Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Grumman G-164B, N3629E: Fatal accident occurred March 27, 2018 in Stockton, San Joaquin County, California

Tyler Graham Haymore
Marysville, California
1988 - 2018

Tyler passed away on March 27, 2018 while doing what he loved as an agricultural pilot, in Tracy, California. He lived life to the fullest and was blessed to be living his dream. Tyler was blessed with a beautiful and loving wife, a career he was passionate about, and was part of a loving pack (he and his siblings) that never wanted to be separated from each other, as well as a family who loved him immensely, and a multitude of extended family and friends who were so blessed by Tyler's love for them.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Haley's Flying Service Inc:http://registry.faa.gov/N3629E 


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Stockton, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA113
Date & Time: 03/27/2018, 1405 PDT
Registration: N3629E
Aircraft: SCHWEIZER AIRCRAFT CORP G 164B
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On March 27, 2018, about 1405 Pacific daylight time, a Schweizer Aircraft Corporation G-164 B restricted category agricultural airplane, N3629E, was substantially damaged after colliding with high transmission powerlines and subsequent impact with terrain about 10 nautical miles southwest of Stockton, California. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. That aerial application flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137, and a flight plan was not filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which departed the operator's private airstrip about 30 minutes prior to the time of the accident.

A company ground crewman who witnessed the accident reported that the pilot had finished spraying the 95-acre alfalfa field and was in the process of trimming up around two sets of transmission towers that ran parallel and diagonally through the field in a southwest to northeast direction. The accident occurred when the airplane, flying from north to south, collided with the second set of wires that the pilot was attempting to fly under while making a trim/cleanup pass. The crewman stated that following impact with the wires the airplane impacted terrain in a steep nose down attitude. There was no postcrash fire. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SCHWEIZER AIRCRAFT CORP
Registration: N3629E
Model/Series: G 164B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SCK, 33 ft msl
Observation Time: 1355 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 320°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Tracy, CA
Destination: Tracy, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  37.847778, -121.516111 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





A crop duster pilot was killed when the biplane he was flying struck a line on a power transmission tower and crashed in a field north of Clifton Court Road shortly after 2 p.m. Tuesday.

The San Joaquin County Coroner’s Office identified the pilot Wednesday morning as Tyler Graham Haymore, 29, of Tracy. 

Ian Gregor, a communications manager for the Federal Aviation Administration Pacific Division, said in a statement that the Schweizer G-164B Ag-Cat crop duster crashed under unknown circumstances near the 16500 block of Clifton Court Road.

The FAA aircraft registry shows the plane registered to Haley Flying Service Inc., 15971 S. Tracy Blvd.

The airplane crashed upside down south of the power transmission towers, with the engine and other parts spread over an area roughly 70 feet from the main body of the plane.

A power line could be seen dangling from a transmission tower, and other lines were sagging into the field where the airplane crashed. The transmission lines that fell damaged other power lines on Bonetti Road to the west. A Pacific Gas & Electric Co. crew was working to repair the damaged power lines.

Chris O’Neil, chief of media relations for the National Transportation Safety Board, said Wednesday morning that the preliminary investigation described a chain of events beginning when the plane struck the power line.

“The pilot was flying by visual flight rules, and in the operation of crop dusting, it struck a suspended wire, resulting in loss of control and the crash,” O’Neil said. “Why the aircraft struck the wire is yet to be seen.”

He said an employee of Haley Flying Service witnessed the crash and gave an account, so the NTSB would not need to send an investigator to the scene.

Fire engines from Tracy, Mountain House and French Camp were called to the scene at 2:11 p.m. along with sheriff’s deputies.

Battalion Chief Scott Arganbright of Tracy Fire Department said the pilot was killed in the crash. A fire department hazmat team was called to decontaminate Haymore’s body and the plane because of the insecticide that spilled in the wreck.

Arganbright said the insecticide that the crop duster was spraying in the area was confined to the crash scene and did not pose a threat to people living nearby.

O’Neil said the final report on the crash could take anywhere from 12 to 24 months to complete, depending on access to records. He added that the NTSB instigates nearly 1,300 general aviation accidents each year, some of which include fatalities.

