Thursday, October 17, 2013

Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport (KEOS) T-37 Jet Restoration


 

NEOSHO, MO.--- An aircraft with the nickname "Tweety Bird" is getting its wings restored back to its original look with the help of Neosho volunteers. It's a Cessna T-37 Jet and it was once used as a military training aircraft. Local volunteers are working on putting the aircraft back together to display in front of the airport.

"I'm passionate about flying. I'm passionate about my airport. I want it to succeed and I want it to draw more people," said Steve Herrin, Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport Manager. 

Steve Herrin is the airport manager at the Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport and just one of the many volunteers helping to get the 1950's jet reassembled.

"We had it in crates and we had it in different boxes, so we had to get it out of the crates and boxes and get it all lined up with the different hardware that we need to reassemble it, and that's what we've done so far," said Herrin.

The city manager says the training jet has been at the Neosho airport for about a year.

"We got it transported from Premeir Turbines out there so that we could mount it out here at the city airport to display it in front of our airport for people to see," said Troy Royer, Neosho City Manager.

He's looking forward to seeing the plane back in one piece.

"I'm glade to see that it's getting put together and I will be very happy to see it mounted out there," said Royer.

The twin engine jet was a trainer attack type aircraft that was used in the United States Air Force as well as several other air forces around the world.

"They modified it to become a AT-37, which was an attack trainer aircraft and they actually had hard options to drop bombs and it was bigger engines and it was used to support the troops in Vietnam," said Herrin.

Herrin says it's a piece of history not just to the aviation family but for everyone.

"It will bring back memories of them, where they'll come out and want to bring their grandkids and so on, and everybody will get a kick out of seeing it," said Herrin.

Although saving history is important to Herrin and other volunteers, it's also vital to keep the younger generations involved in the aviation field.

"I want young people in on this and this will help do that, because young people will see this and think, 'wow, I could fly that.' I did. I started out here watching airplanes and ended up learning how to fly, we need the young people," said Herrin.

They're not sure when they'll be finished repairing the T-37. It all depends on the weather, but it is one of only 419 still in existence in the U.S.

Story and Video:    http://www.fourstateshomepage.com

Beechcraft Owners Said to Be Approaching Potential Bidder

Beechcraft Corp., the U.S. planemaker whose aircraft have trained military pilots since World War II, is for sale again, people with knowledge of the matter said.

Credit Suisse Group AG is contacting potential suitors on their interest in acquiring Beechcraft, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the discussions are private. Beechcraft may fetch about $1.5 billion, another person said. Cessna Aircraft parent Textron Inc. is among companies exploring a bid, said two of the people.

Beechcraft could be attractive to companies focused on smaller defense and general aviation aircraft after shedding debt from an earlier leveraged buyout and shutting a struggling jet unit, said Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with Teal Group, a Fairfax, Virginia-based consultant.

“You get military trainers, you get the world’s most popular turboprop aircraft,” Aboulafia said in a phone interview.

Slumping demand for private jets and curbs on U.S. defense spending led the company, formerly known as Hawker Beechcraft, to file for bankruptcy in May 2012. Negotiations to sell it for $1.79 billion to a Chinese buyer collapsed months later. Beechcraft exited court protection in February and has publicly said it’s selling Hawker assets to focus on propeller-driven and military planes.

‘Good fit’


At the right price, Beechcraft could be a good fit for Textron, whose holdings include Bell helicopters, military drones and Cessna aircraft, Textron CEO Scott Donnelly said during a July 2012 quarterly earnings call after the Chinese bid for Beechcraft was made public.

“I think some of the assets of the company are interesting and would be a good fit in our company and that we could do the right thing for their existing customers and our customers -- it would all work,” Donnelly said at the time.

Beechcraft’s twine-engine King Air turboprops would compliment Cessna’s single-engine Caravan line, especially after Beechcraft landed a $788 million order in August, said Brian Foley, who heads Brian Foley Associates, a Sparta, New Jersey consultant.

The King Air division is Beechcraft’s most valuable asset and biggest driver of its profits, Foley said in a phone interview.

“They practically rule the twin-engine general aviation market,” he said. “They have a very good brand, loyal customer following.”

A spokesman for Credit Suisse declined to comment. Nicole Alexander, a spokeswoman for Beechcraft, and David Sylvestre, a spokesman for Providence, Rhode Island-based Textron, both declined to comment.

Cessna, Bombardier


Beechcraft, based in Wichita, Kansas, is now controlled by its former creditors. Centerbridge Partners LP, Sankaty Advisors LLC and Angelo, Gordon & Co. are among the funds that own a combined stake of about 90 percent and took control following the bankruptcy, according to the company. Before bankruptcy, Hawker Beechcraft was owned by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Onex Corp. 


Negotiations to sell Hawker Beechcraft to Superior Aviation Beijing Co. ended in 2012 while the planemaker was reorganizing, partly because of questions about the Chinese company’s financing, people familiar with the process said at the time.
Recovery in Demand

Beechcraft, whose competitors include Canada’s Bombardier Inc. and Brazil’s Embraer SA, is now seeing a recovery in demand and estimates first-half deliveries rose 67 percent to 115 airplanes. King Air sales will help drive up revenue and earnings “materially” this year and the next, Standard & Poor’s said in April.

Signs of a recovery are also evident in worldwide aircraft shipments tracked by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, a trade group. Deliveries of multi-engine turboprops rose 71 percent in the first half of 2013 versus a year earlier and single-engine turboprop deliveries rose 3.8 percent. Piston-engine airplanes increased 16 percent, while business jet shipments fell 4.1 percent.

“We’ve already turned the corner,” said Foley, who described business jets as a lagging indicator for the sector.

Any deal involving Beechcraft’s defense assets being sold to non-U.S. suitors would be subject to a review from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S.

Beechcraft had previously announced plans to sell by the end of the year assets from its shuttered Hawker and Premier IA jet units, including certificates, spare parts and a manufacturing plant. Foley said he expects those assets to still be sold separately from the rest of the company.


Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.bloomberg.com

THE PLANE THAT DISAPPEARED: Search continues 32 years on - Cessna 210, VH-MDX, Barrington Tops - Australia

 

On Sunday, August 9, 1981, a Cessna 210 with five people on board disappeared over the Barrington Tops. 

The weather conditions were horrific and the terrain was some of the most rugged in the state.

No trace of the Cessna, VH-MDX,  has ever been found. Thirty-two years later, it remains Australia's only unsolved civil aviation incident. Today,  the search resumes.

Reports by Liz Tickner and Luke Horton.

It was 7.25pm on the Sunday when the little single-engine Cessna 210 – with its cream wings and fuselage and green trim – lost radio and radar contact over Craven, just south of Gloucester.

The pilot of VH-MDX, had just reported difficulties.

The plane was icing up badly and there was a possible fire in the cabin, its artificial horizon had also ceased functioning.

Conditions in which the aircraft went down were shocking and would severely hamper the search operation over the following days.

Snow had fallen across the Barringtons, the winds were bitter, and cloud and mist hung over the peaks of the heavily forested mountains.

Taree police reported that fixed-wing aircraft involved in the search, which had centered on the Berrico Tops, south-west of Gloucester, were icing up and might have to withdraw.

Five fixed-wing aircraft, including one from Maitland, three helicopters, 12 Taree Division police, the Newcastle Police Rescue Squad, State Emergency Services personnel and about 20 civilians were involved in the huge operation.

These numbers would increase in the following days – along with the fears that all five men had perished if not on impact, then as a result of the sub-zero conditions – to include 19 aircraft .

On board the missing Bankstown-based Cessna – which belonged to the Marrickville firm Canopy Manufacturing but was on a private flight – were the pilot Michael Hutchins, 52, and his four passengers, (pictured) Inspector Kenneth Price, 54, of Sydney Water Police, and Noel Wildash, 40, Philip Pembroke, 43, and Rhett Bosler all of Sydney.

They were on their way home to Sydney after a weekend fishing trip in Queensland when the crash occurred.

As the Mercury reported, it was unlikely that they would have been dressed in any clothing “that would even offer token resistance to the severe winter conditions in which their aircraft disappeared.”

SES began looking for the wreckage that night, visiting Forestry Commission lookout towers in the vicinity, and calling on the public to come forward if they had perhaps heard the crash or spotted a fire.

Over the following days, hopes were raised – and dashed – as the search continued.

On August 11, 1981, the Maitland Mercury reported that an aircraft wreck near Carey’s Peak – one of at least six other plane crashes in the Gloucester-Barrington Tops area since World War II – had been mistaken for the missing Cessna.

On August 14-15, the paper said that a Nomad transport plane reported sighting broken trees to the west of Mount Cockcrowe, north of Chichester Dam.

And on August 17, another report stated that a suspected oil slick on Chichester Dam was revealed to be some sort of fungi.

They were just three of a number of “leads” – all that over time would amount to nothing.

Mercury journalist Bob Baird joined in the search.

In the edition of August 12 Baird wrote: “I can’t think of a more inhospitable or lonely place in this state to crash in an aircraft, be lost, or die.”

“The feature which struck me most was the basic sameness of the region – the wave after wave of straight up and down hills, the lack of real landmarks, the incredible density of the scrub and forest, the colour only broken by the mottling of cloud,” he said.

At dusk on Monday, August 17, 1981, the week-long search for the Cessna and its occupants was suspended.

Rhett Bosler, a real estate broker from Drummoyne, was only 33 when he met his fate.

Speaking to the Mercury this week from his home in Oran Park, Rhett’s first cousin Ian Bosler said Rhett had only been married to his wife Gail for six months at the time of the crash.

“I had two daughters so we were looking to Rhett and Gail to produce a son to keep the family name going on; but that was not to be,” Ian said.

A memorial service was held for Rhett in Vaucluse; his parents, Clive and Anne, died years later without ever having closure on their son’s death.

Thirty-two years after the crash, police and emergency services, will today commence one final search, a three-day multi agency search and rescue exercise in an isolated area within the Barrington Tops National Park.

More than 150 police and emergency service personnel will take part in the exercise including NSW Police Rescue Squad, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Fire and Rescue NSW, NSW Volunteer Rescue Association, Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad, Ambulance Service of NSW, NSW Rural Fire Service, Police Aviation Support Branch and Marine Area Command, and WYCEN (Wireless Institute Civil Emergency Network).

Superintendent Peter Thurtell, from Manning Great Lakes Local Area Command and Operation Wittenoom Commander said new technology and an unbreakable commitment to find closure for the families of those involved had rekindled the latest effort.

“Over the years there have been a number of searches but what makes this one different is that we have spoken to one of the original radar controllers to get a better appreciation of what was happening and perhaps a more detailed idea of where the plane was heading,” Superintendent Thurtell said.

“We have also been working with those members of the community who have dedicated many years in bushwalking and trying to locate the wreckage and drawing upon their experience to identify where we haven’t searched, and that could be the difference.”

“And with the involvement of online and digital mapping, and cross referencing previous search areas, we believe we have narrowed the scope.”

“We are under no illusion about what we are up against. We know the terrain is rugged, covered by thick canopy where no-one has perhaps ever been, but it will test us and if nothing else will enhance our capability.

Superintendent Thurtell said that the families of the men have been contacted about the search.

“We don’t want to give false hope but we had to let the families know what we were doing and they appreciate the effort.”

“If we can provide closure then that would be extremely satisfying, but if not at least we can enhance our ability to conduct extreme searches with full time operatives and volunteers, and that’s something the public can have confidence in,” he said.

CLAIRVOYANT: I HAD A VISION OF PLANE AND SURVIVORS

Days after the Cessna's crash a Brisbane clairvoyant offered to help police in their search claiming she had a "vision" of the plane - and two survivors.

The medium, known as Zandra Marie, told police she had seen the plane in a vertical position, as if hanging in trees.

According to a report in the Maitland Mercury on August 14-15, 1981, Zandra Marie believed the plane was six to 10 miles on the Queensland side of the main search area in the Gloucester- Barrington Tops region.

"Police say Zandra Marie is well known as a successful professional medium, and predicted the attempt to assassinate President Reagan," the Mercury reported.

A police spokesman told the Mercury they were taking her vision seriously and that they would leave no stone unturned in their attempts to trace the plane.

Story and Photo:  http://www.maitlandmercury.com.au 


 Last ditch effort? 

 A LARGE-scale search involving 150 emergency service personnel begins today in an isolated area of the Barrington Tops National Park in the hope of finding a light plane which went missing 32 years ago with five men on board.

'Project Wittenoom' has been several months in the planning and hopes to use new information and new technologies to locate the plane which went missing shortly before 8pm on August 9, 1981, somewhere over the Barrington Tops.

At 5.02pm that afternoon, the light plane VH MDX carrying the pilot, Michael Hutchins, and his passengers, NSW police superintendent Ken Price, Rhett Bosler, Noel Wildash and Phillip Pembroke, began a three hour flight from Coolangatta to Bankstown Airport.

It was last heard from when it struck bad weather over the Barrington Tops.

Numerous searches have taken place over the years but still the bodies of the five men on board have never been recovered, nor has any trace of the wreckage been found.

But now a joint-agency project involving NSW Police Rescue, the air force, NSW Ambulance, the SES, RFS, National Parks and Wildlife Service, VRA and the Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad is hoping it can succeed where so many previous attempts to find the missing plane have failed.

"The Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad was involved in the original search for the plane in 1981," member Glenn Horrocks said in a new YouTube video about Project Wittenoom.

"What's different about this particular search is Police Rescue has come onboard which has allowed us to research evidence behind the crash in much greater detail than ever before.

"The man who will be coordinating Project Wittenoom is the State commander of the Police Rescue and Bomb Disposal Unit Brenton Charlton.

Commander Charlton contacted the Gloucester Advocate in April seeking more information about the missing plane after the paper published several articles with local aviation historian and VH-MDX expert Don Readford.

"We've conducted two recos (reconnaissance missions) in the past couple of months mainly to address safety and ease of access concerns," he said.

"Project Wittenoom has two main objectives. The first is closure for the families of the five missing souls still onboard the aircraft and the second is to exercise, coordinate and test all our LandSAR (Land Search and Rescue) capabilities in a remote area.

"Corporal Mark Nolan, a pilot in the Australian Army, has also been heavily involved in the effort to find VH-MDX.

He said new information discovered in the National Archives earlier this year had given members involved in Project Wittenoom renewed optimism that the plane could be located.

"The information we discovered was new information and unreleased information that had been kept in the National Archives," he said.

"Using that information and tools such as Lidar, which was not available during the original search, we believe we have a better than average chance of discovering the location of the aircraft."

Mr Horrocks said the members of Project Wittenoom had also been using Google Earth to help track the plane's final flight path.

"We use Google Earth to visualize what the flight path may have been over the ground, which means we can have a look at how the altitude is tracking against the ground," he said.

"And that has allowed us to ... really limit the area down to where the plane is likely to be."

Damian Hofman, from the NSW SES, said those involved in the ground search for the plane would need to be in peak physical condition.

"We're looking for people with experience in overnight walking," he said.

"They need a high level of fitness and preferably some level of medical training. The terrain we will be searching in is extreme.

"The ABC has already recorded a significant amount of footage as part of Project Wittenoom, which it hopes to make into a documentary.

A short five-minute film of the progress so far is now available on YouTube.

The search will be undertaken from today until Monday.

Story and Photo:  http://www.winghamchronicle.com.au

Airplane Gov. Dave Heineman wanted sold by University of Nebraska Foundation

The much deliberated and debated airplane Gov. Dave Heineman wanted the state to purchase from the University of Nebraska Foundation has taken flight.

