problems.

They were just over Makaha at the time, and one of Kawamoto's first thoughts was that the didn't want to crash into people on the sand. So he turned and dove straight into the water.

“I actually had full power coming out at 3,500 feet and then it just … slowed down to where it couldn’t sustain altitude,” Kawamoto told Hawaii News Now, in a live interview on Wednesday morning.

Kawamoto returned to Makaha Beach Park on Wednesday morning, shortly before crews began salvage operations for the single-engine Beechcraft Sundowner registered to Kawamoto and his wife, Leslie.

He said that he initially thought he might make it to Kalaeloa airport, but quickly realized the plane was going down. The plane crashed about 40 yards off Makaha. 

“The plane floated for a little bit, and when it finally went under, we just jumped off and started swimming to shore,” Kawamoto said.

Both suffered minor injuries and were taken to the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center and later transferred to the Queen’s Medical Center.

When asked what was going through his mind at the time, Kawamoto added that he wasn’t fearful of death, but rather the extent of the injuries he would have.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are still investigating the crash.

Story and video:   http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com




Beech C23 Sundowner experienced engine trouble while inbound to Honolulu International Airport and landed just off of Makaha Beach.




A single-engine Beechcraft Sundowner reportedly experienced engine trouble while inbound to Honolulu airport this morning and made an emergency water landing just off Makaha Beach.

The two people on board, a 56-year-old man and a 52-year-old woman, both of Hawaii, sustained minor injuries.

Both were spotted wearing flotation-vests and clinging to a wing of the plane shortly before it sank into a surfing area known as Charlie’s Reef, said Shayne Enright, a spokeswoman for the city Emergency Services Department.

Two lifeguards spotted the aircraft’s tail jutting from the reef’s waters at about 11:20 a.m., and swam to the scene — about 50 yards from shore. Shortly thereafter, a “Good Samaritan” Jet Ski operator arrived at the scene and carried all four to Makaha Beach Park, Enright said.

Responding paramedics treated the man and woman for abrasions and transported them to a hospital in stable condition.

Ocean Safety personnel are now monitoring the crash area, checking for debris and have install equipment to address a potential oil spill.

There were no swimmers in the area at the time of the crash, Enright said.

At least a few fishermen were in the area, however.

Robby Oliveros, 18, and his cousin, Austin Inabata, 21, were fishing off the shore nearby when they were warned that an airplane was about to crash.

“All of a sudden, a fisherman right next to us said, ‘head’s up, there’s a plane coming,’ and we looked up,” Oliveros said. “Then the plane was coming toward us and it took a left and it headed toward Makaha Beach. It just started gliding down into the water. It just nearly missed shore.”

Oliveros posted a photo on Twitter showing only the tail of the aircraft sticking out of the water.

“It actually came in nice and slow and looked like nothing was wrong with the plane,” Oliveros said. “From what I witnessed, it just looked like it ran out of gas or something, or maybe an engine failure.”

The plane was “quiet” as it descended and “just made a big splash. The plane was just floating and then the guy got out and he was standing on his plane,” Oliveros said.

The plane sank in water that Oliveros estimated is 20 to 30 feet deep.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Enright said city officials were told that the couple on the plane are from Oahu and that the flight originated on Kauai

The crash was the second involving a small plane in Hawaii today. Earlier this morning, a skydiving tour plane crashed near Port Allen Airport on Kauai, killing the five people on board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.staradvertiser.com



Ocean Safety personnel brought two people to shore that were in an aircraft that went down in waters about 100 yards offshore of the Maili side of Makaha Beach.

The incident happened about 11:30 a.m. Monday.

The FAA reports that a single-engine Beechcraft Sundowner, tail number N6697Y, reportedly experienced engine trouble while inbound to Honolulu International Airport.

The pilot landed the plane on the water.

Boater Anthony Leon saw the plane in the water.

