Monday, December 1, 2014

Incident occurred November 30, 2014 at Cheddi Jagan International Airport Airport in Guyana

Operations of the Dynamic Airways resumed Monday afternoon after one of its planes destined for New York ran off the runway at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) Sunday night.

Local representative, Captain Gerry Gouveia explained to this newspaper that the aircraft was taxiing from the international ramp when the right main wheel rolled off into the grass.

He noted that the aircraft was moving at a slow pace. He explained that the pilot missed average the distance thus causing the minor incident.

Nevertheless, Gouveia said since safety is of paramount importance, the flight team took the decision to offload the airplane while it was being inspected.

No one was injured during the mishap.

The flight took off from the CJIA at 13:30h Monday and all 117 passengers who were placed in hotels, were safely taken to their destination, Gouveia said.

Following many attempts to get permission from authorities in the United States to operate, Dynamic Airways only recently was granted permission to operate in various countries in South America.


- Source: http://www.guyanatimesgy.com

'Air Cocaine': Trial Begins for Frenchmen Charged With Smuggling Drugs From the Dominican Republic

Air cocaïne: les deux pilotes français vont être jugés
Four Frenchmen are standing trial in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, charged with attempting to smuggle 700 kilos of cocaine out of the country on a private jet. 

Dominican officials discovered the drugs, hidden in 26 suitcases, in Punta Cana airport on March 20, 2013. Since their arrest, the two pilots, one crew member, and one passenger have spent 15 months in jail. They were released in June 2014, but prohibited from leaving the country pending their trial.

The plane, a Dassault Falcon 50 corporate jet, belongs to French businessman Alain Afflelou, the owner of a chain of stores that specialize in optical services and eyewear. It was due to land in a small airport close to Saint-Tropez, in southern France.

According to Le Parisien, around 20 Dominican customs and police officers are also implicated in the case, which has been dubbed "Air Cocaine" by the French media.

The two pilots, former French military members Pascal Fauret and Bruno Odos, have denied from the start having any knowledge of their illegal cargo. At the time of their arrest, the plane was under charter to SN-THS, a private jet rental company based in southeast France, with typical hourly rates of $6,250. 

Read more here: https://news.vice.com

Supervisors quiet on proposed airport settlement

The Yuma County Board of Supervisors took no action during a Monday morning executive session on a $10 million settlement proposal in the 2010 lawsuit filed by a former fixed-based operator at Yuma International Airport, which is set to go to trial in March.

The county is not currently a defendant in the case brought by DBT of Yuma LLC, as county Superior Court Judge John Nelson granted its motion for dismissal from the case earlier this year, County Administrator Robert Pickels said after the session, and the supervisors did not give any legal direction to staff.

Defense attorney Daryl Williams took the matter to the state Court of Appeals, which heard arguments from both sides early last month. A decision on whether the county should be a defendant may not come before the trial date.

DBT Yuma operated at the Yuma airport as Lux Air and was evicted in 2009 due to nonpayment of rent, but the company contends it had always been in arrears and its late payments had been accepted. Yuma County leases the airport property to the Yuma County Airport Authority, and was added as a defendant in the case in 2012.

Fixed-base operators, or FBOs, provide fuel, hangar space, trip-planning computers and other services to general aviation pilots at airports. Williams said he'd offered the county $10 million to settle the case, the only defendant to which it was offered.

Late Monday morning he said he'd already gotten a call from Bill Kerekes, chief civil deputy county attorney, who told him "he was given no direction by the supervisors at all. I assume that means they will not accept my settlement agreement."

He argues in an email he sent Kerekes about the settlement proposal, which he provided to the Yuma Sun, that as the landlord the county does bear liability for the actions of the airport authority and former director Craig Williams.

"I think the county's in trouble on this one," Daryl Williams said.

He said Craig Williams was using the late payment as an excuse to get rid of Lux Air, which had a 30-year lease and was under contract to build a $2.5 million service building.

The attorney says in the email that Craig Williams wanted to change the airport's revenue stream in order to get $2 million in Federal Aviation Administration funding, and that would have precluded any FBO from building its own structure or controlling ramp space at the airport.

DBT is seeking $9.5 million for lost assets plus compensation for lost profits over the course of the 30-year lease. Daryl Williams said total damages could run anywhere from $45 million to $95 million.

Kerekes confirmed Monday that Daryl Williams sent the email to him. Airport authority attorney Wayne Benesch had no comments on the case. Craig Williams retired from the airport authority in August 2013.

The DBT of Yuma suit was a focus of the now-defunct yumaairportwatchdog.com site, which was harshly critical of Williams and the airport's general aviation policies. Founder Joe Gamez, who had worked for another FBO, and others recorded authority board meetings, some of which are still on YouTube. 

 
- Source:  http://www.yumasun.com

McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada: Smoke reported on incoming flight from Miami

LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -  McCarran International Airport spokeswoman Christine Crews confirmed the airport was alerted about smoke in the cabin of an incoming flight from Miami on Monday.

Crews said the airport received the report about American Airlines flight 2207 about 4:18 p.m.

There were 169 people on the flight, including crew members.

Crews said the plane landed safely at 4:25 p.m. and that there were no reports of injuries.

The incident is being investigated by the Clark County Fire Department. Crews said there were no reports of damage to the plane.

Source: http://www.fox5vegas.com

Boxell Aerospace relocates headquarters near Boeing, Charleston International Airport

Boxell Aerospace is moving closer to Boeing South Carolina’s 787 campus and Charleston International Airport in North Charleston to “allow for quicker response to customers,” Boxell Aerospace founder and President Lance Syner said.

The Charleston-based aircraft maintenance company plans to build a 3,000-square-foot facility to house its new headquarters and expand its Federal Aviation Administration 145 Repair Station, replacing its current headquarters and repair station in West Ashley.

Boxell acquired 2.8 acres for the facility late last month for the new building, which will sit less than a mile from Boeing South Carolina’s campus and the airport’s runways.