The foundation put the plane up for sale last summer after the Legislature held up the sale for more study. The sale to an out-of-state buyer closed Sept. 30, said foundation spokeswoman Dorothy Endacott.

"It was sold to a private individual, and we are not releasing further details about the buyer or the sale price," she said.

The Beechcraft King Air B200, manufactured in 2001, was listed on the open market July 1, after the state's lease ran out June 30 and the state opted not to sign a new one.

During the 2013 legislative session, the Appropriations Committee first said it would not allow for deficit spending to buy the plane from the foundation for about $2.165 million. Then the committee changed its mind and put it in the budget.

When the issue got to the full Legislature, senators said they wanted to hold off on buying the plane and asked for a study to determine the best option for carrying the governor and other state agency personnel across the vast open spaces of Nebraska.

While the Legislature conducted that study, the foundation offered a new $10,000-per-month lease to the state to continue using the plane, but no money was set aside in the budget, Endacott said.

The foundation didn't want to wait indefinitely, so it listed the one-owner turboprop plane with a broker. The list price was $2.15 million.

Heineman now uses the state's 1982 Piper Cheyenne when needed, as he did Thursday for his trip to Kearney for a news conference. He had no comment Thursday on the airplane's sale.

The foundation had given the state an exclusive opportunity to buy the plane last year, because the state was its biggest user.

Omaha Sen. Bob Krist, an Air Force veteran who also is a pilot, said it was great for the foundation that the plane was sold, but he had no remorse for the state's missed opportunity.

"I think that if they were able to recoup the money that they wanted to, out of their airplane, I think that's a great thing," he said.

The first phase of the $4,800 study by independent appraiser Conklin and de Decker commissioned by the Legislature showed the fair market value of the plane was closer to $1.98 million.

Krist said that even though the foundation offered it to the state at above fair market value, there were aspects of the plane purchase that were attractive.

Those aspects that were unattractive were the plane's 10-year-old electronic systems, such as communications, navigation and monitoring. Those upgrades would have cost another $500,000. And the engines were going to require overhauls in the next year or so, depending on the hours flown, for another $500,000 to $750,000.

It would make more sense to buy a new plane, under warranty, with no hidden costs of a used plane, he said. Like a King Air C90, for $3.8 million up front and about $1.2 million per year to operate.

"All the numbers point to us buying a brand-new, little bit smaller airplane, but still capable of doing everything the state needs to do," he said. "It's cheaper by a substantial amount over a 20-year period of time, and particularly in the first six years."

The study showed that for security and emergency management, owning the plane -- not leasing or renting trip-by-trip -- is the best option.

The study said the state would need a plane with two turbine engines for safety and reliability; two pilots, capable of flying five to seven passengers anywhere in Nebraska and the neighboring states using public-use airports; and a secure environment for senior officials. The state also would want it to be available immediately for state emergencies.

Read more and photo:  http://journalstar.com

Report: Air show cancellation cost MCAS Miramar $600K - Show canceled due to federal government shutdown

SAN DIEGO - The Defense Department's last-minute decision to cancel this year's Miramar Air Show because of the federal government shutdown cost the local Marine Corps base at least $600,000, according to preliminary figures.

Marine Corps Air Station Miramar was scheduled to host this year's two- day show on Oct. 4 but canceled it Oct. 3 even though civilian performers contracted for the show had already arrived in town or were en route, tickets were sold, and tents and other equipment were in place.

The decision left the base holding the bag for at least $600,000 in contract reimbursements for performers and vendors, Miramar officials told U-T San Diego.

"Most of the big contracts have been covered but there are smaller contracts still being worked out," Miramar spokesman Marine Capt. Anton Semelroth said.

The show normally makes the base money, which is used to support military families.

Last year's show netted $1.6 million in profits for base families, supporting child care programs for working parents and employee assistance for  troops leaving active duty, according to the newspaper.

Even before the cancellation, the show was scaled back from its usual three days to two after the Defense Department announced earlier this year that military flight demonstrations would not be allowed due to the automatic spending cuts known as "sequestration." That included the Navy's wildly popular Blue Angels.

This year's show was expected to draw fewer than half of its normal crowd of 500,000 due to the scale back.

A disappointed Col. John P. Farnam, commanding officer at MCAS Miramar, said he was informed that as a community outreach event, the show was prohibited under the guidelines of the government shutdown, even though no furloughed employees or appropriated funds were to be used.

The Congressional budget standoff over Obamacare started Oct. 1. A GOP compromise that was to be voted on in the House Tuesday was canceled at the last minute because of lack of support from conservative Republicans. Fitch, meanwhile, threatened a downgrading of the government's AAA bond rating.


Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.10news.com

Upskirting: Air Marshal Accused Of Taking Photos Under Skirts

NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather  

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – A federal marshal was arrested at Nashville International Airport after he was accused of taking pictures with his cell phone underneath women's skirts as they boarded the aircraft Thursday morning. 

According to a police affidavit, 28-year-old Adam Bartsch boarded Southwest Airline's flight 3132 on official duty as a Federal Air Marshal. A witness grabbed Bartsch's cellphone and notified a flight attendant.

Bartsch was taken off the plane, and airport police responded. After being questioned, Bartsch admitted to taking the pictures. He was transported to Metro Booking and charged with disorderly conduct.

The Transportation Security Administration issued this statement in response to the incident:

"TSA does not tolerate criminal behavior. The agency has removed this individual from their current duties and is in the process of suspending or terminating their employment. TSA is cooperating fully with investigators."


Story, Video and Photo:   http://www.newschannel5.com

Groundbreaking Held at Rochelle Municipal Airport (KRPJ) for Runway Extension

ROCHELLE (WIFR) -- In the mid 1940′s business man LaVerne Schultz created a grass runway near his factory on Highway 251 south first known as Shultz Field. In 1963 Mr. Schultz donated 27 acres of land to the City of Rochelle in this same location and construction began on a 2100′ hard surface runway. In 1988 the runway was lengthened and widened to the current 4226′ x 75′ runway.

Over the last 5 years the City of Rochelle has worked closely with the Illinois Division of Aeronautics, the Federal Aviation Administration, local land owners and City officials to purchase land necessary to extend the runway to 5001’x75’. This additional length will allow current industries based in Rochelle to utilize the Rochelle Municipal airport instead of neighboring airports. The additional runway length will also act as a catalyst for more economic growth in the region. “The City of Rochelle has always been an innovative community and the airport runway extension is another example of the infrastructure assets that City has invested to further grow the local economy” said Mayor Chet Olson.

Fifty years after the City of Rochelle took over Schultz Field it was renamed Koritz Field. Hosting a ground breaking event for the 2013 expansion of the City of Rochelle Municipal Airport Koritz Field the City Officials boasted about their economic development progress. David Plyman, Rochelle City Manager said “Rochelle has become a very attractive location for industrial clients, especially those that require air and rail service. We are blessed to have the support of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and IDOT’s Division of Aeronautics on this project”.

The nearly $1,500,000.00 project expands the city’s runway length to 5,001’ allowing larger corporate jet aircraft to utilize the Rochelle Municipal Airport, giving the airport the ability to handle these types of aircraft will add to the amenities that Rochelle has to offer. Funding for the project is 90% funded by discretionary money distributed by the State of Illinois and a 10% by the City of Rochelle. Mark Delhotal, Airport Manager for the Rochelle Municipal Airport added, “The increased runway length will allow aircraft from across the country to fly directly into Rochelle instead of neighboring airports, which will allow more opportunities for businesses to be based in Rochelle”.

Jason Anderson, Economic Development Director for the City of Rochelle added, “We have been capitalizing on our infrastructure assets to bring more industry to Rochelle for more than 50 years. We have interstate highways I-88 and I-39, the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroads, a City owned short line railroad, and our own municipal airport. It makes “logistical” sense to be in Rochelle”.


Story and Photo:  http://www.wifr.com

Air France-KLM Seeks Control of Alitalia: Plan Would Forge Three-Hub Group of European Airlines

 Oct. 17, 2013 4:49 p.m. ET

By David Pearson
The Wall Street Journal


PARIS—Air France-KLM SA wants to control struggling Italian airline Alitalia as part of a continuing restructuring plan and create a three-hub European airline group, Air France-KLM Chief Executive Alexandre de Juniac said Thursday.

Earlier this week, Alitalia's shareholders gave their conditional approval to a refinancing plan that would allow the airline to keep operating, but Air France-KLM, which owns a 25% stake in the Italian company, is pushing for a tough industrial restructuring plan to ensure that Alitalia will remain a viable entity over the longer term and won't need more help from its shareholders.

In an interview on France's LCI TV news channel, Mr. de Juniac said Alitalia needs to join a larger airline group. "Aside from financial and industrial issues, we feel it's essential that Alitalia should be integrated into a group like ours—and integrated means that we should be in a situation to control it," he said.

Air France-KLM, which consists of French carrier Air France and Dutch airline KLM, sought to take over Alitalia five years ago when the Italian company was in severe financial difficulties, but that project was scuttled by Italian politicians and Alitalia's unions. Air France-KLM subsequently took a 25% stake in Alitalia.

Mr. de Juniac said adding Alitalia to Air France-KLM would create a group with three European hubs: Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, Schiphol in Amsterdam and Fiumicino in Rome. He said it would be "catastrophic" for Alitalia and Italy if Alitalia were to abandon its long-haul business.

"From what I hear from the Italian government, I get the impression that they are favorable to the creation of such a European group that integrates Alitalia" and in which each of the partners would have its own financial and industrial strengths, he said.

Mr. de Juniac stressed, however, that his group has its own financial difficulties and is seeking tough sacrifices from its personnel. "We don't have money that we can spend carelessly," he said.

One of the biggest challenges Alitalia faces is its sizable staff of more than 14,000 people. The Italian government is concerned that a radical restructuring of the airline would leave thousands of employees out of work, according to people familiar with the government's thinking.

—Daniel Michaels contributed to this article.

Source:   http://online.wsj.com

Smyrna Airport (KMQY), gets $5.1M to support hangar project

MURFREESBORO — The Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport received suppport totaling $5.1 million last month to put toward the construction of a $9.7 million hangar complex.

The hangar complex is part of the Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport Authority’s 20-year development plan, said John Black, executive director of the airport.

Additional site preparation was also factored into the hangar’s design overlay, he said

“By having the infrastructure on the ground, you have the ability to attract new clients,” Black said.

Approximately $3.5 million in various grants was supplied by the Federal Aviation Administration through the Aeronautics Division of the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Black said.

The Industrial Development Board of Rutherford County contributed $330,000 of the $5.1 million, Black said, who added that the IDB sees their contribution as an investment.

“One of the primary goals of the IDB is to promote and bring jobs to the county,” Black said. “That’s what this project is designed to do.”

Rutherford County and the town of Smyrna supplied money totaling approximately $1.2 million, Black said, but those funds are in bonds that the airport will pay back during the next 20 years.

The project, which will include a 24,000 square-foot hangar and 13,000 square feet of development for office space and additional infrastructure, is projected to be complete by the beginning of 2015, Black said.

During the previous fiscal year, the airport accounted for $44 million of expenditures and an additional $34.6 million in payroll, according to the airport’s 2012 economic impact report. The airport employs 3,725 people.

Additionally, the airport induces an additional $18.7 million in output for businesses in Rutherford County that use the runways, according to the report. This supports 1,660 jobs outside of the airport.

Growth in Rutherford and Davidson counties during the next two decades will result in more relief flights to Smyrna, Black said, as the Nashville International Airport may eventually reach a traffic capacity.

“Airports are a tremendous economic engine for the community,” Black said. “Fortune 500 companies that are household names arrive and depart from the airport very frequently.”


Story and Photo:    http://www.tennessean.com

Cleaning worker stole iPad from airplane at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), police say

PHILADELPHIA - October 17, 2013 (WPVI) -- Police have arrested an airplane cleaning worker and charged her with stealing a passenger's iPad from a plane at Philadelphia International Airport. 

Hawa Donzo, 40, works for Prospect Airport Services, which provides cabin cleaning services for airplanes in between flights.

Police say Donzo found an iPad which a passenger said he left in a seat pocket aboard a U.S. Airways plane that arrived in Philadelphia from Phoenix, Arizona on March 23rd.

Rather than turning it in to the airline, investigators say, Donzo kept it.

She was arrested Thursday and charged with theft. 


Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://abclocal.go.com 

An employee subcontracted to do work at Philadelphia International Airport is accused of stealing a passengers iPad. 

 Hawa Donzo, 40, of the 2600 block of Shields Street in the city’s Elmwood section is accused of theft.

Philadelphia Police say that a passenger who flew into the airport on a US Airways flight from Phoenix, Ariz. Back in March left his iPad in the seat pocket of the plane. He alerted the airline’s lost and found but no iPad showed up.

After an investigation, Donzo an employee for Prospect Aircraft Services -- a company that supplies wheelchair services in the airport -- was arrested and charged.

It wasn’t clear how police focused in on Donzo.

Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

Female pilot wins discrimination lawsuit

A Florida woman who was fired from her job as a pilot has been awarded more than $170,000 in a gender discrimination lawsuit against a Summit County charter jet company, court records show.

A U.S. District Court jury in Akron returned the verdict in favor of Carrie Braun, who was hired in April 2011 as the company’s only female pilot.

In an Aug. 28 judgment entry, Judge Sara Lioi affirmed the verdict on the grounds that Ultimate Jetcharters of Akron-Canton International Airport, was in violation of state law prohibiting retaliation based on gender discrimination and harassment.

Braun was awarded $70,250 in compensatory damages and $100,000 in punitive damages, court records show.

Her suit claimed that from October 2011 to March 2012, two male pilots continually made “discriminatory, defamatory and harassing comments” about her job performance and downtime conduct between flights.

One week after Braun formally complained to her supervisors, she was fired, according to the suit.

Several male pilots were treated more favorably during her employment and were not reprimanded for similar after-hours conduct, the suit said.

Sidney Freeman, the company’s attorney, said he is preparing a request for post-trial relief from the judgment before deciding whether to file an appeal.

“Ms. Braun filed a complaint alleging 11 different claims for recovery, only one of which was not dismissed by the court prior to trial,” Freeman said.

Further comment on a pending matter would be inappropriate, he said.

Source:  http://www.ohio.com

Board takes steps to shore up Williamsburg-Whitley County Airport's finances

The Williamsburg-Whitley County Airport Board of Directors took steps Tuesday to get its financial house in order by replacing its former bookkeeper after learning earlier this month that the airport is broke, creditors were knocking at the door, billing was spotty and financial records were disorganized and incomplete.

During a special meeting, board members voted unanimously to hire local businessman Don Strickland as the new bookkeeper, essentially ousting former bookkeeper Rebecca Steely in the process.

“Rebecca Steely is no longer associated with the board,” interim airport manager Butch Housman, also a member of the board, said following the meeting. “We want to thank her for her diligence and hard work. She’s done a lot for the board over the years.”

During the board’s last regular meeting on Oct. 2, members learned that the airport was in a grave financial situation. The board had no money to operate. In fact, Steely said at the time its main account was overdrawn.

After a cursory look at the most recent fiscal year financial report, Strickland said there were a few odd things he noticed about the airport’s finances. For instance:

• Last year, the airport actually lost money on fuel sales. Also, fuel inventory never changed, according to records, over the entire year.

• Two one-year loans the board has with separate banks — one for roughly $268,000 and the other for $270,000 — saw no decline in their principal since payments were only made on interest.

• Invoicing to local governments for funding was spotty.

• No general ledger sheets or other financial records were provided to corroborate the financial statements.

