Wednesday, August 1, 2012

KWDR - Barrow County Airport able to accomodate most types of aircraft with Instrument Landing System

The Barrow County Airport has had its share of bad publicity, most centered on public opposition to expansion. But the little airport that was built almost 75 years ago can now accommodate the type aircraft that most businesses use thanks to the addition of an Instrument Landing System which went into operation in 2010.

Almost 10 years ago funds from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were secured for the ILS project. A series of events were set in motion in preparation for the ILS including land acquisition and extending Runway 13-31 to 5,500 feet.

Pilots used a localizer system before the ILS which lines the plane up with the runway, but can’t pinpoint the start of the runway like the ILS can.

"When you have limited visibility, you can’t land a plane without an ILS approach system," said Rob Mancini of Romanair, the airport’s fixed base operator. "The ILS has greatly increased the safety factor for the airport."

"The ILS has two needles," explained Mancini, "which shows the exact path of the runway. When you are up in the clouds you depend on the instruments to take you in."

Bob Hill of Winder, who houses his RV8 sport plane at the airport, says when making an instrument approach you can only descend so low if you haven’t seen the landing lights and runway.

"If you reach that point and still cannot see, you have to stop your descent and head for another airport," said Hill. "The ILS makes the airport viable under most weather conditions."

Rob Mancini said traffic has definitely increased at the Barrow County Airport with the addition of the ILS and he expects more traffic in the future.

"The safety factor is important, especially with these corporate jets," he said. "Some may have insurance policies which don’t allow landings without an ILS."

All the major airports in the area have one, said Mancini – Athens, Lawrenceville, Gainesville…

"Corporations want to locate near an airport," said Mancini, "and especially one with an ILS."

Georgia airports mean business and business means jobs. The FAA funded a study through the Georgia Department of Transportation to measure the economic impact of the state’s airport system and the results are clear.

The Barrow County Airport supplies 357 jobs with an annual payroll of $7,582,300 and $18,531,200 in economic output – a measure of the value of goods and services related to the airport.

The airport was built in the 1940s with two runways. The late Sen. Richard B. Russell was instrumental in obtaining grants from the Federal Government to aid in further developing the Airport. Today the Barrow County Airport is home to the 1st and 185th Aviation Helicopter Battalion of the Georgia Air National Guard which is looking at a significant expansion in the next 10 years.

Romanair, the FBO has been at the airport for more than 30 years and its services include fuel, aircraft maintenance, catering and aviation accessories. The Barrow County Airport is also home to Air Battle, Inc., owned by Owen Battle, a hangar leasing and construction business and Aircrane, Inc., the largest heavy lift operator on the East Coast. Spitfire Deli, located inside the airport terminal, specializes in freshly prepared hot and cold dishes, and plenty of homemade desserts.

For further information on the Barrow County Airport see the website at www.wdairport.com.

http://www.barrowcountynews.com

Rockford, Illinois: Civil Air Patrol to retire worn flags

 NEW MILFORD — The Rockford Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol, a volunteer auxiliary of the United States Air Force, will conduct a flag retirement ceremony at 6 p.m. Aug. 11 as part of the corn boil hosted by the New Milford Volunteer Fire Department, 2177 Will James Road, New Milford.

United States flags that have become worn or tattered by service can be dropped off at three locations: Akerman’s Professional Shoes, 1613 N. Alpine Road, Rockford; Winnebago Library, 210 N. Elida St., Winnebago; and J.H. Barkau & Sons Auto Sales, 1102 E. South St., Freeport. Flags may also be dropped off at New Milford Volunteer Fire Department before the event from 5 to 6 p.m.

The flags will be retired in accordance with United States Air Force and the Civil Air Patrol policies, and the ashes of the retired flags will be scattered by air at a later date. For more information about the Civil Air Patrol, contact William P. Ponall at 815-405-6602 or visit gocivilairpatrol.com.
 
http://www.rrstar.com

Cessna 172: Canadian pilot lands plane on Meeker County, Minnesota, highway, fixes engine, takes off again

LITCHFIELD — A Canadian pilot safely landed his Cessna 172 on a State Highway 24 in Meeker County Tuesday evening, then fixed an engine problem and flew on his way. 

According to a news release from Meeker County Sheriff Jeff Norlin, a 911 call reported that an airplane had landed on the highway around 5:30 p.m. northeast of Litchfield.

Deputies arrived to find the single-engine plane parked in a field approach north of the intersection with County Road 34.

The pilot, Donald Rennie, 59, of Alberta, Canada, told the officers that he and his two passengers, Ernest Novakowski, 66, and Gerald Richard, 74, also from Alberta, had left the Rochester airport and were heading to the Alexandria airport when the engine of the airplane started to backfire and lose power causing the airplane to lose altitude. Rennie said that he didn’t think that it was safe to fly over the populated areas of Litchfield to attempt to make it to the Litchfield Airport as he didn’t think that the airplane would make it that far.