Original article ➤  http://www.goldenstatenewspapers.com














STOCKTON -- A crop duster crashed into the middle of a field just outside of Tracy Tuesday, taking out power lines before it hit the ground.

The Federal Aviation Administration reports around 2 p.m. the plane crashed near Clifton Court Road.

The pilot was killed, officials said. His identity has not been released.

Transmission and power lines were hit in the crash, according to Pacific Gas and Electric. Power to 25 customers north of Tracy went out around 2:10 p.m. Crews are working to fix the damage and PG&E estimates power could be restored by around 6:15 p.m.

The plane was identified by the FAA as a Schweizer G-164B crop duster. It was registered to Haley's Flying Service out of Tracy.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://fox40.com

City of Cheyenne Mayor Orr Reacts to Great Lakes Airlines suspension



CHEYENNE, Wyo (KGWN) - City of Cheyenne Mayor Marian Orr expressed her surprise and disappointment in learning Great Lakes Airlines immediate suspension of flights through social media on Monday evening.

“I was initially shocked that Cheyenne Regional Airport Director Tim Barth nor I were contacted by Mr. Doug Voss and afforded the courtesy of personal communication,” Orr stated. “But after further reflection, I shouldn’t have been surprised. Last minute cancelled flights and their lack of reliability is simply a mirror of their leadership. I only hope they did better by their employees and provided some financial relief as they search for new jobs”.

Doug Voss is the Co-Founder of Great Lakes.

Community members have been meeting weekly in previous months to determine a best match in both market and carrier for the airport.

Orr stressed that “This is not a time to panic, but rather instead realize we need to make some hard decisions sooner versus later. The tough decision to be made is how do we pay and how much are we willing to pay - to bring a reliable air carrier into Cheyenne? While initially a subsidy may be necessary, I am only willing to do so if the numbers pencil out that doing so won’t be on-going. That the flights will pay for themselves, and ultimately, bring additional sales tax revenue.”

Orr suggested in recent meetings that funding air transportation should be considered critical infrastructure to the Capital City and that means a constant funding source. Although the state has capped the lodging tax at 4 percent, Orr plans to work with legislative leaders to increase the maximum possible tax to 6 percent. The tax must be voter approved every four years.

“This is a tax that is paid by our visitors, and at least for Cheyenne, is among the lowest in the region. Few, if any of us, consider lodging tax rates when paying for a hotel or motel while traveling. By earmarking one or two percent of the bed tax to air service, we can commit to funding air travel outside of having to use general fund revenue to do so” said Orr.

Orr expressed the need to look beyond Cheyenne and to the South where increased traffic time for all the communities along the front range makes flying out of Cheyenne an overall better experience than driving to, and parking, at Denver International Airport (DIA).

The Northern Colorado Regional Airport remains without a control tower, which according to Allegiant Air, was their reason for discontinuing service at that location. The key, however, will be consistency according to Orr.

“Voters approved the new air terminal because they saw the future need, and that future is now. We had to meet the increased federal safety regulations, and our new terminal will provide for that,” Orr added. “We are an important diversion site for DIA, and our airport receives big dollars every time that happens. We can’t forget how important Cheyenne is for the Wyoming Air National Guard. The new terminal was never a ‘build it and they will come’ project. It was necessary because of both federal mandates and aging infrastructure.”

Orr said these next few weeks will be critical, because as of today, the airport has 90 days to secure a replacement carrier or Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will de-federalize the checkpoint. Re-establishing the checkpoint, if it is lost, could take over six months.

Orr will be meeting with city, county, and state officials in the coming days to determine the path forward.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.kgwn.tv

Beech Bonanza V35A, N7019N: Fatal accident occurred near Hinton Municipal Airport (2O8), Caddo County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

On Top Flying Co LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7019N

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Hydro, OK
Accident Number: ERA18FA114
Date & Time: 03/25/2018, 2137 CDT
Registration: N7019N
Aircraft: BEECH V35
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 25, 2018, about 2137 central daylight time, a Beech V35A, N7019N, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Hydro, Oklahoma. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer Field (ODO), Odessa, Texas, about 1947, and was destined for El Reno Regional Airport (RQO), El Reno, Oklahoma.