Board Chairman Tim Mays, who took over leadership of the board on Oct. 2, said Steely has agreed to work with Strickland to provide all necessary financial documents.

“We don’t have everything yet, but she said we can get them,” he said. “We are basically just moving to a new bookkeeper and she’s OK with that. We are trying to do as many things as we can from a fresh start … out there and above board.”

Mays noted that fuel sales are going to be more closely tracked in the future and noted that poor recordkeeping had caused the loss last year in fuel sales. He said improper billing to Air Evac Lifeteam — a medical helicopter service that operates a base at the airport — forced the company to pay an estimated cost for its fuel purchases.

“We are going to become much more aggressive as a board in needing spot on, up-to-the-minute information,” Mays said. “The system [Rebecca] was using probably wasn’t attuned to that form of accounting.”

Strickland does bookkeeping for some local law firms, and is also the bookkeeper for the Whitley County Public Library Board of Directors. He is owner of Hollywood Video in Williamsburg and is a retired auditor from the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet.

He agreed to work for two months at $15 an hour, a request the board approved. At the end of the two-month period, the board will review whether to hire him permanently at a set monthly fee.

One problem that was resolved for the board this week was money owed by the City of Williamsburg to help support the airport. The city has committed to providing $8,000, but officials said last week that hasnt' been paid in three quarters because the airport did not provide proper financial statements to the city. On Monday, the statements were provided and the city paid the airport board $32,000.

In other business, the board:

• Approved a seven-point plan to get a handle on its financial situation which included hiring Strickland, appointing Maureen Baird as Treasurer, opening a new bank account, giving authority to sign checks to certain members and allowing for electronic access to accounts.

• Set its fuel price at $4.95 per gallon, which board member Mike Colegrove said is the lowest around. The move was done, Mays said, to attract plane owners to the airport as a refueling destination.

• Heard reports about the need to repair and maintain the airport’s septic system and leach beds. Also, Housman updated the board on progress towards maintenance issues. Official actions on the reports are expected at the board next regular meeting.

Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://thenewsjournal.net

Sad End to a World War II Plane: Courthouse News Service

Thursday, October 17, 2013   
Last Update: 9:39 AM PT  


By CAMERON LANGFORD

Courthouse News Service


FORT WORTH, Texas (CN) - A Texan claims in court that he was defrauded of $900,000 by an aircraft mechanic who "thoroughly destroyed" a World War II plane flown by the Texan's late father.

Seth Washburne and his company Thirsty 13th LLC sued James Terry and Terry's entities Pacific Prowler LLC, Pacific Prowler Nonprofit and the nonprofit Greatest Generation Aircraft, in Tarrant County Court.

It all began, Washburne says in the lawsuit, when he "found a large round patch from a flyer's jacket, depicting a beer bottle with wings, and the name 'Thirsty 13'" while looking through a box of his father's keepsakes.

Washburne did some research and found a picture of the Thirsty 13th squadron, including his father, from 1946.

"Since there was limited information on the Thirsty 13th squadron, Washburne decided to write a book to memorialize and preserve the history of the squadron in which his father proudly served," the complaint states. "For almost two years, Washburne traveled around the country visiting members of the squadron and their families, the Air Force Historical Research Agency in Montgomery, Alabama, and the National Archives, gathering stories, data and World War II photographs."

While writing his book, Washburne says, he found that one of the planes the Thirsty 13th flew in World War II was still in use as a cargo plane in Puerto Rico.

"The plane originally was a model C-47, the military version of the popular DC-3," the complaint states. "In the Thirsty 13th squadron, the plane's nickname was 'Billie.'

"Billie was quite special for other reasons, too. It was one of four lead planes in the squadron marked with a special white tail stripe; it was flown overseas by the most senior pilot who became the next commanding officer; and it was the first sign of help for 25 men stranded on a remote coral reef for 8 days until food was dropped from Billie to aid them. Billie was particularly important to Washburne, because he had a photo of Billie in New Hebrides, and standing beside it was his father."

 Washburne contacted Billie's owner, learned it was for sale for $75,000, and wanted to buy it and donate it to a museum. But a relative of a member of the Thirsty 13th told Washburne about the Vintage Flying Museum at Fort Worth's Meacham Airport, which preserves WWII planes.

At the airport, Washburne says, he met defendant James Terry.

"Terry convinced Washburne to change his plan of donating the plane to a museum, and instead to keep it for himself as a flying airplane," the complaint states. "Through a series of representations, Terry convinced Washburne that Terry could restore Billie to resemble its original condition, and thereafter, Washburne could personally own Billie for little or no continuing upkeep and maintenance costs. Terry represented that after he restored Billie, he would store and maintain Billie for Washburne, and that he would take Billie to air shows, where it would be viewed by people all over the country."

Washburne says he bought Billie based on Terry's claims. He says Terry promised to have Billie fully restored and airworthy by July 2010 so Washburne could show it off at a Thirsty 13th reunion.
    

 "However, after two and one half years of deceit, misrepresentations, outright lies, theft and faulty advice by the defendants, Billie was a thoroughly dismantled wreck: its wings had been removed and had new holes punched in them ... Billie's fuselage, which is the heart of Billie, was stripped of parts with no record of what went where, and was thoroughly destroyed, being broken in half, with almost every rib broken and the skin torn to shreds" Washburne says in the complaint.

Washburne says he planned to spend $75,000 for Billie, but Terry spent nearly $900,000 of his money on the restoration job, including the purchase of two "donor planes" to be parted out and used to restore Billie.

 Washburne claims he "was led down the primrose path to ultimately be taken for almost $900,000, had his plane destroyed, had parts stolen, and was subject to unending lies and humiliations."
    

He seeks punitive damages for breach of contract, breach of warranty, fraud, deceptive trade, conversion, breach of bailment, negligence and conspiracy.

He is represented by Kevin Vice with Mayo Mendolia & Vice of Royse City, Texas.

Also named as defendants are Patrick Mahaffey, Terry Rogers and Perrin Warbirds Inc.

James Terry's public relations director declined to comment on the lawsuit. 


Source:  http://www.courthousenews.com

For plane peepers, airport is the destination Pittsfield Municipal Airport (KPSF), Massachusetts

 


Few things make a little boy's heart soar like a plane. 

 "They're awesome!" said 4-year-old Owen Tanner, his face lighting up as he recounted a recent visit to see WWII planes at the Pittsfield Municipal Airport.

On any given weekend afternoon, Owen and his brothers can be found at the airport with their parents, Amy and D.J., and grandparents, Betty and Dave Filkins. Ten-month-old Adam hasn't quite earned his plane-peeper wings yet, but Owen and his 7-year-old brother Donald Tanner IV, aka "Tanner," definitely have.

Tanner has been coming to the airport since he was 3, when his grandfather would take Fridays off and pick him up from pre-school to have lunch at the airport and watch the planes. Dave Filkins grew up on Barker Road not far from the airport, and used to watch the planes himself when he was Tanner's age.

It's become something of a family tradition ever since.

Airports are where we go to travel to faraway places -- often a means to an end, not an end in themselves. And yet, for some Berkshire County residents, they are the go-to destination for free family fun.

On a sunny Saturday or Sunday afternoon, and during the week, too, you'll find plane peepers young and old at each of the county's three public airports -- Pittsfield Municipal Airport, Great Barrington Walter J. Koladza Airport and North Adams Harriman and West Airport -- each with its own unique plane-watching scene that, in many ways, reflects the special character of the cities themselves.

Located on Tamarack Road, Pittsfield's Municipal Airport -- which recently completed a multi-million dollar runway expansion -- boasts the greatest diversity of aircraft. It's the only one of the three local aiports that can accommodate larger corporate jets like the Gulfstream and Global Express, in addition to the single engine Cessnas and other propeller planes.

The onlookers are a diverse group as well.

A lot of grandparents and grandchildren, and parents with kids too, come to watch the planes land and take off, according to Lynn Goodman-Leary, a receptionist at Pittsfield's airport.

"I'd say it's about 70-30 grandparents to parents," she said of the spectator ratio. "We also occasionally get busloads of kids from local schools and daycare centers, and there's a group of special needs children who come fairly often."

On an average weekday, Goodman-Leary might see only a few people sitting on the concrete stanchions in the parking lot behind the fence opposite the runway, or at the picnic table in the picnic area the city maintains on a small hill overlooking the runway and surrounding mountains. On weekends, depending on the weather, that number can swell to a few dozen, she said, and it's not just people with kids.

Christine Lyon Carlson, one of the owners of Lyon Aviation, the company that runs the airport, said a good number of retired veterans come to the airport and often will stop at the office to talk about the planes they flew on.

"There's a real sense of relaxation with a retired person," she said of the older plane peepers as they watch the planes and the view, which she calls "one of the best in the city."

The kids, on the other hand, who come to watch the planes take off and land are anything but relaxed.

Owen jumps up and down excitedly every time a plane turns its engine on. Tanner seems more interested in how they work on the inside, like his grandpa. Fortunately, there are often generous pilots around to oblige both types.

Amy said she and her husband bring the boys two to three times a month in the summer, and her parents also take them once a month or more.

"Anything you can do with your grandchildren is a great feeling," said Betty Filkins. She cites the lack of commotion and getting her grandchildren outside and away from the TV as two of the main draws of the spectator sport.

D.J. said he likes that it doesn't cost anything, and echoes his mother-in-law, "It's nice to be able to shut off the TVs and sit and talk. It's a lot more relaxing than going to a bouncy house."

Noah Meyerowitz, a 14-year-old Great Barrington resident, is perfectly poised between wide-eyed child and wise, old pilot. He's a student pilot himself, who comes from a family of pilots. His father, Steve, and brother, Ari, are both pilots, and the family owns a Cessna Cardinal, which they keep at the Great Barrington Airport at Berkshire Aviation Enterprises.

Meyerowitz calls the Great Barrington Airport "one of the most exciting places for families and children to go in the Berkshires." He said families come to the airport all the time, picnicking on the grass for hours, watching the planes go up and down.

Richard Solan, one of the airport owners, estimates they get about 10 visitors a day during the week and 20 a day on weekends between the two picnic tables and 15 to 20 chairs the airport keeps out in the picnic area, which, unlike Pittsfield's, isn't fenced off from the runways. He said there are others who prefer to watch from their cars.

According to Meyerowitz, the pilots love the onlookers.

"We think of them as the next generation of pilots, and want to embrace their amazing joy in aviation," he said. "Many times I've brought children as well as adults up close to our airplane. I even open the plane, and let them sit in it."

Lyon-Carlson from the Pittsfield airport agrees.

"Their faces just light up when they get in the plane and pretend to fly," she said.

Solan sometimes goes even further than that. If it's not busy, occasionally he'll stroll over to the picnic area, and take kids up for a ride.

Solan estimates Great Barrington's airport gets a couple hundred operations -- takeoffs and landings -- every weekend in good weather, and about 1,500 a week overall due to the high volume of flying lessons given.

Solan adds that, in addition to all the plane take-offs and landings, military helicopters land at the airport pretty much every night because the lack of light pollution at the relatively remote 70 Egremont Plain Road location gives the pilots perfect conditions to practice with their night vision goggles.

Attempts to reach a North Adams airport representative were not returned in time for publication.

Many of the same advantages of local airport luxury travel apply to plane peeping -- no crowds, body scans, lost baggage or passports required -- and unlike flying, peeping is totally free and "awesome."

Just ask Owen.

Story and Photo:   http://www.berkshireeagle.com

Hammond moves ahead with air traffic control tower: Hammond Northshore Regional Airport (KHDC), Louisiana

HAMMOND — The long-awaited construction of an aircraft control tower at Northshore Regional Airport moved closer to reality with the passage of two measures by the City Council.

The council accepted a $1.677 million bid Tuesday from Spartan Construction Co. to build the tower on the west side of the airport near the main terminal.

The council also agreed to borrow up to $350,000 from the city’s sales tax fund for the tower construction.

That loan will be repaid with proceeds from the sale of a 17-acre city-owned tract near the airport.

Mayor Mayson Foster has said the appraised value of the land is close to the amount to be borrowed from the sales tax fund.

Foster said construction should start by early November and may be completed in about five to six months.

Once finished, the facility will be operated by air traffic controllers from the Louisiana Army National Guard’s air operations center at the airport.

Foster said the primary objective for the tower is safety.

“We now have various types of aircraft ranging from blimps, regional jets, smaller private planes, helicopters and other aircraft using the airport,” the mayor told the council.

“Add to that the significant military air traffic now at the airport with the National Guard and the U.S. Customs Service and it is imperative that we have a control tower.”

Foster predicts the tower will have a large economic impact, with a potential boost in air traffic once the airport has a controlled airspace environment.

At this time, the nearest control towers to the Northshore Regional Airport are at New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

The tower is funded with an $800,000 grant from the Federal Aviation Administration, a $750,000 grant through the state’s Capital Outlay fund and contributions from the city of Hammond. 


Source:  http://theadvocate.com

Baggage Handler Arrested in LAX Dry Ice Explosions: Dry ice bombs were found in an employee restroom and on the tarmac at LAX

A 28-year-old baggage handler who works at Los Angeles International Airport was arrested Tuesday in connection with dry ice explosions that prompted emergency responses at LAX for two nights in a row. 

 Dicarlo Bennett, a 28-year-old Servisair baggage handler from Paramount, Calif., -- about 15 miles east of the airport -- was arrested at about 7 p.m. PT Tuesday at his apartment on suspicion of exploding a destructive device near an aircraft. His bail was set at $1 million.

Details regarding a court date and when charges will be filed were not immediately available.

An official told the AP that Bennett allegedly took the dry ice from a plane and placed it in an employee restroom Sunday night and another device that was found on a tarmac outside the international terminal.

Police had previously said they didn't believe the explosions were an act of terror but could be the work of a disgruntled employee.

No one was injured in either incident.Three dry ice bombs were found on the tarmac outside of Los Angeles International Airport Monday night, prompting a bomb squad response as the FBI probed an explosion by the same type of bomb at LAX just one night earlier.

A bomb - a relatively harmless and simple device made of a plastic bottle and dry ice - went off about 8:30 p.m., said LAPD Detective Gus Villanueva. No injuries were immediately reported. Though harmless from afar, someone could get hurt if they were close enough, airport officials said.

Officials confirmed a suspicious item drew emergency crews to the Tom Bradley International Terminal. Three dry ice bombs were found outside the terminal on the tarmac -- a location only accessible to badge-carrying employees with authority and clearance to work in the area.

Initial reports indicated one of the bombs was found under a plane, but airport police said that was not the case. One airplane was evacuated - but only a cleaning crew was on board.

The items were discovered near a gate shared by several airlines.

Flights did not appear to be affected Monday.

Servisair released a statement Wednesday: "We are aware of the arrest of Dicarlo Bennett as a suspect in the recent incidents at LAX. All we can confirm at this point is that he was an employee of Servisair at the time of incident. We're cooperating with authorities and will continue to monitor the situation closely. It is important at this early stage to allow law enforcement to continue their investigation and we have no further comment at this time."

Monday's incident follows a similar one on Sunday night, when, at 7 p.m., a dry ice bomb went off in an empty bathroom in a restricted area. No injuries were reported, but several flights were delayed for hours Sunday night.

Police did not immediately discuss possible motives, but the former chief of Homeland Security for airport police told NBC4 before the arrest that a likely objective was disruption of airport operations.

"The motivation certainly does not suggest terrorism," said Erroll Southers, now an adjunct professor of Homeland Security and Public Policy at the University of Southern California. "It does suggest, at least, vandalism -- trying to disrupt the airport, trying to get someone's attention, which they did."

