Monday, July 17, 2017

Amid Spate of Crashes, Investigators, Pilots Weigh in on South Florida Air Safety



Southwest Florida has seen two well-publicized small plane crashes into buildings or onto city streets in recent weeks. With another fatal crash in the Everglades last month, attention has been focused on South Florida air traffic and what could be behind the deadly incidents.

Leah Read, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, joins the show to discuss the latest incidents in South Florida airspace, how the organization determines the cause of such accidents, and what pilots are trained to do during such emergencies.

Also joining the program is local flight instructor Ed Fink, who’s been teaching in Southwest Florida since the 1990s, about the flying scene in the area. We’ll learn who’s earning their wings to fly down here, what kinds of planes are being flown, and how many hours of practice they need before take-off.

Listen - Audio:  http://news.wgcu.org

Counties sue state to overturn Legislature’s ‘unfair’ tax breaks for airlines



Utah homeowners and businesses are paying higher property taxes to make up for unfair discounts that the state is giving to the airline industry, five counties contend in a new lawsuit.

Salt Lake, Weber, Washington, Duchesne and Uintah counties filed the lawsuit Monday in 3rd District Court seeking to overturn two recent laws enacted by the Legislature that they say gave an unfair 39 percent discount to airlines.

It says the Legislature forced changes that "cause property tax assessments in the airline industry to fall well below fair market value" in violation of the state Constitution, and shift "tax burdens from airlines to other individual or small business taxpayers."

Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo, who sponsored the legislation that the counties seek to overturn — SB157 this year and SB165 in 2015 — says the counties' claims are false.

He said the legislation "was not to give any one group an advantage. It was to clarify under the Constitution what fair market value is for aircraft," he said.

He said it uses the "airliner price guide" to figure the retail value of aircraft. "It's sort of like the Kelley Blue Book for airplanes," Bramble said.

But the laws offer discounts from that for fleet pricing. "For example, if you buy a fleet of cars, you get a better price than if you buy one car," Bramble said. "The law uses the retail price minus the fleet discount" to assess value.

But counties argue in their lawsuit that the fleet discounts allowed are too generous, and methodology is flawed.

Their lawsuit said methodology used by SB157 this year reduced "the 2017 assessed system value of one airline from $26.2 billion to less than $14.7 billion," a 44 percent decrease compared to the previous system. "The 2017 Utah taxable values for seven major passenger airlines decreased by roughly 39 percent overall."

The fiscal analyst for the Legislature predicted that SB157 this year "may shift some portion of the $12 million in property tax burden of airlines to other individuals and businesses."

The lawsuit said that when the Legislature passed an earlier pilot project bill, also sponsored by Bramble, to test the system used by his later bills, it said the Utah Tax Commission said the sort of price guidelines used should not be the preferred method used to value airline property — but the Legislature adopted the later bills anyway.

Recent legislation also limited counties' ability to appeal property — such as aircraft — assessed by the state. Counties said the lawsuit is the only way remaining to challenge what they say are unfair assessments.

"Citizens should be able not only to question this unfair and unjust shifting of tax burdens onto them, but also to demand the rules be applied equally," said Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill. "If the counties do not defend the average taxpayer, it seems no one else will."

"Citizens expect principles such as tax fairness and transparency to be followed, which isn't the case here," said Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams. "That is why Salt Lake County is joining in this lawsuit on behalf of homeowners and small business owners, to ensure that their voices are represented as well as those of large industries."

Bramble complained that Salt Lake County, which leads the lawsuit, refused to testify on his bill this year — and took no position on it.

http://www.sltrib.com

Miami County moves to get Grissom airstrip into national airport system: County could have unique access to grants as the only military joint-use airport in Indiana



BUNKER HILL – Miami County officials are working to get the airstrip at Grissom Air Reserve Base included into the national airport system in the hopes of gaining access to federal dollars to upgrade civilian facilities there.

Jim Tidd, executive director of the Miami County Economic Development Authority, which oversees the civilian use of the airstrip, said the county is in the process of applying with the Federal Aviation Administration to include Grissom in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems.

The plan identifies nearly 3,400 existing and proposed airports that are significant to national air transportation that are eligible to receive federal grants under the Airport Improvement Program.