The pilot had departed his home airport, RQO, earlier in the day with the passenger and arrived at ODO about 1345. A line technician who worked at the ODO fixed-base operator (FBO) reported that he added 25 gallons of fuel to the airplane shortly after the arrival. According to another line technician, throughout the afternoon while the pilot was at the FBO, he requested that weather radar and satellite information be displayed on a large monitor, because he was "concerned with the clouds."

Review of an audio recording from Austin, Texas, Leidos Flight Service, revealed that the pilot called for a weather briefing at 1806, about an hour and a half before his departure. The pilot informed the flight service specialist that he planned to complete a "VFR [visual flight rules] flight" from Odessa, Texas to El Reno, Oklahoma in about 30 minutes and it would be about a 2.5-hour flight. During the 11-minute call, the flight service specialist provided the pilot with numerous weather details pertaining to his flight.

The specialist informed the pilot that multiple Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMET) reports affected his flight. The specialist stated that one AIRMET was for "IFR [instrument flight rules] right at your destination," developing between 1900–2200, "shortly after you depart Odessa." The pilot responded by stating that, "I don't see it as a problem right now, the skies look, I can see that things are changing out here, but things look to be VFR over here at Odessa right now." The specialist responded by stating, "It's not a problem at Odessa, this is about your destination." He then asked the pilot, "can you go IFR if you need to?" The pilot responded by stating, "Yeah, I can if I need to." The specialist and pilot continued their weather discussion for another 7 minutes, with the specialist providing current conditions, radar information, winds aloft, pilot reports, notices to airmen, and forecast conditions for the destination area.

Review of preliminary air traffic control audio provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot radioed the Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZFW), at 2133, after being handed off from the Oklahoma City Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility. The pilot checked in with ZFW and when asked by the controller, what his intentions were, the pilot stated, "ok, my intentions are now, I've got myself out of the clouds, I'm back up on top here, I'm going to try to go out to the west and fly down underneath it." The ZFW controller responded by asking where he wanted to fly out west, and where he was trying to get back to. The pilot stated, "ok, I'm going to try to go out towards Hinton Oklahoma and I'll try to get on the outskirts of this overcast and try to go underneath it, to go to El Reno [Oklahoma]." The ZFW controller responded by saying "alright sir," and there were no further communications from the pilot.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the FAA revealed that the airplane was headed toward the destination airport, RQO, and about 8 miles southwest, at 2125, the airplane turned north and then west toward the town of Hinton, Oklahoma. The airplane continued flying west, past Hinton, and then flew southwest. At 2134, the airplane was about 8 miles southeast of Weatherford, Oklahoma, flying at 3,850 ft mean sea level (msl), continuing southwest. Subsequently, the radar track showed the airplane enter two left, descending, 360° spiral turns, leveling off about 2,200 ft msl. The airplane then flew north, for about 20 seconds, with the last radar data point recording at 2137, showing the airplane flying at 2,125 ft msl, headed 033°, with a 157-knot groundspeed. The last radar point was about 1/4-mile southwest of the accident site.

According to a witness who was traveling in his car, southbound on a road about a 1/2-mile west of the accident site, about the time of the accident, he reported that he observed a "steady red light" and a "steady white light" travel over his car. He continued observing the lights out of his driver's side window for about 10 to 15 seconds, looking eastward, as the lights continued to get lower in his field of view, and then suddenly, he observed a bright "yellow glow" ignite.

The airplane came to rest upright in a flat, open field, on a magnetic heading of 060°. The airplane sustained extensive impact damage, and evidence of a small post-impact fire was observed. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was established for all flight controls to the cockpit area.

The left main landing gear remained attached to the wing, and the nose and right main landing gear separated from the airframe. The landing gear selector and actuators were found in the retracted position. The flap handle and actuators were found in the retracted position. The fuel strainer screen and fuel strainer bowl were found clean. The fuel selector handle and valve were found selected to the right fuel tank.

The cockpit instrument panel, navigation, and communication instruments were damaged during the impact. The attitude indicator and heading indicator were found in the debris field. The heading indicator displayed a heading of 060°. Both gyroscope housings exhibited evidence of rotational scoring. The throttle lever and mixture control lever were found full forward and bent. The propeller control lever was found pulled out (aft).