In May, a dry ice bomb exploded in a trash can in Disneyland's Toontown area. No one was hurt, but part of the park was evacuated and a Disneyland employee was later arrested on suspicion of placing the device.


Story, Video and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.nbclosangeles.com

Historic hangar to be restaurant: Curtiss-Wright Hangar at Jim Hamilton - L.B. Owens Airport (KCUB), Columbia, South Carolina

A group of private developers and aviation enthusiasts say plans are moving apace to restore and repurpose the historic Curtiss-Wright Hangar at the downtown Hamilton- Owens Airport.

The 1929 structure, rusting and mostly neglected for decades, will be reborn as a family-style restaurant, event space and aviation museum, the developers say.

The hangar was the first building constructed at the former Columbia Municipal Airport by a company created by aviation pioneer Glenn Curtiss and airplane inventors Orville and Wilbur Wright. For years, it served as the main terminal for the airport’s passenger and airmail operations and is listed on the National Register of Historic Place.

Columbia businessman Scott Linaberry said the developers are offering to purchase the 15,000- square-foot building from Richland County for $176,000 plus an abatement fee for the removal of asbestos and lead-based paint.

As things stand now, the sale is in a due diligence state as the business partners, organized under the name CW Hangar Partners, LLC, review restoration, architectural, and development costs that are expected to total $4.7 million when the project is complete.

Other partners in the development include real estate brokers Ed Garrison and Ben S. Riddle and architect Joe Rogers.

Linaberry said developers expect to finance the project by leveraging historic renovation tax credits and corporate sponsorships that include naming opportunities. Meanwhile, CW Hangar Partners has landed a $20,000 grant from Richland County.

The sale still has to be approved by the Richland County Airport Commission and Richland County Council. Even the Federal Aviation Administration, responsible for disposition of any airport properties, has a say.

Hami l ton- Owens Airport director Chris Evermann said he hopes the partners can put together a successful financing that has the potential to showcase the airport. The building is at the northwest corner of the field and is the first building that comes into sight for most persons traveling to the terminal.

“It’s a neat building,” Everman said of the hangar, one of some 30 that Curtiss-Wright constructed across the country during the “Golden Age” of aviation. Only a handful remain

Linaberry said the proposed 3,500-squarefoot restaurant is expected to draw customers from the nearby Rosewood and Shandon areas of the city and will be “an important key” to the project becoming self-sustaining instead of a financial obligation for taxpayers.

“In many cases where you put a museum in an old building, it creates a never-ending burden for the taxpayers,” he said. “That’s not what we want. The restaurant is there to insure the maintenance and integrity of the building itself.”

Linaberry said he hopes the project can be completed by 2015, but “to tell the truth, I’m not in a huge hurry to rush the project. I want everything done correctly, meticulously. Time is not the real issue for me.”

Looming large over the entire project is a partially restored World War II B-25 bomber that crashed on a training mission during the war and was recovered from the bottom of Lake Greenwood in 1983. The bomber is currently housed in the hangar and will remain as a centerpiece for the restaurant and museum.

The developers are inviting public support for the project and have created a crowd funding site at http://www.rockethub.com/projects/29493-curtisswrighthangar-project#desc.... The site has generated in excess of $4,600 in the short time it has been online.

The project also has its own website: www.columbiahangar.com and a Facebook page: www.facebook.com/The-CurtissWrightHangar

 Story and Photo:  http://www.thecolumbiastar.com

Hawker Beechcraft 390 Premier IA, Digicut Systems, N26DK: Accident occurred March 17, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana.

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA196 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 17, 2013 in South Bend, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/14/2016
Aircraft: HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION 390, registration: N26DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 3 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), during cruise flight, the unqualified pilot-rated passenger was manipulating the aircraft controls, including the engine controls, under the supervision and direction of the private pilot. After receiving a descent clearance to 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl), the pilot told the pilot-rated passenger to reduce engine power to maintain a target airspeed. The cockpit area microphone subsequently recorded the sound of both engines spooling down. The pilot recognized that the pilot-rated passenger had shutdown both engines after he retarded the engine throttles past the flight idle stops into the fuel cutoff position. Specifically, the pilot stated "you went back behind the stops and we lost power." According to air traffic control (ATC) radar track data, at the time of the dual engine shutdown, the airplane was located about 18 miles southwest of the destination airport and was descending through 6,700 feet msl. The pilot reported to the controller that the airplane had experienced a dual loss of engine power, declared an emergency, and requested radar vectors to the destination airport. As the flight approached the destination airport, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound similar to an engine starter spooling up; however, engine power was not restored during the attempted restart. A review of the remaining CVR audio did not reveal any evidence of another attempt to restart an engine. The CVR stopped recording while the airplane was still airborne, with both engines still inoperative, while on an extended base leg to the runway. Subsequently, the controller told the pilot to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern to make another landing approach. Witness accounts indicated that only the nose landing gear was extended during the second landing approach. The witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low, rolling descent into a nearby residential community. The postaccident examinations and testing did not reveal any anomalies or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Although the CVR did not record a successful engine restart, the pilot was able to initiate a go-around during the initial landing attempt, which implies that he was able to restart at least one engine during the initial approach. The investigation subsequently determined that only the left engine was operating at impact. Following an engine start, procedures require that the respective generator be reset to reestablish electrical power to the Essential Bus. If the Essential Bus had been restored, all aircraft systems would have operated normally. However, the battery toggle switch was observed in the Standby position at the accident site, which would have prevented the Essential Bus from receiving power regardless of whether the generator had been reset. As such, the airplane was likely operating on the Standby Bus, which would preclude the normal extension of the landing gear. However, the investigation determined that the landing gear alternate extension handle was partially extended. The observed position of the handle would have precluded the main landing gear from extending (only the nose landing gear would extend). The investigation determined that it is likely the pilot did not fully extend the handle to obtain a full landing gear deployment. Had he fully extended the landing gear, a successful single-engine landing could have been accomplished.

In conclusion, the private pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown during cruise descent. Additionally, the pilot's inadequate response to the emergency, including his failure to adhere to procedures, resulted in his inability to fully restore airplane systems and ultimately resulted in a loss of airplane control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The private pilot's inadequate response to the dual engine shutdown during cruise descent, including his failure to adhere to procedures, which ultimately resulted in his failure to maintain airplane control during a single-engine go-around. An additional cause was the pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls, which directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 17, 2013, at 1623 eastern daylight time, a Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet, N26DK, serial number RB-226, collided with three residential structures following an aborted landing attempt on runway 9R located at the South Bend Airport (SBN), South Bend, Indiana. The private pilot and pilot-rated-passenger, who were occupying the cockpit seats, were fatally injured. An additional two passengers, who were seated in the cabin area, and one individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to 7700 Enterprises of Montana, LLC, and operated by Digicut Systems of Tulsa, Oklahoma, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 while on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight that departed the Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 1356 central daylight time.

According to air traffic control (ATC) information, after departing RVS, the accident flight proceeded toward the intended destination while receiving normal ATC services. The flight was eventually cleared to a final cruise altitude of 41,000 feet (FL410). The cockpit voice recorder (CVR) contained about 31 minutes of cockpit conversation/audio and radio communications. At 1545:31, the beginning of the CVR recording, the pilot was discussing the airplane's fuel status and how much fuel would be required for the return flight. The pilot continued to explain and demonstrate various flight management system functions to the pilot-rated-passenger. At 1546:08, the pilot-rated-passenger remarked "a lot of stuff to learn." The pilot continued to explain and demonstrate the features of the flight management system, the use of his mobile tablet as an electronic flight bag, and the airplane's various weight limitations.

At 1552:17, the pilot established contact with Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center and reported being level at FL410. The controller subsequently cleared the flight to descend to 24,000 feet (FL240). After receiving the descent clearance, the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger discussed how to initiate a descent using the autopilot's vertical speed mode. The pilot explained how to use airplane pitch and engine power and to maintain a desired airspeed during the descent. At 1555:22, the pilot stated "we're up more speed, so we got to get our power back. gettin' ready to start beeping at us. got to bring it back." At 1555:27, the CVR recorded a sound similar to the airspeed overspeed warning for 13.5 seconds. At 1555:31, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot, "just pull it way back?" The pilot replied, "well, just get it out of the line. and we got to get it so, that it trends -- there you go -- there you go -- now give it -- it ends, there you go." The pilot continued to explain how to maintain a desired airspeed. At 1555:55, the pilot-rated-passenger remarked, "I just hate chasin' the darn thing." The pilot replied, "huh, how many hours you got flying this jet?" The pilot-rated-passenger stated, "well, I know, but I'm just saying it's just, you know, uncomfortable. Creates alarm in the back -- throttle up, throttle down."

The pilot then explained how to setup a descent while maintaining a specified airspeed. At 1557:29, the pilot-rated passenger stated, "so, pull back?" The pilot replied, "little bit. little bit. keep working it back 'cause that tells you where you're gonna be in six seconds. so, right now, you're going to be at the line in six seconds, so you want to continue to trend back. so yeah. so, just take two seventy or something like that." At 1557:53, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger to "just keep us out the red."

At 1558:08, the controller cleared the flight direct to South Bend. After acknowledging the direct clearance, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger how to program the flight management system to proceed direct to the destination airport. The pilot then discussed the airplane's indicated airspeed, ground speed, and how to cross-check the airplane's flight attitude with the backup cockpit instrumentation. At 1559:24, the Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) recording is audible over the radio channel. At 1559:42, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot if they needed to engage engine heat. The pilot replied that they would wait until they get an ice indication light. At 1600:34, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot "okay. pull back on the power?"

At 1601:35, the controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 20,000 feet (FL200). At 1602:13, the pilot discussed the current weather conditions that he had obtained from the ATIS recording, the expected wind correction during the approach and landing, the minimum descent altitude during the instrument approach, and the landing reference speed. At 1603:22, the controller asked the pilot to expedite a descent to 17,000 feet mean sea level (msl). At 1603:51, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "watch your speed" and "very good, very good. great speed management."

At 1605:08, a sound similar to the altitude alert was heard, the pilot announced "thousand away" and told the pilot-rated-passenger "okay, now we can come nose back up." At 1605:29, the pilot stated "let's go to the stop... to the click (detent)... MCT (maximum continuous thrust)." At 1606:14, the CVR recorded a sound similar to the airspeed overspeed warning that lasted for 11.4 seconds. At 1606:20, the pilot stated "that's what a check pilot will do, is he'll give you three things to do... when he knows you're trending in the wrong direction." At 1606:32, the pilot said "your throttles."

At 1606:49, the controller cleared the flight to expedite a descent to maintain 11,000 feet msl. After acknowledging the descent clearance, the pilot and pilot-rated passenger continued to discuss how to maintain airspeed during a cruise descent. At 1607:23, the controller asked the pilot for a ride report. The pilot replied that the weather conditions had been "smooth all the way." At 1607:52, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger to maintain 290 knots. The pilot-rated-passenger replied "okay, where is it?" The pilot responded "two ninety would be more power." At 1608:44, the controller issued a heading change for traffic sequencing. The pilot then explained how to promote a waypoint using the flight management system and how to plan for a descent to the selected waypoint. At 1610:11, the controller cleared the flight direct the destination airport and to contact South Bend Approach Control.

At 1610:32, the pilot established communications with South Bend Approach Control and reported being level at 11,000 feet msl. The approach controller cleared the flight direct to KNUTE, the outer marker for the instrument landing system (ILS) runway 9R instrument approach, but to expect a visual approach to the airport. The pilot then explained how to promote KNUTE as the next active waypoint within the flight management system, and how to plan for the descent to the waypoint. At 1611:45, the approach controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 10,000 feet msl. At 1613:07, the approach controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 3,000 feet msl.

After receiving the descent clearance to 3,000 feet msl, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "let's power back. let's bring it back to uh -- let's trend toward uh two twenty, two ten." The pilot-rated-passenger acknowledged and the pilot replied "and we'll have to come way out of it to do that." At 1613:30, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound consistent with a decrease in engine speed. The pilot then verbalized a descent checklist and turned on the seatbelt cabin chime. At 1614:14, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "we gotta get -- just pull -- just pull the power out." At 1614:18, the pilot-rated-passenger asked, "just pull it on down?" The pilot replied, "yeah, let's -- let's get back to two hundred (knots)." At 1614:21, the cockpit area microphone recorded another sound consistent with a decrease in engine speed. At 1614:26, the cockpit area microphone recorded the sound of two clicks. At 1614:27, there was a brief interruption in electrical power, an autopilot disconnect chime, and two unidentified tones. According to ATC radar track data, at 1614:28, the final radar return with an accompanying mode-C altitude return was recorded at 6,700 feet msl. At that time, the flight was located about 18 miles southwest of the destination airport. At 1614:29, the pilot said "uh-oh" and the pilot-rated-passenger replied "what?" At 1614:33, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was heard for 3.5 seconds. At 1614:35, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "you went back behind the stops and we lost power." (The airplane throttle quadrant had a mechanical stop at the flight idle power position, which required lifting finger levers, or pull-up locks, to further retard the throttles into the fuel cut-off position.)

At 1614:43, the pilot said "okay let's see here... boost pumps are on... okay we are dead stick." At 1614:56, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was heard for 10.9 seconds. At 1615:01, the approach controller told the pilot to turn five degrees left for runway 9R and to report when he had the airport in sight. At 1615:02, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound similar to an engine starter/generator spooling up; however, according to a sound spectrum study, engine power was not restored during the attempted restart. At 1615:08, the pilot told the approach controller, "uh... South Bend, we have an emergency, two six delta kilo. dead engines, dead stick, no power." The controller asked if he needed assistance and the pilot replied "affirm." Between 1615:19 and 1615:27, there was a sustained electrical power interruption to the CVR. At 1615:30, the controller asked for the pilot's intentions and the pilot replied "uh, we've lost all power and we have no hydraulics." At 1615:32, there was the sound similar to an altitude alert.

At 1615:38, the controller stated that the airport would have emergency equipment standing-by and asked if the airplane was controllable. At 1615:42, the pilot replied "ah, barely controllable." The controller told the pilot that all of the runways were available for landing and issued the current wind condition. At 1615:53, the pilot told the controller "uh, we have no navigation. if you could give us a vector please... we have no heading either. which -- you're gonna have to tell us which way to fly." The controller replied that the airplane was about 9 miles from the airport, which was at the 12-o'clock position. At 1616:09, the pilot-rated-passenger stated "there's the airport" and the pilot responded "Where? -- Okay." At 1616:12, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was audible until the end of the CVR recording. At 1616:13, the approach controller told the pilot to turn left 10 degrees. At 1616:16, the pilot replied "two six delta, turning left." At 1616:32, the CVR stopped recording while the airplane was still airborne with both engines still inoperative.

No additional voice communications were received from the accident airplane. The approach controller continued to transmit radar vectors toward runway 9R without any response from the accident pilot. At 1618:59, the approach controller told the accident airplane to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. (The tower controller had informed the approach controller that only the nose landing gear was extended) The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern for runway 9R. The airplane made another landing approach to the runway with only the nose landing gear extended. Several witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low, rolling descent into a nearby residential community.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

--- Pilot ---

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 58, held a private pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. He was type-rated for the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet. His last aviation medical examination was completed on January 22, 2013, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate. The medical certificate had a limitation that it was not valid for any certificate classification after January 31, 2014. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The pilot's flight history was reconstructed using a partially completed pilot logbook, a spreadsheet flight log, several applications for his FAA pilot certificates and ratings, and a spreadsheet history of the flights that had been completed in the accident airplane. The pilot began his primary flight instruction on January 21, 2011. On April 29, 2011, when he applied for his private pilot certificate, he reported having 71 hours total time. On February 5, 2012, when he applied for his instrument rating, the pilot reported having 314 hours total time. On February 26, 2012, when he applied for his multi-engine rating, the pilot reported having 330 hours total time. On May 4, 2012, when he applied for his type-rating in the Hawker Beechcraft model 390, the pilot reported having 450 hours total time. According to additional flight documentation, after he had received his type-rating, the pilot accumulated an additional 163.7 hours in the accident airplane. The pilot's total flight experience was estimated to be about 613.7 hours, of which at least 171.5 hours were completed in the same make/model as the accident airplane.