Tidd said a feasibility study looking at the long-term needs and future growth of civilian uses at the airstrip has been conducted in preparation to apply to the national airport system.

He said the sales pitch to the FAA to gain inclusion in the system is the unique capacity the airstrip has to accommodate large, industrial airplanes such as the Boeing 747. Tidd said no other airport in north central Indiana can accommodate the size of aircraft that can use Grissom’s facilities.

That capacity led to Dean Baldwin Painting to open inside a renovated airplane hangar near the base in 2013 to service and paint large airplanes from clients such as American Airlines, Southwest and Air Canada.

“We’re trying to develop Grissom to have more economic impact and job creation to handle these large aircrafts that no other airport in our region can do,” Tidd said. “We’re not trying to compete in the recreation market. We’re just trying to use this airport for economic impact in our region.”

But the main reason for getting into the national airport system is gaining access to federal dollars that could fund major upgrades to the civilian facilities at the base, which has a joint-use agreement with the Miami County Economic Development Authority to allow civilian planes to land on the airstrip.

That funding could come from the FAA’s Military Airport Program, which provides money exclusively to joint-use airports, such as Grissom, or to convert former military airports to civilian use.

Tidd said Grissom is the only joint-use airport in the state, and one of only around 14 in the entire country, which could apply to receive money from the military program. That money could finance projects such as building or rehabilitating hangars, utility systems, access roads, cargo buildings and other airfield projects.

“It would be a shot in the arm for us to repair and resurface ramps or build and remodel new facilities around the airport,” he said. “It would be very, very beneficial – not just to Miami County, but to north central Indiana as a whole.”

Since 1990, the FAA has provided airport sponsors in the military program with approximately $722 million for a variety of airfield-related projects, according to FAA’s website.

Miami County commissioners Monday approved a letter supporting the initiative to get Grissom into the national airport system. Tidd said the project has also received written support from Indiana’s U.S. Senators Joe Donnelly and Todd Young, and U.S. Representatives Jackie Walorski and Todd Rokita.

Tidd said getting accepted into the national system can be a difficult process, but the payout could be well worth the effort.

“You’ve got to have a ticket to play, and getting into the National Plan Integrated Airport System is one of our goals,” he said. “It could be tough, but at least we’d be there to be competitive and submit an application for this grant money.”

http://www.kokomotribune.com

Florida's airport traffic rises above Texas'

TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott spent the past week touting the state’s move ahead of Texas in the overall number of passengers boarding airplanes.

While many large commercial airports in Florida have been steadily climbing, the vault to second in the nation in 2016 came with growth predominantly at facilities in Central and South Florida.

“You’d expect to see continued growth in Orlando because it is a major tourist destination for people all over the world, and continues to be the number one destination for people booking vacations through AAA — based on hotel bookings,” said Mark Jenkins, a AAA spokesman. “St. Pete-Clearwater and Fort Lauderdale airports are popular alternatives to the bigger international airports in Tampa and Miami. People might choose these smaller airports because they are less crowded, so it is easier to get in and out, but also because they can often find cheaper airfares.”

Florida recorded a nearly 4 percent growth in its overall outbound passenger count, from 78.07 million in 2015 to 81.17 million last year, according to annual Federal Aviation Administration data.

The Federal Aviation Administration figures counted 59 active airfields in Florida last year, from the 20.8 million airline passengers departing from Miami International to the single passenger recorded as flying out of Zephyrhills Municipal in Pasco County.

With Florida trailing only California for air passengers, the largest year-to-year increases in such traffic were found at Orlando International, Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International, Orlando Sanford International and St. Pete-Clearwater International, along with a number of smaller regional facilities, according to the Federal Aviation Administration figures.

Other airports were more in a year-to-year holding pattern.

Scott, in part, credited the recent uptick in passengers to state infrastructure spending.

“Florida’s airports help welcome millions of visitors, business leaders and families to our state each year, and have a significant impact on supporting job creation and growing our economy,” Scott said in a prepared statement. “That is why I am proud that we have invested more than $1 billion in state funding in our airports over the past six years.”

The state spending includes $263 million for aviation improvements in the budget that started July 1.

