Friday, September 11, 2015

Casa Grande Municipal Airport (KCGZ) wants more corporate jet traffic to Phoenix

Seeing an opportunity, Casa Grande Municipal Airport Manager Richard Wilkie marketed the airport as an alternative destination for people flying into the Phoenix area to attend Super Bowl XLIX.

As a result, the airport served 13 corporate jets, allowing the city to also promote what Casa Grande has to offer potential businesses.  

“During the Super Bowl, (the Phoenix area) is a controlled airspace. It’s locked down. If you didn’t get in by a certain window and in fact, in order to land during the Super Bowl, you actually had to schedule flights into some of the major airports,” Wilkie said. “We were offering how easy it is to fly in here. You fly in when you want. We had a few transportation companies and provided that to the people who flew in. “We tried to promote local, ‘hey you can come in, stay the night and zip up to the Super Bowl and then come back down. It’s easy because there is not a wait.”’

Wilkie said major sporting events in the Valley provide an opportunity for the city to market itself to potential businesses.

“A lot of the people going (to the Super Bowl) have a lot of money and they own their planes,” Wilkie said. “With the Super Bowl, Pro Bowl, the Phoenix Open, it was just ‘let’s try and capture as much as we can.’”

It’s a strategy that he said will continue as the Valley is set to host the college football National Championship game in January and the NCAA Final Four in 2017. It’s also part of a larger plan for the airport that Wilkie presented to the City Council Monday that includes close to $600,000 in improvements.

The improvements include an estimated $254,000 for hangar repairs, involving weather stripping, sliding repairs and gutters to help with some of the flooding issues that airport users have complained about.

Other improvements include a new aviation-grade fuel tank, fuel delivery truck, exterior enhancements for the terminal and pavement maintenance, which Wilkie said is always one of the larger expenses.

“Because we live in the desert and the heat and the cold environment, cracks will expand. With that much pavement out there, cracks will happen,” he said. “(The airport) is a return investment — a positive attitude that could lead into a potential business opportunity in the community.”

Future improvements include new hangars, including a multi-use hangar that would support the two fly-in events that occur at the airport, recruitment of additional commercial operations and an extension of the runway.

Wilkie said the runway extension won’t be designed to accommodate commercial airline traffic. Instead it will be designed to allow for heavier, larger Gulfstream corporate jets that the current runway can’t accommodate during the summer months because of the heat.  

“When you take off, you wouldn’t be able to fully fuel your aircraft,” Wilkie said of the current runway and the summer heat. “What we are trying to do with the extension of the runway is we are trying to accommodate any of those aircraft throughout the year so they can utilize the facilities, fuel up and then take off fully loaded.”

Currently the airport is not a towered airport, but that could change as operations increase.

Wilkie said if PhoenixMart proceeds as planned, the air traffic could well exceed the threshold the FAA sets for the need for a towered airport.

Source: http://www.trivalleycentral.com

Eurocopter AS350B3 Ecureuil, N253HP: Accident occurred September 09, 2015 in Draper, Utah

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA258 
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 09, 2015 in Draper, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/15/2016
Aircraft: AIRBUS AS350, registration: N253HP
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he and a tactical flight officer were conducting a high altitude rescue mission in "remote and nearly vertical" terrain with a public use helicopter, by doing a one-skid recovery. The purpose of this mission was to recover a fallen hiker. 

A member of the three person ground recovery team had secured himself to a rescue rope that was anchored to the steep terrain above the plane-of-rotation of the main rotor system blades. Once the helicopter's right skid landed on a rock outcrop, the ground recovery team approached the helicopter to begin the loading process. During the approach to the helicopter, the rescue rope came in contact with a main rotor blade. 

The pilot reported that the helicopter then, "rotated abruptly to the left and began to shake violently." The helicopter impacted terrain, the pilot regained control, and he then made an emergency landing at a lower altitude. He reported that upon applying power to land, the helicopter "began to shake violently again until touching down and reducing collective pitch." A postflight inspection revealed substantial damage to the main rotor system, the tail boom, and the empennage. 

The pilot reported there were no pre-impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The ground recovery team member's failure to secure a rescue rope during the helicopter loading process in steep terrain, resulting in the rope fouling the helicopter's main rotor system.

The pilot reported that he and a tactical flight officer were conducting a high altitude rescue mission in "remote and nearly vertical" terrain with a public use helicopter, by doing a one-skid recovery. The purpose of this mission was to recover a fallen hiker. 

A member of the three person ground recovery team had secured himself to a rescue rope that was anchored to the steep terrain above the plane-of-rotation of the main rotor system blades. Once the helicopter's right skid landed on a rock outcrop, the ground recovery team approached the helicopter to begin the loading process. During the approach to the helicopter, the rescue rope came in contact with a main rotor blade. 

The pilot reported that the helicopter then, "rotated abruptly to the left and began to shake violently." The helicopter impacted terrain, the pilot regained control, and he then made an emergency landing at a lower altitude. He reported that upon applying power to land, the helicopter "began to shake violently again until touching down and reducing collective pitch." A postflight inspection revealed substantial damage to the main rotor system, the tail boom, and the empennage. 