According to training records, from April 29, 2012, through May 4, 2012, the pilot attended initial type-rating training for the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 airplane at The Jetstream Group, located in Chino, California. The course consisted of 41 hours of ground training, 8 hours of flight briefing/debriefing, and 7.8 hours of flight training in the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 airplane. On May 4, 2012, the pilot obtained his type-rating following a 2.1-hour oral examination and a 2.0 hour checkride with a FAA designated pilot examiner.

--- Pilot-Rated-Passenger ---

According to FAA records, the pilot-rated-passenger, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on August 3, 2005, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with the limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

A review of available logbook information indicated that the last recorded flight was completed on September 28, 2008. At that time, the pilot-rated-passenger had accumulated 1,877.2 hours total flight experience, of which 1,705.3 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. He had accumulated 1,576.2 hours in multi-engine airplanes and 301 hours in single-engine airplanes. He had accumulated 92.4 hours in actual instrument conditions and 517.6 hours at night. His last recorded flight review and instrument proficiency check was completed on September 19, 2006, in a Beech model 60 twin-engine airplane. A review of available information did not reveal any logged flight experience in turbine-powered business jets.

According to an affidavit provided by the pilot's son following the accident, the pilot-rated-passenger was not an employee of the operator, nor was he employed as a pilot for the accident flight. He was reportedly a friend of the pilot who shared a common interest in aviation. He reportedly did not have an official role on the accident flight, and as such, was considered a pilot-rated-passenger.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 2008 Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet, serial number RB-226. Two Williams International model FJ44-2A turbofan engines, each capable of producing 2,300 pounds of thrust at takeoff, powered the airplane. The airplane had a maximum takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds. The airplane was equipped for operation under instrument flight rules and in known icing conditions.

The accident airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate on March 13, 2008. According to FAA documentation, 7700 Enterprises of Montana, LLC, purchased the airplane on April 18, 2012. The current FAA registration certificate was issued on May 1, 2012. The airplane was maintained under the provisions of a FAA-approved manufacturer inspection program. The last inspection of the airplane was completed on November 4, 2012, at 419 hours total airframe time. As of the last inspection, both engines also had accumulated 419 hours since new. The static system, altimeter system, automatic pressure altitude reporting system, and transponder were last tested on July 7, 2011. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane hour meter indicated 457.5 hours at the accident site.

The primary flight control systems, except the spoilers, were manually operated through control cables, push/pull tubes, and mechanical linkages. The spoilers were electronically controlled and hydraulically actuated. The pitch trim system, roll trim system, and yaw trim system were electrically operated. The speed brake was controlled electrically and operated hydraulically. The flaps were electronically controlled and electrically actuated.

Pitch attitude of the airplane was controlled by the elevators and the variable incidence horizontal stabilizer. The elevator control system was operated manually by movement of the cockpit control columns. Roll attitude was controlled through the ailerons, spoilers and roll trim. The aileron control system was operated manually by movement of the cockpit control wheels. The spoiler control system was electrically controlled by movement of the cockpit control wheels and hydraulically actuated. Yaw control was accomplished by the rudder and rudder trim tab. The rudder control system was operated manually by moving the cockpit rudder pedals.

The cockpit engine thrust levers were connected to control cables that extended aft through the fuselage to the power control arm located on the bottom of each hydromechanical fuel control unit (HMU). In addition to the mechanical throttle linkages to the HMUs, each engine had an electronic control unit (ECU) that interfaced with its respective HMU to provide automatic fuel control throughout the normal engine operating envelope. The ECUs were part of the Standby Bus electrical system. Finger levers, or pull-up locks, were installed to prevent the inadvertent movement of the thrust levers from flight idle into the fuel cutoff position. To access the fuel cutoff position, the pull-up locks are lifted as the thrust levers are moved aft into the fuel cutoff position. During normal flight, with the engines operating, placing the thrust levers into the fuel cutoff position will shut off fuel flow to the engine and cause the engines to shut down.

During normal operation, the Standby Bus is powered by the Essential Bus. The Essential Bus receives electrical power from the main battery and generators (when online). During engine prestart and engine start, the ECUs are powered by the main battery until a generator is brought online. The generators are used as starter motors during normal engine starts and starter-assisted air starts. As such, following an engine start, a generator is reset by selecting the associated toggle switch that is located on the electrical control sub-panel. The momentary reset toggle switch position reestablishes electrical power from the generator to the Essential Bus system. During normal engine operation, the ECUs are powered by the generators through the Essential Bus; however, the ECUs could also be powered by the standby battery, through the Standby Bus, if the standby battery is selected following the depletion of the main battery.

The airplane's main battery was a 24-volt direct current (DC), maintenance free lead-acid battery with a minimum performance capacity of 42 ampere-hours. The battery provides power for self-contained engine starts and is a backup power source for the Essential Bus components.

The standby battery was a 5 ampere-hour, lead-acid battery. The standby battery was used to supply 24-volts DC to the Standby Bus and 5 volts DC for lighting of selected components during abnormal power conditions. The standby bus supplies electrical power to dedicated airplane components to sustain safe operation of the airplane when no other source of power is available. According to the airframe manufacturer, the standby battery was designed to supply 150 watts of power for a minimum of 30 minutes or until the cutoff voltage of 20 volts DC is reached.

In abnormal power situations, the main battery is used to provide airplane power until a generator is reset and brought back online. Furthermore, if a starter/generator is inoperative due to a loss of engine power, the main battery is designed to power the starter/generator to reignite the affected engine. In the event the battery switch is selected to Standby, regardless if the generators have been reset, electrical power would not be available to the essential bus (only the Standby bus would be powered). Additional information concerning the airplane electrical system, including a list of components found on the Essential and Standby Buses, is included with the docket materials associated with this investigation.

In the event of a loss of engine power during flight, an engine can be restarted in the air by one of two methods: either a windmilling start or a starter-assisted air start. A windmilling start uses residual engine speed, air movement against the fan blades, and engine igniters to restart the engine and regain power. A starter-assisted air start uses electrical power, routed through the generator/starter motor, to increase the N2 shaft to a speed where the igniters can restart the engine. Generally, the flight envelope to accomplish an engine air start is between 130 and 300 knots indicated airspeed and from sea level to 25,000 feet. At lower airspeeds, a starter-assisted air start is recommended and uses the normal engine start switch. At higher airspeeds a windmilling start is recommended and does not use the normal engine start switch. In contrast to the normal ground start procedure, the air start procedure requires that the igniter switches be switched to the "ON" position before attempting any engine air start.

The airplane was equipped with an electrically controlled, hydraulically actuated, retractable landing gear. If hydraulic or electric power is unavailable, an alternate procedure is used to extend the landing gear. When the alternate landing gear extension handle, located at the base of the left-side control column, is pulled outward from the stowed position, the landing gear and door up-lock hooks are released, which allows the landing gear to free-fall into the down-and-locked position. The use of the alternate landing gear handle also opens a mechanically actuated recirculation valve that connects the main landing gear retraction and extension hydraulic lines to allow a more positive free-fall of the gear. The landing gear release is sequenced so that the nose gear is released first, followed by the main landing gear inboard doors, and finally the main landing gear. According to the airframe manufacturer, the nose landing gear is released from the up-locks when the alternate extension handle is extended to 2-1/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). The main landing gear inboard doors are released when the alternate extension handle is extended to 2-3/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). Finally, the main landing gear are released from their respective up-locks when the alternate extension handle is pulled to 3-1/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). The full stroke length of the alternate extension handle, following a full deployment of the landing gear, is specified to be a minimum of 4 inches.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1620, the SBN automated surface observing system reported: wind 120 degrees at 13 knots, gusting 17 knots; a clear sky; 10 mile surface visibility; temperature 2 degrees Celsius; dew point -8 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS

The accident flight was on an activated instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. A review of available ATC information indicated that the accident flight had received normal air traffic control services and handling. A transcript of the voice communications recorded between the accident flight and South Bend Approach Control are included with the docket materials associated with the investigation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The South Bend Airport (SBN), a public airport located approximately 3 miles northwest of South Bend, Indiana, was owned and operated by the St. Joseph County Airport Authority. The airport was a certificated airport under 14 CFR Part 139 and had on-airport fire and rescue services. The airport field elevation was 799 feet msl. The airport had three runways: runway 9R/27L (8,414 feet by 150 feet, asphalt/grooved); runway 18/36 (7,100 feet by 150 feet, asphalt/grooved); and runway 9L/27R (4,300 feet by 75 feet, asphalt).

FLIGHT RECORDERS

Although not required, the airplane was equipped with an L-3/Fairchild model FA2100-1010 CVR, serial number 446023. The CVR recording contained about 31 minutes of digital audio, which was stored in solid-state memory modules. The CVR was not damaged during the accident and the audio information was extracted from the recorder normally. The recording consisted of four channels of audio information, ranging from good to excellent quality. The recording began at 1545:31 with the airplane established in cruise flight at 41,000 feet (FL410), and the recording stopped about 1616:32 while the airplane was maneuvering toward the destination airport with both engines inoperative. A transcript of the CVR audio information is included with the docket materials associated with the investigation. The airplane was not equipped with a flight data recorder, nor was it required to be so equipped.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane collided with three residential structures during the final impact sequence. A majority of the wreckage was found within one of the structures. There was a noticeable odor of Jet-A fuel at the accident site and the South Bend Fire Department reported that fuel had pooled in the basement of the house. The airplane wreckage was recovered from the house and transported to the South Bend Airport to facilitate a more detailed examination. A postaccident examination of the runway 9R revealed areas of abrasion damage to the grooved asphalt surface. The observed damage was consistent with the accident airplane coming in contact with the runway surface during the accident flight.

--- Fuselage ---

The radome had separated from the radome bulkhead, which had separated from the fuselage. The nose baggage and avionics sections had separated forward of the forward pressure bulkhead and the nose wheel well structure had buckled. The cabin area exhibited impact damage; however, portions remained intact from the forward pressure bulkhead to the aft pressure bulkhead. A section of the right cabin sidewall, from the emergency escape hatch opening forward to approximately the right side galley area, had been cut open by first responders to extract the occupants. The aft fuselage had separated from the cabin portion at the aft pressure bulkhead, but remained attached by flight control cables and other conduits. Both engines remained attached to the aft fuselage. The main entry door remained attached at both hinge locations and was found open with the latches in the closed position. The main entry door latching mechanism was actuated and operated as designed. Examination of the fuselage revealed no evidence of an in-flight or post-impact fire. The VHF communications No. 1 antenna had separated from the lower fuselage, and exhibited gouges and scoring of the lower leading edge that were consistent with contact with the runway surface. The VHF communications No. 1 antenna was recovered from the runway by airport personnel following the accident.

--- Wings ---

The wing assembly had separated from the airframe at all mounting points. The left wing exhibited deformation consistent with impact forces, but remained intact with all flight control surfaces attached. The right wing exhibited deformation consistent with impact forces and had separated in several locations. The inboard portion of the right wing exhibited minor damage when compared to the outboard wing. The outboard portion of the right wing, outboard of the inboard flap, exhibited impact damage, deformation, and had separated into several pieces. The outboard portion of the right wing, from the aileron outboard, had separated as one piece, with the exception of the composite wing tip assembly. The composite wing tip assembly had separated from the outboard end of the wing and was found amongst the main wreckage. The lower skin of the outboard portion of right wing and the lower skin of the composite wing tip exhibited gouging/scoring that was consistent with contact with the runway surface. The marks made by the gouging/scoring were approximately parallel with the chord of the wing and were aligned with the longitudinal axis of the fuselage. Additional abrasion damage was observed on the lower aft portion of all right wing flap tracks and the aft portion of the wing center keel structure. The trailing edge of the right aileron also exhibited abrasion damage. The wing flaps were observed in the retracted position and the measurement of the individual flap actuators corresponded with fully retracted flap positions. The aileron flight control system displayed multiple separations throughout the circuit; however, all observed separations exhibited features consistent with an overstress failure. The roll trim actuators remained attached to their respective aileron and were observed to be extended 1.3 inches. The roll trim tabs were visually aligned (faired) with the aileron trailing edge, consistent with a neutral position.

--- Stabilizers ---

The horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the rear fuselage and revealed limited impact damage. The pitch trim actuator remained attached to its mounting location in the vertical stabilizer and was attached to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer. The pitch trim actuator extension was observed to be extended 17-5/8 inches. The elevators remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer at all hinges. The outboard portion of the right elevator, including the balance weight, had separated from the remaining right elevator. The right and left elevator trim tab surfaces remained attached to their respective elevators at their hinges. Both elevator trim tab surfaces were visually aligned (faired) with the trailing edge of the respective elevator. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer and the hinges exhibited no apparent damage. The rudder trim tab remained attached to the rudder at the hinges and did not appear to be damaged. The rudder trim tab surface was visually aligned (faired) with the trailing edge of the rudder. Flight control continuity for the elevator and rudder displayed multiple separations; however, all observed separations exhibited features consistent with an overstress failure or had been cut to facilitate wreckage recovery.

--- Landing Gear ---

The nose landing gear had separated from the airframe trunnion. The nose landing gear drag brace had separated from the nose landing gear assembly and the airframe supporting structure. The down lock actuator and down lock "pawl" assembly had separated from the drag brace assembly. The nose wheel and tire remained attached to the nose landing gear assembly. The nose wheel exhibited signs of impact damage to a portion of the bead area. The nose landing gear doors had separated from the airframe and were found amongst the main wreckage. The nose landing gear actuator had separated from the airframe in two pieces. The piston portion of the actuator remained attached to the nose landing gear assembly.

The left main landing gear assembly remained intact and attached to the left wing trunnion. The gear was found in the wheel well; however, the uplock was not engaged to the main landing gear uplock roller. The left main landing gear actuator remained attached to the main landing gear assembly and to the wing supporting structure. The actuator was found in the retracted position; however, multiple separations of hydraulic lines and impact damage prevented a determination of the landing gear position by the measurement of the landing gear actuator. The left outboard gear door remained attached to the wing structure and the left main landing gear assembly. The left inboard gear door had separated from the wing and was found in several pieces amongst the main wreckage. The left inboard gear door actuator remained attached to the wing. About 90-percent of the inboard gear door was recovered and reconstructed. The paint on the exterior portions of the door appeared to be eroded, consistent with contact with the runway surface while in the closed position.

The right main landing gear assembly remained intact and attached to the wing structure. The right wing had separated between the main landing gear trunnion fitting and the main landing gear actuator wing attach fitting. The main landing gear actuator remained attached to the main landing gear assembly and the wing attach fitting. The right main landing gear actuator was partially extended; the actuator was in neither the fully retracted nor the down-and-locked position. Multiple separations of hydraulic lines and impact damage prevented a determination of the landing gear position by measurement of the landing gear actuator. The right main landing gear outboard door had separated from the wing and was not recovered during the investigation. About 60-percent of the right inboard gear door was recovered and reconstructed. The reconstructed portion of the door exhibited exterior paint abrasion that was consistent with door in the closed position. The inboard gear door actuator remained attached the wing.