The next hurdle for Florida remains California, which experienced 7.2 percent growth in traffic that put its outbound passenger count in 2016 at 105.7 million.

California, topped by 39.6 million passengers last year at Los Angeles International and 25.7 million at San Francisco International, had people flying out of 74 different locations.

Among Florida’s top 10 busiest airports, Orlando International grew 8.12 percent year to year, bumping its terminal count to 20.3 million in 2016.

Orlando Sanford International, an alternative to the massive Orlando International, went up 9.18 percent, to 1.3 million passengers last year.

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood grew by 9.2 percent, to 14.26 million.

The largest percentage year-to-year increase among the 10 busiest was St. Pete-Clearwater International, going from 819,974 passengers in 2015 to 915,668 in 2016, an 11.67 percent jump, primarily due an expansion of routes by Allegiant Air, the airport’s dominant carrier.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com

Lake Charles Regional Airport (KLCH) $1 million project improves sewer and reduces wildlife



LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) -

The Federal Aviation Administration has awarded the Lake Charles Regional Airport $1.04 million in an effort to help reduce wildlife hazards at the airport by improving sewer infrastructure. Congressman Clay Higgins (R-LA) announced the news on Friday, July 14.

"Wastewater treatment is not the sexiest project," said Heath Allen, executive director of the Lake Charles Regional Airport. "It's obviously something that is very important."

The two-fold fix is aimed at improving safety. 

"These funds will help ensure that the runways and surrounding airfield remain safe for all parties as the airport continues to expand," said Higgins in a news release. 

The project will finance 1,500 feet of sanitary sewer connector improvements which will eliminate ponding on the airfield that creates potential wildlife hazards.

"The goal is to try and keep birds and other animals off of the air operations area in close proximity to the aircraft," Allen said. 

Wildlife and airplanes don't mix. On Jan. 15, 2009, an aircraft struck a flock of geese in New York City and ended up landing on the Hudson River. Luckily, all of the 155 passengers survived. 

"A bird, if it's big enough, can come through the windshield or it can dent and damage the wing or the engine," said pilot Rylan Campbell. 

Campbell flies into the Lake Charles Regional Airport twice a week and although he's never encountered an animal on the runway that doesn't mean he's going to let his guard down. 

"There's really not much you can do," he said. "They're going to fly out in front of you. It'd be almost like a dog running out in front of your car, you're not going to crash your car to not hit the dog, but on the other hand, you don't want to hit the dog, there's not much you can do."

The current wastewater treatment system is more than 50 years old and needs to be replaced, according to Allen.

This project will be a two-phase effort. Construction for the first phase is expected to begin this fall. 

Currently, there's also a fencing project underway to fence off the wooded area that surrounds the airport to help with bigger wildlife entering the airfield.

 "This Federal grant, as part of the aviation user-funded Airport Improvement Program, will enhance safety at LCH by eliminating the Airport's fifty-plus-year-old mechanical wastewater treatment facility and the associated wastewater effluent which serves as an attractant for birds and other wildlife," said Heath Allen, executive director of the Lake Charles Regional Airport. "By utilizing this funding to connect the Airport's facilities to the Parish and City's sanitary sewer lines, we will greatly increase safety and position the Airport for future economic growth. This represents a great partnership between the Airport, Calcasieu Parish, City of Lake Charles, and the federal government.  We appreciate the support of our federal delegation in gaining this critical funding."  

http://www.kplctv.com

Cessna A185F Skywagon 185, N401WC: Accident occurred July 16, 2017 near Wasilla Airport (IYS), Wasilla, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wasilla, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N401WC

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA037
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA A185F, registration: N401WC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 15, 2017, about 1700 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Cessna A185F airplane, N401WC, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power about 5 miles southwest of the Wasilla Airport (IYS), Wasilla, Alaska. The private pilot, the sole occupant, sustained no injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Lake Louise Seaplane Base, Lake Louise, Alaska, about 1600, destined for Campbell Lake Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to reposition the airplane from a cabin on Lake Louise to his home on Campbell Lake. On the day of the accident, about 1 hour into the 1.3-hour flight, he noticed that the digital fuel flow indicator was showing a fuel flow of 11 gallons per hour (gph) before it rapidly decreased to 4 gph. When the decrease occurred, the left fuel tank quantity gauge indicated zero and the right fuel tank quantity gauge indicated about ½ full. He said he verified that the fuel selector valve was in the "both" position and he advanced the throttle to full open. The fuel flow increased to 15.6 gph and then the engine sputtered and lost all power. The pilot maneuvered to perform a forced landing on the mudflats north of the Knik Arm inlet. During the forced landing touchdown in an area of tall grass, the left float contacted a log, and the airplane nosed over. The airplane came to rest inverted and the pilot safely egressed.

