Saturday, June 29, 2019

Unregistered Light Sport Airplane: Accident occurred June 22, 2019 in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf




Location: Barnesville, OH
Accident Number: CEN19LA181
Date & Time: 06/22/2019, 1725 EDT
Registration: None
Aircraft: Unknown 2 seat
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 22, 2019, about 1725 eastern daylight time, an unregistered Light Sport Airplane, impacted terrain shortly after departing a private residence near Barnesville, Ohio. The pilot received serious injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

A witness reported that the pilot departed the private airstrip; when the airplane was about 40 ft in the air, "the airplane crashed". The airplane was described as a two-seat ultralight, without a Federal Aviation Administration registration number.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Unknown
Registration: None
Model/Series: 2 seat
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCDI
Observation Time: 1739 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Barnesville, OH
Destination: Barnesville, OH

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 39.987500, -81.180556

BARNESVILLE, Ohio — Ohio State Police has identified the victim of a Saturday evening plane crash.

Police officials say that 63-year-old Tim Ackerman of Barnesville, Ohio took off from his personal airfield, Howell Airport, at 7:35 p.m.

Shortly after takeoff, Ackerman's ultralight aircraft made a turn and then nosedived into the ground.

“After taking off he got up to approximately 40 feet in the air, made a slight left-hand turn and then plummeted down to the ground where he crashed,” Sgt. Drew Hertlein of the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Emergency responders rushed to the scene located at the intersection of State Route 800 and Flat Rock Road.

“He was awake and conscious, still somewhat seat-belted into his machine,” said Somerton EMS Squad Captain Roy Clark. “His girlfriend was with him talking to him, he talked to me several times.”

About a dozen emergency responders worked to free Ackerman from the wreckage within the first ten minutes on scene.

“He was in a lot of pain because of being entangled in the wreckage, both legs were entangled, pretty much a mess,” said Clark.

Clark was the lead paramedic working to free Ackerman, someone he has known for many years.

“He’s very caring, down to earth person, works hard daily,” said Clark. “He’s a good guy, he helps us out at the church a lot and everything else.”

Neighbors also say that Ackerman was a good friend and enjoyed flying.

“He just goes out and joyrides whenever he can, goes out to eat,” said neighbor Jason Doty. “I’ve talked to him a couple times about it. He’ll take people out. Say you want to go for a ride, he’ll take people out, he’ll take them where they want to go.”

Ackerman suffered severe injuries to both of his legs and was flown to a Morgantown hospital where he underwent surgeries throughout the night as well as through the day on Sunday. He is expected to survive his injuries.

This kind of event is uncommon for the area, but state police say this is the second plane crash in the past several months.

“I would say it’s uncommon, but just within the past couple months this is the second plane crash that we’ve had,” said Sgt. Drew Hertlein. “The prior one was down in Monroe County at the Monroe County Airport.”

The Federal Aviation Administration said they are investigating the accident, however, a determination of what caused the accident could take several months to surface.

Story and video ➤ https://wtov9.com

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N4614S: Fatal accident occurred June 28, 2019 near Hiawatha Municipal Airport (K87), Brown County, Kansas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Persons:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Aircraft Engines; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N4614S

Location: Hiawatha, KS
Accident Number: CEN19FA189
Date & Time: 06/28/2019, 1715 CDT
Registration: N4614S
Aircraft: Beechcraft 58
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 28, 2019, about 1715 central daylight time, a Beechcraft BE-58 airplane, N4614S, impacted terrain during an approach to the Hiawatha Municipal Airport (K87), Hiawatha, Kansas. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Mako Certificate LLC, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross-country fight. The flight departed the Augusta Municipal Airport (3AU), Augusta, KS, at 1623 en route to K87.


The pilot was not in contact with air traffic control (ATC) during the flight; however, a preliminary review of radar information revealed the pilot's flight from 3AU, northeast, towards K87.


The airplane wreckage was located in an open corn field about 1 mile north of K87. The airplane came to rest upright, on a 171° heading, with a post-crash fire consuming most of the cabin and inboard sections of both wings. The wreckage was confined to one area, and all major components were accounted for on-site.


The left and right engines remained attached to their respective airframe locations, and both had impact and fire damage. The right 3-bladed propeller separated from the engine crankshaft flange and was located underneath the right nacelle. The left 3-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Beechcraft

Registration: N4614S
Model/Series: 58
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFNB
Observation Time: 1753 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 18 knots, 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Augusta, KS (3AU)
Destination: Hiawatha, KS (K87) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.887778, -95.517222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Bruce Leo Lutz

On the evening of June 28, 2019 Bruce Leo Lutz, age 67, was tragically killed in a plane crash in Hiawatha, Kansas.  