Boxell Aerospace’s employees perform maintenance and modifications to 787 Dreamliners at Boeing and aircraft at the airport.

Boxell supports Boeing’s tier-one supplier Ipeco, which manufactures the four crew seats on Dreamliners, Syner said.

Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita, Kan., installs the seats; the nose section of the plane then is flown to Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, where Boxell can perform cosmetic repairs or modifications to the seats as required by Boeing or the FAA.

Much of the work is done on Boeing’s flightline, a parking area for the jets post-assembly and pre-delivery.

Boxell also provides continuous services to operators at the airport. Work includes daily plane inspections for FedEx and overnight inspections for JetBlue, as well as tire repairs, oil services or component changes, for example.

Construction has not yet begun on Boxell Aerospace’s new facility, coined “Mission Control” by the team. It is scheduled to open in the spring.

Syner said it “will allow Boxell Aerospace to expand its capabilities worldwide and serve a growing and much-needed service demand for Boeing 787 component repair.”

The company, founded in 2006, focused mainly on general aviation until Syner sold that division in 2011. The company now focuses solely on commercial aviation. Boxell Aerospace has 12 employees between its Savannah and Charleston operations.

“I used to have to fly people in to Charleston to interview them,” Syner said. “Within a few years of Boeing being here, thousands of qualified people for aircraft maintenance are now here, and that bolsters the base of people we can hire from. Additionally, the airport is much busier and aviation as a whole has grown in Charleston.”


- Source:  http://www.charlestonbusiness.com

India and France to push ahead with Rafale jet deal

(Reuters) - The French and Indian defense ministers agreed on Monday to overcome any differences and finalize the sale of 126 fighter jets to India in a deal worth an estimated $15 billion, the Indian defense ministry said.

France's Dassault Aviation  has been trying to clinch a deal to sell India its Rafale jets since New Delhi chose the company over other foreign plane manufacturers in 2012. But disagreements over cost and work-sharing have slowed talks, while India's weak economy has stretched government finances.

On Monday, French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian met his Indian counterpart Manohar Parrikar, who was appointed defense minister last month.

"Both sides agreed to take forward the strategic co-operation between the two countries. They discussed all issues including Rafale. It was decided that whatever differences still existed would be resolved in a fast-track manner," said Indian defense ministry spokesman Sitanshu Kar.

Under the deal, which would provide a major boost to French domestic defense manufacturing, the first 18 planes will be made in France and shipped to India, while the remaining 108 will be produced by state-run Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.

The final phase of exclusive negotiations on the contract should conclude within India's current budget year ending in March 2015, Dassault Chief Executive Eric Trappier said last month.

Rival manufacturers including the makers of the Eurofighter aircraft are hoping that the stalled Rafale deal will collapse, possibly opening the door to negotiations with a new vendor.


- Source:  http://in.reuters.com

Source documents: Affidavit and criminal complaint against Khamraj Lall; Bond for Pilot Detained With Cash in Puerto Rico



See ICE Agent Darika Davis’ affidavit in relation to the discovery of US$620,000 aboard the private jet of one Kharamj Lall; and the criminal complaint against Lall for a violation of Currency or Monetary Instruments Report and Bulk Cash Smuggling.  

The preliminary inquiry and bond hearing is set for 2.30 pm. In the case folder there is also a file named “restriction” that is currently sealed indicating sensitive information.

Story and documents:   http://gtmosquito.com





 SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Dec 1, 2014, 7:30 PM ET

A judge ordered the release on bond of a pilot and CEO who was arrested in Puerto Rico after authorities found more than $600,000 in undeclared cash inside his plane, his lawyer said Monday.

The federal court judge approved bond of $100,000 for Khamraj Lall while a grand jury decides whether to indict him, defense attorney Rafael Castro Lang said.

Lall, 47, is the CEO Exec Jet Club LLC, a company based in Gainesville, Florida, that has flown the president of his native Guyana on official trips. The businessman will be allowed to leave Puerto Rico and return home to Ringwood, New Jersey under the terms of the bond.

Lall was the co-pilot on a flight to Guyana when U.S. federal agents searched the aircraft during a refueling stop in Puerto Rico. He and the two others on board reported carrying about $12,000, but agents found $620,588 in plastic bags inside the plane, according to court documents.

U.S. law requires amounts over $10,000 to be declared. Lall was jailed on suspicion of intent to evade currency reporting.

Following his arrest in the U.S. island territory, the government of Guyana said in a statement that Lall's company has transported delegations led by President Donald Ramotar on three official trips overseas.


- Source:   http://abcnews.go.com

 
Kemraj Lall, CEO, Head of Operations of Exec Jet Club


Guyanese pilot arrested in Puerto Rico with over US$620,000 of undeclared cash 

 Guyanese businessman Kemraj Lall, the copilot of a Guyana bound 1988 Israel Aircraft Industries Westwind 1124 aircraft registration N822QL Serial number 441 registered to Exec Jet Sales LLC. Ringwood, New Jersey, USA, was arrested in Puerto Rico by Customs and Border Protection after he falsely declared the amount of cash he was taking out of the USA.

According to reports Mr. Lall was travelling with his father and the Pilot in Command who each declared $5,000 (US) and $60 (US) respectively.  Lall initially declared that he was transporting $5,000 (US). After an initial search of the aircraft began, he changed the amount to $7,000 (US). The first search uncovered $170,000 (US) in the aircraft cabin and a later search uncovered a further $470,000 hidden in the aft compartment.

According to his bio on Exec Jet Club’s website, Kemraj Lall is the CEO, Head of Operations. The company operates out of Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV) located at 4050 NE 45th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32609. Lall is also the owner of Kaylee’s Service Station at Coverden, East Bank Demerara and Quin’s Special Events and Services in Guyana.

Lall is being held in custody at a federal jail in San Juan, Puerto Rico on suspicion of intent to evade currency reporting, said Carol Torres, a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.