Rennie made the decision to land the airplane on State Highway 24. Once the airplane was safely on the ground, the three men discovered that the fuel in the airplane had water in it. They were able to drain the water and get the plane to run correctly.

After the Federal Aviation Administration was contacted, it was determined that the airplane was cleared to take off from the roadway. Deputies and the Minnesota State Patrol blocked the roadway so the airplane could take off.

No damage was done to the airplane, the roadway, or any vehicles. Nobody was injured as a result of the incident.  


http://www.wctrib.com

 Yesterday afternoon at 5:31, the Meeker County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call reporting that an airplane had landed on State Highway 24 northeast of Litchfield. When deputies arrived they located a single engine Cessna 172 parked in a field approach located on County-State-Aid-Highway 34, north of the intersection of State Highway 24. 

 The pilot was identified as 59-year-old Donald Rennie of Alberta, Canada. Rennie said that he and his two passengers, 66-year-old Ernest Novakowski, and 74-year-old Gerald Richard, both from Alberta, Canada, had left the Rochester MN Airport and were heading to the Alexandria MN Airport when the engine of the airplane started to backfire and lose power, causing the airplane to lose altitude.

Rennie said that he didn’t think that it was safe to fly over the populated areas of Litchfield to attempt to make it to the Litchfield Airport; he didn’t think that the airplane would make it that far. Rennie made the decision to land the airplane on State Highway 24. Once the airplane was safely on the ground, the three discovered that the gas in the airplane had water in it. They were able to drain the water and get the plane to run correctly.

After the FAA was contacted, it was determined that the airplane was cleared to take off from the roadway. Meeker County Deputies and the Minnesota State Patrol blocked the roadway so the airplane could take off. No damage was done to the airplane, the roadway, or any vehicles. Nobody was injured as a result of the incident.

All three occupants of the airplane are friends from Alberta, Canada who take two weeks a year and go flying. All three are pilots. The incident is under investigation by the Meeker County Sheriff’s Office, the Minnesota State Patrol, and the FAA.


http://klfd1410.com

Police Twitter error over 'plane crash in Byfleet'

TWITTER users were given a fright last week when police in Woking tweeted that there had been a plane crash in Byfleet - by mistake. 

 An officer sent out the worrying message on Friday (July 27) on the Woking Safer Neighbourhood Policing Team's social media account, @WokingBeat.

The error was caused by selecting the wrong option from a dropdown list.

Police quickly deleted the message, then tweeting: "There has NOT been a plane crash in #Byfleet #Woking one of our staff accidentally sent the wrong tweet from a list of options."

This message was followed by another, responding to a query from a member of the public.

It said: "Tweet has been deleted, we use automated tweets with a dropdown bar to choose what we want to say."



http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/s/2118067_police_twitter_error_over_plane_crash_in_byfleet

Bowling Green, Kentucky: Airplane restoration to be part of PBS special

— The Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport holds the hope of a dream.

It started with Harry Balcer of Bainbridge, Ohio, who has loved airplanes since he was a child, and is continuing with Peridot Pictures owner Dorian Walker.

Walker plans to make Balcer's dream a reality by getting the Curtiss Jenny airplane Balcer was building ready for its first test flight. The plane will be part of his upcoming PBS television special "Jenny." The one-hour film is scheduled to be released in the fall.

"It was one of the most popular airplanes of its kind," Walker said last week as he walked around the plane and its various parts. "We're taking an icon of aviation that is rarer than a rare steak."

The Curtiss Jenny is a biplane created in the early 20th century by the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Co. Glenn Curtiss recruited B. Douglas Thomas, who had worked for Sopwith Aviation Co. in England, to help develop ideas for fighter planes. These became the JN series of planes, which came in six model variations, JN-1 through JN-6. They were called the Jenny and flew in World War I. They were used for aerial stunts in later years.

"Charles Lindbergh learned to fly on a Jenny. Amelia Earhart learned to fly on a Jenny," Walker said.
Walker decided he wanted to tackle the story of Glenn Curtiss, considered the father of the American aircraft industry, and the aircraft he helped design.

"I've been an aviator most of my life. I fly mainly vintage airplanes," he said. "The story of Glenn Curtiss and the Jenny is not told very often. As I researched it, I fell in love with the story."

Balcer remembers when he and his friends would play with toy airplanes.

"I've been interested in airplanes ever since I was a kid. I built a lot of model airplanes. I was always interested in French Flyers," he told the Daily News in a phone interview.

In 1979, Balcer bought construction plans for a Jenny from the Smithsonian Institution. Then he did what any other man who was busy with a wife, kids, home and job would do.

"I put them in a drawer," he said, laughing.

It wasn't until the early 1990s that Balcer brought the plans out again. The retired engineer found himself with time to work on the plane.

"I researched for six or seven months, located materials and went through the whole process," he said. "I started working on it in the basement. I have a large basement."