“When we looked over, you can see it. It was still sitting on top of the water,” he told KHON2. “Then all of a sudden, it started going down, so we pulled everyone back into the boat and then we went over there. An off-duty lifeguard was out on his Jet Ski and he pulled up right at the same time as we did. He was able to get a lot closer, so he went and grabbed the two people — they were on some sort of flotation device — and he pulled them both up on the ski.”

The two people on board sustained minor injuries, according to the FAA.

The FAA and NTSB will investigate.

Story and video:  http://khon2.com
















MAKAHA, OAHU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

An aircraft crashed about 30 yards off Makaha Beach Park on Monday.

There were no reports of serious injuries. Two patients were transported to the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center.

The crash is the second of an aircraft in the islands Monday. On Kauai, five people were killed when a Skydive Hawaii plane crashed near Port Allen Airport.

Twitter user Robby Oliveros said he was fishing on shore when he saw the plane go down.

He subsequently tweeted that he believed the passengers and pilot on board the plane were OK.

Original article can be found here: http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com

Cessna 182H Skylane, SkyDive Kauai - D & J Air Adventures, N2007X: Fatal accident occurred May 23, 2016 near Port Allen Airport (PHPA), Hanapepe, Hawaii

D & J AIR ADVENTURES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2007X 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Honolulu FSDO-13

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 23, 2016 in Hanapepe, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N2007X
Injuries: 5 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 23, 2016 about 0922 Hawaiian standard time, a Cessna 182H, N2007X, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Port Allen (PAK), Hanapepe, Hawaii. The pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, D & J Air Adventures, Inc., as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 flight as a part of the skydiving flight operation. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan filed. The local flight originated from PAK at about 0921.

Multiple witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff, about 150 feet above ground level, the airplane made a sudden right turn, descended, and impacted terrain. A post crash fire ensued. 

After the on-site documentation, the wreckage was recovered to a secured facility for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

In this 2015 photo provided by Laura Bettis, her son Marshall Cabe, right, takes a self-portrait of himself and his brother Phillip Cabe in Houston, Texas. The brothers were among five killed in a Hawaii plane crash in May. They were about to go skydiving when the single-engine plane crashed soon after takeoff. Their parents are suing the skydiving tour company. The lawsuit was filed Monday, Aug. 8, 2016, so that the parents can find out why the plane's engine failed.


HONOLULU (AP) — The parents of two Oklahoma brothers who were among five people killed in a Hawaii plane crash filed a negligence lawsuit Monday against the skydiving company that owned the single-engine aircraft.

Marshall and Phillip Cabe were about to go skydiving in May when the Cessna crashed and burned soon after taking off from a Kauai airport.

"This lawsuit is going to hopefully find out why the engine failed," said Honolulu attorney Rick Fried, who filed the case in state court against D&J Adventures Inc.

Company owner David Timko declined to comment.

Pilot Damien Horan and skydiving instructors Enzo Amitrano and Wayne Rose also died in the crash.

Witnesses told National Transportation Safety Board investigators the plane was 150 feet in the air when it made a sudden right turn, descended and hit the ground.

The brothers had both graduated from college recently, and their father Michael Cabe was giving them the joint skydiving trip as a present, Fried said.

The father, a general contractor on Kauai, ran to the burning wreckage and tried to pull them out while administering CPR.

Marshall Cabe, 25, was an athlete who played rugby, soccer and softball, Fried said. His brother Phillip Cabe, 27, was an artist who painted and played piano and guitar. He was in the Air National Guard and had deployed to the Middle East.

The brothers graduated from Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma, in December.

They had a close bond, their mother Laura Bettis, a bank manager in Oklahoma, said through tears.

"They were just out of college. They had their whole lives ahead of them," Fried said. "The father witnessing this.  You can't imagine what he went through having seen that. It was just horrific."


Source:  http://www.dailyprogress.com




HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Three former Skydive Kauai pilots said they were concerned about the airworthiness of the plane that crashed Monday just after takeoff, killing all five people on board.