- Source:  http://www.guyanagraphic.com
 

Europe Presses for New Air-Travel Safeguards: Civilian Officials Pursue Safety Review With Military, Intelligence Groups

The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor And Robert Wall


Dec. 1, 2014 5:07 p.m. ET

 

European air-safety officials are considering novel steps to safeguard airliners from potential military threats in the wake of July’s downing of a Malaysia Airlines jet, but some proposals are provoking controversy among other countries.

The safety discussions follow the death of 196 Dutch citizens and 102 victims from other nations in the presumed shootdown of Malaysia Flight 17 by a high-altitude antiaircraft missile over eastern Ukraine. Propelled by intense public demands for action in the Netherlands, Dutch authorities are pushing to create a first-of-its-kind passenger notification system—intended to explicitly warn travelers about possible dangers of flights over war zones—according to industry and government officials.

Specifics are under debate and the outcome remains unclear. Dutch officials envision that such warnings would be provided to passengers before takeoff, according to these officials. But it remains unclear exactly how or when travelers would receive the notifications.

The initial concept sparked strong opposition from international safety experts concerned about unilateral action by the Netherlands or the European Commission.

At the same time, the European Aviation Safety Agency, the region’s premier regulator, is conducting a detailed safety review in conjunction with military and intelligence groups of recent overflights of various countries by Russian military planes. EASA previously steered clear of military matters, but an agency spokesman said European Union defense officials asked it to investigate the matter more closely.

Russia in the past has denied its flights are provocative.

The separate initiatives highlight Europe’s continued focus on finding new ways to protect passenger planes from the fallout of hostilities on the ground or military maneuvers in the air.

The issues are expected to come to a head on Tuesday and Wednesday during closed-door meetings in Montreal, when a task force set up by the International Civil Aviation Organization, an arm of the United Nations, debates recommendations for stepped-up warnings to airlines about airspace hazards.

EASA and ICAO, as the U.N. group is known, are seeking extensive security data to provide better guidance to carriers about where it is and isn’t safe to fly.

The high-level group advising ICAO favors, among other things, more-coordinated sharing of information about hostile threats to commercial aviation world-wide. Members of the task force, according to people involved in the process, also are seeking a compromise that will satisfy Dutch passenger-rights advocates while avoiding disruptions to current ticketing and routing arrangements.

Dutch officials didn’t respond to requests to comment. Spokesmen for ICAO and the International Air Transport Association, the airline industry’s top global trade group, have declined to comment on details of the task force’s deliberations.

Based on preliminary recommendations, the ICAO panel is expected to call for more timely and proactive steps to formally alert carriers when airspace is closed due to identification of antiaircraft missiles or other advanced weapons on the ground. In addition, ICAO already has launched pilot programs to set up centralized clearinghouses of updated information about shifting military threats to airliners.

ICAO’s policy-making council won’t consider any proposals until February and internal plans indicate some of the changes could take many more months—or even years—to implement. Nonetheless, one ICAO document emphasizes “there is significant room for improvement to reinforce and enhance” civil aviation safety with regard to conflict zones.

Patrick Ky, EASA’s executive director, told a hearing of the European Parliament’s transportation committee in September his agency was entirely dependent on U.S. intelligence in assessing the safety of airspace in other regions. Since then, however, the downing of Flight 17 and its aftermath have led EASA to start working more closely with European military and intelligence personnel to develop ways to share relevant security information, according to industry and government officials.

“Intelligence services should share information about air space issues better,” Peter van Dalen, a Dutch member of the European Parliament’s transportation committee, said. The information should be circulated among security services and all airlines, he said, expressing frustration that some carriers were avoiding Ukrainian air space before the Malaysian airliner was shot down while others continued flying there.

Traditionally, intelligence agencies have opposed widely sharing information, particularly with companies. That remains a potentially major stumbling block for ICAO’s plans.

Thomas Windmuller, senior vice president for security at IATA, the airline trade group, said the challenge can be managed through the type of information that is shared. “We don’t need to know sources and methods” by which the intelligence was collected, he said. “We need to know what the operational consequences are.”

Where there are doubts about airspace security, flights should be barred, Mr. van Dalen said. Ukraine had closed airspace below where Flight 17 was cruising, though left the air space above 32,000 feet clear for airlines to traverse. Partial openings make no sense in an era where “there is so much modern equipment that could be in the hands of insurgents,” Mr. van Dalen said.

David McMillan, a veteran safety official who previously ran Eurocontrol, the region’s umbrella air-traffic control network, is heading up the ICAO task force. At a conference in Abu Dhabi last month, Mr. McMillan said Flight 17 convinced both industry leaders and regulators “to act urgently on what many people saw as a new threat.”

Since the wide-body Boeing 777 was following an authorized route in unrestricted airspace open to any airliner, Mr. McMillan told the audience, the tragedy came “as something of a surprise to many” national aviation authorities. But looking forward, he predicted “it will be exceedingly difficult for intelligence information to be shared” outside existing national cooperative agreements.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization last month said flights of Russian bombers have surged recently and that alliance members conducted more than 100 intercepts of Russian aircraft this year. The Russian planes typically don’t file flight plans or use transponders, which makes them difficult for civilian air-traffic controllers to detect.

Michael Fallon, the U.K.’s defense secretary, said in a recent interview that such flights provocative and illegal. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg also urged recently “more transparency and predictability” between Russia and the alliance “to avoid that the crisis spirals into something worse.”