The pilot reported there were no pre-impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service (for the National Search and Rescue Academy) has published a manual, Helicopter Rescue Techniques (2013). This manual describes the various rescue techniques that can be employed with helicopters. This manual states in part;

Helicopters provide an outstanding rescue tool, but they have specific operating limitations. Recognize that the consequences of a poorly managed helicopter rescue can be swift and fatal. Rescuers need to understand these limits and have the professional discipline not to exceed them during an emergency. As accident investigators repeatedly conclude, "self-imposed psychological pressure" causes us to make poor decisions when adrenaline clouds our judgment. Poor decision-making is preventable yet, tragically, it is a factor in the vast majority of helicopter rescue accidents. 

The option of delaying the mission in favor of safer operating conditions is repeatedly overlooked and requires considerable discipline on the part of a rescue team. Remarkably, accidents with the same root cause occur over and over. As rescuers, we must learn from these mistakes and break this dangerous pattern of repetition. 

The Mountain Rescue Association (MRA) has published a manual, Helicopters in Search and Rescue Intermediate Level (2008). This manual provides intermediate level knowledge with utilizing helicopters for search and rescue operations. This manual states in part; 

In certain situation, pilots and rescuers may choose to perform a hovering or one-skid recovery of a rescue victim.

The factors to be taken into account in selecting a site for a hovering recovery are generally the same as those for selecting a helispot. In these conditions, a smaller ground area, rougher terrain and steeper slope are permissible. On the other hand, it is extremely important that there be plenty of room for both the main rotor and the tail rotor boom, since the pilot may have to turn the helicopter in the event changes in wind direction. An experienced hand signaler, one that the pilot knows is competent, should be at the site and all ground personnel should be within the pilot's view, if at all possible. In the case of one-skid recoveries on rock outcrops, this may be impractical.

The MRA has also published another manual, Situational Awareness in Mountain Rescue (2008). This manual describes the three stages of Situational Awareness during mountain rescue operations. This manual states in part;

"Situational Awareness" is "the degree of accuracy by which one's perception of his/her current environment mirrors reality." Situational Awareness can also be looked at as a constantly evolving picture of the state of the environment. It is the perception and comprehension of the relevant elements in an incident within a volume of time and space. In this regard, Situational Awareness is not an event, but rather a process that only ends when the search and rescue incident is concluded.

Situational Awareness requires the human operator to quickly detect, integrate and interpret data gathered from the environment. In the case of search and rescue operations, the "human detector" can be anything from the incident commander to a "field grunt." That is the beauty (and challenge) of Situational Awareness – it requires and demands awareness by all users.

Stage I – Perception of Relevant Information

The first stage of Situational Awareness – perception – is arguably the most important stage. After all, without perception of information, one cannot really comprehend, interpret and draw conclusions. 

Many accidents in search and rescue operations result from a series of different things happening. There are often a number of contributing factors that, if occurring individually, might not have resulted in an accident. Break any rescue accident down, and you will often find that there were a number of elements that came together to make that accident possible. 

In this important perception stage of Situational Awareness, rescuers need to be very attentive – not only to the occurrence of situations that are beyond their expectations, but to the frequency and number of those situations. This perception stage requires that you OBSERVE! In order to be an effective observer, one must remain attentive. This can be one of the greatest challenges to a search and rescue professional, as periods of inactivity and boredom can hamper one's ability to be an effective observer.

Stage II – Comprehension and Interpretation of the Relevant Information

The second stage of Situational Awareness is the stage wherein one attempts to comprehend and interpret the data collected in the first stage. While the collection of data and the perception of the relevant information are important, the comprehension and interpretation of that data cannot be overlooked. 

The key to this stage of Situational Awareness is that it requires one to have and utilize key training and experience.

Stage III – Projection into the Future

The third stage of Situational Awareness – projection into the future – is the stage where one puts it all together. Once the clues are interpreted, the next step is to project how that information will affect the future of the operation.

STATE OF UTAH: http://registry.faa.gov/N253HP

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA258

14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 09, 2015 in Draper, UT
Aircraft: AIRBUS AS350, registration: N253HP
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he and a tactical flight officer were conducting a high altitude rescue mission in "remote and nearly vertical" terrain with a public use helicopter, by doing a one-skid recovery. The purpose of this mission was to recover a fallen hiker. 

A member of the three person ground recovery team had secured himself to a rescue rope that was anchored to the steep terrain above the plane-of-rotation of the main rotor system blades. Once the helicopter's right skid landed on a rock outcrop, the ground recovery team approached the helicopter to begin the loading process. During the approach to the helicopter, the rescue rope came in contact with a main rotor blade. 

The pilot reported that the helicopter then, "rotated abruptly to the left and began to shake violently." The helicopter impacted terrain, the pilot regained control, and he then made an emergency landing at a lower altitude. He reported that upon applying power to land, the helicopter "began to shake violently again until touching down and reducing collective pitch." A postflight inspection revealed substantial damage to the main rotor system, the tail boom, and the empennage. 

The pilot reported there were no pre-impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Helicopter Rescue Missions 

The United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service (for the National Search and Rescue Academy) has published a manual, Helicopter Rescue Techniques (2013). This manual describes the various rescue techniques that can be employed with helicopters. This manual states in part; 

Helicopters provide an outstanding rescue tool, but they have specific operating limitations. Recognize that the consequences of a poorly managed helicopter rescue can be swift and fatal. Rescuers need to understand these limits and have the professional discipline not to exceed them during an emergency. As accident investigators repeatedly conclude, "self-imposed psychological pressure" causes us to make poor decisions when adrenaline clouds our judgment. Poor decision-making is preventable yet, tragically, it is a factor in the vast majority of helicopter rescue accidents. 

