Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Bellanca 17-31ATC Super Viking, N6708V: Incident occurred January 27, 2020 in Maricopa, Pinal County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed gear up.

Aircraft restoration service enhancements LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N6708V

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N6708V
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 17
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MARICOPA
State: ARIZONA

Piper PA-28R-201, N2103M: Incident occurred January 27, 2020 at Oakland International Airport (KOAK), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oaklands, California

Aircraft had a propeller strike on landing since gear did not fully extend.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2103M

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 02:13:00Z
Regis#: N2103M
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: OAKLAND
State: CALIFORNIA

Cirrus SR22T G6, N288WT: Accident occurred January 27, 2020 near Aspen Pitkin County Airport (KASE), Pitkin County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 

Aircraft reported equipment issue, deployed chute and crashed near airport. 

Noel Development LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N288WT

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 22:40:00Z
Regis#: N288WT
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: ASPEN
State: COLORADO


By the time Mountain Rescue Aspen volunteers made it within a half-mile of a small plane crash Monday evening near Lenado, it was pitch dark, snowing heavily and the wind was blowing hard.

Seven teams of rescuers — 25 people in all — had been breaking trail through waist-deep snow and were coming at the plane’s reported GPS coordinates at about 9,400 feet from different directions, Patrol Capt. Jesse Steindler of the Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office said Tuesday.

“At that point, we called the pilot (on his cellphone) and asked him to turn on as many lights (in the plane) as he could,” Steindler said. “It was those lights that attracted the rescuers to the location.”

The Cirrus SR22T G6 had been flying Monday afternoon from Aspen to Eagle County when, the pilot later told authorities, his instruments “went haywire” and indicated the plane’s engine was stalling, Steindler said. The pilot, 50-year-old Tyler Noel of Verona, Wisconsin, later said he didn’t think the plane was actually stalling, though he only had seconds to decide whether to deploy the plane’s parachute, which he did, he said.

The plane — which also was carrying Noel’s 49-year-old wife, Kristina — came down deep in the forest on a heavily wooded, long, steep mountainside, Steindler said.

“I can’t emphasize enough how steep it was,” he said.

The tower at the Aspen-Pitkin County airport notified emergency dispatchers of the crash at 3:25 p.m., which it said was about 5 miles north of Aspen in the Woody Creek area, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release. The Noels reported they were uninjured and sheltering inside the plane, though they were not equipped to spend the night in that condition, the release states.

“The rescuers reported that the aircraft was lodged on a very steep slope amidst a forest of pine trees,” according to the release.

The airplane’s parachute was tangled in the trees above the plane and was holding the aircraft in place and keeping it from sliding down the slope, Steindler said.

Rescuers, however, were able to extricate the couple, who were cold and suffering from wet gloves, from the plane without any issues. Mountain Rescue volunteers brought extra clothes, snowshoes, food and water for the Noels, then guided them out of the wilderness starting about 9:15 p.m., Steindler said.

The hike out took about three hours, he said.

“It was very difficult for Mountain Rescue just getting there, then getting back out again,” Steindler said.

A message left Tuesday for the Noels seeking comment was not returned.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.aspentimes.com

Piper PA-31-350 Chieftain, N606JS: Incident occurred January 15, 2020 at Benjamin Taisacan Manglona International Airport (PGRO), Rota Island, Northern Mariana Islands

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu

Aircraft initiated a go-around when first attempt to land with gear up.

Star Marianas Aviation School Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N606JS

Date: 15-JAN-20
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N606JS
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA31
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ROTA ISLAND
State: N MARIANA ISLANDS

Cessna 210L Centurion, N732GP: Accident occurred January 27, 2020 at John Murtha Johnstown-Cambria County Airport (KJST), Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aircraft landed gear collapsed and experienced a propeller strike.

Gulf Pop Aviation

https://registry.faa.gov/N732GP

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 19:54:00Z
Regis#: N732GP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: JOHNSTOWN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Beech C90 King Air, N73PH: Incident occurred January 27, 2020 at Memphis International Airport (KMEM), Shelby County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee

Aircraft struck a hawk on landing.

Bronson Air LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N73PH

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 20:46:00Z
Regis#: N73PH
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 90
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MEMPHIS
State: TENNESSEE

Aeropro CZ Aerotrek A220, N214K: Fatal accident occurred January 27, 2020 in Grafton, Taylor County, West Virginia



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston

Aircraft crashed in a wooded area for unknown reasons.

Rollison Light Sport Aircraft Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N214K

Date: 27-JAN-20
Time: 17:54:00Z
Regis#: N214K
Aircraft Make: AEROPRO
Aircraft Model: A220
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: EASTERN
State: WEST VIRGINIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 





UPDATE (1/29/2020 11:55 a.m.):

GRAFTON, W.Va. (WBOY) – The Taylor County Detachment of the West Virginia State Police has released the name of the deceased pilot of the plane that crashed in Taylor County on Monday.

According to state police, the man has been identified as Thomas Kaye, 67, of Haydenville, Massachusetts. Kaye was a neurosurgeon at Baystate Medical Center in Massachusetts, until he retired in 2018, according to a spokesman at the medical center.

The Taylor County Sheriff’s Office believes Kaye has just purchased the plane and was flying it home when the accident occurred.

UPDATE (1/28/20 2:20 p.m.):

New information is available in a plane crash January 27 in Taylor County that killed one person.

The plane involved is an Aeropro CZ A220 registered to Rollison Light Sport Aircraft, Inc., which is based out of Bloomfield, Indiana. The registration number is N214K. This is a two-seat, single-engine propeller airplane that is typically used for recreational purposes.