"I didn't feel comfortable flying that plane myself," said one pilot.

Two of the pilots said they quit rather than go up in the 51-year-old plane again. The third said he left Skydive Kauai in 2012 when he asked to see the plane's maintenance logs and was fired.

Hawaii News Now granted the three pilots anonymity.

The pilot who said he was fired said that he had experienced a minor maintenance issue with the airplane and lost oil pressure in the engine.

"Luckily, I was on the ground," he said.

The pilot said Skydive Kauai's owner subsequently refused to show him the maintenance log books for the aircraft. "It kind of made me wonder something was going on with the airplane," he said.

Skydive Kauai owner David Timko, who has headed the company since 2005, said the company has a "perfect safety record."

The plane that crashed Monday had no prior incidents in the last 11 years.

Authorities said the Cessna 182H had just taken off about 9:30 a.m. Monday when it ran into trouble. A witness said he could hear the engine sputtering, and saw the plane beginning to turn back toward the airport when the engines cut out and the aircraft burst into flames.

On board were two brothers from Oklahoma who were to skydive, two tandem skydive instructors, and a pilot.

The NTSB is investigating the crash.

Attorney Rick Fried, who has handled a number of wrongful death lawsuits over plane crashes, said the maintenance records of the aircraft will be a focus of the federal investigation that's now underway.

"With the severity of the incident, I think they'll look at all that very closely, he said.


http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com



Damien Jimmy Horan

An Irish pilot who was among five people killed in a horrific Hawaii plane crash died “doing what he loved”, friends have said.

Damien Jimmy Horan, from Tullamore in Co Offaly, was the pilot of a plane that was being used for skydivers when it crashed on Kauai island at around 9.30am local time on Monday.

Four other people also died in the tragedy- two Skydive Kauai instructors and two tandem jumpers- there were no survivors.

Sources said that the community in Tullamore are stunned as the news of 30-year-old Jimmy’s sudden death broke.

Local Cllr Thomas McKeigue told The Irish Mirror: “His family would be well-known in the area, his mother is an American woman and his family are stonecutters here for generations and would do gravestones.

“They would also be involved in a printing business and they have a small farm.

“They are a well-known, well-liked, decent and hard-working family. The whole community will rally around the Horan family.

“To lose a young person is always terrible, and in those circumstances and when he was in the full bloom of health and the full blooms of his life is just tragic.

“It’ll be a very hard blow for his family to take.”

Mr. Horan grew up in Offaly and is only recently thought to have moved to Hawaii, he also lived in Australia in recent years.

His devastated family were said to be making preparations to travel to Hawaii today.

Loved ones took to social media to pay tribute to Mr Horan.

One person said: “I can’t believe it, I’m still waiting for someone to call and tell me it was all just some kind of sick joke!

“Never have I met such a driven genuine bloke! My heart feels like it’s shattered into a million pieces you were such a great friend, you never judged me and you were always there to lend an ear when I needed you!

“I’ll forever cherish the times we had together! Until we meet again!”

Another added: “To a true gent, may you rest in peace.”

Meanwhile, eye witnesses told Hawaii News Now that the Cessna 182H model plane had just taken off when it ran into trouble.

Cisco Campos, a retired Air Force aircraft mechanic, said the plane was only feet off the ground when the engine started to sputter and fail.

He explained that the plane seemed to be turning back when it burst into flames.

He added that it looked like it “fell out of the sky” and exploded as it hit the ground.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating what happened.

The Department of Foreign Affairs confirmed that they are providing consular assistance to Mr Horan’s family.

Original article can be found here: http://www.irishmirror.ie

HANAPEPE — Four victims of Monday’s plane crash at the Port Allen Airport have been identified by friends and family.

Enzo Amitrano, Wayne Rose, and brothers Marshall and Phillip Cabe died in the accident. The pilot has not been identified.