- Source:  http://online.wsj.com

Debris from the crash site of the Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17 is being load at the Pelahiivskyi train station ahead of its transportation to Kharkov last month.
 TASS/Zuma Press

Sunday, November 30, 2014

Cessna 170B, N3292A: Fatal accident occurred November 28, 2014 in Alzada, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3292A

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Helena, Montana
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA049
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 28, 2014 in Alzada, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3292A
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot departed for a local area flight. When he did not return, a search was initiated, and the wreckage was located in a saddle between two mountain peaks. There were no identified witnesses to the accident. Onsite documentation revealed that the airplane collided with the terrain in a vertical nose-down attitude. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

According to a friend of the pilot, the pilot was very comfortable flying in the local area at altitudes of 150 ft above ground level or less. Given the pilot's preference for low altitude flight, it is likely that he was maneuvering around the mountainous terrain, lost control of the airplane, and did not have sufficient altitude to recover before ground impact.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control while maneuvering, which resulted in a collision with mountainous terrain. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 28, 2014, at an undetermined time, a Cessna 170B, N3292A, impacted terrain near Alzada, Montana. The co-owner/pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot was fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The local personal flight departed Spearfish, South Dakota, about 1200. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot became the subject of a family concern alert notice (ALNOT) on November 29, 2014, after the pilot failed to arrive at work. The accident site was located by the Civil Air Patrol on November 30, 2014, at about 1130 MST.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 50-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land.

The pilot held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 27, 2014. It had no limitations or waivers.

An examination of the pilot's logbook indicated a total flight time of 1,580 hours. He logged 14 hours in the last 90 days, and 5 hours in the last 30 days. About 200 hours had been accumulated in the make and model airplane involved in the accident. A biennial flight review was accomplished on October 10, 2013.

A close friend of the accident pilot reported that the pilot was very conscious and that he had learned to fly from a former crop duster. He was very comfortable flying low level in the local area and anything above 150 feet was too high for him to be happy.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Cessna 170B, serial number 25936. The engine was a Continental Motors Model C-145, serial number 7515-D-2-2.

The airframe logbook(s) were not located. Examination of the only recovered maintenance records (Engine Logbook) indicated that the last annual/100-hour inspection had been complied with on September 2, 2013. Total time recorded on the engine at this time was unknown, and time since major overhaul was 1,727.9 hours.

No records were recovered which would indicate that the airplane had an annual inspection after the September 2013 date. 

Fueling records at Westjet Air Center, Rapid City, SD established that the airplane was last fueled on November 9, 2014, with the addition of 20 gallons of 100 Low Lead-octane aviation fuel.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Investigators examined the wreckage at the accident scene on December 2, 2014.

There were no identified witnesses to the accident, or the flight of the accident airplane.

The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was the ground crater with the main wreckage. The 50-foot debris path was along a magnetic heading of 130-degrees. The orientation of the fuselage was also 130-degrees. The wings were oriented 040/220-degrees.

The wreckage was located on the southeast side of a saddle between two peaks. The airplane was positioned in a near vertical nose down attitude with the tail section standing vertical. The aft fuselage exhibited no indications of rotation. The aft fuselage, from the aft doorpost to the empennage was observed accordion towards the nose of the airplane. The damage to both wings was consistent with the contour of the terrain. The right wing was observed accordion aft from the leading edge to just aft of the main spar and the wing root and from the leading edge to the aileron at the tip. The left wing was observed accordion aft from the leading edge to aft of the main spar at the wing root and from the leading edge to the aileron at the wing tip. The engine was only partly visible under the cockpit area. One propeller tip was observed under the engine. There was no fire. There was an odor of fuel near the left fuel tank.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

The closest aviation weather observation station was Baker Municipal Airport, Baker, Montana (KBHK), which was 69 nautical miles north of the accident site. The elevation of the weather observation station was 2,980 feet mean sea level (msl). An aviation routine weather report (METAR) for KBHK was recorded at 1451 MST. It reported: wind from 230 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 10 degrees C; dew point -1 degrees C; altimeter 29.49 inches of mercury.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

No autopsy was performed on the pilot. The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of specimens of the pilot.

Analysis of the specimens contained no findings for carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and tested drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Investigators examined the wreckage at Air Transport, Phoenix, Arizona, on March 9, 2015. 

Examination of the engine revealed no abnormalities which would have precluded normal operation of the engine. The engine displayed impact damage consistent with the engine operating at the time of impact. 

Examination of the recovered airframe revealed no abnormalities which would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. The airframe sustained impact damage from a vertical descent with no rotational signatures. All control surfaces were accounted for and control continuity was established for the flight controls. 

The complete engine and airframe examination reports are attached to the docket for this accident.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA049 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 28, 2014 in Alzada, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3292A
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 28, 2014, at an unknown time, a single-engine Cessna 170B airplane, N3292A, impacted mountainous terrain near Alzada, Montana. The owner/private pilot operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed from Black Hills Airport-Clyde Ice Field (SPF), Spearfish, South Dakota about 1200 MST.

A family concerned Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on November 29, when the pilot did not show up for work. The airplane was found by the Wyoming Civil Air Patrol on November 30, 2014, at about 1130 MST, and the accident site was accessed by personnel from the Carter County Sheriff's Department on November 30.

The airplane came to rest on the east side of a saddle located between two peaks in a near vertical nose down attitude on a magnetic heading of 130 degrees. The accident site was located about 25 miles north of Alzada, at an elevation of about 4,000 feet. The entire airplane came to rest at the accident site, and flight control continuity was established on site.

The airplane was recovered on December 4, 2014, for further examination.





Peter Kovarik is shown here flying above the Black Hills. Kovarik, the priest at the Lead and Deadwood Catholic churches died Friday when the plane he was piloting crashed north of Alzada, Mont.



LEAD — Vibrant, passionate, energetic, caring. That is how friends and parishioners remember Peter Kovarik who died Friday when the plane he was piloting crashed in the Finger Buttes area north of Alzada, Mont. 

 Better known as Father Pete, Kovarik was the priest at the Lead and Deadwood Catholic churches. In the 11 months that he served as the spiritual leader in the church, parishioners said he has turned the church around, reinvigorating the members, bringing back younger parishioners and rekindling the spark of faith to many.

Steve Biegler, the pastor at Our Lady of the Black Hills in Piedmont and the vicar general of the Rapid City Catholicdiocese has known Kovarik for nearly 30 years.

The two men went to seminary together at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona, Minn.