The pilot stated that he last fueled the airplane on July 11, prior to flying north to Lake Louise, and at that time, the airplane had about 62 gallons of fuel on board. During his preflight inspection, he sumped all the fuel tanks and visually checked the fuel levels in both wing tanks. The flight to Lake Louise was uneventful. 

On the day of the accident, just before departure, the fuel quantity indicators each read 3/4 full and he verified that by visual inspection of the fuel tank quantities. He then sumped the fuel tanks and gascolator, he noted no water or particle contamination was present. 

The pilot reported that the airplane flew about 2.3 hours since the fueling on July 11. 

On the day of the accident, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector witnessed the airplane flying low over the Wasilla mudflats just prior to the accident. He stated that as he watched the airplane descend towards the mud-covered beach, he heard the engine sputtering for about 45 seconds. He said that just before the airplane's floats touched down, he momentarily heard the engine power increase, which was followed by silence. The FAA inspector then responded to the scene of the accident and noted that the airplane was inverted and that there was no fuel leaking from the airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, left lift strut and vertical stabilizer. 

Following recovery of the airplane to a secure storage facility, the NTSB IIC and FAA inspector conducted an examination and documentation. The left fuel quantity gauge indicated empty and the right tank indicated about ½ full. The four fuel tank caps were in place and secure and the tanks were visually inspected. The tanks were drained and fuel from the left tank measured about 1 3/4 gallons and the right tank measured about 8 gallons. The fuel quantity indicators both read empty after draining the tanks. 

The airplane was outfitted with extended range fuel tanks. The Cessna A185F owner's manual lists the maximum fuel capacity as 84 gallons, with 6 gallons unusable. The fuel tank caps were a vented design. An Electronics International FP-5L digital fuel flow monitor was installed and operable. 


The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-520 series engine. A detailed engine examination is pending.

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, N210SL: Incident occurred July 16, 2017 at Napa County Airport (KAPC), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Pine Lake Leasing Group LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N210SL

Aircraft landed with nose gear retracted.

Date: 16-JUL-17
Time: 18:55:00Z
Regis#: N210SL
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NAPA
State: CALIFORNIA

Mooney M20C, N6712U: Incident occurred July 14, 2017 at Columbia Airport (O22), Tuolumne County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N6712U

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 14-JUL-17
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N6712U
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: COLUMBIA
State: CALIFORNIA

Epic LT, N44GB, AAV Evolution LLC: Incident occurred July 16, 2017 at Santa Monica Airport (KSMO), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

AAV Evolution LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N44GB

Aircraft on taxi, struck a sign.

Date: 17-JUL-17
Time: 01:35:00Z
Regis#: N44GB
Aircraft Make: BURK AIRCRAFT
Aircraft Model: EPIC LT
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SANTA MONICA
State: CALIFORNIA

Stolp Starduster Too SA300, N506WS, N506WS Partners LLC and Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N5396E, Sorbi Aviation Inc: Accident occurred July 16, 2017 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

N506WS Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

N506WS  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


N5396E  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N5396E  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N506WS Partners LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N506WS

Sorbi Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5396E

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA411A

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in San Diego, CA
Aircraft: SPANI WAYNE M STARDUSTER TOO SA300, registration: N506WS
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA411B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in San Diego, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N5396E
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tandem seat, tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, while taxiing to the runway, and seated in the rear seat, he had "poor [forward] visibility" and the airplane's propeller collided with the left wing of a stationary airplane on the taxiway. The pilot reported that he had "broke and turned" as soon as he saw the stationary airplane, but "it was too late."