The airplane was equipped with five seats. The front two seats were found separated from the airframe in the debris field. One front seat lap belt was found buckled with its attached point stitching ripped on one side. The other front seat lap belt was found unbuckled, with one of its attach points stitching ripped. The number 5 passenger seat was the only seat that was found attached to the airframe. The airplane was not equipped with shoulder harnesses.

The engine separated from the airframe and was found about 220 ft forward of the main wreckage. During a postaccident engine examination, the crankshaft was rotated by hand and valve train continuity was established, and all pistons operated normally. Each spark plug displayed varying degrees of impact damage; the top spark plugs were visually inspected, and normal operating and combustion signatures were observed. The cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope; the cylinder bore, piston faces, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures.

The fuel manifold valve and fuel nozzles were examined, and no debris was observed. Numerous engine accessories separated from the engine and were found in the debris field. Both magnetos separated from the engine and were found capable of producing spark when rotated by an electric drill.

The vacuum pump remained attached to the engine and displayed impact damage signatures. The vacuum pump was removed, and it was noted that the shear coupling remained intact. The vacuum pump was disassembled, and it was noted that the rotor was impact damaged.

All three propeller blades had broken free from the propeller hub and displayed impact damage signatures. Each propeller blade displayed varying amounts of S-bending, blade polishing, leading edge gouging, and twisting deformation.

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed, the most recent annual and 100-hour inspection was performed on December 21, 2017, at an airframe time of 3361.17, a tachometer time of 2559.17, and 887.6 hours since major engine overhaul. The tachometer was found in the debris field and it displayed 2583.17 hours.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land ratings, as well as instrument airplane. The pilot was issued an FAA second-class medical certificate on January 18, 2018. At that time, the pilot reported civil flight experience that included 4,500 total hours and 2 hours in last 6 months.

A witness reported that at the time of the accident, it was windy, and it was a darker than normal night, as "the moon was not visible." He reported that other than a farm house light, there were no other cars that past him near the time of the accident, the road was not lit, and the fields around the accident site were "pitch black."

The weather conditions reported about the time of the accident at Thomas P. Stafford Airport (OJA), Weatherford, Oklahoma, which was located 8 miles northwest of the accident site, included an overcast cloud ceiling at 800 ft above ground level, wind 120° at 11 knots, gusting 18 knots, visibility 7 statute miles, temperature 17°C, and dew point 16°C. The weather conditions at the destination airport RQO, about the time of the accident, included an overcast cloud ceiling at 800 ft above ground level, wind 140° at 19 knots, gusting 25 knots, visibility 7 statute miles, temperature 18°C, and dew point 16°C. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N7019N
Model/Series: V35 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOJA, 1607 ft msl
Observation Time: 2135 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots/ 18 knots, 120°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.77 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: ODESSA, TX (ODO)
Destination:  EL RENO, OK (RQO)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.454444, -98.562778

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Walter "Rick" Mullaney


Cesar Gomez 


HYDRO, Okla. (AP) — The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says two men were killed when the plane they were flying from Texas to Oklahoma crashed in central Oklahoma.

The OOklahoma Highway Patrol said Tuesday that 62-year-old pilot Walter R. Mullaney of El Reno and 27-year-old passenger Cesar Gomez of Fort Lupton, Colorado, died in the crash that was discovered on Monday near Hydro, about 60 miles (96 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City.

An Oklahoma Highway Patrol report says the two were flying Sunday night from Odessa, Texas, to El Reno when the aircraft was diverted to the Hinton Municipal Airport because of clouds and fog and that the plane crashed into a field.

Walter R. Mullaney was the airport manager for the El Reno Municipal Airport from September of 1986 to March of 2011. He continued as a commercial pilot until October 2014, according to his LinkedIn profile.