For about 15 years, Balcer and his wife worked on the plane, starting with the fuselage. They put the airplane skin on together.

"The airplane I put together was experimental. I built it from scratch," he said.

Even experimental aircraft need certification from the Federal Aviation Administration, and that's what eluded Balcer.

"It got expensive. I couldn't afford it anymore," he said.

At the same time, Walker was looking for the number of Jennys still in the world.

"I found 26 in museums or exhibits worldwide. I found six that are flying worldwide," he said.

Walker found two active rebuilding projects in the U.S. One was an airplane pilot in Atlanta who has been working on his Jenny for seven years. The other was Balcer's project.

"In the fall, I went up there with my cameras. Harry looked at me and said, 'I don't have it in me. I want to pass the torch,' " he said. "I agreed to try."

Balcer thought it would be a good educational tool.

"I was selective in letting someone get it," he said.

Walker isn't an airplane builder, so he has been gathering people in the southcentral Kentucky area to help. He has volunteers but needs more so the film can be ready by fall. His goal with the production is not only to make an interesting film, but to also make it educational.

"It shows people who set examples of what you can aspire to be," he said. "Glenn Curtiss showed American ingenuity and entrepreneurship." 

http://www.kentucky.com/2012/07/31/2278539/airplane-restoration-to-be-part.html

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2012/07/31/2278539/airplane-restoration-to-be-part.html#storylink=cpy

Beech H35 Bonanza, N4684D: Accident occurred August 01, 2012 in Holly Lake Ranch, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N4684D

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA501  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in Holly Lake Ranch, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: BEECH H35, registration: N4684D
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane’s engine lost power during the descent to the destination airport, and the airplane struck trees during the ensuing forced landing attempt. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the idler gear pin was not in position and no retaining bolts were found. Additionally, the nuts from the forward left, lower through bolt on the crankcase half and the forward left engine mount bolt were missing. A logbook entry indicated that the engine had been reassembled and re-installed on the airplane about 1 week before the accident due to a previous propeller strike. Based on the available information, it is likely that the improper assembly of the engine, specifically the omission of the idler gear pin retaining bolts, resulted in the idler gear falling out of its position and a subsequent complete loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The incomplete maintenance performed by maintenance personnel, which resulted in a total loss of engine power.

On August 1, 2012, about 1120 central daylight time, a Beech H35 airplane, N4684D, sustained substantial damage when it struck trees following a loss of engine power near Holly Lake Ranch, Texas. The pilot received serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to an individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Wood County Airport (JDD), Mineola, Texas, about 1100, and was destined for the Gilmer Municipal Airport (JXI), Gilmer, Texas.

The pilot reported that he performed a pre-flight run-up with no anomalies noted. He then departed JDD and climbed to 7,500 feet altitude en route to JXI. During the descent to JXI, at 6,500 feet altitude, the engine experienced a total loss of engine power. The pilot reported that he turned the airplane toward the Holly Lake Ranch Airport (16TE), and attempted an engine restart to no avail. The airplane struck trees off the end of runway 27 at 16TE.

Examination of the airplane’s engine after recovery from the accident scene revealed that the idler gear pin was missing from the rear of the engine, and both nuts and washers were missing from the idler gear pin attachment studs. The idler gear pin was found in a plastic trash bag that contained smaller parts recovered from the wreckage site. The idler gear had fallen in to the rear crankshaft gear and damaged the rear crankshaft gear teeth. The nut was missing from the forward left side lower through bolt on the crankcase half. The nut was also missing from the forward left side engine mount bolt.

Examination of the maintenance records revealed a piece of paper attached to the log book indicating that the engine was disassembled and inspected after a propeller strike. The crankshaft was turned 0.010 inches undersize and the engine was re assembled. The entry was dated July 25, 2012 and was signed by the pilot, who also held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings issued by the Federal Aviation Administration.

According to manufacturer drawings, the aft crankshaft gear engaged the idler gear which in turn engaged both magneto drive gears. Without the idler gear in place the magnetos would cease to operate.



NTSB Identification: CEN12LA501 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in Holly Lake Ranch, TX
Aircraft: BEECH H35, registration: N4684D
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 1, 2012, about 1120 central daylight time, a Beech H35, N4684D, sustained substantial damage when it struck trees following a loss of engine power near Holly Lake Ranch, Texas. The pilot received serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to an individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Wood County Airport (JDD), Mineola, Texas, at an unconfirmed time, and was destined for the Gilmer Municipal Airport (JXI), Gilmer, Texas.



IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 4684D        Make/Model: BE35      Description: 35 Bonanza
  Date: 08/01/2012     Time: 1164

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: TYLER   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CLIPPED TREES, FLIPPED OVER AND CRASHED INTO A WOODED AREA, NEAR 
  TYLER, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ,   (0)                               Entry date: 08/02/2012















A single-engine plane crashed near the Holly Lake Ranch Airport in Wood County, Wednesday afternoon.