The pilot of the stationary airplane reported that he had stopped on the taxiway due to the run-up area ahead being fully occupied with multiple airplane's awaiting to depart. He added that, his "first awareness" of the tailwheel airplane was the sound of a "loud bang." 

The stationary airplane's left wing and aileron sustained substantial damage. The tailwheel airplane sustained minor damage to the propeller. 

The pilot's reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with their respective airplane's that would have precluded normal operation.

Glasair SH2, N181AL: Accident occurred July 15, 2017 at Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N181AL

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in Colorado Springs, CO
Aircraft: Endler Glasair SH2, registration: N181AL
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 15, 2017, about 1300 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Endler Glasair SH2, N181AL, impacted terrain during takeoff from Meadow Lake Airport (FLY), Colorado Springs, Colorado. A post-impact fire ensued destroying the airplane. The pilot and passenger on board were uninjured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

While taking off on runway 15 at FLY (6,000 feet by 60 feet, asphalt), the airplane ground looped and veered off the runway striking a taxiway light. The airplane then caught on fire.

=======

PEYTON, Colo. — Officials say a sudden severe wind gust from an approaching storm may have caused a plane to veer off the runway and hit a culvert before catching fire Saturday afternoon.

It happened around 1 p.m. at Meadow Lake Airport located at 12850 E. Highway 24.

According to the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, the plane veered off the runway and hit a culvert. The plane then spun around and caught fire, according to authorities.

The pilot and passenger were able to exit the plane and were not injured. 

Firefighters were able to extinguish the fire.

Authorities say the pilot was authorized to remove the wreckage.

Representatives of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Denver Flight Standards District Office were notified but determined they would not respond to conduct a further investigation.

http://fox21news.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N1416W, Gulf Atlantic Airways Inc: Incident occurred July 14, 2017 at Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV), Alachua County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Gulf Atlantic Airways Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1416W

Aircraft on taxi, struck a taxiway light.

Date: 14-JUL-17
Time: 14:15:00Z
Regis#: N1416W
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: GAINESVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Bombardier Challenger 604 (CL-600-2B16), N956PP, Printpack Equipment LLC: Incident occurred July 16, 2017 at Fulton County Airport (KFTY), Atlanta, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Printpack Equipment LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N956PP

Aircraft on landing rollout, struck deer.

Date: 16-JUL-17
Time: 10:40:00Z
Regis#: N956PP
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL600
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Cessna T188C, N4911J: Incident occurred July 15, 2017 in Monticello, Piatt County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N4911J

Aircraft, during aerial application operation, force landed in a field.

Date: 15-JUL-17
Time: 14:00:00Z
Regis#: N4911J
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C188
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MONTICELLO
State: ILLINOIS

Piper PA-32-300, N31841, On The Beam LLC: Accident occurred July 15, 2017 at Marion Airport (C17), Linn County, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA422
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in Marion, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA32, registration: N31841
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, after a normal touchdown, the airplane’s nose dropped, and he added power. Subsequently, the airplane bounced, exited the runway to the right, and came to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and engine mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

The pilot reported that, after a normal touchdown, the nose of the airplane dropped, and he added power. Subsequently, the airplane bounced, exited the runway to the right, and came to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and engine mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

On The Beam LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N31841


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA422

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in Marion, IA
Aircraft: PIPER PA32, registration: N31841
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, after a normal touchdown, the nose of the airplane dropped, and he added power. Subsequently, the airplane bounced, exited the runway to the right, and came to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and engine mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Tecnam P92 Eaglet, N561TU, Tecnam US Inc: Accident occurred July 15, 2017 at Bay Bridge Airport (W29), Stevensville, Queen Anne's County, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Agenzia Nazionale per la Sicurezza del Volo (ANSV); Rome
Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecna; Capua, Italy
Rotax Aircraft Engines; Vernon, British Columbia, Canada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Tecnam US Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N561TU

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA246
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in Stevensville, MD
Aircraft: COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE TECNA P92 Eaglet, registration: N561TU
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 15, 2017, about 1615 eastern daylight time, a Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecna P92 Special Light Sport Airplane, N561TU, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during approach to Bay Bridge Airport (W29), Stevensville, Maryland. The two private pilots were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed from Shoestring Aviation Airfield (0P2), Stewartstown, Pennsylvania, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The airplane had recently been purchased by the owner and placed on a lease-back operation with the operator. On July 13, 2017, the owner along with the pilot who was in the right seat on the accident flight, took delivery of the airplane in Apopka, Florida and flew it to W29.