Bruce was born on August 7, 1951 in Boonville, MO, the son of Leo & Jean Lutz. 

Bruce graduated from Tipton High School in 1969. He attended the University of Rolla, and went on to graduate from the University of Missouri, Columbia with an engineering degree in 1973. 

Bruce married in 1980 and was the father of 3 children. Bradley Lutz (wife Ashley) of Westminster, CO, Stacy Simmer (husband Heath) of Hiawatha, KS, and Rebecca Trickle (husband Taylor) of Wichita, KS. 

Bruce was a loyal Missouri Tiger fan & alumni - yet somehow found a way to make his home in arch rival territory, Kansas. He began his career in Hesston, KS where he worked for Hesston Corp for 15 years. 

Bruce then transitioned into the aviation industry in Wichita where he worked for Beechcraft & Cessna, and finally in private consulting. 

Bruce took no greater pride than that of the love of his children and grandchildren. He made certain to take advantage of every opportunity to attend their activities. This genuine love of family extended to his siblings, nieces, and nephews.

Bruce was an avid pilot, fisherman, gardener, and photographer. He enjoyed cooking, wine, and preparing gourmet meals and entertaining guests.

Bruce was preceded in death by by his father Leo B Lutz, and brother-in-law Ralph Knipp. He is survived by his mother Jean G Lutz (Tipton, MO). He is also survived by aforementioned children and spouses and 7 grandchildren, Hannah & Leo Simmer (Stacy & Heath), Benjamin & Jacob Lutz (Bradley & Ashley), and Truett, Adalyn, and Zion (Rebecca & Taylor), and the mother of his children (Debbie Berry of Andover, KS). 

Bruce is also survived by 5 siblings, Nancy Knipp (Jefferson City, MO), Burl Lutz (Ashland, MO), Wanda Higgins (Jefferson City, MO), Mike Lutz (Shelly) (California, MO), Joe Lutz (Tipton, MO). 

Visitation & rosary will be held at St Vincent de Paul, where Bruce was a member, on Tuesday, July 2nd at 6pm. Funeral Mass will be on Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019 at 2 pm at St Vincent de Paul in Andover, KS. Bruce will be buried at a graveside service 11am, Friday July 5th, 2019 at St Andrews Cemetery, Tipton, MO. 

In lieu of flowers, the family request donations to the American Red Cross.


https://www.cozinememorial.com

Bruce Leo Lutz

Bruce Leo Lutz, age 67, was tragically killed in a plane crash in Hiawatha, Kansas on the evening of June 28, 2019. Bruce was born on August 7, 1951, in Boonville, Mo., the son of Leo and Jean Lutz. Bruce graduated from Tipton High School in 1969. He attended the University of Rolla, and went on to graduate from the University of Missouri, Columbia with an engineering degree in 1973. 

Bruce married in 1980, and was the father of three children: Bradley Lutz (wife Ashley) of Westminster, Colo., Stacy Simmer (husband Heath) of Hiawatha, Kan., and Rebecca Trickle (husband Taylor) of Wichita, Kan. Bruce was a loyal Missouri Tiger fan and alumni - yet somehow found a way to make his home in arch rival territory, Kansas. He began his career in Hesston, Kan. where he worked for Hesston Corp for 15 years. 

Bruce then transitioned into the aviation industry in Wichita where he worked for Beechcraft & Cessna, and finally in private consulting. Bruce took no greater pride than that of the love of his children and grandchildren. He made certain to take advantage of every opportunity to attend their activities. This genuine love of family extended to his siblings, nieces, and nephews. 

Bruce was an avid pilot, fisherman, gardener, and photographer. He enjoyed cooking, wine, and preparing gourmet meals and entertaining guests. 