Wood County Airport officials said a single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft suffered engine problems during a test flight.

The plane is registered to Adam Smith of Lindale. Smith was reportedly having a new engine installed in the four-seater airplane and the mechanic, also a pilot, was taking the aircraft back to the Gilmer Airport from the Wood County Airport.

The plane crashed about 75 feet short of the runway at the Holly Lake Ranch airport around noon. The plane reportedly clipped a couple of trees and flipped over before coming to a complete stop in a heavily wooded area just off Blue Sky Lane.

It did not catch on fire, but the Holly Lake Volunteer Fire Department cleared the brushy area and waited on the scene for the appropriate authorities.

Witnesses reported the engine of the plane was running when it crashed, but sounded like it was “running rough”.

The mechanic/pilot was pulled from the aircraft by Holly Lake Firefighters and Champion EMS personnel.

He was transported to a Longview hospital with minor injuries. Officials would not release the name of the pilot however did say they believe he will be ok.

DPS Trooper Tommy Barrett was dispatched to the crash site. An FAA investigator from Dallas is on the scene and investigating the crash, but would not comment on the possible cause of the accident. 
http://www.news-journal.com 

 


WOOD COUNTY, TX (KLTV) -   A single-engine plane crashed in East Texas late Wednesday morning.

Officials with the Department of Public Safety say a single-engine Beechcraft aircraft suffered engine problems during its flight from the Wood County Airport in Mineola to the Gilmer Airport.  Investigating officers on the scene say the plane began to experience engine trouble, prompting the pilot to circle back towards the airport at Holly Lake Ranch. The plane lost altitude and struck several trees before coming to rest on its canopy.

The plane crashed in a wooded area on Blue Sky Lane, off of CR 3590, just outside of the Holly Lake Ranch airport.  The pilot was pulled from the aircraft by Holly Lake Firefighters and EMS personnel.  He was taken to Longview Regional Medical Center; the extent of injuries is unknown at this time.

The plane is registered to a Lindale man, but officials on the scene say the pilot is from Gilmer.   The Federal Aviation Administration has taken over the investigation.

Read more, video and photos:   KLTV.com

Eclipse Aerospace donates jet to Veterans Airlift Command

N61HF Eclipse EA500 owned by Veterans Airlift Command Foundation, aircraft was  donated last year along with $500,000 to make it the nicest Eclipse in the air!!!

http://www.veteransairlift.org/


http://corpjetfin.live.subhub.com/articles/Eclipse_Jet_VAC_113 

Westjet firms up order for 20 Q400 plus 25 options . . .

Bombardier said WestJet will be the fifth operator and fourth airline in Canada to put its Q400 aircraft into service, joining approximately 40 other operators around the world. Photograph by: Aaron Vincent Elkaim, 
THE CANADIAN PRESS
 
http://www.bombardier.com/en/corporate/media-centre/press-releases/details?docID=0901260d8023440a 


MONTREAL — Bombardier Aerospace said Wednesday that WestJet’s firm order for 20 Q400 NexGen turboprop aircraft has a list value of $683 million.

If the Calgary-based airline exercises all its options for up to 25 additional Q400s, the list value of the total deal would be about $1.59 billion.

“We are very pleased that our negotiations with Bombardier have led to the finalization of this purchase agreement,” said Gregg Saretsky, WestJet’s president and CEO.

“We now look forward to fine tuning our plan to launch our new regional airline in the second half of 2013,” Saretsky said in a statement.

WestJet has only Boeing 737s in its fleet but the new regional service — consisting of Bombardier Q400 aircraft — will allow it to increase its presence in smaller markets.

Bombardier said WestJet will be the fifth operator and fourth airline in Canada to put its Q400 aircraft into service, joining approximately 40 other operators around the world.

The Q400 NexGen turboprop airliner, which is built at Bombardier’s Toronto facility, is suited to short-haul flights and uses less fuel than regional jets.


Luscombe 8A, N2761K: Accident occurred August 01, 2012 in St Petersburg, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N2761K