On the day of the accident, the airplane was fueled to approximately 16 gallons (8 gallons per side). The flight instructor believed that the planned round-trip flight from W29 to 0P2 was the airplane's first since the delivery flight. The purpose of the trip was twofold; the pilot in the right seat (who was also a flight instructor) and the pilot in the left seat were flying to 0P2 for personal business. Additionally, the right seat pilot wanted to provide operational exposure to the left seat pilot in the operation of Garmin G3X avionics, with which the plane was equipped, and on which, she (in her role as an advanced ground instructor) was scheduled to provide a future training seminar. The flight from W29 to 0P2 was uneventful.

Immediately prior to the accident flight, the left seat pilot checked the fuel, oil, and engine coolant. The oil and coolant levels were normal; fuel was approximately 12 gallons. The route of flight after departing from 0P2 included a transition at 2,000 ft. above mean sea level over the Class D airspace around Martin State Airport (MTN), Baltimore, Maryland, and then direct to W29. Upon arrival in the area of W29, they obtained the field conditions from the automated weather observation station at W29, and decided to enter the traffic pattern for runway 29 on the crosswind leg. No other traffic was observed in the traffic pattern at the time, and due to noise-abatement rules, the runway 29 downwind leg was conducted about 2 miles south of the airport.

With the left seat pilot flying the airplane, power reduction and configuration for landing was started abeam "the 29 numbers." Several seconds after power reduction, the engine abruptly started to run rough. At this time, the control of the airplane was relinquished to the right seat pilot. Both pilots scanned the engine indications but did not observe any anomalous readings. The right seat pilot turned a somewhat close base leg, but did not turn direct to the runway out of concern for arriving too high at the threshold, and a flight path that would have taken the flight over a densely populated townhouse community. Flaps were then increased to correct for the high glide path. About 20 seconds later, the engine abruptly stopped.

The right seat pilot turned directly toward the runway threshold; both pilots assessed the possibility of making the runway and decided it would be impossible. At this point the right seat pilot noted that the glide could be improved by reducing the wing flaps to 15° (but the right seat pilot was not sure if they did this). The right seat pilot then steered the airplane towards an open area that was 20° off his left side, and decided on a range of landing options while the left seat pilot went through an engine restart attempt. This attempt was unsuccessful as the engine would not "turn over." They then assessed a mature cornfield but decided to continue their glide as it appeared rough and they could nose over due to the corn.

After the turn, the right seat pilot's first touchdown choice, was a road that was 30° to the right of their flightpath in an uncompleted section of a neighborhood. The right seat pilot decided that it was unsuitable for landing due to numerous obstacles. Their remaining option, which they chose, was a cleared but rough area of open ground approximately 45° to the left of their flight path. They turned towards it, and completed the turn about 5 ft. above ground level. The airplane then "firmly" glanced off the top of an earthen berm at landing speed and settled onto the rough ground beyond it. During the landing roll, about 150 ft. from the touchdown point there was a second earthen berm that was obscured by vegetation and the natural lighting. The airplane then struck the second berm, the right main gear and nose gear separated from their mounting points, and the airplane both rolled and pitched, damaging both wings. The airplane then came to rest approximately 20 to 30 ft. beyond the second berm. The pilots then shut off both fuel valves, and the master switch, and then egressed.

Once it was determined there was no risk of fire, the right seat pilot returned to the cockpit and disabled the emergency locator transmitter which had activated during the impact sequence.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, and pilot records, the left seat pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. Her most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on November 21, 2016. She reported that she had accrued 330 total hours of flight experience, 5 of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airman records, and pilot records, the right seat pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and airplane single-engine sea. He also possessed a flight instructor certificate with a sport rating. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 28, 2017. He reported that he had accrued 4,625 total hours of flight experience, 594 of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airworthiness records and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 2017. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued approximately 13.2 total hours of operation.