Rose, 27, and Amitrano, 43, were skydiving instructors at Skydive Kauai. It is believed the men were tandem jumping with Marshall and Phillip Cabe, from Oklahoma, when the single-engine Cessna 182H crashed and burned about 9:30 a.m.

Since the crash, friends and family members have taken to social media to offer condolences and remember their loved ones.

Autumn Rose, Wayne Rose’s twin sister, was one of them.

“My twin brother was my hero. He was kind, genuine, smart, funny, fearless, and full of life and love. He chased his dreams and never settled for an ordinary life, and he encouraged everyone around him to do the same,” she said on Facebook. “Blue skies, fly free, brother, you handsome devil. I love you more than words could ever convey and I’ll carry you with me and make you proud every single day I’m blessed to walk the Earth.”

Rose said her brother was her rock.

“(He was) always there to support me in a way only a brother, and I suspect only a twin brother, can,” she said. “But then again, I think he did that for everyone he cared about. Each and every one of us was beyond blessed to know and love him.”

David Schmidt, who worked with Amitrano at the Bristol Renaissance Faire in Wisconsin, said in a Facebook post Amitrano was a gift to all who knew him.

“(He was) an amazingly gifted comic and a laid back, amazingly positive human being who I never heard a harsh word for anyone from,” he said. “More times than I can count, when my personal life was rough I asked myself “What would Enzo do?” He’d brush it off, and go out and make some people laugh. And I tried to do the same.”

Bill Freeze, who visited Kauai from Utah in February, met both men when he and his daughter went skydiving for their shared Leap Year birthdays. Amitrano and Rose were their instructors.
Freeze jumped twice with Amitrano, who had been skydiving for 20 years.

“I had trust in Enzo. He knew everything about the sport and Kauai,” Freeze said. “As others will tell you, skydiving can be scary and both of these men knew how to put you at ease by describing things as the plane climbed to 10,000 feet.

Freeze’s daughters, Amy and Camille, both jumped with Rose, who had been skydiving for about 10 years.

“I will always remember the smiles and laughs of these two guys,” Freeze said. “They loved life and I believe experienced it to the fullest every day by giving people thrills and memories that they would never forget.”

The Cabe brothers were recent graduates from Cameron University, in Lawton, Oklahoma. Marshall graduated fall 2015, while Phillip graduated spring 2016, said Elijay Morlett, a high school friend of Phillip, and a fellow member of the Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity.

“Marshall and Phillip were great men and outstanding fraternity brothers,” Morlett wrote to The Garden Island Tuesday. “They both would go out of their way to help others and were such positive individuals in so many lives.”

Aaron Walker, one of Marshall’s pledge brothers, said he was lively, charismatic, a jester and caring.

“He was the life of the party. He was good at every sport I seen him play. Soccer was his favorite, but we often played basketball together or ran football routes,” Walker said. “He has an incredible amount of determination and devotion. He was never scared to do anything or try anything new.”

Keysha Wilson, who was close with Phillip, will miss his contagious laugh and his down-to-Earth personality.

“He stood up for what he believed in and dreamed big,” Wilson said. “He left a positive impact on everyone with whom he crossed paths.”

Wilson added the brothers were a strong team.

“They both lit up a room whenever they walked in,” she said. “Their brotherly love was beautiful.”

A GoFundMe account has been started to help the family for funeral expenses. As of Tuesday afternoon, 40 people had donated $3,050.

An investigation by The National Transportation Safety Board and FAA continues into the cause of the crash. On Tuesday, investigators were reviewing records and the burned wreckage of the plane.

A witness said that shortly after the plane took off, the plane’s engine seemed to quit and catch fire. The plane appeared to be turning back when it went straight down and exploded as it hit the ground.

As of Tuesday, there were no records of accidents for the owner of the skydiving plane, which is registered under the name D&J Air Adventures. There also are no reports of enforcement actions against David Timko, the owner of Skydive Kauai.