“He had a lot of energy in life in general, but he had a lot of energy for the faith and the ministry that’s for sure,” Biegler said. “We were good friends. We hiked together. We played practical jokes on each other and together. What was most important to me was that he was a good brother priest.”

Kovarik came to the Lead and Deadwood parish on Jan. 3 after serving in Custer for nearly a decade.

Shortly before coming to the Black Hills Kovarik received his pilot’s license in Timber Lake.

He enjoyed sharing his love of flying with members of the church and took many parishioners for flights in his plane. Several members of the congregation, including fellow pilots, said he was a cautious pilot and did not take risks.

But that didn’t mean problems in flight did not find Kovarik.

“One encounter he told us about, he flew into Rapid City and saw sparks coming from under the plane,” said Darlene J. Burns, a volunteer office administrator at the parish. “ He thought he better get off the concrete, so he went over to the grass but then said ‘this isn’t a very good idea either’ because it was pretty dry. It ended up breaking the landing gear.”

When the he took Burns for a flight later she asked him with a chuckle, “now you did get that fixed, right?’

They flew low over Lead and Deadwood and then to the Southern Hills where he surprised them by touching down on a grass landing strip.

“He enjoyed flying and he wanted people to experience what he felt,” Burns said. “I’m looking at it to help me cope, he died doing what he loved.”

Mary DeMarcus, who was working with Kovarik to develop a lifelong faith program said he was ardent about so many things in life.

“He was passionate about flying, about music – he had a beautiful voice. He also played the guitar and piano. He was also very spiritual. You could see that he loved God. He was also very joyful,” DeMarcus said.

She said Kovarik caused people to become better versions of themselves.

“He was so vibrant and so full of energy,” she said. “We called him the Energizer Bunny around the office because he had so much energy.”

Lisa Fahey, a parishioner, agreed that Kovarik helped revive the church.

“He was real,” she said. “He didn’t say he had it all together, and he didn’t expect us to have it all together. He walked with us and we walked with him.

“His life was beautiful. He makes us all communal,” she added. “I will miss him as a friend and as my pastor.”

Burns too added Kovarik breathed new life into the church.

“He challenged us to go deeper in our faith,” she said. “Some of the young people who have come back, a lot of single parents, it’s just astronomical to see these young people and their children in the church.”

But it wasn’t just the church that he impacted.

“He has done so much for so many people in such a short time for the whole community,” she said. “He will be really hard to replace with as outgoing he was with the whole community, not just us Catholics, but the entire community.”

Fellow pilot and parishioner Les Wolff said the two men often talked about flying.

“Father Pete loved to fly. His first thought of the day, if he saw the sun, was a flight out in the country,” Wolff said.

Kovarik’s last flight began around 11 a.m., Friday from the Spearfish Airport/Clyde Ice Field. He was the only passenger aboard the single-engine Cessna 170B private airplane of which he was the registered owner. A flight plan was not filed, nor was one required.

Ted Miller, the business manager with Black Hills Aero, located at the Spearfish Airport talked to Kovarik that morning, minutes before he took flight for the last time.

“He drove up, got out of his car and said he was going flying,” Miller said.

Miller himself went on a flight just hours later and unknowingly flew within 20 miles of the crash site. He reported good weather with high clouds at the time of his flight.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation into the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration is assisting.

“If weather got him I’d say it was one of those situations a lot of pilots get pitched into and have to make a decision on how to get out of it,” Wolff said. “Some of us make the right choice and some don’t. You don’t have but seconds for that to happen.”

Wolff feels he saw a sign from above when he was returning to Spearfish on Sunday in his airplane.

“As we traveled from Billings to Spearfish, all we knew was prayers were in order,” Wolff said. “We had no idea what the outcome would be. Somewhere west of Broadus, Mont., this bald eagle swooped down out of the sky and flared to our right and then lifted out. We were pretty much at peace when we saw that.”

Services for Kovarik will be at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, in Rapid City. A wake and vigil will be at 7 p.m. Thursday and the funeral is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Friday.

It was not known at press time if there would be an additional community service in Lead and Deadwood at a later date.
 

- Source:  http://www.bhpioneer.com


The Catholic community in the Black Hills is mourning the loss of a well-known parish leader.  

 Father Peter Kovarik died after his plane crashed this weekend near the Montana town of Alzada.

Bishop Robert Gruss with the Diocese of Rapid City says that Father Kovarik was loved everywhere he went.

Kovarik served as a pastor at numerous parishes throughout Black Hills communities.

Bishop Gruss says Father Kovarik was in love with his priesthood and he will be dearly missed by his parishioners.

Bishop Gruss says, "I think he'll be remembered as someone who was deeply loved by his parishioners. He also had a passion for all he did; he had a passion for flying, a passion for priesthood, a passion for the outdoors. I think every part of his life he was passionate about and I think he'll be remembered in that way as well, as someone who really embraced life as best he could in ministry and he was serious but he had a lot of fun."

Father Kovarik's wake is set for Thursday at 7pm and the funeral is scheduled for Friday at 6:30pm, both will be held at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Rapid City.


- Source:  http://www.blackhillsfox.com



ALZADA, Mont — A single engine plane crash in Montana has claimed the life of Peter Kovarik, the priest at the Lead and Deadwood Catholic Churches.  

 On Friday, Kovarik took off shortly after 11 a.m. from the Spearfish Airport/Clyde Ice Field for a recreational flight around the Spearfish area. When he did not show up for 4 p.m. mass Saturday at St. Patrick’s Church in Lead, he was reported missing.

His airplane was discovered Sunday morning by members of the Wyoming Civil Air Patrol. He was the only occupant in the single-engine Cessna 170B private airplane of which he was the registered owner.

A flight plan was not filed, nor was one required.