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 717-200, N987DN: Incident occurred July 15, 2017 at Logan International Airport (KBOS), Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachachusetts

Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N987DN


Aircraft on turning off taxiway, struck a runway light. No injuries. Damage unknown.

Date: 15-JUL-17
Time: 01:20:00Z
Regis#: N987DN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B717
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: DAL677
City: BOSTON
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Aircraft, while taxiing to the gate, struck a runway light. No injuries. Damage unknown.

Date: 15-JUL-17
Time: 01:30:00Z
Regis#: N987DN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B717
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: DAL677
City: BOSTON
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Aeroprakt A-20 Vista Cruiser N55US: Accident occurred July 16, 2017 near Brookhaven Airport (KHWV), Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N55US

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: AEROPRAKT A 20 VISTA CRUISER, registration: N55US
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2017, about 2010 eastern daylight time, an experimental light sport Aeroprakt A-20 Vista Cruiser, N55US, was substantially damaged during a forced landing into trees, following a total loss of engine power on final approach to Brookhaven Airport (HWV), Shirley, New York. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

The pilot reported that he was performing touch-and-go landings to runway 24 at HWV. About 700 feet above ground level, the airplane encountered a downdraft and the engine lost all power. The pilot was unable to restart the engine and realized that the airplane would not glide all the way to the runway. He elected to land in the tops of trees approximately .3 mile from the runway threshold. The airplane subsequently contacted the tree tops and descended left wing low to the ground.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The airplane was equipped with a Rotax 912 S, 100-horsepower engine. Subsequent examination and successful test-runs of the engine by the pilot and FAA inspectors did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The engine operated continuously at multiple power settings, including full power.


The engine's choke control was located in the vicinity of the throttle lever. During one of the test-runs, the pilot and FAA inspectors noted that when the choke control was moved approximately halfway (1 inch), the engine lost all power. The pilot and inspectors believed that during the downdraft/turbulence encounter, the pilot's hand on the throttle accidentally bumped the choke control, which resulted in a total loss of engine power.



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: AEROPRAKT A 20 VISTA CRUISER, registration: N55US
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2017, about 2010 eastern daylight time, an experimental light-sport Aeroprakt A-20 Vista Cruiser, N55US, operated by the private pilot, was substantially damaged during a forced landing into trees, following a total loss of engine power on final approach to runway 24 at Brookhaven Airport (HWV), Shirley, New York. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

The pilot reported that he was performing touch-and-go landings at HWV. About 700 feet above ground level, the airplane encountered a downdraft and the engine lost all power. The pilot was unable to restart the engine and realized that the airplane would not glide all the way to the runway. He elected to land in the tops of trees approximately .3 mile from the runway threshold. The airplane subsequently contacted the tree tops and descended left wing low to the ground.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed damage to the wings and fuselage. The airplane was equipped with a Rotax 912S, 100-horsepower engine, which was retained for further examination.





A small plane crashed on Long Island, but the pilot was able to walk away uninjured, authorities say.

The aircraft went down just after 8 p.m. Sunday night along the Moriches-Middle Island Road in Mastic just shy of Brookhaven Calabro Airport, according to officials.

The FAA said the pilot was doing practice landings and was on the final approach to the airport when the plane’s engine cut out.

The pilot was able to coast the plane into a patch of woods before it came to rest in the trees, the FAA said.

http://www.nbcnewyork.com

his pilot was all smiles after he survived a crash-landing on Long Island.

Yuri Koziy, 45, was doing practice landings on his final approach to Brookhaven Calabro Airport around 8 p.m. Sunday when his plane went down along the Moriches-Middle Island Road in Mastic, officials told NBC.

Koziy, of Massapequa, managed to coast the plane into a patch of woods until it landed in the trees, the FAA told the station.

He was the only person on board the plane, and refused medical attention.

A photo shows Koziy, wearing shorts and a T-shirt, grinning broadly as he leans against a first responder’s van. The aircraft crash-landed in the trees in Mastic, Long Island.

Balony Kubicek BB30Z, N715VG: Incident occurred July 16, 2017 in Perkasie, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N715VG

Hot air balloon force landed in a field.