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA491 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in St. Petersburg, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: SILVAIRE LUSCOMBE 8A, registration: N2761K
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot had recently purchased the accident airplane and was working with a flight instructor for familiarization because he had not flown during the past 30 years. The flight instructor stated that he and the pilot had flown seven or eight flights together before the accident flight and that the pilot had previously flown about 5 hours with another flight instructor. During the accident flight, the pilots took off from a runway intersection. The flight instructor stated that the engine seemed to be producing full power until the airplane reached an altitude of about 100 feet above the ground. At that point, the flight instructor noted an audible loss of rpm that was confirmed by the tachometer. The airplane began to descend, the pilot applied carburetor heat, and the flight instructor assumed control of the airplane. With insufficient runway remaining on which to land and obstacles at the end of the runway that made a straight-ahead off-airport landing hazardous, the flight instructor attempted to maneuver toward the ramp area adjacent to the runway. The airplane subsequently stalled, impacted the runway in a nose-down attitude, and came to rest inverted. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical failures or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The flight instructor stated that the takeoff was initiated with the carburetor heat off, despite a placard in the airplane requiring the use of carburetor heat during takeoff and landing. Although the weather conditions at the time of takeoff were conducive to the formation of carburetor ice at glide and cruise power at the time of the accident, it was not possible to determine whether carburetor ice was a factor in the accident. Weight and balance calculations revealed that the airplane was loaded about 68 pounds over its maximum allowable gross weight, and calculated density altitude at the airport about the time of the accident was more than 2,000 feet. Despite these factors, both of which would have adversely affected both the distance required for takeoff and the airplane’s rate of climb once airborne, the pilots elected to conduct an intersection takeoff, which reduced the available runway takeoff distance by nearly 20% and also reduced the diversionary options available in the event of a loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor’s and the pilot’s failure to maintain airspeed after a partial loss of engine power after takeoff for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and loss of airplane control. Contributing to the accident were the pilots’ decisions to operate the airplane above its maximum allowable gross weight and to perform an intersection takeoff.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 1, 2012, approximately 1400 eastern daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N2761K, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground when control was lost  during takeoff from Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida. The private pilot/owner was fatally injured, and the flight instructor sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was originating at the time of the accident. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The flight instructor was interviewed following the accident, and also provided a written statement recounting the events of the accident flight. He stated that a preflight inspection of the airplane revealed no anomalies, and the engine start and pre-takeoff checks were performed with no discrepancies noted. The fuel tank was filled to capacity, containing 14 gallons of fuel. The flight was cleared for takeoff from runway 25 at the intersection with taxiway B, with the owner conducting the takeoff. The flight instructor reported that the carburetor heat control was in the off position for “maximum takeoff power,” and that the engine was producing full power during the takeoff roll until it reached an altitude around 100 feet above ground level. Shortly thereafter, the flight instructor noted an audible loss of power that was confirmed by the tachometer, which varied from 1,800 to 2,100 rpm. He stated that the engine seemed to “roll back,” and did not sputter or run rough. The airplane began to descend, the pilot/owner applied carburetor heat, and the flight instructor assumed control of the airplane. With insufficient runway remaining on which to land, and the presence of obstacles at the end of the runway straight ahead, the flight instructor attempted to maneuver the airplane towards the ramp to the south of the runway. The airplane subsequently impacted the runway in a nose-down attitude, and came to rest inverted. The flight instructor stated that he attempted to turn the fuel selector valve to the off position prior to egressing the airplane, but could not remember if he had successfully done so. The flight instructor then egressed, and assisted in extricating the pilot/owner from the wreckage.

Four witnesses observed the airplane as it was taking off. They all recounted that the airplane reached an altitude between 20-40 feet, before the engine began to “sputter” and “miss.”  One witness described the airplane rocking from side to side, at a slow airspeed, prior to making a “sharp” left turn, descending nose-first, and impacting the runway. 


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot/owner held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot’s logbooks were not recovered, and no determination of the pilot’s total or recent flight experience could be made. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued in June, 1978.

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land and sea, and instrument airplane; and a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued in December, 2011. Review of the flight instructor’s logbooks indicated that he had accumulated approximately 940 hours of flight time at that date.

The flight instructor stated that prior to purchasing the accident airplane, the pilot had not flown in over 30 years, and was in need of a flight review to obtain currency. He had completed “seven or eight” flights with the pilot in the weeks leading up to the accident. Prior to that, the pilot had flown around 5 hours with another flight instructor at SPG.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 1947, and registered to the owner in April 2012. The airplane was powered by a Continental A-65-8, 65-hp, reciprocating engine. Review of the airplane’s maintenance logs revealed that its most recent annual inspection was completed on February 13, 2012, at a total time in service of 1135.6 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated approximately 19 hours since the most recent inspection.

Although the airplane held a standard airworthiness certificate, it met the definition of a Light Sport Aircraft as contained in Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1.1, making it eligible for operation by a pilot holding a valid drivers’ license in lieu of an FAA-issued medical certificate.

According to weight and balance information contained in the airplane’s maintenance logs, the airplane had an empty weight of 838 lbs, and a maximum allowable gross weight of 1,260 lbs. The autopsy report indicated that the pilot/owner’s weight was 203 lbs. The weight of the flight instructor as reported on his most recent FAA medical certificate was also 203 lbs. The calculated total fuel weight was approximately 84 lbs at capacity, resulting in an estimated gross weight of 1,328 lbs at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1400 weather observation at SPG included winds from 260 degrees at 8 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds at 3,000 feet, temperature 30 degrees Celsius (C) dew point 25 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury.