Federal officials are on scene to determine what happened in the crash and why, according to Adam Gerhardt, an air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.

One of the key pieces of the investigation involves determining if the four corners of the plane, the right and left wings, the nose and the tail, are at the accident site. Investigators are looking at the plane itself, the engine, the pilot and any challenges the pilot may have encountered and weather conditions at the time.

Investigators are working to determine what the weather conditions were like across the area to understand what the pilot encountered when the plane crashed.

According to Gerhardt, the plane left Indiana and made a refueling stop at the North Central West Virginia Airport in Bridgeport. The plane was then continuing on toward the Massachusetts area, although Gerhardt said it is uncertain which airport the pilot was flying to.

The plane’s direction of travel at the time of the crash is still under review, according to Gerhardt.

The plane was not equipped with a black box, and Gerhardt said it is not required to be. Investigators are looking for non-volatile memory, such as an iPad or GPS device, that could contain relevant data.

The NTSB and the Federal Aviation Administration will be on site for about three to five days. A recovery crew will take the airplane to Springfield, Tennessee to continue the investigation, Gerhardt said.

A preliminary report will be released in about 10 days. A final report will take between 12 and 18 months and will include the full factual and analysis and probable cause for the crash, according to Gerhardt.

The FAA is on site to assist the NTSB, with a focus on what regulatory items applied to the plane and to the flight. If there are any urgent safety recommendations, the two agencies can make any needed changes, said Gerhardt.


Gerhardt added that the whole reason for being on site is to prevent future accidents.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wboy.com



GRAFTON — An aircraft that crashed in Taylor County Monday afternoon was en route to Massachusetts from Indiana when the accident occurred, according to investigators.

The Aeropro CZ Model A220, described as a special light-sport aircraft, went down approximately 10 minutes after taking off from the North Central West Virginia Airport, where the pilot had stopped to refuel, according to National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson.

The accident occurred in Taylor County not far from the Marion County line in a wooded area near Valley Falls Road, according to a press release issued Monday evening by West Virginia State Police.

The pilot, who was the sole occupant of the plane, was killed, according to local law enforcement.

The identity of the deceased had not yet been released as of Tuesday afternoon, pending notification of next of kin, according to a representative of the West Virginia State Police.

The pilot was “not from this area,” said Taylor County Sheriff Terry Austin.

Along with State Police, first responders from Taylor and Marion counties responded to the accident scene on Monday afternoon.

The aircraft was “still smoldering with fire in the woods” when first responders arrived, according to the State Police press release.

NTSB investigators arrived at the “highly fragmented” crash scene around 8 a.m. Tuesday, according to Knudson.

North Central West Virginia Airport staff have been in contact with investigators and are assisting investigation efforts “anyway we can,” said North Central West Virginia Airport Director Rick Rock.

According to Rock, airport staff members interacted with the pilot and there was “nothing apparent” that was amiss at the time of the refueling.

“It’s a really unfortunate thing. Our hearts go out to the family and the first responders,” Rock said.

Investigators are not aware of any distress call from the pilot, nor did the pilot receive any air traffic control services, according to Knudson.

The pilot was flying under visual flight rules rather than instrument flight rules, and was therefore not required to have contact with air traffic control, he said.

An aircraft recovery company team is expected to arrive at the crash site on Wednesday, and on-site investigation and cleanup are expected to be completed by the afternoon, he said.

Preliminary radar data will also be used in the investigation, he said.

No eye or ear witnesses have yet come forward. Anyone who may have seen or heard the crash is asked to email witness@ntsb.gov.

A preliminary report on aircraft accidents is typically completed in the weeks following the crash, but a final report, including the cause and contributing factors, can take anywhere from 12 to 24 months to complete, Knudson said.


https://www.wvnews.com


A retired Baystate Medical Center neurosurgeon died Monday when he crashed his small private aircraft in a wooded section of West Virginia 10 miles south of the Pennsylvania line.

West Virginia state police identified the deceased as Thomas Kaye, 67, of the Haydenville section of Williamsburg, Massachusetts. He was the only occupant of the aircraft, according to WTAP news in Parkersburg, West Virginia.

He was killed Monday afternoon when his single-engine Aeropro A220 light-sport aircraft crashed in a wooded area near Grafton, West Virginia.

WVNews cites a National Transportation Safety Board official who said the plane was heading from Indiana to Massachusetts. It had stopped to refuel at North Central West Virginia Airport in Clarksburg, and then crashed around 10 minutes after resuming its flight.

Keith O’Connor, spokesman for Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, said Kaye worked at the hospital for nearly two decades as a neurosurgeon before he retired in 2018.

The crash is being investigated by West Virginia State Police and the NTSB.


https://www.masslive.com


TAYLOR COUNTY, West Virginia (WDTV) - UPDATE: 01/29/20 11:40 A.M.

West Virginia State Police have released the name of the man killed in a plane crash Monday.

Thomas Kaye, 67, of Haydenville, Massachusetts, was flying from Indiana to Massachusetts. He stopped at North Central West Virginia Airport to refuel shortly before crashing.

A NTSB spokesperson told 5 News investigators haven't found witnesses to the crash.

The debris field was “highly fragmented," Knudson said. The plane was an experimental Aeropro A220. Kaye did not send out a distress signal before crashing and didn't have air traffic control services like flight following, investigators learned.

NTSB crash investigators are expected to remain at the crash site until sometime Wednesday. A preliminary crash report could be finalized within one to two weeks, but the official investigation could take 12-24 months to complete.

Investigators want to talk to anyone who may have saw the plane crash. They should contact witness@NTSB.gov if they have information that could help the investigation.


https://www.wtap.com