The option of delaying the mission in favor of safer operating conditions is repeatedly overlooked and requires considerable discipline on the part of a rescue team. Remarkably, accidents with the same root cause occur over and over. As rescuers, we must learn from these mistakes and break this dangerous pattern of repetition. 

Hovering and One-Skid Recoveries 

The Mountain Rescue Association (MRA) has published a manual, Helicopters in Search and Rescue Intermediate Level (2008). This manual provides intermediate level knowledge with utilizing helicopters for search and rescue operations. This manual states in part; 

In certain situation, pilots and rescuers may choose to perform a hovering or one-skid recovery of a rescue victim. 

The factors to be taken into account in selecting a site for a hovering recovery are generally the same as those for selecting a helispot. In these conditions, a smaller ground area, rougher terrain and steeper slope are permissible. On the other hand, it is extremely important that there be plenty of room for both the main rotor and the tail rotor boom, since the pilot may have to turn the helicopter in the event changes in wind direction. An experienced hand signaler, one that the pilot knows is competent, should be at the site and all ground personnel should be within the pilot's view, if at all possible. In the case of one-skid recoveries on rock outcrops, this may be impractical.

Situational Awareness

The MRA has also published another manual, Situational Awareness in Mountain Rescue (2008). This manual describes the three stages of Situational Awareness during mountain rescue operations. This manual states in part; 

"Situational Awareness" is "the degree of accuracy by which one's perception of his/her current environment mirrors reality." Situational Awareness can also be looked at as a constantly evolving picture of the state of the environment. It is the perception and comprehension of the relevant elements in an incident within a volume of time and space. In this regard, Situational Awareness is not an event, but rather a process that only ends when the search and rescue incident is concluded. 

Situational Awareness requires the human operator to quickly detect, integrate and interpret data gathered from the environment. In the case of search and rescue operations, the "human detector" can be anything from the incident commander to a "field grunt." That is the beauty (and challenge) of Situational Awareness – it requires and demands awareness by all users. 

Stage I – Perception of Relevant Information 

The first stage of Situational Awareness – perception – is arguably the most important stage. After all, without perception of information, one cannot really comprehend, interpret and draw conclusions. 

Many accidents in search and rescue operations result from a series of different things happening. There are often a number of contributing factors that, if occurring individually, might not have resulted in an accident. Break any rescue accident down, and you will often find that there were a number of elements that came together to make that accident possible. 

In this important perception stage of Situational Awareness, rescuers need to be very attentive – not only to the occurrence of situations that are beyond their expectations, but to the frequency and number of those situations. This perception stage requires that you OBSERVE! In order to be an effective observer, one must remain attentive. This can be one of the greatest challenges to a search and rescue professional, as periods of inactivity and boredom can hamper one's ability to be an effective observer. 

Stage II – Comprehension and Interpretation of the Relevant Information 

The second stage of Situational Awareness is the stage wherein one attempts to comprehend and interpret the data collected in the first stage. While the collection of data and the perception of the relevant information are important, the comprehension and interpretation of that data cannot be overlooked. 

The key to this stage of Situational Awareness is that it requires one to have and utilize key training and experience. 

Stage III – Projection into the Future 

The third stage of Situational Awareness – projection into the future – is the stage where one puts it all together. Once the clues are interpreted, the next step is to project how that information will affect the future of the operation.




DRAPER — A Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter attempting to retrieve the body of a fallen hiker in Corner Canyon nearly crashed in a terrifying close call on Wednesday, the agency reported.

Luke Bowman, chief pilot for the Utah Highway Patrol's aero bureau, said the pilot, Kent Harrison, and another officer on board were attempting to meet with rescuers on a cliff ledge. The crews were attempting a "skid load," intending to rest one skid on the ledge while essentially keeping the chopper hovering, when a rope became tangled in the craft's main rotor.

"The pilot, at that point, applies some aggressive maneuvers to maneuver the aircraft away from the cliff and the people on the ground," Bowman said.

The chopper's rotor was spinning at full power, sending the craft spinning and sending the helicopter's tail toward the rescuers on the ledge, Bowman said. The tail passed over the heads of the rescuers and hit the cliff wall, and the chopper continued to spin as it headed toward the ground.

Harrison began to prepare for a crash landing, but managed to steady the craft and determined he had enough control to fly down to a park in Highland, Bowman said.

As Harrison applied more power as he prepared to land, however, the chopper began to shake again. Fearing a crash, the pilot called for a medical response before he attempted to put the craft down.

"He was convinced at that point that, when he did go to land, that they were going to roll and they wouldn't be able to control it well enough to land," Bowman said. "They were actually able to land pretty uneventfully. … They were able to land upright on the landing gear in the park."

After the emergency was averted, the crews successfully completed their mission of retrieving the body of 43-year-old Kerry Crowley, a South Jordan woman believed to have died in an accidental fall.

The chopper — which is the department's newest and best helicopter — has been pulled from service since the near-crash and is significantly banged-up, Bowman said. However, the aircraft's engine and other mechanics pose an even greater concern.

In the meantime, the department will rely on some of its older units.

Bowman complimented Harrison's flying, applauding his ability to keep himself and the people around him safe in an emergency.

"I've talked extensively with him and spent the day with him yesterday going over the situation," Bowman said. "He's doing really good, and I think he did an phenomenal job. … He had a situation and he did his job and dealt with it, and now he has kind of moved on. He's not really one to emotionally dwell on things."