The icing probability chart indicates there was potential for carburetor icing at glide and cruise power at the time of the accident.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Albert Whitted Airport was a tower-controlled, public-use airport equipped with two runways oriented in a 07/25 and 18/36 configuration. According to FAA records, runway 7/25 measured 3,677 feet in length and 75 feet in width. From the intersection with taxiway B, the point at which the flight instructor stated the takeoff was initiated, approximately 3,000 feet of runway takeoff distance available remained from runway 25. Obstructions included a 12-foot blast fence at the runway end, a street 5 feet from the runway end, and a 24-foot building 100 feet from the runway end.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest inverted approximately 100 feet from the blast fence at the departure end of runway 25. The initial impact point was identified by a ground scar approximately one and a half feet in length, located in the grass about one foot from the right edge of the runway. About 16 feet past the ground scar, on a heading of approximately 187 degrees magnetic, a small crater was observed in the runway surface. Two abrasions, dimensionally consistent with the diameter and chord of the propeller, extended out from the crater.  The airplane came to rest about 20 feet past the crater. The engine was displaced aft into the firewall and the cockpit area exhibited significant crush damage. Fuel staining was observed on the runway surrounding the airplane.

The propeller remained attached to the engine, and exhibited scratching and gouging along its leading edge. One blade exhibited slight s-bending approximately four inches from its tip. The engine spark plugs were removed and exhibited normal wear. The crankshaft was rotated by hand, and powertrain continuity was confirmed from the propeller to the rear accessory gears and to the valve train. The carburetor remained attached to the engine, but was impact damaged and void of fuel. The carburetor float bowl was absent of fuel, water, and debris. The float was undamaged, and the fuel intake screen was clear.

Flight control continuity was established from all flight controls to the cockpit area. The instrument panel, engine controls, and flight controls exhibited significant impact damage. The fuel selector valve was found in the off position, and continuity of the fuel system was confirmed from the fuselage tank to the fuel selector valve. No fuel remained in the tank. The carburetor heat control was found extended aft approximately 1 inch. The mixture control was in the full rich position, and the throttle control was in the full power position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Medical Examiner District Six, Largo, Florida. According to the autopsy report, the cause of death was “blunt trauma.”

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot/owner by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  Review of the toxicological report revealed that Carvedilol was detected in the liver and blood, Citalopram was detected in the liver and blood, N-Desmethylcitalopram was detected in the liver and blood, and Tamsulosin was detected in the urine and blood.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Given the atmospheric conditions, the calculated density altitude at the time of the accident was approximately 2,070 feet. According to the airplane’s Owner’s Handbook of Operation, “Due to reduced air density at higher altitudes wing lift and engine power are reduced with resulting performance reduction. Take-off and landing distances are increased and the rate of climb reduced.”

Airworthiness Maintenance Bulletin No. 40, issued by the Civil Aeronautics Administration in February 1941, addressed the issue of engine failures on takeoff in Luscombe 8A airplanes. It stated:

“The cause of these failures is believed to be attributable to insufficient fuel pressure resulting from the backward surge in the fuel lines due to the forward acceleration of the airplane on takeoff. Tests have shown that the cutting-out tendency of the engine on takeoff can be eliminated by installing a revised fuel tank cap and following certain precautions during the takeoff operation.”

As a result of this maintenance bulletin, the airplane was required to be equipped with a placard reading, “Full carburetor air heat required for takeoff and landing.” This placard was installed on the accident airplane and found during postaccident examination to be in good condition. The TCDS also stated:

“The reason for this placard is that, during takeoff acceleration and initial high-angle-of-attack climb, the fuel flow may not be adequate for proper operation. Application of full carburetor heat in this case helps overcome the possible deficiency of fuel flow during takeoff. Carburetor ice is not a basic consideration in requiring this placard.”

According to the Luscombe Endowment, which maintains a technical resource library and provides support to Luscombe owners and operators, the use of carburetor heat on takeoff and landing is required in 8A airplanes equipped with 65 or 75-hp engines and a single fuselage fuel tank. It states that, in low fuel conditions, (one-half tank or less), and on a cool day, it is possible to achieve an angle of climb wherein the engine fuel inlet is higher than the fuel tank outlet, resulting in a disruption of fuel flow to the engine. The use of carburetor heat effectively reduced the power output of the engine, thus prohibiting the airplane from achieving such an angle of climb.


 NTSB Identification: ERA12FA491 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in St. Petersburg, FL
Aircraft: SILVAIRE LUSCOMBE 8A, registration: N2761K
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 1, 2012, approximately 1400 eastern daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N2761K, was substantially damaged when it impacted the runway during takeoff from Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida. The certificated private pilot/owner was fatally injured, and the certificated flight instructor sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was originating at the time of the accident. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witnesses observed the airplane initiate a takeoff from runway 25. Two witnesses stated that the airplane lifted off the runway and climbed to approximately 20 feet above the ground. The engine began to “sputter,” and the airplane landed on the runway before initiating a second takeoff. They reported that during the second takeoff, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 50 feet, and that the engine continued to sputter. One witness described the airplane rocking from side to side, at a slow airspeed, prior to descending nose-first and impacting the runway.