AutoGyro Cavalon, N442AG: Accident occurred March 26, 2018 at Dean Memorial Airport (5B9), Haverhill, Grafton County, New Hampshire

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N442AG

Analysis 

The pilot of the gyroplane reported that, during the takeoff roll, after the front landing gear became light, he attempted to push the control stick forward, but was unable. He then used both hands in an attempt to push the stick forward. He realized he could not move the control stick forward and therefore could not control the gyroplane. He rejected the takeoff by reducing power, the gyroplane veered to the left, and the rotor struck the runway. Subsequently, the gyroplane rolled onto its left side, skidded down the runway, exited the left side of the runway, and impacted a snowbank.

The gyroplane sustained substantial damage to the rotor system and fuselage.

The pilot reported that he removed the rotor blade by removing the center pivoting bolt, and in doing so, the rotor head moved forward and freed the stick.

The Federal Aviation Administration sent two inspectors to examine the gyroplane. During the visit, the rotor head moved freely in all directions with no evidence of binding or restriction, and no discrepancies were noted with the torque tube or cabling in the keel tube. The brake and trim controls were also moved in various sequences and control positions, but there were no discrepancies found. The FAA inspector added that, with an inadvertent and or unnoticed activation of full aft trim prior to beginning the takeoff roll, there could be enough resistance created to generate the conditions the pilot experienced. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during a rejected takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the binding of the control stick, for an undetermined reason, which precipitated the rejected takeoff. 

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Takeoff-rejected takeoff
Abnormal runway contact
Attempted remediation/recovery
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other

Roll over

Location: Haverhill, NH
Accident Number: GAA18CA179
Date & Time: 03/26/2018, 1015 EDT
Registration: N442AG
Aircraft: LYNN PERRY CAVALON
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the gyroplane reported that, during the takeoff roll, after the front landing gear became light, he attempted to push the control stick forward, but was unable. He then used both hands in an attempt to push the stick forward. He realized he could not move the control stick forward and therefore could not control the gyroplane. He rejected the takeoff by reducing power, the gyroplane veered to the left, and the rotor struck the runway. Subsequently, the gyroplane rolled onto its left side, skidded down the runway, exited the left side of the runway, and impacted a snowbank.

The gyroplane sustained substantial damage to the rotor system and fuselage.

The pilot reported that he removed the rotor blade by removing the center pivoting bolt, and in doing so, the rotor head moved forward and freed the stick.

The Federal Aviation Administration sent two inspectors to examine the gyroplane. During the visit, the rotor head moved freely in all directions with no evidence of binding or restriction, and no discrepancies were noted with the torque tube or cabling in the keel tube. The brake and trim controls were also moved in various sequences and control positions, but there were no discrepancies found. The FAA inspector added that, with an inadvertent and or unnoticed activation of full aft trim prior to beginning the takeoff roll, there could be enough resistance created to generate the conditions the pilot experienced. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private; Sport Pilot
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/04/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1831 hours (Total, all aircraft), 77 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LYNN PERRY
Registration: N442AG
Model/Series: CAVALON NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: V00311
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/16/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1232 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 57.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 914UL
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K1P1, 505 ft msl
Observation Time: 1415 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 149°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.75 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Haverhill, NH (5B9)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Haverhill, NH (5B9)
Type of Clearance:None 
Departure Time: 1015 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: DEAN MEMORIAL (5B9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 581 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: 01
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2511 ft / 58 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  44.080000, -72.007778 (est)

Air China, Boeing 777-300, B-2035: Incident occurred March 25, 2018 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles

Flight 987: Experienced bird strike on landing.

Date: 25-MAR-18
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 777-300
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AIR CHINA
Flight Number: 987
City: LOS ANGELES
State: CALIFORNIA

Hughes 369D, N571HH, operated by High Line Helicopters LLC: Accident occurred January 11, 2018 in San Juan, Puerto Rico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.
 
Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Juan, Puerto Rico

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N571HH

Location: San Juan, PR
Accident Number: ERA18LA091
Date & Time: 01/11/2018, 1350 AST
Registration: N571HH
Aircraft: HUGHES 369
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: External load event (Rotorcraft)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load 

On January 11, 2018, about 1350 Atlantic Standard Time, a Hughes 369D, N571HH, operated by High Line Helicopters LLC. (HLH), was not damaged during an external load operation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. The commercial pilot was not injured, while one power line maintenance person was seriously injured. The external load flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 133. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

The pilot reported to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) that the plan for the day was to install six polymer insulators and wire to utility towers. The flights originated from a landing zone, where different equipment could be added and removed from the helicopter throughout the day. During the day, the pilot used the helicopter to lift ladders with ground crewmen on them nine times. The common terminology used during radio transmissions for that specific task was "man pick with a ladder," which alerts the pilot to use an A-frame attachment at the end of the longline, instead of a grapple. After making nine "man picks with a ladder" using the A-frame, he was summoned back to the utility tower with a 100-foot longline and grapple to move a wire up to the middle arm of the tower. After doing so, a transmission came over the radio to move a ladder with the grapple and 100-foot longline.

The terminology used during that transmission was "ladder pick," which alerts the pilot that the A-frame is not required as it would be a gear move only. From the pilot's position, he was able to see a lineman down near the bottom arm and another lineman near the top arm of the utility tower. The pilot flew into position to pick up the ladder only. He witnessed the lineman at the top arm rig the grapple. After the pilot received a visual signal from the lineman near the top arm, he began to maneuver the helicopter to apply upward pressure. Shortly after this, the ladder appeared to become bound on something. At that point the pilot could see both lineman shaking the ladder back and forth to get it free. Directly following this action, the lineman near the top arm reached out for the right-side safety chain on the ladder to remove it. Following that action, the ladder pivoted, came free of the structure and grapple, and the lineman and ladder fell to the ground.

In a subsequent statement provided to the National Transportation Safety Board, the pilot reported that as the ladder became bound, the upper (accident) lineman gave a visual head signal to let the line down (shaking head left to right). The pilot then lowered the line until the grapple came free of the rigging and was suspended near the upper lineman, but not in contact with the ladder or any other rigging. As the pilot hovered above, both lineman were shaking the ladder in an attempt to free it. Immediately after, the upper lineman reached out for the right-side safety chain on the ladder in an apparent attempt to remove it. When he did so, the ladder pivoted to the right, came free of the structure and the lineman and ladder departed the structure and fell to the ground.

The accident lineman reported to the USACE that a conductor was positioned low and hard against the utility tower at an angle, which necessitated the helicopter to use a longer line to lift it up. The helicopter then had to maneuver at an extreme angle to pull the conductor away from the tower, but could not maneuver the conductor around the ladder. The pilot radioed the accident lineman and stated that he was going to attempt the lift again, but with a shorter line. The accident lineman then told the pilot that he wanted to move the ladder to the other side of the tower to provide more clearance to lift the conductor. The helicopter returned with the A-frame, and picked up the ladder with the accident lineman on it and moved it directly above where it had been. However, that was not where the accident lineman wanted the ladder, but he was not in radio contact with the helicopter at that time (the radio was working properly, but at that time he was using both hands to safety/unsafety himself and/or the ladder to the structure).

The helicopter returned with the grapple at the end of the long line and the accident lineman advised the pilot that he thought the ladder would have to be positioned on the other side of the tower to provide enough clearance. At that point, the helicopter pilot lowered the grapple down and did not go back to get the A-frame. The accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder and unsafetied the ladder from the tower. The helicopter then picked up the ladder with the accident lineman on it and successfully moved it to the other side of the tower. Subsequently, the helicopter pilot moved the conductor and returned to the ladder with the grapple. The accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder, but before he could unsafety the ladder from the tower, the helicopter pilot tried to lift the ladder with the accident lineman on it. The accident lineman then gave a down signal and was trying to get the safety undone. The accident lineman was able to disconnect the safety; after which the top of the ladder tipped over and the ladder and lineman descended to the ground.

Another lineman was partnered with the accident lineman throughout the day. He reported to the USACE that they had worked on a different tower earlier in the day. During that work, the helicopter pilot completed some tasks with the grapple and then lifted the ladder with the accident lineman to a different location on the tower with the grapple, rather than an A-frame. However, in that instance, the ladder was only being moved straight down to a different position on the tower. When the helicopter departed, the other lineman mentioned to the accident lineman that he was surprised that they could use the grapple to move the ladder with a lineman on it and they briefly discussed it. Later in the day, while working on the accident tower, the accident lineman told the helicopter pilot that he needed the ladder further away from the conductor. The helicopter pilot did not go back to get the A-frame and moved the ladder with the accident lineman, using a 50-foot line with a grapple, directly above where it had been.