Due to poor weather conditions Saturday evening, members of the South Dakota Civil Air Patrol did not launch an immediate search. A ground team deployed early Sunday morning in the Colony, Wyo., area as a cell phone ping indicated that the plane was in the vicinity Friday. At approximately 9:30 a.m. Sunday, two Civil Air Patrol planes from South Dakota and another from Wyoming launched and joined the ground search, said Bruce Kip with the South Dakota branch.

The Wyoming search plane, equipped with sensors to locate radio signals from emergency beacons in aircraft, located the crash site north of Alzada at approximately 11 a.m. and gave coordinates to redirect the ground search that included members of the Carter County, Mont., Sheriff’s Office.

Dale Diede, the deputy corner for Carter County, Mont., said the plane crashed hard approximately 30 miles north of Alzada in very steep and rugged terrain called the Finger Buttes.

Ted Miller, the business manager with Black Hills Aero, located at the Spearfish Airport talked to Kovarik Friday morning.

“He drove up, got out of his car and said he was going flying,” Miller said. “He was a wonderful man, really kind.”

Miller himself went on a flight just hours later and unknowingly flew within 20 miles of the crash site. Miller reported good weather with high clouds at the time of his flight.

Miller said he was unsure of how many hours Kovarik had logged, but said he was an experienced pilot and had been flying for quite a few years and has owned several planes throughout his life.

The National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation into the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration is assisting.


- Source:   http://www.bhpioneer.com

Civil Air Patrol/South Dakota Wing news release concerning a joint South Dakota Wing/Wyoming Wing search for and location of a crashed small aircraft. 

Civil Air Patrol Search For/Location of Crashed Small Aircraft 


Late in the evening of 29 November the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida notified the South Dakota Wing and the Wyoming Wing of the Civil Air Patrol that an aircraft was overdue to return to Spearfish, SD. Poor weather conditions prevented the launch of an immediate search that night. Around 6:00am on Sunday a ground search team was dispatched from CAP’s Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron 9Spearfish) to Colony, WY which cell phone forensics indicated as a possible search site. Later that morning three aircraft; two from South Dakota Wing and one from Wyoming Wing, were launched to conduct an aerial search for the missing aircraft’s emergency beacon (ELT). Using special onboard sensors the CAP aircraft began picking up the ELT signal and worked to refine the location. About one hour later, using aerial triangulation, a Wyoming Wing aircraft sighted the missing aircraft on the ground in high desert area near the tiny town of Alzada, MT. The ground search team was re-directed from Colony to Alzada where they linked up with officers from the Carter County Sheriff’s Office. While the ground team was en route, Wyoming Wing and South Dakota Wing aircraft took turns orbiting the crash site to direct the ground team to the location. Once Carter County Sheriff Office personnel were at the crash site the South Dakota Wing ground team and both wing’s aircraft returned to their bases. 

Bruce Kipp, Major, CAP 
Public Affairs Officer 
SD Wing Civil Air Patrol

Air Tractor 502B, N946TR, Tri-Rotor Spray and Chemical Inc: Fatal accident occurred November 30, 2014 in Somerton, Yuma County, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N946TR

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Air Tractor, Inc.; Olney, Texas



Michael Alan Kratz 
 (October 29, 1959 - November 30, 2014)



NTSB Identification: WPR15LA048
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in Somerton, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502B, registration: N946TR
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The commercial pilot was performing a water calibration flight at the end of a day of agricultural application. After spraying the field with water, the airplane was scheduled to return to the airport. Another pilot flying in the area reported that he saw a flash, and, when he flew in the di
rection of the flash, he saw the accident airplane engulfed in flames. There were no witnesses to the accident, nor did the pilot communicate distress before the impact. No obstructions were observed in the vicinity of the accident site.

Postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed damage consistent with a near-vertical impact with terrain and high forward impact forces. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation, and the reason for the loss of control was not determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of airplane control for reasons that could not be determined based on available evidence.



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 30, 2014, about 0115 mountain standard time, a single-engine Air Tractor, Inc. AT-502B, N946TR, impacted an open field near Somerton, Arizona. Tri Rotor Spray and Chemical, Inc., operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as a local aerial application flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed in the postcrash fire. The airplane had departed from a private airstrip about 0110. Visual night meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a company flight plan had been filed.

According to a company representative, prior to the accident the pilot had landed the airplane, and placed 100 gallons of water onboard. The intent was to do a water calibration flight to end his day. After the field had been sprayed with water, the pilot was returning to land. The company representative reported that no radio communications were made prior to the accident between the pilot and other company pilots flying in the area.

A company pilot saw a flash as he was taking off. He flew toward the direction of the flash, and saw an airplane engulfed in flames. The pilot landed his airplane near the accident site, but stated that he was not able to get close due to the flames.

There were six pilots in the area at the time of the accident. They all reported small areas of patchy fog conditions. Their estimation based on their specific location was that the patchy fog layer was between 150-400 feet above ground level with good visibility.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 55, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane; he also held a helicopter rating. The pilot held a second-class medical certificate issued on September 23, 2014, with the restriction that he must wear corrective lenses. The pilot reported 12,200 total hours with 45 hours in the past 6 months on his medical certificate application. The date of his last flight review was March 18, 2014.

According to the operator, the pilot's last flight review was performed on March 18, 2014, in a Bell 206B.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine low-wing conventional-geared Air Tractor AT-502B airplane, serial number 502B-2946, was equipped with a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG turbo-prop engine. According to the operator, a 100-hour inspection was performed on November 2, 2014. The airframe total time was 502.2 hours. The engine had a total of 20 hours since the last inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

A weather study was performed by a senior meteorologist from the NTSB; the report is attached to the public docket for this accident. In part, it was reported that a moist layer existed in the low farming region where the accident occurred. The temperature was 50.7 degrees F, dew point was 48 degrees F and relative humidity was 91 percent. The existing fog layer was not extensive nor was it observed at Yuma, Arizona, or indicated on satellite imagery. Aircraft soundings for the area indicated strong surface based temperature inversion with light winds, which was below favorable for light fog or mist formation. There were no National Weather Service weather advisories in effect for extensive instrument flight rules conditions, low-level windshear, or turbulence across the region at the time of the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was situated at the intersection of County 18-3/4's street and Avenue E South in an open field, with no obstacles identified in the flight area. The entire airplane came to rest at the accident site and was consumed by a post-crash fire. The accident site was 1 mile west from the operator's airfield and base of operations. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination was conducted by the Yuma County Medical Examiner, Yuma, Arizona, on December 3, 2014. The cause of death was reported as undetermined.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot; Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide testing were not performed, and no volatiles or drugs of abuse were detected.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The FAA, Air Tractor, and Pratt and Whitney – Canada examined the airplane at Air Transport in Phoenix, Arizona, on December 16, 2014.