Original article can be found here: http://thegardenisland.com








HANAPEPE, KAUAI (HawaiiNewsNow) -  Two brothers visiting from Oklahoma were among the five killed Monday when a Skydive Kauai plane crashed shortly after takeoff.

Marshall and Phillip Cabe had recently graduated from Cameron University in Lawton, Okla., HNN's sister station KSWO reported.

On social media, friends remembered the two as warm and outgoing. 

A friend of the brothers who set up a GoFundMe account said the two were "great people who will be genuinely missed."

The two were to tandem jump on the plane, which was also carrying two skydive instructors and a pilot.

Authorities said the Cessna 182H had just taken off about 9:30 a.m. Monday when it ran into trouble.

A witness said he could hear the engine sputtering, and saw the plane beginning to turn back toward the airport when the engine cut out and the aircraft burst into flames.

The plane "fell out of the sky," said Cisco Campos, who was fishing nearby when he saw the crash. He said it exploded on impact.

The crash sent plumes of heavy smoke into the air, and sparked a small brush fire. The NTSB is investigating the crash.

Also among those on the plane was skydiving instructor Enzo Amitrano, 43. His family described him as a fun and outgoing husband, brother and friend.

"He was just the kind of guy who was easy to get along with," said his brother, Marco. "He was really outgoing, super-friendly. It's like one of those really charismatic personalities that would draw people in. He was always the center of groups he was in."

Amitrano, who spent years working as a skydiving instructor in Chicago, is survived by his wife.

A fourth victim was identified by a family member as 27-year-old Wayne Rose, a tandem instructor at Skydive Kauai.

His twin sister, Autumn Rose, wrote on Facebook that he was “kind, genuine, smart, funny, fearless, and full of life and love.” He is also survived by his wife, Kaela Lynn Rose.

The identities of the victims have not been officially released.

Story and video:  http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com







 ‘An incredibly sad day’

HANAPEPE — Five people were killed in a plane crash at the Port Allen Airport Monday morning.

The single-engine Cessna 182H owned by Skydive Kauai had just taken off for skydive tour around 9:30 a.m. when it crashed and burned.

A pilot, two skydive instructors and two tandem jumpers were on board, according to a release from the Kauai Fire Department.

Four of the passengers were pronounced dead on the scene. A man was taken to Wilcox Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, according to a county release.

“My condolences go out to the family,” said Dave Timko, president of Skydive Kauai. He declined further comment.

The crash also resulted in a small brush fire, which was extinguished by KFD firefighters by 10:30 a.m., the release said.

The Kauai Police Department, the Salvation Army, the Kauai Red Cross and Life’s Bridges also responded.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to the victims’ family and loved ones. (Monday was) an incredibly sad day for our close-knit community here on Kauai,” Mayor Bernard Carvalho said.

The identities of the passengers have not been officially released.

Hawaii News Now identified one of the victims as Enzo Amitrano, 43, a skydiving instructor.

He and his wife, Shannon, were the subject of a March 8, 2011 story in The Garden Island after their home was damaged in a fire while they were on their honeymoon in the Kalalau Valley.

Friends were posting condolences on Facebook.

“My heart goes out to Shannon Bre Amitrano we lost a great man in Enzo,” posted a friend. “He will truly be missed. to Enzo who is fishing and skydiving in heaven. love you. god bless ur gonna be missed.

One witness quoted by news agencies said the plane had just taken off when the engine seemed to quit.

Cisco Campos said the plane looked like it was turning back to the airport when it caught fire, went straight down and crashed.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash.

There are several standards and regulations skydive operations have to adhere to, said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for FAA Pacific Division.

“Aircraft and pilots engaged in skydiving operations have to meet essentially the same standards as aircraft and pilots engaged in other charter operations,” he said. “For example, aircraft must be inspected at specific intervals, and pilots must have at least commercial pilot licenses.”

Other operating standards, as set out by FAA, include: displaying a maintenance log on every aircraft and a cockpit checklist.

Skydive Kauai is listed in FAA documents as D&J Air Adventures.