The pilot subsequently instructed the accident lineman that he needed to move the ladder to the opposite side of the tower. The helicopter successfully moved the ladder with the accident lineman to the other side of the tower with the grapple. After the helicopter lifted the conductor up on top of an arm with a grapple, the accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder and the helicopter started to lift the ladder with the accident lineman on it; however, the second safety was still attached from the tower to the ladder. It seemed like it took about 1 minute for the accident lineman to free the second safety. When the helicopter lifted the ladder, it went up, then backwards and downwards at an angle before falling to the ground with the accident lineman on it.

Review of two videos provided by an eyewitness revealed that about 40 minutes prior to the accident, the helicopter lifted a cable with a grapple. About 20 minutes prior to the accident, the helicopter lifted a ladder with a lineman on it from a lower static arm to an upper static arm on the same side of the tower, using an A-frame.

Review of a video recorded by the accident lineman earlier that day revealed that the accident lineman was on a ladder and used hand-signals to the helicopter. The ladder was then lifted with a grapple, with the lineman on it, and subsequently placed on a lower static arm.

Review of the USACE Accident Report revealed the "direct cause" of the accident was: "Failure to follow written safety procedures…Grapple hook was used instead of A Frame which is approved for human transport. This does not follow flight rules for human transport or the written safety policies in company safety manual."

Review of the electrical contractor accident report revealed the "direct cause" of the accident was: "…The individual's failure to follow the written procedures for the transport of human cargo by both the helicopter pilot and both lineman resulted in Lineman 1's fall from the helicopter. The use of a grapple hook for human external cargo (HEC) is not allowed in the (HLH) safety manual. Lineman 2 observed this procedure being violated while working on the first pole but did not stop the work. Lineman 1 and (the pilot) both violated this procedure at least two times on poles 1 and 2."

In addition, the report noted that both linemen were wearing a bee suit due to the presence of bee nests and neither linemen had previous performed this work while wearing a bee suit.

Review of Federal Aviation Regulation 27.865 (c) (2) and (4) revealed the for rotorcraft-load combinations to be used for human external cargo (HEC) applications: "Have a reliable, approved personnel carrying device system that has the structural capability and personnel safety features essential for external occupant safety…Have equipment to allow direct intercommunication among required crewmembers and external occupants…" The pilot must use approved attaching means during external load HEC operations and an intercom system, not radio, is required during external load HEC operations.

The 1356 weather observation at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport, located about 15 nautical miles northwest of the accident site included wind at 17 knots, gusting to 23 knots, a temperature of 29°C (84°F) and a dew point of 21°C (70°F).

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/03/2017
Flight Time:  3831 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1200 hours (Total, this make and model), 3778 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 350 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 165 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HUGHES
Registration: N571HH
Model/Series: 369 D
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 470125D
Landing Gear Type: High Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/09/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 6 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 10789 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Allison
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20
Registered Owner: UTILITY HELICOPTERS INC
Rated Power: 425 hp
Operator: High Line Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft External Load (133) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SJU, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1356 AST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 320°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3600 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots/ 23 knots, 110°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: San Juan, PR
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: San Juan, PR
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  AST
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 18.241667, -65.819167


Location: San Juan, PR
Accident Number: ERA18LA091
Date & Time: 01/11/2018, 1350 AST
Registration: N571HH
Aircraft: HUGHES 369
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load 

On January 11, 2018, about 1350 Atlantic Standard Time, a Hughes 369D, N571HH, operated by High Line Helicopters LLC., was not damaged during an external load operation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. The commercial pilot was not injured, while one ground crewman was seriously injured. The external load flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 133. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

The pilot reported to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) that the plan for the day was to install six polymer insulators and wire to utility towers. The flights originated from a landing zone, where different equipment could be added and removed from the helicopter throughout the day. During the day, the pilot used the helicopter to lift ladders with ground crewmen on them nine times. The common terminology used during radio transmissions for that specific task was "man pick with a ladder," which alerts the pilot to use an A-frame attachment at the end of the longline, instead of a grapple. After making nine "man picks with a ladder" using the A-frame, he was summoned back to the utility tower with a 100-foot longline and grapple to move a wire up to the middle arm of the tower. After doing so, a transmission came over the radio to move a ladder with the grapple and 100-foot longline.