The airplane came to rest inverted approximately 100 feet from the blast fence at the departure end of runway 25. The initial impact point was identified by a ground scar approximately one and a half feet in length, located in the grass about one foot from the right edge of the runway. About 16 feet past the ground scar, on a heading of approximately 187 degrees, a small crater was observed in the runway surface. Two abrasions, dimensionally consistent with the diameter and chord of the propeller, extended out from the crater. The airplane came to rest about 20 feet past the crater. The engine was displaced aft into the firewall and the cockpit area exhibited significant crush damage.

Examination of the airplane showed that flight control continuity was established from all flight controls to the cockpit area. The propeller remained attached to the engine, and exhibited scratching and gouging along its leading edge. One blade exhibited slight s-bending approximately four inches from its tip. The engine spark plugs were removed and exhibited normal wear. The crankshaft was rotated by hand, and continuity was confirmed from the propeller to the rear accessory gears and to the valve train. The carburetor remained attached to the engine, but was impact damaged. The carburetor float bowl was absent of fuel, water, and debris. The float was undamaged, and the fuel intake screen was clear.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 2761K        Make/Model: L8        Description: 8 SILVAIRE
  Date: 08/01/2012     Time: 1752

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: SAINT PETERSBURG   State: FL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON TAKEOFF, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 WAS FATALLY 
  INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, SAINT PETERSBURG, FL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: TAMPA, FL  (SO35)                     Entry date: 08/02/2012 
 



 James "Jim" Allen Finnegan,  79, of St. Petersburg, passed August 1, 2012. He is survived by his wife Carolyn “CJ” Bruce Finnegan; son, John (Carolyn)and their son, John IV; stepsons, Scott (Sondra) Bruce and Hunter (Jane) Bruce; grandchildren, Katie, Stone, Braxton, Hope, Cameron, Camille, Hannah-Grace, Grant and Hailey. Born in St. Louis, MO, he served in the US Army and was honorably discharged. He was a member of several clubs and organizations including the St. Pete Yacht Club, Vinoy Club, AWAPS, Quiet Birdmen, and AOPA. Some of his many passions were flying, boating, motorcycles, dancing, cooking and most of all his love for family and friends. He will truly be missed by all, but not forgotten. A Celebration of Life service will be held at 5:30pm on Thursday, Aug. 9th at AWAPS building at Albert Whitted Airport with a gathering following until 7pm. In lieu of flowers please make donations to Lupus Foundation of Florida, 535-Central Ave. Ste. 304, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 or Salvation Army, PO Box 10909, St Petersburg, FL 33733. 

Read more here:   http://www.andersonmcqueen.com/obituaries/Jamesjim-Finnegan/ 

 
Plane crash survivor in fair condition at Bayfront Medical Center

ST. PETERSBURG — The flight instructor who survived a nosedive crash at Albert Whitted Airport spoke out for the first time Thursday, thanking first responders and offering condolences for the family of a friend who died in the accident.

"Jim Finnegan's friendship and spirit have made an everlasting impact on my life," said Patrick Murphy, 37, "Jim and C.J. (his wife) and the Finnegan family are held strongly in my heart as they cope with this tragedy."

Murphy, 37, of St. Petersburg, was in fair condition at Bayfront Medical Center, said hospital spokeswoman Emily Nipps.

A National Transportation Safety Board investigator who surveyed the wreckage at the airport on Thursday said it is too early to determine the cause of the crash but that a preliminary report will be issued within 10 days.

James Allen Finnegan, 79, died while piloting the 1947 Luscombe model 8A when the two-seat aircraft crashed at 1:52 p.m., police said. Finnegan owned the plane but had not flown in several years.

He was taking a refresher training course from Murphy, a certified flight instructor. They were practicing take-offs and landings, Weiss said.

The plane touched down once before taking off and ascending as high as 100 feet in the air, witnesses said. The tail of the plane wiggled a bit and then the craft nose-dived into the runway.
Murphy jumped out of the plane after the crash and tried to pull Finnegan out, witnesses said.
Finnegan was unconscious and bleeding as restaurant worker and two airport mechanics came to his aid.

"I would like to thank the emergency services personnel and the pilot community at Whitted Airport for their heroic and rapid response," Murphy said.

http://www.tampabay.com
 
A crew from the St. Petersburg Fire Dept. remove a plane that crashed Wednesday at Albert Whitted Airport in St. Petersburg, killing one and injuring another.

A plane that crashed at St. Petersburg’s Albert Whitted Airport was turned right side up and removed from the runway this morning.

The
plane nosed dived Wednesday afternoon just after take-off.