The accident will be reviewed by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Story, comments and photo gallery:  http://www.ksl.com



Mooney M20TN Acclaim, N370MM: Fatal accident occurred September 10, 2015 in Atlantic Ocean, Atlantic City, New Jersey

MICHAEL MOIR: http://registry.faa.gov/N370MM

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA349 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 10, 2015 in
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRPLANE CO INC M20TN, registration: N370MM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 10, 2015, about 1445 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20T, N370MM, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Atlantic City, New Jersey. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the personal flight. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Gaylord Regional Airport (GLR), Gaylord, Michigan, around 1220, with an intended destination of Atlantic City International Airport (ACY), Atlantic City, New Jersey.

According to Federal Aviation Administration Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) records, the airplane departed GLR and was instructed to climb to 25,000 feet mean sea level. The pilot read back the assigned altitude and continued toward the destination. Subsequently, the ARTCC lost radio contact with the airplane. The airplane flew for approximately two hours without radio communications prior to descending and impacting the water.

Approximately 5 miles northwest of the ACY, the airplane began descending and continued to descend while on a southeast heading. As the airplane was descending, two F-16 airplanes departed ACY in order to relay search and rescue information. Radar contact was lost approximately 15 miles southeast of ACY.

The airplane was located by the United States Coast Guard off the coast of Atlantic City, New Jersey, in about 45 feet of water. On September 12, 2015, the airplane was recovered, and the airframe and engine were retained for further examination.

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Gaylord Community Productions will be missing a talented performer in future productions following a fatal plane crash in the Atlantic Ocean Sept. 10.

Michael Moir, 68, of Gaylord, died upon impact in what the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General is considering an accident when his plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean seven miles from the Atlantic City coastline.

In an email, Paul Loriquet, director of communications for New Jersey attorney general's office, said the results of Moir's autopsy from the Southern Regional Medical Examiner’s Office revealed the cause of death as “blunt impacts of torso and extremities with fracture and avisceral injuries”. Loriquet added the manner of death was ruled an accident.

Al Glasby, treasurer for Gaylord Community Productions and former pharmacy department manager at Otsego Memorial Hospital, worked with Moir — who worked as an oral surgeon — professionally for around 11 years, during a time where both men worked at OMH.

Both men became friends and also worked together on several productions and performances through Gaylord Community Productions.

“He was in several shows and always was a positive, energetic, cheerful performer,” Glasby said.

The last production Moir was featured in was “Broadway Showstoppers." He performed in several other productions, though one he will especially be remembered for his first role in “The Sound of Music” when he played Captain von Trapp in a 1999 production.

Glasby recalled the rapport Moir had with the von Trapp children and how he was able to enthrall all who watched.

“His sincerity and humor and ability to communicate,” are all things Glasby said he will remember. “He was up and bright all the time. He was able to capture the hearts of all the children in the von Trapp family and audiences that attended the show. He was just a bright entertaining figure on stage.”

In addition to his experiences with Gaylord Community Productions, Moir was also an avid pilot of several decades.

He departed on what would be his final flight in his Mooney M20 from the Gaylord Regional Airport at or around noon Sept. 10, according to Matt Barresi, Gaylord Regional Airport manager. The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed the plane was headed for Atlantic City International Airport and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Atlantic City at approximately 2:45 p.m.

Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday the crash remains under investigation and the cause of the crash could take 12 to 18 months to determine. Officials said accident report is expected to be published soon.

Associated Press reports indicated flight tracking software showed the plane traveled past the Atlantic City International Airport at around 20,000 feet. The plane then began to quickly descend, going from a drop rate of 1,113 feet per minute to 5,438 feet per minute over the course of two minutes while heading east and out to sea, the data showed.

FlightAware data analyst Ryan Jorgenson called that descent rate "not normal", according to the report. He said weather data showed there was low visibility at the airport around the time the plane flew over and there were thunderstorms in the area as well.

The aircraft held a steady course for Atlantic City before making a steep descent over the ocean, according to the AP report, and officials said Moir made no radio contact with air traffic control for approximately two hours before the crash.

Glasby said Gaylord Community Productions will soon begin rehearsing for its next play, “Mary Poppins”, though he said it is sad to know that Moir will not be a part of it.

“We are all sad,” he said. “We have been praying and had high hopes that it would be a rescue operation. We are deeply saddened by the final information conveyed to us.”

Though nothing has been set yet, Glasby said Gaylord Community Productions is sure have some kind of remembrance or dedication in Moir's memory.

According to the Nelson Funeral Home website, there will be a Mass of Christian Burial at noon Saturday, Sept. 19 for Moir at St. Mary Cathedral, 606 N. Ohio Ave. Visitation at Nelson Funeral Home, 135 N. Center Ave., will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

http://www.petoskeynews.com



 


SOMERS POINT — The Mooney M20TN Acclaim plane that crashed 7 miles off Atlantic City Thursday afternoon has been recovered and turned over to federal officials, a salvage company official says.

John Ryan, owner of TowboatUS, said his company recovered the plane about 8 p.m. Saturday. When the plane was brought up, a body was found inside, Ryan said.

Pilot Michael Moir was headed to Atlantic City International Airport for a safety program for Mooney pilots when his plane went down.

“We had the coordinates, and we were able to locate it quickly,” Ryan said Sunday afternoon, adding that federal officials had come by his Bay Avenue salvage yard to examine the plane Sunday. “The rough weather conditions made it a little more difficult to bring up.”