The terminology used during that transmission was "ladder pick," which alerts the pilot that the A-frame is not required as it would be a gear move only. From the pilot's position, he was able to see a lineman down near the bottom arm and another lineman near the top arm of the utility tower. The pilot flew into position to pick up the ladder only. He witnessed the lineman at the top arm rig the grapple. After the pilot received a visual signal from the lineman near the top arm, he began to maneuver the helicopter to apply upward pressure. Shortly after this, the ladder appeared to become bound on something. At that point the pilot could see both lineman shaking the ladder back and forth to get it free. Directly following this action, the lineman near the top arm reached out for the right-side safety chain on the ladder to remove it. Following that action, the ladder pivoted, came free of the structure and grapple, and the lineman and ladder fell to the ground.

The accident lineman reported to the USACE that a conductor was positioned low and hard against the utility tower at an angle, which necessitated the helicopter to use a longer line to lift it up. The helicopter then had to maneuver at an extreme angle to pull the conductor away from the tower, but could not maneuver the conductor around the ladder. The pilot radioed the accident lineman and stated that he was going to attempt the lift again, but with a shorter line. The accident lineman then told the pilot that he wanted to move the ladder to the other side of the tower to provide more clearance to lift the conductor. The helicopter returned with the A-frame, and picked up the ladder with the accident lineman on it and moved it directly above where it had been. However, that was not where the accident lineman wanted the ladder, but he was not in radio contact with the helicopter at that time.

The helicopter returned with the grapple at the end of the long line and the accident lineman advised the pilot that he thought the ladder would have to be positioned on the other side of the tower to provide enough clearance. At that point, the helicopter pilot lowered the grapple down and did not go back to get the A-frame. The accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder and unsafetied the ladder from the tower. The helicopter then picked up the ladder with the accident lineman on it and successfully moved it to the other side of the tower. Subsequently, the helicopter pilot then moved the conductor and returned to the ladder with the grapple. The accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder, but before he could unsafety the ladder from the tower, the helicopter pilot tried to lift the ladder with the accident lineman on it. The accident lineman then gave a down signal and was trying to get the safety undone. The accident lineman was able to disconnect the safety; after which the top of the ladder tipped over and the ladder and lineman descended to the ground.

Another lineman was partnered with the accident lineman throughout the day. He reported to the USACE that they had worked on a different tower earlier in the day. During that work, the helicopter pilot completed some tasks with the grapple and then lifted the ladder with the accident lineman to a different location on the tower with the grapple, rather than an A-frame. However, in that instance, the ladder was only being moved straight down to a different position on the tower. When the helicopter departed, the other lineman mentioned to the accident lineman that he was surprised that they could use the grapple to move the ladder with a lineman on it and they briefly discussed it. Later in the day, while working on the accident tower, the accident lineman told the helicopter pilot that he needed the ladder further away from the conductor. The helicopter pilot did not go back to get the A-frame and moved the ladder with the accident lineman, using a 50-foot line with a grapple, directly above where it had been.

The pilot subsequently instructed the accident lineman that he needed to move the ladder to the opposite side of the tower. The helicopter successfully moved the ladder with the accident lineman to the other side of the tower with the grapple. After the helicopter lifted the conductor up on top of an arm with a grapple, the accident lineman hooked the grapple to the ladder and the helicopter started to lift the ladder with the accident lineman on it; however, the second safety was still attached from the tower to the ladder. It seemed like it took about 1 minute for the accident lineman to free the second safety. When the helicopter lifted the ladder, it went up, then backwards and downwards at an angle before falling to the ground with the accident lineman on it.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer:  HUGHES
Registration:  N571HH
Model/Series:  369 D
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: High Line Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SJU, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1356 AST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:  Few / 3600 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots/ 23 knots, 110°
Lowest Ceiling:  None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: San Juan, PR
Destination: San Juan, PR 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 18.241667, -65.819167