--- Cockpit Switch and Lever Positions ---

Both engine power levers were in the normal takeoff position. Both levers were bent right and forward approximately 45-degrees. The power levers moved smoothly from the normal takeoff position to the flight idle detent. There was a positive indication at the normal takeoff and flight idle stops. The finger levers, which allow the power levers to be moved aft of the flight idle detent into fuel cut-off, could not be activated/pulled because of damage to both the power levers and the finger levers.

The flap handle was in the 20-degree detent position. Although the flap handle was bent, it could be moved between each flap position detent. A positive detent was noted at each flap position.

The lift dump switch was in the "Unlock" position. The lift dump handle was in the retracted position.

The speed brake was in the "RETRACT" position.

The landing gear position handle located in the cockpit was observed in the "UP" position. The cockpit landing gear circuit breaker was in the closed (not pulled) position. The landing gear alternate extension handle was found partially extended about 1-1/2 inches and was bent toward the instrument panel.

The battery toggle switch was in the "Standby" position.
Both generator toggle switches were in the "ON" position.
Both avionics switches were in the "ON" position.

The left fuel boost switch was in the "ON" position.
The position of the right fuel boost switch could not be determined due to impact damage.
The fuel transfer switch was in the "OFF" position.

Both engine ECU switches were in the "ON" position.
Both engine ignition switches were in the "ARM" position.
Engine synchronization was in the "OFF" position.

Additional cockpit switch positions are included in the docket materials associated with this investigation.

--- Engines ---

A postaccident examination of the left engine, serial number 105363, revealed evidence of leading edge foreign object damage to the N1 (Spool) Fan, consistent with the ingestion of debris during the impact sequence. Although damaged, the N1 Fan could still be rotated by hand. Thrust lever cable continuity from the center pedestal to the engine could not be verified due to the severity of the airframe damage. However, on the engine, the power control cables were continuous from the engine pylon to the power control arm located at the base of the HMU. The fuel control throttle lever was observed in the maximum power position. The Low Pressure (LP) Trip Lever cable exhibited no visible damage, and the fuel cutoff mechanism had not been activated. All three engine magnetic chip collectors were inspected and were free of metallic chips and/or debris. The powerplant examination revealed evidence that the left engine was operating at the time of impact.

A postaccident examination of the right engine, serial number 105364, revealed evidence of attic insulation, pieces of home roofing shingles, pieces of wood, and other unidentified debris within the engine cowling and bypass duct. However, the N1 fan did not reveal visible evidence of leading edge foreign object damage that would be expected from the ingestion of debris in conjunction with engine operation. Thrust lever cable continuity from the center pedestal to the engine could not be verified due to the severity of the airframe damage. However, on the engine, the power control cables were continuous from the engine pylon to the power control arm at the base of the HMU. The fuel control throttle lever was observed in the maximum power position. The LP Trip Lever cable was found bent and damaged, and the LP Trip Lever fuel cutoff mechanism had been activated. (The LP Shaft Trip Sensor is activated when the LP turbine is forced in the aft direction against the trip lever. Typical scenarios of when a trip sensor would be activated include a LP Shaft separation or when the engine is exposed to significant impact loading.) All three engine magnetic chip collectors were inspected and were free of metallic chips and/or debris. The powerplant examination did not reveal any evidence that the right engine was operating at the time of impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On March 18, 2013, autopsies were performed on the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger at the St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, located in Mishawka, Indiana. The cause of death for both individuals was attributed to blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during each autopsy.

The pilot's toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Losartan, an FAA-accepted high blood pressure medication, was detected in urine and blood samples. The pilot had reported the use of this medication on his most recent FAA medical certificate application.

The pilot-rated-passenger's toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all drugs and medications.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

--- Sound Spectrum Study ---

A study was performed to evaluate the sound spectrum of audio recorded by the cockpit area microphone after the loss of engine power at 1614:27. The CVR audio was compared with audio recorded during ground testing of an exemplar Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA). The sound spectrum study indicated that, at 1615:02, the pilot engaged a starter motor in attempt to restart one of the engines. The study further established that the electrical noise from the engine igniters was not present at any point during the CVR recording, including the attempted engine air start. (The air start procedure required that the igniter switches be switched to the "ON" position before attempting any engine air start) A review of the remaining CVR audio did not reveal any evidence of another attempt to restart an engine.

--- Surveillance Video Study ---

There were several surveillance videos of the accident airplane during the two landing attempts, and the final descent and impact. A study of airport surveillance footage was completed to determine an average ground speed of the airplane during the second landing attempt. The study determined that the airplane's average ground speed was 127 knots (+/- 4 knots) during the 3.75 seconds of camera footage of the second landing attempt. Additional information concerning the surveillance videos can be found with the docket materials associated with this investigation.

--- Mobile Device Examinations ---

Several mobile devices were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for examination.

The pilot's tablet mobile device contained several aviation related applications; however, none of the applications contained flight track data for the accident flight. One application, ForeFlight, depicted the planned route-of-flight for the accident flight. Additionally, the ForeFlight application also contained 160 file-and-brief entries for previous flights. Another application, LogTen Pro, contained a partial flight history log.

The pilot's mobile phone was reviewed and no information pertinent to the investigation was recovered.

The pilot-rated-passenger's mobile phone contained a text message, dated March 13, 2013, concerning a previous flight that he had in the accident airplane with the pilot. No additional information was recovered that was pertinent to the investigation.

Another passenger's mobile phone contained multiple out-going text messages with timestamps between 13:45 and 13:53 central daylight time. These text messages noted that the accident flight was about to takeoff and provided the expected time en route to South Bend. At 1505 eastern daylight time, a multi-media text message was sent with a photograph from inside the airplane cabin looking toward the cockpit. At 1612, another photo was taken from inside the cabin looking outside through a cabin window. No additional information was recovered that was pertinent to the investigation.

--- Starter-Generator Examinations ---

An initial visual examination of both starter-generators determined that their drive shafts were intact and the armatures rotated. The brush covers were removed and the brushes were observed to be in a good condition. The starter-generators were examined and tested at the manufacturer and no failures or anomalies were noted that would have prevented normal operation.

--- Generator Control Unit Examinations ---

Visual examination revealed the outer dust sleeve for the left generator control unit (GCU) was dented; however, further disassembly revealed no internal damage. The right GCU appeared to be undamaged. Both devices were examined and tested at the manufacturer and no failures or anomalies were noted that would have prevented normal operation.

--- Battery Examinations ---

During the on-site investigation, the no-load voltage of the main battery was 25 volts. Additional examination, at the manufacturer, confirmed that the battery was electrically intact and exceeded the acceptance test standards for a new battery. The standby battery was visually inspected at the accident site and no additional testing was completed.

--- Throttle Quadrant Assembly Examinations ---

The throttle quadrant assembly was removed from the airplane and examined at the manufacturer. A visual inspection revealed that both throttle levers were bent to the right and the fuel cutoff pull-up locks were jammed. There was foreign object debris, mostly loose attic insulation, found within the throttle quadrant assembly. To facilitate additional testing, the throttle arms were straightened to a vertical position. A partial Acceptance Test Procedure was completed because of existing damage to the throttle quadrant assembly. An electrical continuity check confirmed proper function of the throttle quadrant at each switch location.

--- Engine Electronic Control Unit Examinations ---

Both engine electronic control units (ECU) were examined and tested at the manufacturer on a Williams FJ44-2A engineering test cell. After a successful bit check at power-up, the contents of the ECU's non-volatile memory were downloaded. The examination of the recorded fault codes from each ECU determined no faults were recorded during the last flight in memory. Additionally, neither device contained any information regarding the engine operation during the last recorded flight.

Additional component examination summaries are included with the docket materials associated with the investigation.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

One of the surviving passengers was interviewed by two NTSB Human Performance and Survival Factors investigators. The passenger reported that he loaded his luggage and computer gear on the airplane between 1330 and 1345 central daylight time. After loading, he and the other passenger boarded the airplane and waited for the pilots. Around 1350, the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger boarded the airplane. The passengers were not provided a safety briefing. He stated that the takeoff and cruise portion of the flight appeared to be normal; however, while the airplane was on approach to the runway he noticed instrument panel was not illuminated like it had been earlier in the flight. Specifically, he recalled that the cockpit instrument panel appeared to be unpowered. He saw that the pilot was manually flying the airplane. The pilot-rated-passenger turned around and announced that they should prepare for landing. The passenger stated that he became concerned when the airplane flew past the terminal and control tower and had not touched down. He noted that he felt like the airplane was "coming in hot." The airplane then banked right and climbed away from the runway. The passenger heard the pilot tell the pilot-rated-passenger that they were "down to one engine." The airplane continued in the traffic pattern back to the runway. The passenger stated that the cockpit instrument panel still appeared to be unpowered during the second landing attempt; however, he did recall seeing flashing red and yellow cockpit lights. The passenger believed that during the second landing attempt the airplane had a slower groundspeed when compared to the first landing attempt. He noted that the airplane bounced off the runway several times before it entered a nose-high attitude and rolled to the right. He remembered seeing rooftops of homes before he blacked-out. His next memory was after the accident, as first responders attempted to gain access to the cabin.

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA196 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 17, 2013 in South Bend, IN
Aircraft: HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION 390, registration: N26DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 3 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The following is an INTERIM FACTUAL SUMMARY of this accident investigation. A final report that includes all pertinent facts, conditions, and circumstances of the accident will be issued upon completion, along with the Safety Board's analysis and probable cause of the accident.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 17, 2013, at 1623 eastern daylight time, a Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet, N26DK, serial number RB-226, collided with three residential structures following an aborted landing attempt on runway 9R located at the South Bend Airport (SBN), South Bend, Indiana. The private pilot and pilot-rated-passenger, who were occupying the cockpit seats, were fatally injured. An additional two passengers, who were seated in the cabin area, and one individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to 7700 Enterprises of Montana, LLC, and operated by Digicut Systems of Tulsa, Oklahoma, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 while on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight that departed the Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 1356 central daylight time.

According to air traffic control (ATC) information, after departing RVS, the accident flight proceeded toward the intended destination while receiving normal ATC services. The flight was eventually cleared to a final cruise altitude of 41,000 feet (FL410). The cockpit voice recorder (CVR) contained about 31 minutes of cockpit conversation/audio and radio communications. At 1545:31, the beginning of the CVR recording, the pilot was discussing the airplane's fuel status and how much fuel would be required for the return flight. The pilot continued to explain and demonstrate various flight management system functions to the pilot-rated-passenger. At 1546:08, the pilot-rated-passenger remarked "a lot of stuff to learn." The pilot continued to explain and demonstrate the features of the flight management system, the use of his mobile tablet as an electronic flight bag, and the airplane's various weight limitations.

At 1552:17, the pilot established contact with Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center and reported being level at FL410. The controller subsequently cleared the flight to descend to 24,000 feet (FL240). After receiving the descent clearance, the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger discussed how to initiate a descent using the autopilot's vertical speed mode. The pilot explained how to use airplane pitch and engine power and to maintain a desired airspeed during the descent. At 1555:22, the pilot stated "we're up more speed, so we got to get our power back. gettin' ready to start beeping at us. got to bring it back." At 1555:27, the CVR recorded a sound similar to the airspeed overspeed warning for 13.5 seconds. At 1555:31, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot, "just pull it way back?" The pilot replied, "well, just get it out of the line. and we got to get it so, that it trends -- there you go -- there you go -- now give it -- it ends, there you go." The pilot continued to explain how to maintain a desired airspeed. At 1555:55, the pilot-rated-passenger remarked, "I just hate chasin' the darn thing." The pilot replied, "huh, how many hours you got flying this jet?" The pilot-rated-passenger stated, "well, I know, but I'm just saying it's just, you know, uncomfortable. Creates alarm in the back -- throttle up, throttle down."

The pilot then explained how to setup a descent while maintaining a specified airspeed. At 1557:29, the pilot-rated passenger stated, "so, pull back?" The pilot replied, "little bit. little bit. keep working it back 'cause that tells you where you're gonna be in six seconds. so, right now, you're going to be at the line in six seconds, so you want to continue to trend back. so yeah. so, just take two seventy or something like that." At 1557:53, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger to "just keep us out the red."

At 1558:08, the controller cleared the flight direct to South Bend. After acknowledging the direct clearance, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger how to program the flight management system to proceed direct to the destination airport. The pilot then discussed the airplane's indicated airspeed, ground speed, and how to cross-check the airplane's flight attitude with the backup cockpit instrumentation. At 1559:24, the Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) recording is audible over the radio channel. At 1559:42, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot if they needed to engage engine heat. The pilot replied that they would wait until they get an ice indication light. At 1600:34, the pilot-rated-passenger asked the pilot "okay. pull back on the power?"

At 1601:35, the controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 20,000 feet (FL200). At 1602:13, the pilot discussed the current weather conditions that he had obtained from the ATIS recording, the expected wind correction during the approach and landing, the minimum descent altitude during the instrument approach, and the landing reference speed. At 1603:22, the controller asked the pilot to expedite a descent to 17,000 feet mean sea level (msl). At 1603:51, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "watch your speed" and "very good, very good. great speed management."

At 1605:08, a sound similar to the altitude alert was heard, the pilot announced "thousand away" and told the passenger-rated-pilot "okay, now we can come nose back up." At 1605:29, the pilot stated "let's go to the stop... to the click (detent)... MCT (maximum continuous thrust)." At 1606:14, the CVR recorded a sound similar to the airspeed overspeed warning that lasted for 11.4 seconds. At 1606:20, the pilot stated "that's what a check pilot will do, is he'll give you three things to do... when he knows you're trending in the wrong direction." At 1606:32, the pilot said "your throttles."

At 1606:49, the controller cleared the flight to expedite a descent to maintain 11,000 feet msl. After acknowledging the descent clearance, the pilot and pilot-rated passenger continued to discuss how to maintain airspeed during a cruise descent. At 1607:23, the controller asked the pilot for a ride report. The pilot replied that the weather conditions had been "smooth all the way." At 1607:52, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger to maintain 290 knots. The pilot-rated-passenger replied "okay, where is it?" The pilot responded "two ninety would be more power." At 1608:44, the controller issued a heading change for traffic sequencing. The pilot then explained how to promote a waypoint using the flight management system and how to plan for a descent to the selected waypoint. At 1610:11, the controller cleared the flight direct the destination airport and to contact South Bend Approach Control.

At 1610:32, the pilot established communications with South Bend Approach Control and reported being level at 11,000 feet msl. The approach controller cleared the flight direct to KNUTE, the outer marker for the instrument landing system (ILS) runway 9R instrument approach, but to expect a visual approach to the airport. The pilot then explained how to promote KNUTE as the next active waypoint within the flight management system, and how to plan for the descent to the waypoint. At 1611:45, the approach controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 10,000 feet msl. At 1613:07, the approach controller cleared the flight to descend and maintain 3,000 feet msl.