The aircraft departed from Gaylord Airport in Michigan at noon Thursday, according to FlightAware, a flight-tracking system. The site’s tracker shows the plane heading on a steady course for Atlantic City before making a steep descent over the ocean. Moir was a dentist in Gaylord and had been flying planes for more than four decades.

A family member confirmed to The Press that they had been notified that the plane and a body had been found.

Neither the State Police nor the Coast Guard could confirm the plane had been located. Each agency referred questions to the other. The Federal Aviation Administration referred all questions to the National Transportation  Safety Board. Representatives of the board did not return calls seeking comment.

Jean Moir, Michael Moir’s wife, confirmed to The Press on Thursday that her was husband was the pilot of the downed plane.

Moir’s aircraft hadn’t made radio contact with air traffic control for two hours prior to the crash about 2:45 p.m., officials said.

The Coast Guard reached the debris field Thursday afternoon and couldn’t find the occupant of the Mooney, officials said. Upon initial response, the Coast Guard deployed dive teams, search boats and a helicopter to the debris site. By Friday afternoon, the Coast Guard had suspended its search for Moir.




Dr. Michael Moir
Michael Moir, the pilot of the Mooney M20TN Acclaim plane that crashed seven miles off Atlantic City’s coast Thursday afternoon, was heading to Atlantic City for a safety program for pilots who flew Mooney planes.

“He never missed one,” said his wife, Jean Moir.“He liked to go and talk to the other pilots about issues they may be having.”

Jean Moir, who confirmed to The Press that the her husband was the pilot of the downed plane, said the 68-year-old Army veteran, learned to fly with funding from the GI Bill.

He was supposed to go to the safety program put on by the Mooney Aircraft Pilots Association, she said. Calls to the association about the program were not returned Friday.

Moir’s nephew, James Simpson, 32, said Friday he and other family members are looking for answers and holding out hope there was a chance his uncle could still be alive.

The plane’s debris field was located Thursday, but no body has been found.

“He was a very smart and charismatic man,” Simpson, of Rochester Hills, Michigan, said in a phone interview Friday. “He was always very quick with a joke or lightened the situation. He had a presence he gave off. He was the man in the room, a leader and commanded a lot of respect.”

Simpson said he flew with Moir once when he was very young.

Moir was a dentist in Gaylord, Michigan, where he flew from Thursday afternoon.

An experienced pilot, he last saw his wife 45 minutes before his plane left. He stopped by the tennis courts to say goodbye, she said.

The aircraft departed from the Michigan airport at noon Thursday, according to FlightAware, a flight-tracking system. The site’s tracker shows the plane heading on a steady course for Atlantic City before making a steep descent over the ocean.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman, Eric Weiss, said Moir’s aircraft didn’t make radio contact with air traffic control for two hours prior to the crash at about 2:45 p.m.

The United States Coast Guard reached the debris field Thursday afternoon and couldn’t find the occupant of the Mooney M20TN Acclaim, Weiss said.

Upon initial response, the Coast Guard deployed dive teams, search boats and a helicopter to the debris site.

Friday afternoon, the Coast Guard suspended its search for Moir. There is still no information on what might have led to the crash.

“Due to the amount of time that has elapsed since the plane crash and the information we have gathered from our searches, we made the difficult decision to suspend active search efforts pending further developments,” said Capt. Benjamin Cooper, the commanding officer of Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay.

For now, Simpson and the family still hope that Moir is found.

“It’s just time to work with family,” Simpson said when he learned that the Coast Guard suspended search efforts. “We will move forward and see how our family wants to deal with everything.”

Story and comments: http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

Greene County-Lewis A. Jackson Regional Airport (I19) paving postponed



XENIA — A $1.37 million runway resurfacing project at the Greene County – Lewis A. Jackson Regional Airport has been postponed. The paving project was originally slated to take place earlier this summer, but a delay in federal funding for the work forced airport officials to move the paving to spring 2016.

“We just did not want to take a risk of running into cool weather this year,” Greene County Airport Manager Dave Kushner said. While funding for the project was recently finalized, according to Kushner, by time a contractor was ready to pave at the airport’s 337,500-square-foot surface, the calendar would likely have flipped to October or November, which would put the project in danger of running up against asphalt suppliers closing for the winter.

“We’re going to be laying a lot of asphalt out here,” Kushner said. “If that were to happen, then it could potentially leave the runway closed through the winter. That’s a much bigger risk than we want to take.”

Kushner said the airport has an agreement with the paving contractor such that the delay won’t boost project costs.

Local officials were recently notified of a final FAA grant for the project, to the tune of about $1.2 million. The airport’s contribution to the project will be about $137,500.

The delay could be a blessing in disguise for the airport, as the paving project could potentially dovetail with other projects, including the construction of a new ramp there. The paving project is expected to close the airport for about 30 days.

The resurfacing project comes as the runway has begun to show signs of its age through cracks along its surface. The runway was last paved about 10 years ago.

Source:  http://xeniagazette.com

Gallia-Meigs Regional Airport (KGAS) begins runway rehab soon

GALLIPOLIS — Gallia County Commissioners, Shelly Company and Delta Airport Consultants firmed up plans Thursday for the upcoming rehabilitation of the Gallia-Meigs Regional Airport runway.

A grant was awarded in June for the runway’s reworking by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration in the amount of roughly $1 million.