Visual inspection of the airframe revealed that the structure aft of the cockpit was intact; while forward of the cockpit had been destroyed by a post-crash fire. The airplane was equipped with AmSafe Inflatable Restraints. The flight control surfaces were all identified, and were damaged by the impact and post-crash fire; flight control continuity was established. There was no evidence of a pre-impact anomaly that would have precluded normal operation of the airframe or flight control systems. According to Air Tractor, the condition of the wreckage was consistent with a near-vertical impact with terrain with high forward G-impact forces. A detailed report is attached to the public docket for this accident.

Examination of the engine revealed no pre-impact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The three-bladed Hartzell propeller was located with the main wreckage. One of the propeller blades remained attached to he propeller hub, and the other two propeller blades had separated from the propeller hub. All of the propeller blades showed evidence of S-bending. 


The engine inspection revealed that the engine had sustained severe impact damage, which included compressional deformation of the exhaust duct, and the gas generator case, along with the fracture of the inlet case support struts. The compressor turbine shroud, compressor turbine, interstage baffle, power turbine shroud, and the power turbine sustained circumferential rubbing and machining due to the impact. Both the compressor and power turbine blades were circumferentially fractured due to contact with the adjacent components.



NTSB Identification: WPR15LA048 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in Somerton, AZ
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502B, registration: N946TR
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 30, 2014, about 0120 mountain standard time, a single-engine Air Tractor, Inc., AT-502B, N946TR, impacted an open field near Somerton, Arizona. Tri Rotor Spray and Chemical, Inc., operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as a local aerial application flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed in the postcrash fire. The airplane departed from a private airstrip about 0100. Visual night meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight.

According to a company representative, prior to the accident the pilot had landed the airplane and placed 100 gallons of water onboard the airplane. The intent was to do a water calibration flight to end his day. After the field had been sprayed with water, the pilot was returning to land. The company representative reported that no communications between the pilot and company pilots flying in the area were made prior to the accident.

A witness reported that he observed a fire in a nearby field, which was later identified as the accident airplane.




The pilot killed Sunday near Somerton in a crop duster crash has been identified as 55-year-old Michael Alan Kratz, of North Dakota. Yuma County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Alfonzo Zavala said he believes Kratz had been coming to the Yuma area the past three to four years.  
 
Zavala said it appears Katz was making his final approach to land when he crashed. The runway is about three quarters of a mile west of where Kratz’s plane went down.

“(Katz) had been spraying out in Dome Valley,” Zavala said. “He had come in once already and picked up water for a rinse load to cleanse his spraying system.”

At approximately 1:20 a.m., the Yuma County Sheriff’s Office responded to the area of County 18 ½ Street and Avenue D ½ in reference to a downed aircraft. Upon arrival, deputies located the aircraft in an open field and fully engulfed in flames.

The aircraft, an Air Tractor 502 crop duster, is owned by Tri Rotor and operated out of Somerton.

The aircraft had no chemicals on board at the time of the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were contacted and are investigating this incident.



The pilot of a crop duster died Sunday in an early-morning crash near Somerton. 

At about 1:20 a.m., the Yuma County Sheriff's Office responded to a call of a downed airplane, a YCSO news release stated. 

The Somerton/Cocopah Fire Department responded to an area near County 18¾ and Avenue E, about 1:43 a.m., according to a news release from that agency.

YCSO noted that the aircraft was in an open field and fully engulfed in flames when it arrived. 


SCFD firefighters quickly worked to extinguish the burning plane.

According to YCSO, initial information indicated that there was one deceased person inside the aircraft. 


The identity of the pilot is being withheld pending positive identification.

The aircraft was described as an Air Tractor 502 crop duster owned by Tri Rotor and operated out of Somerton.


YCSO added that it no chemicals on board at the time of the crash.

The incident remains under investigation by YCSO as well as the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The fire department at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma took over for SCFD while they were handling the call in Somerton.

Rutan Long EZ, N7015T: Accident occurred November 30, 2014 near McGregor Executive Airport (KPWG), Waco, Texas

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA063
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in McGregor, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/03/2016
Aircraft: SIEGEL GERALD LONG EZ, registration: N7015T
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The noncertificated pilot was taking off from the airport. A witness reported that, immediately after the airplane became airborne, it began flying erratically and that he then heard the pilot make a radio call, during which the pilot stated that he was aborting the takeoff because the cockpit canopy had opened. The airplane descended and struck a vehicle on a highway near the south end of the airport. The airplane then impacted trees and terrain and came to rest inverted. Emergency responders reported that the pilot told them that he had climbed the airplane to a maximum of 100 to 200 ft when the engine lost power. 
An on-scene examination revealed that the airplane was extensively fragmented; all of the airplane’s major components were located at the accident site. Both fuel tanks were breached, which resulted in a fuel spill but no postimpact fire. The cockpit canopy frame was observed mostly intact and partially impact-separated. The inside canopy latch was observed latched and locked. Both propeller blades were separated near the propeller hub and did not exhibit evidence of significant power at impact. An engine examination revealed that there was excessive debris in the gascolator bowl and corrosion on the gasket mating surface; the gascolator housing exhibited excessive wear and had a rusty, rough surface. The excessive debris in the fuel system likely restricted the fuel flow to the engine and resulted in the subsequent total loss of engine power during takeoff. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power during takeoff due to excessive debris in the fuel system. 