The company owns three Cessna’s, according to FAA records.

Skydive Kauai, which operates out of the Port Allen Airport, is the only skydiving company on the island, said Sue Kanoho, executive director of the Kauai Visitors Bureau.

It’s been operating for about eight years, she added.

“Our hearts and prayers are with those affected by this tragedy. We stand ready to assist Life’s Bridges with any needs they have in assisting the families,” Kanoho said.

In his book “The Ultimate Kauai Guidebook,” Andrew Doughty voiced concerns about the Port Allen location and the age of the aircraft.

Doughty, a pilot, who reviewed Skydive Kauai for his book, wrote that because Port Allen is a peninsula, it’s shifting winds can make landing difficult, he said.

The plane that crashed was reportedly built in 1965.

“Their plane doesn’t exactly inspire confidence,” the review from the “Ultimate Kauai Guidebook” reads.

But Doughty emphasized that his concerns were about location, not about the operations.

“Skydiving isn’t an unsafe thing,” he said. “This wasn’t a skydiving accident, it was an airplane crash.”

Bill Freeze, a Utah resident who went on a skydive tour through Skydive Kauai in February, said in his experience, all of the employees at Skydive Kauai were highly trained.

“We had a phenomenal experience,” he said. “They did everything by the book, and everything went exactly as planned.”

Original article can be found here: http://thegardenisland.com


Five people died after a skydiving tour plane crashed and caught fire in Hawaii, one of two plane crashes reported Monday in the islands.

It happened about 9:30 a.m. on the island of Kauai, the county fire department said. The pilot, two skydive instructors and two tandem jumpers were believed to be on the plane.

Four of them were pronounced dead at the crash site, just outside Port Allen Airport. One man was taken to Wilcox Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The group was believed to have been part of a tour operated by SkyDive Kauai, county firefighters said. The company offers tours from Port Allen.

SkyDive Kauai is listed in state documents as a trade name for D & J Air Adventures, which FAA records identify as the registered owner of the aircraft.

Company President David Timko said he didn't have any comment because the crash is under investigation. But he said he offers his condolences to the families of those killed.

Kauai firefighters said the identities of the dead haven't been released.

The National Transportation Safety Board will work with officials to determine the cause of the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration will also investigate.

The plane was a Cessna 182H Skylane, FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said. It's unclear what led to the crash.

A few hours later Monday off the coast of the island of Oahu, emergency responders took one person to a nearby hospital after a small aircraft crashed in the water off Makaha Beach Park.

County lifeguards brought two people to shore from a single engine aircraft that was about 30 yards off the coast, Honolulu Fire Department Capt. David Jenkins said.

The other person in the airplane wasn't injured, Honolulu Emergency Services Department spokeswoman Shayne Enright said.

State Department of Health data shows 20 visitors died in aircraft crashes in Hawaii from 2005 to 2014, including one skydiver. The others were killed in plane, helicopter and light sport aircraft crashes. Over the same period, 24 residents were killed in air crashes, including four skydivers.



Fire officials have confirmed that five adults have died in a plane crash that occurred just outside the fence line of Port Allen Airport, also known as Burns Field, in Hanapepe.

The FAA reports that the single-engine Cessna 182H crashed under unknown circumstances while taking off at approximately 9:30 a.m. The plane caught fire after crashing.

County officials say the plane was owned by Skydive Kauai, which operates out of the airport. It is believed that the company was conducting a skydive tour at the time of the crash and had a pilot, two skydive instructors and two tandem jumpers on board.

Four individuals were pronounced dead at the scene and one adult male was transported to Wilcox Hospital, where he was then pronounced dead.

The names of those involved in the crash have not yet been confirmed. An autopsy will be conducted this week.

Cisco Campos, who witnessed the crash, said the plane was just a couple of minutes into its flight after taking off when “all of a sudden, the engine just knocked off. They was trying to turn back in, but the thing went straight down. When it was going straight down, the flames came out of the engine.”