Shelly Company was awarded the contract through the bidding process. The total cost of the project is expected to cost $1.2 million, according to Gallia County Administrator Karen Sprague. Roughly $120,000 was matched with county funds according to stipulations provided by the grant. That equates to roughly a 10 percent match.

“We’re going to rehabilitate your runway, which means we’re going to do a nominal one-half-inch mill, basically we’ll call for our terms a scarification of the existing pavement,” Delta Airport Consultants project manager Steven Potoczak said. “Then put three inches of hot mix asphalt on top.”

Debris will be removed before the asphalt is laid.

According to the project manager, grooves will be laid in the asphalt down the runway in its entirety. The 10-foot surrounding perimeter area of the runway will not have them. Supposedly, the grooves should be cut a quarter of an inch deep and help displace water and protect against hydroplaning, particularly when jets land, during aircraft activity on runway.

Mobilization for the project is anticipated to begin Sept. 30 with the runway’s closing. Asphalt milling will begin Oct. 5. Bituminous surface coursing should occur Oct. 8.

Oct. 14 will see the surrounding runway lawn’s soil replaced, seeded and mulched. Nov. 16 marks when the runway should be grooved. Crew workers will make permanent runway and taxiway markings Nov. 20 and the entirety of the project should be theoretically finished Nov. 24.

Pilots commonly use Gallia-Meigs Regional Airport as a refueling point. The runway is estimated to measure 3,999 feet long and 75 feet wide.

“I’ve known some of the local (industrial) plants to fly product in and out occasionally,” Commissioner Harold Montgomery stated earlier in the year. “Some people may view it as just a recreational area (the airport), but it is an important tool in our (Gallia-Meigs) economic development.”

Source:  http://mydailytribune.com

Samsung seeking to sell its private jets, choppers: sources

SEOUL, Sept. 11 (Yonhap) -- South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. is trying to sell its private planes and helicopters, industry sources said Friday, a move seen as part of Samsung Group heir apparent Lee Jae-yong's drive for efficiency amid a shakeup.

The world's biggest smartphone maker is apparently in talks with Korean Air Lines Co. to sell three airplanes -- two Boeing 737s and a Bombardier 700, according to Samsung officials.

It is also looking to hand over six of the seven helicopters it owns to Korea Airport Service Co., a subsidiary of Korean Air, they said.

"We are in the process of pursuing the sale and we've yet to reach an official agreement," a Samsung official said, declining to give details on the price, citing confidentiality.

"The management has decided to dispose of assets that are less related to the business."

According to industry sources, a Boeing 737 is worth around 70 billion won (US$59.2 million) and a Bombardier 700 costs about 60 billion won.

A spokesperson from Korean Air declined to comment.

Samsung's push for such an asset sale is largely seen as coming from Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong, industry watchers said.

Since his father Lee Kun-hee, the group's patriarch, became bedridden after a heart attack last May, the 47-year-old scion has practically been in charge of the richest conglomerate in Korea with 67 affiliates under its wing.

Samsung Group has been conducting a restructuring through a slew of sales and mergers of the key affiliates to streamline its complex ownership structure in preparation for the leadership transfer.

Lee Jae-yong, who barely appears in public, is known to stress practicality as opposed to "looks." For most of the latest overseas trips, he flew by a commercial plane, either on his own or accompanied by a small group of staff.

Source: http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr

Commercial flights to resume into Dominica’s main airport

ROSEAU, Dominica, Friday September 11, 2015 – The Douglas-Charles Airport which was severely damaged and lost every piece of equipment in the floods caused by Tropical Storm Erika two weeks ago, will start receiving commercial flights in a few days.

Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit says regional airline LIAT, which successfully completed a test flight, has indicated that by Monday, or Tuesday at the latest, it will resume service to the airport on the northeast coast of the island.

This follows the removal of debris from the runway and the airport terminal which were battered by the flood waters, and the all-clear given by the Eastern Caribbean Civil Aviation Authority (ECCAA).

“The CEO of LIAT, Mr. David Evans, and the director general of the Eastern Caribbean Civil Aviation Authority and a contingent from that authority and also the chief pilot and other senior staff of LIAT were all at the airport doing their own independent assessment and investigation and both are satisfied that the Douglas-Charles Airport is at a state where commercial flights can be channeled through,” Skerrit said during a media briefing yesterday evening.

Skerrit had previously indicated it would take about EC$39.5 million (US$14.6 million) to get the Douglas-Charles Airport back into full operation.

The prime minister used the opportunity of yesterday’s update on tourism and travel post-Erika to give kudos to LIAT for sticking by Dominica and demonstrating its commitment to and care for the island.

LIAT, as well as the Puerto Rico-based Seaborne Airlines, had increased flights into Guadeloupe to facilitate travel into and out of Dominica via ferry services since the storm hit.

The country’s smaller Canefield Airport continues to be operational for helicopter and small aircraft, with WINAIR, Caribbean Helicopters and Hummingbird Air offering scheduled and charter services.

All sea ports remain functional and open, and the L’ Express Des lles ferry service, which brings passengers from the islands of Guadeloupe, Martinique and St. Lucia is running.

Meantime, many of Dominica’s tourism sites and attractions are open for business. Some of them had not been affected by Erika. Additional, as far as visitor accommodation is concerned, 72 of 94 properties are currently operational.

Almost all roads in Dominica are passable, as temporary bypasses have been put in place where there were damages, to facilitate travel until permanent repairs are carried out.