On November 30, 2014, about 1248 central standard time, an experimental – amateur built Seigel, Long EZ, single-engine airplane, N7015T, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain following a loss of engine power during takeoff at McGregor Executive Airport (PWG), McGregor, Texas. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing PWG and was destined for Teague Municipal Airport (68F), Teague, Texas. 

A witness at the airport reported that he saw the airplane climb to about 20 to 25 feet above ground level (agl) when it began flying erratically immediately after becoming airborne. He then heard a radio call from the pilot saying that he was aborting his take off because his cockpit canopy had opened. 

The southbound airplane descended and struck and damaged a vehicle traveling eastbound on the highway. The airplane then impacted trees and terrain and came to rest inverted. The occupants of the vehicle struck by the airplane were not injured. Several witnesses called 9-1-1 emergency and went to the wreckage location to provide aid to the injured pilot. 

Emergency responders reported that the pilot told them that he had climbed to a maximum of 100 to 200 feet when the engine lost power. The pilot added that he had a heavy right wing with more fuel in the right side than the left side. 

An on-scene examination of the wreckage showed all major components of the airplane were observed at the accident location, with all pieces of the fragmented wreckage located within a radius of about 50 feet. The right wing was completely separated and the right rudder and right aileron remained attached to the separated right wing. The left wing was partially separated at mid-span. The left side of the fuselage, forward of the instrument panel, including the left rudder pedal was completely separated. The entire nose gear assembly and nose gear attach fitting were separated. 

The fuel tanks in both wings were breached by impact damage, which resulted in a fuel spill at the accident scene, but there was no postimpact fire. Both propeller blades were impact separated near the propeller hub and did not show evidence of significant power at impact. The cockpit canopy frame was observed mostly intact and partially impact separated. The inside canopy latch was observed latched and locked. The Plexiglas in the canopy was impact fragmented and was almost completely missing from the cockpit canopy frame. 

The fuel pump circuit breaker was observed in the OFF position. The fuel tank selector was observed in the RIGHT position. An examination of the engine compartment showed more than one teaspoon of small debris was observed in gascolator bowl. An in-line fuel filter was not observed and an internal gascolator filter was not observed. The non-transparent metal gascolator bowl showed corrosion on the gasket mating surface and the gascolator housing gasket showed excessive wear and a rusty rough surface. 

Aircraft maintenance logbooks and evidence at the scene showed that the airplane had been operated for about 34 hours since 2011, which included a total of 4.9 hours of operation in the previous year. 

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records show that the pilot had never held an FAA pilot certificate or an FAA aviation medical certificate. 

At 1255 the automated weather observing system at PWG, located about 1 mile north from the accident location, reported wind from 190 degrees at 21 knots gusting to 27 knots, visibility of 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,900 feet, scattered clouds at 4,900 feet, temperature 26 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 16 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of Mercury.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7015T

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA063 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 30, 2014 in McGregor, TX
Aircraft: SIEGEL GERALD LONG EZ, registration: N7015T
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 30, 2014, about 1248 central standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Seigel Long EZ, single-engine airplane, N7015T, impacted terrain following a loss of engine power during takeoff from the McGregor Executive Airport (PWG), McGregor, Texas. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan.

Emergency responders reported that the pilot told them that the airplane had climbed to about 100 ft above ground level when he lost engine power. The airplane traveling south descended and struck and damaged a vehicle traveling east on the highway. The airplane then impacted trees and terrain coming to rest inverted. At least one fuel tank was breached and there was a smell of fuel at the scene; however, there was no postimpact fire. Several witnesses called 9-1-1 emergency and went to the airplane wreckage location to provide aid to the injured pilot. The occupants of the vehicle struck by the airplane were not injured.

At 1255 the automated weather observing system at PWG, located about 1 mile north from the accident location, reported wind from 190 degrees at 21 knots gusting to 27 knots, visibility of 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,900 ft, scattered clouds at 4,900 ft, temperature 26 degrees C, dew point 16 degrees C, and altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.


Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19












MCGREGOR - A local man is hospitalized after crashing his small plane into a car in McGregor Sunday afternoon.

The pilot, 65 year-old Eugene Herr lost control of his plane then hit a car on the highway before crashing to the ground. The plane finally came to stop just feet from a law office building which could have been much worse. The pilot was hurt but fortunately no one else was injured in the crash.

The plane went down shortly after taking off from the McGregor Executive Airport.

Officials say the plane lost altitude after taking off and started going down on highway 84. As the plane came crashing down it hit a car that was traveling along the highway sending the plane tumbling into a traffic sign before finally landing in some trees.

DPS Troopers, McGregor Police and firefighters responded.

The pilot suffered a couple broken bones and some cuts and bruises and was taken to Hillcrest hospital. The driver and the passenger in that car weren't injured in the crash.

Authorities believe the high winds could have played a role but the cause of the crash is still under investigation.


- Source: http://www.kxxv.com

WACO (November 30, 2014) A pilot was taken to a local hospital after his small plane crashed Sunday during takeoff near the McGregor Airport. 

 The plane crash was first reported just after 1:00pm Sunday off Highway 84 and Harris Creek.

According to initial reports from the scene, the pilot of a small plane was taking off on the runway at the McGregor Executive Airport when one of the planes wings hit a black SUV due to strong winds in the area.

The winds then started pushing and twirling the plane, causing the it to slide onto Highway 84 and crash upside down in front of a law office.

The pilot was the only person onboard the plane.

He was taken to Baylor Scott & White Hillcrest Medical Center in Waco with a broken leg and possible concussion.

His injuries are not considered life threatening.

No one else was hurt.

Roads in the area were closed for a brief period but have since reopened.

The McGregor Fire Department, City of Waco Fire Department, the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Crawford Police Department all responded to the scene of the accident.