After receiving the descent clearance to 3,000 feet msl, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "let's power back. let's bring it back to uh -- let's trend toward uh two twenty, two ten." The pilot-rated-passenger acknowledged and the pilot replied "and we'll have to come way out of it to do that." At 1613:30, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound consistent with a decrease in engine speed. The pilot then verbalized a descent checklist and turned on the seatbelt cabin chime. At 1614:14, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "we gotta get -- just pull -- just pull the power out." At 1614:18, the pilot-rated-passenger asked, "just pull it on down?" The pilot replied, "yeah, let's -- let's get back to two hundred (knots)." At 1614:21, the cockpit area microphone recorded another sound consistent with a decrease in engine speed. At 1614:26, the cockpit area microphone recorded the sound of two clicks. At 1614:27, there was a brief interruption in electrical power, an autopilot disconnect chime, and two unidentified tones. According to ATC radar track data, at 1614:28, the final radar return with an accompanying mode-C altitude return was recorded at 6,700 feet msl. At that time, the flight was located about 18 miles southwest of the destination airport. At 1614:29, the pilot said "uh-oh" and the pilot-rated-passenger replied "what?" At 1614:33, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was heard for 3.5 seconds. At 1614:35, the pilot told the pilot-rated-passenger "you went back behind the stops and we lost power." (The airplane throttle quadrant had a mechanical stop at the flight idle power position, which required lifting finger levers, or pull-up locks, to further retard the throttles into the fuel cut-off position.)

At 1614:43, the pilot said "okay let's see here... boost pumps are on... okay we are dead stick." At 1614:56, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was heard for 10.9 seconds. At 1615:01, the approach controller told the pilot to turn five degrees left for runway 9R and to report when he had the airport in sight. At 1615:02, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound similar to an engine starter/generator spooling up; however, according to a sound spectrum study, engine power was not restored during the attempted restart. At 1615:08, the pilot told the approach controller, "uh... South Bend, we have an emergency, two six delta kilo. dead engines, dead stick, no power." The controller asked if he needed assistance and the pilot replied "affirm." Between 1615:19 and 1615:27, there was a sustained electrical power interruption to the CVR. At 1615:30, the controller asked for the pilot's intentions and the pilot replied "uh, we've lost all power and we have no hydraulics." At 1615:32, there was the sound similar to an altitude alert.

At 1615:38, the controller stated that the airport would have emergency equipment standing-by and asked if the airplane was controllable. At 1615:42, the pilot replied "ah, barely controllable." The controller told the pilot that all of the runways were available for landing and issued the current wind condition. At 1615:53, the pilot told the controller "uh, we have no navigation. if you could give us a vector please... we have no heading either. which -- you're gonna have to tell us which way to fly." The controller replied that the airplane was about 9 miles from the airport, which was at the 12-o'clock position. At 1616:09, the pilot-rated-passenger stated "there's the airport" and the pilot responded "Where? -- Okay." At 1616:12, the sound similar to the landing gear warning horn was audible until the end of the CVR recording. At 1616:13, the approach controller told the pilot to turn left 10 degrees. At 1616:16, the pilot replied "two six delta, turning left." At 1616:32, the CVR stopped recording while the airplane was still airborne with both engines still inoperative.

No additional voice communications were received from the accident airplane. The approach controller continued to transmit radar vectors toward runway 9R without any response from the accident pilot. At 1618:59, the approach controller told the accident airplane to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. (The tower controller had informed the approach controller that only the nose landing gear was extended) The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern for runway 9R. The airplane made another landing approach to the runway with only the nose landing gear extended. Several witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low, rolling descent into a nearby residential community.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

--- Pilot ---

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 58, held a private pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. He was type-rated for the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet. His last aviation medical examination was completed on January 22, 2013, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate. The medical certificate had a limitation that it was not valid for any certificate classification after January 31, 2014. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The pilot's flight history was reconstructed using a partially completed pilot logbook, a spreadsheet flight log, several applications for his FAA pilot certificates and ratings, and a spreadsheet history of the flights that had been completed in the accident airplane. The pilot began his primary flight instruction on January 21, 2011. On April 29, 2011, when he applied for his private pilot certificate, he reported having 71 hours total time. On February 5, 2012, when he applied for his instrument rating, the pilot reported having 314 hours total time. On February 26, 2012, when he applied for his multi-engine rating, the pilot reported having 330 hours total time. On May 4, 2012, when he applied for his type-rating in the Hawker Beechcraft model 390, the pilot reported having 450 hours total time. According to additional flight documentation, after he had received his type-rating, the pilot accumulated an additional 163.7 hours in the accident airplane. The pilot's total flight experience was estimated to be about 613.7 hours, of which at least 171.5 hours were completed in the same make/model as the accident airplane.

According to training records, from April 29, 2012, through May 4, 2012, the pilot attended initial type-rating training for the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 airplane at The Jetstream Group, located in Chino, California. The course consisted of 41 hours of ground training, 8 hours of flight briefing/debriefing, and 7.8 hours of flight training in the Hawker Beechcraft model 390 airplane. On May 4, 2012, the pilot obtained his type-rating following a 2.1-hour oral examination and a 2.0 hour checkride with a FAA designated pilot examiner.

--- Pilot-Rated-Passenger ---

According to FAA records, the pilot-rated-passenger, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on August 3, 2005, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with the limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

A review of available logbook information indicated that the last recorded flight was completed on September 28, 2008. At that time, the pilot-rated-passenger had accumulated 1,877.2 hours total flight experience, of which 1,705.3 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. He had accumulated 1,576.2 hours in multi-engine airplanes and 301 hours in single-engine airplanes. He had accumulated 92.4 hours in actual instrument conditions and 517.6 hours at night. His last recorded flight review and instrument proficiency check was completed on September 19, 2006, in a Beech model 60 twin-engine airplane. A review of available information did not reveal any logged flight experience in turbine-powered business jets.

According to an affidavit provided by the pilot's son following the accident, the pilot-rated-passenger was not an employee of the operator, nor was he employed as a pilot for the accident flight. He was reportedly a friend of the pilot who shared a common interest in aviation. He reportedly did not have an official role on the accident flight, and as such, was considered a pilot-rated-passenger.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 2008 Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet, serial number RB-226. Two Williams International model FJ44-2A turbofan engines, each capable of producing 2,300 pounds of thrust at takeoff, powered the airplane. The airplane had a maximum takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds. The airplane was equipped for operation under instrument flight rules and in known icing conditions.

The accident airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate on March 13, 2008. According to FAA documentation, 7700 Enterprises of Montana, LLC, purchased the airplane on April 18, 2012. The current FAA registration certificate was issued on May 1, 2012. The airplane was maintained under the provisions of a FAA-approved manufacturer inspection program. The last inspection of the airplane was completed on November 4, 2012, at 419 hours total airframe time. As of the last inspection, both engines also had accumulated 419 hours since new. The static system, altimeter system, automatic pressure altitude reporting system, and transponder were last tested on July 7, 2011. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane hour meter indicated 457.5 hours at the accident site.

The primary flight control systems, except the spoilers, were manually operated through control cables, push/pull tubes, and mechanical linkages. The spoilers were electronically controlled and hydraulically actuated. The pitch trim system, roll trim system, and yaw trim system were electrically operated. The speed brake was controlled electrically and operated hydraulically. The flaps were electronically controlled and electrically actuated.

Pitch attitude of the airplane was controlled by the elevators and the variable incidence horizontal stabilizer. The elevator control system was operated manually by movement of the cockpit control columns. Roll attitude was controlled through the ailerons, spoilers and roll trim. The aileron control system was operated manually by movement of the cockpit control wheels. The spoiler control system was electrically controlled by movement of the cockpit control wheels and hydraulically actuated. Yaw control was accomplished by the rudder and rudder trim tab. The rudder control system was operated manually by moving the cockpit rudder pedals.

The cockpit engine thrust levers were connected to control cables that extended aft through the fuselage to the power control arm located on the bottom of each hydromechanical fuel control unit (HMU). In addition to the mechanical throttle linkages to the HMUs, each engine had an electronic control unit (ECU) that interfaced with its respective HMU to provide automatic fuel control throughout the normal engine operating envelope. The ECUs were part of the Standby Bus electrical system. Finger levers, or pull-up locks, were installed to prevent the inadvertent movement of the thrust levers from flight idle into the fuel cutoff position.

During normal operation, the Standby Bus is powered by the Essential Bus. The Essential Bus receives electrical power from the main battery and generators (when online). During engine prestart and engine start, the ECUs are powered by the main battery until a generator is brought online. The generators are used as starter motors during normal engine starts and starter-assisted air starts. As such, following an engine start, a generator is "RESET" by selecting the associated toggle switch that is located on the electrical control sub-panel. The momentary "RESET" toggle switch position reestablishes electrical power from the generator to the Essential Bus system. During normal engine operation, the ECUs are powered by the generators through the Essential Bus; however, the ECUs could also be powered by the standby battery, through the Standby Buss, if the standby battery is selected following the depletion of the main battery.

In the event of a loss of engine power during flight, an engine can be restarted in the air by one of two methods: either a windmilling start or a starter-assisted air start. A windmilling start uses residual engine speed, air movement against the fan blades, and engine igniters to restart the engine and regain power. A starter-assisted air start uses electrical power, routed through the generator/starter motor, to increase the N2 shaft to a speed where the igniters can restart the engine. Generally, the flight envelope to accomplish an engine air start is between 130 and 300 knots indicated airspeed and from sea level to 25,000 feet. At lower airspeeds, a starter-assisted air start is recommended and uses the normal engine start switch. At higher airspeeds a windmilling start is recommended and does not use the normal engine start switch. In contrast to the normal ground start procedure, the air start procedure requires that the igniter switches be switched to the "ON" position before attempting any engine air start.

The airplane was equipped with an electrically controlled, hydraulically actuated, retractable landing gear. If hydraulic or electric power is unavailable, an alternate procedure is used to extend the landing gear. When the alternate landing gear extension handle was pulled outward from the stowed position, the landing gear and door up-lock hooks are released, which allows the landing gear to free-fall into the down-and-locked position. The use of the alternate landing gear handle also opens a mechanically actuated recirculation valve that connects the main landing gear retraction and extension hydraulic lines to allow a more positive free-fall of the gear. The landing gear release is sequenced so that the nose gear is released first, followed by the main landing gear inboard doors, and finally the main landing gear. According to the airframe manufacturer, the nose landing gear is released from the up-locks when the alternate extension handle is extended to 2-1/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). The main landing gear inboard doors are released when the alternate extension handle is extended to 2-3/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). Finally, the main landing gear are released from their respective up-locks when the alternate extension handle is pulled to 3-1/4 inches (+/- 0.25 inch). The full stroke length of the alternate extension handle, following a full deployment of the landing gear, is specified to be a minimum of 4 inches.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1620, the SBN automated surface observing system reported: wind 120 degrees at 13 knots, gusting 17 knots; a clear sky; 10 mile surface visibility; temperature 2 degrees Celsius; dew point -8 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS

The accident flight was on an activated instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. A review of available ATC information indicated that the accident flight had received normal air traffic control services and handling. A transcript of the voice communications recorded between the accident flight and South Bend Approach Control are included with the docket materials associated with the investigation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The South Bend Airport (SBN), a public airport located approximately 3 miles northwest of South Bend, Indiana, was owned and operated by the St. Joseph County Airport Authority. The airport was a certificated airport under 14 CFR Part 139 and had on-airport fire and rescue services. The airport field elevation was 799 feet msl. The airport had three runways: runway 9R/27L (8,414 feet by 150 feet, asphalt/grooved); runway 18/36 (7,100 feet by 150 feet, asphalt/grooved); and runway 9L/27R (4,300 feet by 75 feet, asphalt).

FLIGHT RECORDERS

Although not required, the airplane was equipped with an L-3/Fairchild model FA2100-1010 CVR, serial number 446023. The CVR recording contained about 31 minutes of digital audio, which was stored in solid-state memory modules. The CVR was not damaged during the accident and the audio information was extracted from the recorder normally. The recording consisted of four channels of audio information, ranging from good to excellent quality. The recording began at 1545:31 with the airplane established in cruise flight at 41,000 feet (FL410), and the recording stopped about 1616:32 while the airplane was maneuvering toward the destination airport with both engines inoperative. A transcript of the CVR audio information is included with the docket materials associated with the investigation. The airplane was not equipped with a flight data recorder, nor was it required to be so equipped.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane collided with three residential structures during the final impact sequence. A majority of the wreckage was found within one of the structures. There was a noticeable odor of Jet-A fuel at the accident site and the South Bend Fire Department reported that fuel had pooled in the basement of the house. The airplane wreckage was recovered from the house and transported to the South Bend Airport to facilitate a more detailed examination. A postaccident examination of the runway 9R revealed areas of abrasion damage to the grooved asphalt surface. The observed damage was consistent with the accident airplane coming in contact with the runway surface during the accident flight.

--- Fuselage ---

The radome had separated from the radome bulkhead, which had separated from the fuselage. The nose baggage and avionics sections had separated forward of the forward pressure bulkhead and the nose wheel well structure had buckled. The cabin area exhibited impact damage; however, portions remained intact from the forward pressure bulkhead to the aft pressure bulkhead. A section of the right cabin sidewall, from the emergency escape hatch opening forward to approximately the right side galley area, had been cut open by first responders to extract the occupants. The aft fuselage had separated from the cabin portion at the aft pressure bulkhead, but remained attached by flight control cables and other conduits. Both engines remained attached to the aft fuselage. The main entry door remained attached at both hinge locations and was found open with the latches in the closed position. The main entry door latching mechanism was actuated and operated as designed. Examination of the fuselage revealed no evidence of an in-flight or post-impact fire. The VHF communications No. 1 antenna had separated from the lower fuselage, and exhibited gouges and scoring of the lower leading edge that were consistent with contact with the runway surface.

--- Wings ---

The wing assembly had separated from the airframe at all mounting points. The left wing exhibited deformation consistent with impact forces, but remained intact with all flight control surfaces attached. The right wing exhibited deformation consistent with impact forces and had separated in several locations. The inboard portion of the right wing exhibited minor damage when compared to the outboard wing. The outboard portion of the right wing, outboard of the inboard flap, exhibited impact damage, deformation, and had separated into several pieces. The outboard portion of the right wing, from the aileron outboard, had separated as one piece, with the exception of the composite wing tip assembly. The composite wing tip assembly had separated from the outboard end of the wing and was found amongst the main wreckage. The lower skin of the outboard portion of right wing and the lower skin of the composite wing tip exhibited gouging/scoring that was consistent with contact with the runway surface. The marks made by the gouging/scoring were approximately parallel with the chord of the wing and were aligned with the longitudinal axis of the fuselage. Additional abrasion damage was observed on the lower aft portion of all right wing flap tracks and the aft portion of the wing center keel structure. The trailing edge of the right aileron also exhibited abrasion damage. The wing flaps were observed in the retracted position and the measurement of the individual flap actuators corresponded with fully retracted flap positions. The aileron flight control system displayed multiple separations throughout the circuit; however, all observed separations exhibited features consistent with an overstress failure.

--- Stabilizers ---

The horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the rear fuselage and revealed limited impact damage. The elevators remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer at all hinges. The outboard portion of the right elevator, including the balance weight, had separated from the remaining right elevator. The right and left elevator trim tab surfaces remained attached to their respective elevators at their hinges. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer and the hinges exhibited no apparent damage. The rudder trim tab remained attached to the rudder at the hinges and did not appear to be damaged. The rudder trim tab surface was visually aligned (faired) with the trailing edge of the rudder. Flight control continuity for the elevator and rudder displayed multiple separations; however, all observed separations exhibited features consistent with an overstress failure.

--- Landing Gear ---

The nose landing gear had separated from the airframe trunnion. The nose landing gear drag brace had separated from the nose landing gear assembly and the airframe supporting structure. The down lock actuator and down lock "pawl" assembly had separated from the drag brace assembly. The nose wheel and tire remained attached to the nose landing gear assembly. The nose wheel exhibited signs of impact damage to a portion of the bead area. The nose landing gear doors had separated from the airframe and were found amongst the main wreckage. The nose landing gear actuator had separated from the airframe in two pieces. The piston portion of the actuator remained attached to the nose landing gear assembly.