Police say 79-year-old James Finnegan was taking a refresher course when something went wrong.


Witnesses say as he started to take off, the engine sputtered and plummeted from the sky.


Finnegan's neighbors described him as a friendly, active person and said they're in shock.


"It's unbelievable,” said Ed Alex, a neighbor. "I can't even get over it because he's just a nice guy and I never would have thought something like this would happen. It's shocking."


The flight instructor, 37-year-old James Murphy, was taken to the hospital but is expected to be okay. 

Watch video of aircraft removal from runway: http://www.baynews9.com


 







 


























St. Petersburg, Florida — Emergency crews rushed to St. Pete’s Albert Whitted Airport about 2 o’clock on Wednesday after a small plane crashed upon take off.

Witnesses say the single-engine plane sounded like it was in trouble. It stalled and then plowed nose first into the runway.

Photo Gallery: Small plane crash at Albert Whitted Airport

“The plane was about 100 feet into the air, they [the witnesses] heard some engine sputtering and it just nose-dived right on the engine-impacted right into the runway,” said Lt. Joel Granata, of St. Petersburg Fire Rescue.

The pilot and owner of the plane, 79-year-old James Finnegan, of St. Petersburg, died in the crash. According to police, Finnegan had some flight experience in his past and was taking a refresher course from instructor 37-year-old James Murphy.

Although injured himself, Murphy was able to drag Finnegan from the wreckage and he was already performing CPR on the pilot when rescue crews arrived. Murphy was taken to Bayfront Medical Center in stable condition.

Several pilots at the airport declined to talk on camera. They were clearly upset by the crash.
And people at a nearby restaurant on the USF campus said they could hear that something went terribly wrong.

“We heard a loud crash,” said Will Roberts. “It was like a loud boom and then all of a sudden we heard all the sirens.”

FAA investigators are on scene and on Thursday morning, they plan to continue their examination of the wreckage on the runway. 


A 79-year-old pilot who was taking some refresher flying training died today as he crashed while trying to take off in his single-engine plane, St. Petersburg police said. The crash left his instructor hospitalized 

 James Finnegan, 79, 219 Rialto Way N.E., St. Petersburg, was killed in the crash. Finnegan owned the plane and was the pilot at the time of the crash, police said.

Finnegan had previous flight experience, but he had not flown for several years and was taking refresher training from his passenger, James Murphy, at the time of the crash, police said.

Murphy, 37, 10800 Brighton Bay Blvd., No. 1708, St. Petersburg, is hospitalized.

Rescue crews had to remove the men from the wreckage, and they were taken to Bayfront Medical Center.

The two-seat plane went down just before 2 p.m. as it was taking off, said St. Petersburg Police spokesman Mike Puetz said. The plane got about 50 to 100 feet off the ground when the engine sputtered and the aircraft nosedived to the ground, he said.

The plane is a Luscombe, Model 8A, that was built in 1947.

FAA investigators are at the scene and will continue their work in the morning.
 












ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - A small plane crashed at Albert Whitted Airport on Wednesday afternoon, leaving its pilot dead and a passenger injured.

Based on preliminary information, investigators believe the two-seater airplane was being piloted by owner James Allen Finnegan. 

Police say Finnegan had previous flight experience, but had not piloted a plane for number of years and was taking refresher training instruction from passenger James Patrick Murphy at the time of the crash.

According to officers on the scene, the single-engine aircraft was taking off westbound.  According to a witness, as the plane began to ascend at a height of 50 to 100 feet, the engine began to sputter and the plane nose-dived into the runway.

Murphy's injuries are not life threatening and he is speaking with investigators.

FAA investigators have arrived at the crash site and requested that the scene be held overnight for further examination in the morning. 

ST. PETERSBURG — A single-engine plane crashed just after takeoff Wednesday at Albert Whitted Airport. 

A witness said the plane made sputtering noises immediately after becoming airborne, then did a nosedive and crashed into the runway, said police spokesman Mike Puetz.

There were two men in the plane and both were taken to Bayfront Medical Center. One of them was pronounced dead at the hospital; the other is in critical but stable condition, Puetz said.

Melissa Voulineaw, general manager at the Hangar restaurant, saw the crash.

She said the plane took off, then touched down one time, and continued to fly. She doesn't know if it stalled or just lost power because it crashed into the runway face down, pushing the nose into the cockpit area.

She said the plane was still spinning when it hit the ground.

The passenger got out of the plane and immediately started trying to pull the pilot out, she said.

Voulineaw and two other restaurant employees ran over to help pull the pilot out.

She said he was unresponsive and bleeding.

Jeff Ploch, 63, a St. Petersburg pilot eating at the restaurant, theorized that the plane may have stalled or experienced some sort of a mechanical problem.

The Federal Aviation Authority has been notified and is sending investigators to the airport at 107 Eighth Ave. SE in downtown St. Petersburg.