Utilities have also been restored to most consumers.

Water has been restored to 70 percent of the island; electricity have been restored to 97 percent of the island; telecommunications (primarily cell sites) has been restored to approximately 98 percent of the island; and television and Internet service has been restored to the majority of the island.

Source:  http://www.caribbean360.com

State helicopters won't fight federal forest fires this year

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Federal officials say Montana has a safe aviation program, but it is unlikely the state's five firefighting helicopters will be used to respond to blazes on U.S. Forest Service lands this year.

The five modified Bell UH-1H helicopters have been barred from responding to fires in the state's national forests because federal standards require that those helicopters use smaller buckets to scoop water.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock objected to U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, prompting a review by federal aviation experts last week.

The review found the Montana Department of Natural Resources' aviation program to be safe, but now the agencies must determine how the standards can be broadened to allow the helicopters' use.

DNRC director John Tubbs says he believes that will be resolved before next year's fire season.

Source:   http://mtstandard.com

JetBlue passenger pees on fellow travelers, seats during Portland-bound flight, police say

A passenger on a Portland-bound flight was arrested after police say he urinated on other passengers, their seats and carry-on items about a half-hour before the plane landed early Friday.

Jeff David Rubin, 26, of Gresham was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on misdemeanor accusations of offensive littering and third-degree criminal mischief. He has since been released on his own recognizance.
  
Rubin was "slumped over asleep in his seat" when Port of Portland officers boarded the plane about 4:30 a.m. after it landed at Portland International Airport, according to a Port police report.

Plane staff and other passengers told officers that Rubin had been sleeping for most of the flight, but stood up toward the end of the trip and began urinating between the space of the seats in front of him, the report said. The urine hit passengers sitting there.

Rubin soon lost his balance and fell backward, causing his urine to shoot upward, the report said. Other passengers, their seats and their personal belongings were hit.

No one was injured on the JetBlue flight from Anchorage, Alaska, said Steve Johnson, a Port spokesman. A message left for JetBlue was not immediately returned.

Story, comments and photo: http://www.oregonlive.com

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N263AT, Airline Transport Professionals (ATP) Corp: Incident occurred September 11, 2015 at Morristown Municipal Airport (KMMU), New Jersey

Date: 11-SEP-15
Time: 16:07:00Z
Regis#: N263AT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Teterboro FSDO-25
City: MORRISTOWN
State: New Jersey

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, MORRISTOWN, NJ



AIRLINE TRANSPORT PROFESSIONALS CORP OF USA: http://registry.faa.gov/N263AT



HANOVER The pilot of a Piper Seminole aircraft executed a successful emergency return to Morristown Municipal Airport on Friday, touching down on the front nose of his plane after experiencing problems with the retraction of its front wheel, according to the Morristown Police.

Flight instructor James Forrey, 25, and passenger Harrison Martin, 24, of Flemington, exited the aircraft safely and without injury, according to Lt. Stuart Greer. Forrey was piloting the aircraft, which is owned by A.T.P. Flight School at the airport.

Airport operations advised the Morris County Communication Center at 11:55 a.m. of an aircraft emergency after Forrey radioed air traffic control reporting that shortly after takeoff, he had experienced an issue with the front wheel. Forrey advised that he was unsure of whether or not that wheel was able to lock in place and requested an emergency return to the airport.

Following established response-plan procedure for Morristown Municipal Airport, emergency crews responded from the Morristown Airport Fire Rescue, Morristown Fire Department, Morris Township Fire Department, Hanover Township Fire Department, Morristown Police, Hanover Township Police, Morristown E.M.S., Cedar Knolls E.M.S and Atlantic Health Paramedics.

With the emergency responders in place, the aircraft landed but the front wheel did not lock and the aircraft came to rest on the front nose, according to Greer. Fire units responded immediately and ensure that there was no fire.

Maria Sheridan, senior director for government affairs and business development, said members of the Teterboro-based Flight Standards District Office, a regional office of the Federal Aviation Administration, also was notified of the incident and were responding to the scene.

Runway 523 will be closed until the aircraft can be removed, Sheridan said, but cross runway 1331 is open.

Sheridan did not know if Martin was a student of the flight school, which declined comment.

The incident at Morristown Municipal Airport occurred as officials continue to investigate the crash of another plane that was went missing Tuesday but was not found until Thursday just outside Somerset Airport. That crash claimed the life of the pilot, a 62-year-old man from Chester Township.

Somerset Airport officials did not know whether the plane had crashed during takeoff or landing. An FAA spokeswoman did not immediately release further details Thursday.

Source: http://www.dailyrecord.com

MORRISTOWN - A small plane has made a crash landing at Morristown Airport, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The crash landing happened Friday afternoon when the plane's landing gear collapsed as the plane came into the runway.

Fire crews responded to the scene to assist.

The small plane belonged to a flight training school.

No one on the plane or on the ground was hurt during the incident, according to officials.

This is the third crash involving a small plane in New Jersey in the last 24 hours. On Thursday a single engine plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Atlantic City, and in Bedminster, the wreckage of a small plane was found in a wooded area near Somerset Airport.

Story, comments and photo: http://newjersey.news12.com

Federal Aviation Administration facility arsonist gets 12 1/2 years in prison

Brian Howard
A disturbed Naperville man who set fire to an Aurora radar facility last year, disrupting air traffic across the country, was sentenced to 12 1/2 years in prison Friday.