Date: 16-JUL-17
Time: 01:10:00Z
Regis#: N715VG
Aircraft Make: BALONY KUBICEK SPOL
Aircraft Model: BB30Z
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PERKASIE
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Pitts S1S (Mfr. Perner), N714H: Accident occurred July 16, 2017 at Brenham Municipal Airport (11R) , Washington County, Texas and Incident occurred July 21, 2012 at Northeast Florida Regional Airport ( KSGJ), St. Augustine, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA417
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Brenham, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: PERNER/PITTS S1S, registration: N714H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during touchdown, the airplane bounced, and he applied power to go around. He added that the “yaw factor” affected the go-around, and the left wing struck the runway, followed by the propeller, which resulted in the airplane cartwheeling off the runway to the left. The airplane stopped between hangars about 375 ft from the runway. 

The left and right wings sustained substantial damage.  

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain lateral/bank and yaw control during a go-around.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N714H


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA417
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Brenham, TX
Aircraft: PERNER/PITTS S1S, registration: N714H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during touchdown the airplane bounced and he applied power to go-around. He added that, the "yaw factor" affected the go-around and the left wing struck the runway, followed by the propeller, which resulted in the airplane cartwheeling off the runway to the left. The airplane stopped between hangars about 375 ft. from the runway.

The left and right wings sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 714H        Make/Model: EXP       Description: PITTS S1S
  Date: 07/21/2012     Time: 1614

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: SAINT AUGUSTINE   State: FL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
Aircraft went off the end of the runway and flipped over.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0         
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0        
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0        


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ORLANDO, FL  (SO15)                   Entry date: 07/24/2012 


 
St. Johns County Fire Rescue personnel inspect a biplane after it crashed at the Northeast Florida Regional Airport on July 21, 2012. 


 



ST. AUGUSTINE -- A Weirsdale man was not injured and his experimental plane suffered only minor damage when the aircraft flipped onto its roof after landing, according to a Florida Highway Patrol trooper report. 

 Edward McCaskill told Trooper Dennis Shorter after landing the plane on runway 24 at St. Augustine Airport on Saturday that he ran out of runway, causing the plane to move into a grassy area, just west of the runway.

The front landing gear was stuck in the ground, causing the plane to overturn onto its roof, the FHP said.

McCaskill managed to walk away without any injury, while damage to the aircraft was estimated at $700, the report said.

The 56-year-old McCaskill was the only one on board the Pitts SIS, which was removed from the runway area and taken to a hangar.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified about the incident, which officials said occurred around 12:20 p.m.

Story and comments:    http://www.ocala.com
 

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Dennis Shorter was called to the Northeast Florida Regional Airport at St Augustine on July 21, 2012 to investigate the crash of a privately owned experimental airplane that ran out of runway after landing. 

 The red, white and blue 1967 Pitts S1S biplane, piloted by 56 year-old Edward McCaskill, Jr., the owner of Alligator Irrigation and Landscaping in Weirsdale, landed west on Runway 24. McCaskill was unable to stop the aircraft before it went into the grass area, just west of the runway.

The front landing gear dug into the dirt, causing the plane to overturn onto its roof.

McCaskill was the only person on board and was not injured in the crash, Shorter reported. The plane sustained about $700 in damage.

Kelvin Harvey, the airport’s operation manager, contacted the Federal Aviation Administration to report the incident. The airplane was turned back onto its landing gear and then removed from the runway and taken to a hangar as the investigation continues.

Story:   http://www.historiccity.com


A red, white and blue biplane traveled off a runway and flipped at the Northeast Florida Regional Airport on July 21, 2012, according to a Florida Highway Patrol Report.

The pilot, Edward McCaskill, 56, of Weirsdale, Fla., was not injured in the accident. He was the only person on board.

McCaskill had been flying a 1967 Pitts S1S biplane and came in to land around 12:30 p.m.

After he landed on runway 24, the plane went into the grass west of the runway, according to the report. The front landing gear went into the dirt, and the plane flipped and landed on its roof.

The plane’s landing gear was removed from the runway, and the plane was taken to a hangar.

The plane sustained $700 in damage.

Story and photo:    http://staugustine.com