Bruce was preceded in death by by his father, Leo B. Lutz, and brother-in-law, Ralph Knipp. He is survived by his mother, Jean G. Lutz (Tipton, Mo). He is also survived by aforementioned children and spouses and seven grandchildren, Hannah and Leo Simmer (Stacy and Heath), Benjamin and Jacob Lutz (Bradley and Ashley), and Truett, Adalyn, and Zion (Rebecca and Taylor); and the mother of his children, Debbie Berry of Andover, Kan. Bruce is also survived by five siblings, Nancy Knipp (Jefferson City, Mo.), Burl Lutz (Ashland, Mo.), Wanda Higgins (Jefferson City, Mo.), Mike Lutz (Shelly) (California, Mo.), Joe Lutz (Tipton, Mo). Visitation and Rosary will be held at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Andover, Kan., where Bruce was a member, on Tuesday, July 2, at 6 p.m. Funeral Mass will be Wednesday, July 3, 2019, at 2 p.m. also at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church. Graveside service will be at 11 a.m., Friday, July 5, 2019, at St. Andrews Cemetery, Tipton, Mo. In lieu of flowers, the family request donations to the American Red Cross. Condolences may be shared at www.CozineMemorial.com. Services are under the care of Broadway Mortuary.



HIAWATHA, Kansas  (WIBW)     One person was killed Friday evening when a small plane crashed about a mile north of the Hiawatha airport in Brown County.

According to the Brown County Sheriff's Office, the plane went down around 5:30 p.m. in a cornfield, north of 260th Road, between Hwy. 73 and Mallard Rd.

Bruce L. Lutz, 67, of Andover, Kansas, was declared dead at the scene. His body was transported to Frontier Forensics.

Brown County Sheriff John Merchant said the Kansas Highway Patrol and Federal Aviation Administration have been notified. He also complimented the various emergency response teams who arrived on the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wibw.com


One person died in a plane crash Friday evening two miles north of Hiawatha, Kansas.

A Beechcraft 58 Baron crashed in a cornfield around 5:15 p.m. one mile north of Hiawatha Municipal Airport, according to Kansas Highway Patrol Lt. Bryce Whelpley.

The plane was fully engulfed in flames when emergency crews arrived.

Kansas Highway Patrol first responders were joined by Brown County sheriff’s deputies, Hiawatha police and crews from the Hiawatha Fire Department at the scene.

After putting out the fire, one person was found dead inside.

There is no control tower at the airport.

The pilot’s identification is being withheld, pending notification of family.

Federal investigators from either the Federal Aviation Administration or National Transportation Safety Board will be responding.

“The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are aware of this and are going to be assisting or taking over the investigation soon,” Whelpley said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kshb.com



HIAWATHA, Kansas (KSNT) – A small plane crashed near Highway 73 just north of Hiawatha Friday evening, according to Brown County Dispatch.

The call came in at 5:33 p.m. and the plane crashed in a field, between Highway 73 and Mallard Rd one mile north of the airport, two miles north of Hiawatha.

Brown County Sheriff, John Merchant said there was one fatality, and they are waiting to notify next of kin before anything is confirmed or names released.

The Federal Aviation Administration and Kansas Highway Patrol have been notified.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ksnt.com



One person is dead in a plane crash just north of Hiawatha, Kansas, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol.

Lt. Bryce Whelpley, with the Kansas Highway Patrol, said at 5:16 p.m. Troopers were called to a cornfield field north of 260th Road in Brown county North of Hiawatha. Upon arrival, the plane was engulfed in flames, which first responders were able to quickly extinguish.

The person who died in the crash was the sole occupant of the small aircraft. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and is continuing the investigation. 

The identity of the pilot and the type of plane are not being released pending the notification of family members.

Original article ➤ https://www.hiawathaworldonline.com

Friday, June 28, 2019

Aerodynamic Stall / Spin: Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N612DF, fatal accident occurred on July 30, 2017 at Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR), Fairfield County, Connecticut

Pilot Mark Stern, 63, passed away on August 3rd, 2017 in Danbury Hospital after succumbing to injuries sustained from a Cessna 172S Skyhawk crash on July 30th, 2017.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N612DF




Location: Danbury, CT
Accident Number: ERA17LA261
Date & Time: 07/30/2017, 1025 EDT
Registration: N612DF
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 30, 2017, about 1025 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N612DF, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Danbury Municipal Airport (DXR), Danbury, Connecticut. The pilot died from his injuries 4 days after the accident, and the two passengers received serious injuries. The airplane was owned by a private company and was being operated by Arrow Aviation LLC as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

The rear-seat passenger was a certificated pilot with about 1,500 hours of flight experience. He stated that, when the airplane was cleared for takeoff, the pilot taxied to the runway and applied what sounded like full engine power. The rear-seat passenger could not see the instruments or flight controls from where he was seated. After a short ground roll, the airplane took off, but from what he could see out the side window, it seemed that the airplane was not gaining altitude normally. Less than 1 minute later, the pilot stated, "we're going in."