The crash resulted in a small brush fire in the surrounding area, which firefighters had extinguished by approximately 10:30 a.m. with the help of Air 1 and two water tenders provided by the Department of Public Works.

Representatives from the Hawaii Department of Transportation Airports Division was also on scene and the Kauai Civil Defense Agency assisted with the coordination of emergency response.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has been notified of the incident and will work with officials to help determine the cause of the crash.

Volunteers from Life’s Bridges, a grief counseling service, is assisting the families of the victims.

The public is advised to avoid the area.


Story and video:  http://khon2.com




Five people died after a sky-diving airplane crashed and burned while taking off from the Port Allen Airport, also known as Burns Field, in Hanapepe, this morning.

Kauai County officials said the “fiery plane crash” occurred at about 9:30 a.m. Four people were pronounced dead at the scene and one man was transported to Wilcox Hospital, where he died, a county official said.

Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said a single-engine Cessna 182H crashed while taking off at the Port Allen Airport at about 9:30 a.m. The plane caught fire after crashing, Gregor said.

The Cessna 182H can hold four passengers and a pilot. The plane was registered to Skydive Kauai, according to Kauai Fire Department officials.

The passengers were part of a skydiving tour. The pilot, two skydive instructors and two tandem jumpers were believed to be in the plane at the time of the crash, Kauai Fire Department officials said.

The plane is registered to a Koloa company called D & J Air Adventures. The company’s registered agent David Timko said Monday he didn’t have any comment because the crash is under investigation. But he says he offers his condolences to the families of those killed, according to the Associated Press.

The National Transportation Safety Board and FAA will be investigating the crash, officials said. An autopsy will be conducted this week, according to fire officials.

County officials said fire rescue crews and police were sent to the scene. The crash ignited a small brush fire in the crash area, which was extinguished by 10:30 a.m. Officials asked the public to stay away from the area.

According to a state website, Port Allen Airport is used for helicopter tours, ultralight aircraft traffic and skydiving, and is restricted to aircraft weighing less than 12,500 pounds.

The Kauai crash was the first of two plane accidents in Hawaii today; later this morning, a small plane with two people on board crashed in the waters off Makaha. No major injuries were reported in that crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.staradvertiser.com
















HANAPEPE, Hawaii -  Tragedy on Kauai.  Five people are dead after a fiery plane crash near the Port Allen Airport in Hanapepe on Monday.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash. 

Authorities allowed us to get a little bit closer to the crash site.  The corner of a burned out field is what remains of the plane that crashed Monday morning.  A tragedy not just for families of the victims, but also the entire community. 

The crash happened around 9:30 a.m.  The FAA says the circumstances behind the tragedy are not known.  An FAA spokesman told KITV the plane caught fire after it crashed not too far from the airport. 

Many people wiping tears as they waited for answers near the crash site.

"Whenever something like this happens, there's a pebble in the pond effect.  This is a small locally-owned business, and there's a tremendous amount of people who are just saddened by this," said Gina Kaulukukui from Life's Bridges.

The FAA says five people were on board -- four died at the scene; one died at the hospital. The Kaua'i Fire Department says a pilot, two skydiving instructors, and two tandem divers were believed to on board the Cessna 182H aircraft. 

"I don't know whether they were tourists or local, but it was the pilot and two tandem jumpers that were visitors and then the two staff from Skydive Kaua'i that they were jumping with," said Kauai Fire Chief Robert Westerman.

KSWO, the ABC affiliate in Texas and Oklahoma, is reporting that brothers Marshall and Philip Cabe were on the plane.  They are from Oklahoma.  Officials have not yet released the identities of the others who were on the plane.

This model is a single-engine, 4-seater plane.  FAA records show the plane is registered under "D&J Air Adventures."  The Kaua'i Fire Department says it was owned by Skydive Kaua'i.

It's going to take investigators some time to figure out exactly why this plane crashed.

Story and video:  http://www.kitv.com