Brian Howard faced as much as 30 years in prison.

On Sept. 26, Howard, who was employed as a contractor by the FAA, walked into the air traffic facility in Aurora, cut telecommunication wires and set a fire, before cutting his throat and wrists.

The sabotage stranded thousands of air travelers and disrupted flights across the country for several days. It disabled the facility for two weeks and caused the FAA to reassess its backup systems.

“This wasn’t merely an inconvenience,” U.S. District Judge Gary Feinerman said. “This was far more than that . . . Inconvenience doesn’t begin to describe what
happened here.”

Feinerman said that while Howard didn’t want to see any planes crash, “he wanted to increase the risk of danger,” as he sought to lash out at his former employer.

The judge described Howard’s crime as “an extremely selfish act.”

He also said Howard “accepted responsibility quickly and unequivocally.”

Howard pleaded guilty in May of this year to willfully disabling an air navigation facility, hoping the judge would give him treatment for mental health issues.

Prosecutors, in their sentencing memorandum to the judge, sought a 13 year prison term and a $4.5 million fine.
Source: http://chicago.suntimes.com

Over $18,000 Raised for family of Knik Arm plane crash victim: Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N3675P

Seth Fairbanks.
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More than $18,000 has been raised for the daughters of Seth Fairbanks, the pilot from Bethel, who died after a plane crash in early August.

After learning of her friend’s death, Bethel resident Nikki Corbett hosted an online auction on Facebook. The funds went to a trust fund for Seth Fairbanks’ twin daughters.

“When something like this happens everyone kind of comes together and helps the families,” Corbett said. “It’s been amazing outpour of support.”

Corbett was out of town when she heard about the accident but still felt a call to action. She got the “ok” and began planning.

“I didn’t think it would turn out to be so big. I was only thinking there would be about 30 items because that’s how it started out. I think it ended up being over 50, 60 items.”

Donation items included everything from handmade children’s ware and pottery to canned salmon and handcrafted artwork. Donations came mostly from the Bethel region and Anchorage area, with some items coming as far as Arizona.

“Now’s the fun part where we have to get everything ready and process it and send it out,” Corbett said.

Corbett and Fairbanks’ mother will cover the cost of shipping and hope to begin sending items out soon.

Fairbanks, who was 29 and living in McGrath, died with passenger Anthony Hooper after his plane crashed in the Knik Arm River.  He was to Anchorage for his sister’s wedding reception.

“I’ve just known him since grade school. We were great friends through high school,” Corbett said. “It was amazing to see him evovle from when his daughters were first born. He was a great dad.”

In an interview with KTVA in early August, the pilot’s father, Grant Fairbanks, described his son as happy-go-lucky and well liked.

Source:   http://kyuk.org

http://registry.faa.gov/N3675P 

NTSB Identification: ANC15FA062
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Chugiak, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N3675P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2015, about 2350 Alaska daylight time, a wheel-equipped Piper PA-18-150 airplane, N3675P, sustained substantial damage during impact with the ocean waters of Knik Arm about 4 miles northwest of Chugiak, Alaska. The private pilot and one passenger are presumed to have received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed along the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the McGrath Airport, McGrath, Alaska, at 2111, en route to the Birchwood Airport, Chugiak.

A postaccident review of archived Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radio communication recordings revealed that at 2109, the pilot reported taxiing for departure from the McGrath Airport. At 2111, he reporting taking off from runway 16 at the McGrath Airport. No further radio communications were received from the airplane. 

At 2354, a 911 call was received by the Alaska State Troopers from the pilot, stating that he had just crashed in the waters of Knik Arm, and was standing on top of his airplane. He requested rescue, and stated that he was too far from shore to swim. At 0003, the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center received notification of the accident and air assets were on scene searching at 0016. The search was conducted by personnel from the Alaska Air National Guard, U.S. Air Force, Alaska State Troopers and Civil Air Patrol, with support from the U.S. Coast Guard.

On August 7, about 0610, the airplane was located about 1.8 miles northwest of the Birchwood Airport. The airplane was inverted and mostly submerged under the salt water with the bottom of the fuselage, wing strut attach points, landing gear, and a portion of the propeller protruding above the water. The occupants were not located with the airplane, and the official search continued through August 8 before being suspended. The two occupants are still missing and presumed deceased.

The area the airplane was located in was a portion of the Knik Arm consisting of fast moving salt water. The several rivers that terminate at the inlet are glacier fed, and visibility in the water is often less than 1 foot due to turbidity. The Knik Arm is an area with strong tidal influence, and strong currents.

On August 8, about 1045, the airplane was extracted from the water by helicopter. Due to the amount of water and organic material contained within the airplane after being submerged through several tide cycles, the airframe structure could not support the additional weight. Both wings fractured at the forward spar attach points and folded aft. The fuselage fractured about 3 feet forward of the horizontal stabilizer and remained attached by the rudder and elevator control cables.

A Garmin 196 handheld GPS was still mounted on the instrument panel and all cables were still attached. The unit was removed and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for download.

The closest weather reporting facility is Birchwood Airport, Chugiak, about 2 miles southeast of the accident site. At 2336, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Birchwood Airport was reporting in part: wind from 120 degrees at 3 knots; sky condition, clear; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 63 degrees F; dewpoint 52 degrees F; altimeter, 29.85 inHg.

A detailed wreckage and engine examination is pending. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine.





 Helicopter brings crashed Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub plane to Birchwood Airport.
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