The left main landing gear assembly remained intact and attached to the left wing trunnion. The gear was found in the wheel well; however, the uplock was not engaged to the main landing gear uplock roller. The left main landing gear actuator remained attached to the main landing gear assembly and to the wing supporting structure. The actuator was found in the retracted position; however, multiple separations of hydraulic lines and impact damage prevented a determination of the landing gear position by the measurement of the landing gear actuator. The left outboard gear door remained attached to the wing structure and the left main landing gear assembly. The left inboard gear door had separated from the wing and was found in several pieces amongst the main wreckage. The left inboard gear door actuator remained attached to the wing. About 90-percent of the inboard gear door was recovered and reconstructed. The paint on the exterior portions of the door appeared to be eroded, consistent with contact with the runway surface while in the closed position.

The right main landing gear assembly remained intact and attached to the wing structure. The right wing had separated between the main landing gear trunnion fitting and the main landing gear actuator wing attach fitting. The main landing gear actuator remained attached to the main landing gear assembly and the wing attach fitting. The right main landing gear actuator was partially extended; the actuator was in neither the fully retracted nor the down-and-locked position. Multiple separations of hydraulic lines and impact damage prevented a determination of the landing gear position by measurement of the landing gear actuator. The right main landing gear outboard door had separated from the wing and was not recovered during the investigation. About 60-percent of the right inboard gear door was recovered and reconstructed. The reconstructed portion of the door exhibited exterior paint erosion that was consistent with door being abraded in the closed position. Additionally, there was evidence that the left tire had pressed against the interior of the door when the exterior abrasion had occurred. The inboard gear door actuator remained attached the wing.

--- Cockpit Switch and Lever Positions ---

Both engine power levers were in the normal takeoff position. Both levers were bent right and forward approximately 45-degrees. The power levers moved smoothly from the normal takeoff position to the flight idle detent. There was a positive indication at the normal takeoff and flight idle stops. The finger levers, which allow the power levers to be moved aft of the flight idle detent into fuel cut-off, could not be activated/pulled because of damage to both the power levers and the finger levers.

The flap handle was in the 20-degree detent position. Although the flap handle was bent, it could be moved between each flap position detent. A positive detent was noted at each flap position.

The lift dump switch was in the "Unlock" position. The lift dump handle was in the retracted position. 

The speed brake was in the "RETRACT" position.

The landing gear position handle located in the cockpit was observed in the "UP" position. The cockpit landing gear circuit breaker was in the closed (not pulled) position. The landing gear alternate extension handle was found partially extended about 1-1/2 inches and was bent toward the instrument panel.

The battery toggle switch was in the "Standby" position.
Both generator toggle switches were in the "ON" position.
Both avionics switches were in the "ON" position.

The left fuel boost switch was in the "ON" position.
The position of the right fuel boost switch could not be determined due to impact damage.
The fuel transfer switch was in the "OFF" position.

Both engine ECU switches were in the "ON" position.
Both engine ignition switches were in the "ARM" position.
Engine synchronization was in the "OFF" position.

--- Engines ---

A postaccident examination of the left engine, serial number 105363, revealed evidence of leading edge foreign object damage to the N1 (Spool) Fan, consistent with the ingestion of debris during the impact sequence. Although damaged, the N1 Fan could still be rotated by hand. Thrust lever cable continuity from the center pedestal to the engine could not be verified due to the severity of the airframe damage. However, on the engine, the power control cables were continuous from the engine pylon to the power control arm located at the base of the HMU. The fuel control throttle lever was observed in the maximum power position. The Low Pressure (LP) Trip Lever cable exhibited no visible damage, and the fuel cutoff mechanism had not been activated. All three engine magnetic chip collectors were inspected and were free of metallic chips and/or debris. The powerplant examination revealed evidence that the left engine was operating at the time of impact.

A postaccident examination of the right engine, serial number 105364, revealed evidence of attic insulation, pieces of home roofing shingles, pieces of wood, and other unidentified debris within the engine cowling and bypass duct. However, the N1 fan did not reveal visible evidence of leading edge foreign object damage that would be expected from the ingestion of debris in conjunction with engine operation. Thrust lever cable continuity from the center pedestal to the engine could not be verified due to the severity of the airframe damage. However, on the engine, the power control cables were continuous from the engine pylon to the power control arm at the base of the HMU. The fuel control throttle lever was observed in the maximum power position. The LP Trip Lever cable was found bent and damaged, and the LP Trip Lever fuel cutoff mechanism had been activated. (The LP Shaft Trip Sensor is activated when the LP turbine is forced in the aft direction against the trip lever. Typical scenarios of when a trip sensor would be activated include a LP Shaft separation or when the engine is exposed to significant impact loading.) All three engine magnetic chip collectors were inspected and were free of metallic chips and/or debris. The powerplant examination did not reveal any evidence that the right engine was operating at the time of impact.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On March 18, 2013, autopsies were performed on the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger at the St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, located in Mishawka, Indiana. The cause of death for both individuals was attributed to blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during each autopsy.

The pilot's toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Losartan, an FAA-accepted high blood pressure medication, was detected in urine and blood samples. The pilot had reported the use of this medication on his most recent FAA medical certificate application.

The pilot-rated-passenger's toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all drugs and medications.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

--- Sound Spectrum Study ---

A study was performed to evaluate the sound spectrum of audio recorded by the cockpit area microphone after the loss of engine power at 1614:27. The CVR audio was compared with audio recorded during ground testing of an exemplar Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA). The sound spectrum study indicated that, at 1615:02, the pilot engaged a starter motor in attempt to restart one of the engines. The study further established that the electrical noise from the engine igniters was not present at any point during the CVR recording, including the attempted engine air start. (The air start procedure required that the igniter switches be switched to the "ON" position before attempting any engine air start) A review of the remaining CVR audio did not reveal any evidence of another attempt to restart an engine.

--- Surveillance Video Study ---

There were several surveillance videos of the accident airplane during the two landing attempts, and the final descent and impact. A study of airport surveillance footage was completed to determine an average ground speed of the airplane during the second landing attempt. The study determined that the airplane's average ground speed was 127 knots (+/- 4 knots) during the 3.75 seconds of camera footage of the second landing attempt. Additional information concerning the surveillance videos can be found with the docket materials associated with this investigation.

--- Mobile Device Examinations ---

Several mobile devices were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for examination.

The pilot's tablet mobile device contained several aviation related applications; however, none of the applications contained flight track data for the accident flight. One application, ForeFlight, depicted the planned route-of-flight for the accident flight. Additionally, the ForeFlight application also contained 160 file-and-brief entries for previous flights. Another application, LogTen Pro, contained a partial flight history log.

The pilot's mobile phone was reviewed and no information pertinent to the investigation was recovered.

The pilot-rated-passenger's mobile phone contained a text message, dated March 13, 2013, concerning a previous flight that he had in the accident airplane with the pilot. No additional information was recovered that was pertinent to the investigation.

Another passenger's mobile phone contained multiple out-going text messages with timestamps between 13:45 and 13:53 central daylight time. These text messages noted that the accident flight was about to takeoff and provided the expected time en route to South Bend. At 1505 eastern daylight time, a multi-media text message was sent with a photograph from inside the airplane cabin looking toward the cockpit. At 1612, another photo was taken from inside the cabin looking outside through a cabin window. No additional information was recovered that was pertinent to the investigation.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

One of the surviving passengers was interviewed by two NTSB Human Performance and Survival Factors investigators. The passenger reported that he loaded his luggage and computer gear on the airplane between 1330 and 1345 central daylight time. After loading, he and the other passenger boarded the airplane and waited for the pilots. Around 1350, the pilot and pilot-rated-passenger boarded the airplane. The passengers were not provided a safety briefing. He stated that the takeoff and cruise portion of the flight appeared to be normal; however, while the airplane was on approach to the runway he noticed instrument panel was not illuminated like it had been earlier in the flight. Specifically, he recalled that the cockpit instrument panel appeared to be unpowered. He saw that the pilot was manually flying the airplane. The pilot-rated-passenger turned around and announced that they should prepare for landing. The passenger stated that he became concerned when the airplane flew past the terminal and control tower and had not touched down. He noted that he felt like the airplane was "coming in hot." The airplane then banked right and climbed away from the runway. The passenger heard the pilot tell the pilot-rated-passenger that they were "down to one engine." The airplane continued in the traffic pattern back to the runway. The passenger stated that the cockpit instrument panel still appeared to be unpowered during the second landing attempt; however, he did recall seeing flashing red and yellow cockpit lights. The passenger believed that during the second landing attempt the airplane had a slower groundspeed when compared to the first landing attempt. He noted that the airplane bounced off the runway several times before it entered a nose-high attitude and rolled to the right. He remembered seeing rooftops of homes before he blacked-out. His next memory was after the accident, as first responders attempted to gain access to the cabin.
==================

Jim Rodgers can smile, even though he can’t speak normally. He is good-humored and desperately wants to get better, his attorney says.

But the former Tulsa, Okla., firefighter and survivor of a South Bend plane crash is bedridden. He can’t walk or take care of his own bodily functions. His ability to communicate is limited.

He has a serious brain injury from the crash.

“It’s still highly unlikely he will make a serious recovery and be independent,” Rodgers’ attorney Fred Stoops said.

And the medical bills after the March 17 crash into a South Bend neighborhood are mounting fast.

The Oklahoma City, Okla., attorney has filed a lawsuit in South Bend on behalf of Rodgers and his wife Sheryl. Chris Evans, Rodgers’ son-in-law who also survived the crash, and his wife Jill are named as plaintiffs as well.

The suit, filed in April against the plane manufacturer and the company that owned it, alleges that parts of the jet, a Hawker Beechcraft model 390, were defective, which caused the fatal and destructive plane crash.

A pilot and owner of the jet, Wes Caves, along with a co-pilot, Steve Davis, died after the jet spiraled out of the air into three homes on Iowa Street.

The crash followed an unsuccessful landing attempt at the nearby South Bend Regional Airport. The jet destroyed three homes, but the residents survived.

St. Joseph Superior Court Judge David Chapleau has allowed two of the homeowners whose residences were leveled, Diana McKeown and Patricia Kobalski, to join the lawsuit.

In the months after the filing of the claim, the case has grown into a massive stack of papers that detail the financial repercussions the crash left in its wake.

Filings from McKeown and Kobalski and their insurance companies ask for monetary reimbursement for the destruction of their homes.

Rodgers’ and Evans’ cite physical injury, emotional distress, loss of normal life, medical expenses, lost earnings and the ability to continue earning income in their quest for monetary relief.

“They are facing an unbelievable hardship,” Stoops said.

Evans is in better physical shape than Rodgers and faced orthopedic injuries.

Rodgers was a firefighter when he was injured, but, Stoops said, his health insurance plan did not cover injuries sustained when working other jobs.

He and Evans flew in the plane that day because they were employees of Caves, who was traveling to the area from Oklahoma for business.

Stoops said Rodgers’ family is able to pay for some of his medical care but not all of it.

“They are totally mortgaging their future in hopes that at some point, they can get it back,” Stoops said.

Named as defendants in the case are the Beechcraft Corp., Hawker Beechcraft Inc., Digicut Sales LLC, 7700 Enterprises of Montana LLC and 7700 Enterprises LLC, as well as unnamed manufacturers.

Robert Konopa, who is representing the Beechcraft Corp., declined to comment, saying it is his policy not to discuss pending litigation.

Other attorneys involved in the case did not return phone messages left today.

Caves owned Digicut Sales, which owned the jet.

The lawsuit cites “improper manufacture and dangerous stability, handling, stall and spin characteristics” as factors that caused the crash.

“The landing gear, GPS navigation systems and other flight-essential systems subsequently failed to function properly,” the complaint says.

It argues that the manufacturer and company that maintained the plane allowed a defective craft to fly.

The defendants have denied these claims in answers to the complaint.

Stoops said the parties in the suit are waiting for the final report from the National Transportation Safety Board, which is delaying the progression of the lawsuit.

NTSB has released a preliminary report detailing the radio traffic dispatched before the crash, but it has not released a final report that determines a cause.

“We've lost all power, and we have no hydraulics," the pilot radioed minutes before the crash, according to the NTSB report.

He radios that the plane is barely controllable.

Stoops said Evans recalls the crash and the events leading up to the crash. Evans told him the problem was mechanical.

But the plaintiffs don’t have access to the jet parts that could prove or disprove that while NTSB is conducting the investigation.

Neither Evans nor his attorney will specifically relate what happened during the crash, as that is a key part of their case, Stoops said.

Meanwhile, as the survivors trudge through what will likely be a long litigation process, South Bend firefighters offered some comfort for Rodgers as he fights to recover.

Two local firefighters traveled to Tulsa this week to visit Rodgers, a fellow fireman, and gave him a helmet with insignias of both Notre Dame and Oklahoma University.

Members of the fire department signed the helmet.

Davis, one of the pilots who died, was a quarterback for the Sooners from 1972 to 1976.

“It was such an unbelievably classy thing they did,” Stoops said.

Story and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.southbendtribune.com

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N26DK 

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA196
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 17, 2013 in South Bend, IN
Aircraft: Hawker Beechcraft Corporation 390, registration: N26DK
Injuries: 2 Fatal,3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 17, 2013, at 1623 eastern daylight time, a Hawker Beechcraft model 390 (Premier IA) business jet, N26DK, serial number RB-226, collided with three residential structures and terrain following an aborted landing attempt on runway 9R located at the South Bend Regional Airport (KSBN), South Bend, Indiana. The private pilot and pilot-rated-passenger occupying the cockpit seats were fatally injured. An additional two passengers and one individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to 7700 Enterprises of Montana, LLC and operated by Digicut Systems of Tulsa, Oklahoma, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 while on an instrument flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight that departed Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 1358 central daylight time.

According to preliminary air traffic control information, at 1610:31, the accident pilot established radio communications with South Bend Approach Control while at 11,000 feet mean sea level (msl). The air traffic controller cleared the flight direct to KNUTE intersection and told the pilot to expect a visual approach to runway 9R. At 1611:44, the flight was cleared to descend to 10,000 feet msl. At 1613:06, the flight was cleared to 3,000 feet msl. At 1615:00, the approach controller told the pilot to make a 5-degree left turn to align with runway 9R and asked the pilot to report when he had the airport in sight. At 1615:07, the pilot declared an emergency because of a lack of engine power, reporting that they were "dead stick" and without any power. About 23 seconds later, at 1615:30, the pilot transmitted "we've lost all power, and we have no hydraulics." When the controller asked if the airplane remained controllable, the pilot replied "ah, barely controllable." The controller advised that all runways at KSBN were available for landing and issued the current winds, which were 130-degrees at 10 knots. At 1615:22, the pilot transmitted that the airplane’s navigational systems were inoperative and requested a radar vector toward the airport. The controller replied that the airport was 9 miles directly ahead of the airplane’s current position. At 1616:12, the controller told the pilot to turn 10-degrees left to intersect runway 9R. At 1616:15, the pilot replied "26DK, turning left." No additional voice communications were received from the accident airplane. The approach controller continued to transmit radar vectors toward runway 9R without any response from the accident pilot. At 1618:58, the approach controller told the accident airplane to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. (The tower controller had informed the approach controller that only the nose landing gear was extended) The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern for runway 9R. The airplane made another landing approach to runway 9R with only the nose landing gear extended. Several witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low descent into a nearby residential community.