According to an air traffic controller at DXR, the airplane lost altitude after takeoff while still over runway 26, a 4,422-ft-long runway. He then observed it "appearing to correct" as it had assumed a more nose-up attitude. It then began a left roll, followed by a "full nose up attitude, rolling to the left," before it descended and impacted the ground.

Another witness, who was in a dog park near the accident site, stated that he heard a small airplane "lumbering" and sounding under-powered. He saw the airplane appear to turn sharply 180°, then impact the ground.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and rotorcraft-helicopter. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued June 14, 2016, at which time he reported 582 hours of total flight experience. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

Review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on July 21, 2017, about 17 flight hours before the accident. At that time, the airframe had accrued about 4,013 hours and the engine had accrued 656 hours since overhaul.

According to fuel records and statements from the operator, the airplane was fueled to capacity on the afternoon of July 28. The accident flight was the first flight since that fueling. The airplane's maximum gross weight was 2,550 lbs. The airplane's estimated weight at the time of the accident, including full fuel and the three occupants (not accounting for any baggage), was about 2,609 lbs. Review of takeoff performance data revealed that, at 2,550 lbs, a pressure altitude of 500 ft mean sea level, and a temperature of 20°C, the airplane required about 1,770 ft to clear a 50-ft obstacle. The data assumed no wind and flaps extended 10°.

At 1053, the reported weather at DXR included wind from 350° at 9 knots, the temperature was 23°C, and the dew point was 12°C.

An initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administrator (FAA) inspector revealed that the fuselage came to rest upright in a nose-down attitude in an area of heavy brush about 1,000 ft from the departure end of the runway. The left wing was partially separated from the fuselage and exhibited leading edge crush damage from the root to the tip. The outboard one-third of the right wing was bent upward and aft. The fuselage was buckled on both sides aft of the rear window, and the left rear pillar was crushed and separated from the roof. The nose section, including the engine, was crushed and displaced upward and aft. The empennage, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, rudder, and elevators were largely undamaged. The ignition key was found positioned to the left magneto; however, the preimpact position of the key could not be determined.

Several branches were found severed at a 45° angle in the westerly path leading up to the airplane consistent with propeller contact. Both propeller blades exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise scratches. Fuel samples from both tanks were blue in color and absent of water. Oil was present in the engine, but the quantity could not be determined due to the resting position of the engine.

The wreckage was transported to a recovery facility and examined again. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all control surfaces to the cockpit area. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to a 5° tab up (nose down) elevator trim. Measurement of the flap actuator revealed that the flaps were in the fully retracted position.

The engine crankshaft was rotated by means of a tool inserted in the vacuum pump drive pad and continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was observed. The interiors of the cylinders were examined with a lighted borescope and no anomalies were noted. The fuel servo, engine-driven fuel pump, flow divider, and injector nozzles remained attached to the engine and were removed and partially disassembled. The fuel servo regulator section was partially disassembled and no damage was noted to the rubber diaphragms or other internal components. The fuel servo fuel inlet screen was absent of debris. The flow divider was partially disassembled. No debris was noted inside and no damage to the rubber diaphragm was noted. The two-piece fuel injector nozzles were unobstructed. The engine-driven fuel pump was partially disassembled and no damage was noted to the rubber diaphragms or the internal check valves. Liquid with an odor consistent with aviation gasoline was observed in the engine-driven fuel pump, the hose from the pump to the servo, in the servo and in the hose from the servo to the flow divider. Both magnetos were removed and produced spark from all electrode towers when rotated by hand.

A GPS data card, and three personal electronic devices were forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC. No performance data were recovered for the accident takeoff.

According to the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) Chapter 10, Weight and Balance, excessive weight reduces flight performance in almost every respect. Some of the most important performance deficiencies of an overloaded aircraft include higher takeoff speed, longer takeoff run, reduced rate and angle of climb, and higher stalling speed. 




Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/14/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 582 hours (Total, all aircraft)




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N612DF
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 172S10201
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/21/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 17 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4013 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: CESSNA 616DF LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Arrow Aviation LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDXR, 457 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 69°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Danbury, CT (DXR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Danbury, CT (DXR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1025 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D



Airport Information

Airport: DANBURY MUNI (DXR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 456 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4422 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 41.368056, -73.493056 (est)

Cessna 150L, N5256Q: Accident occurred June 28, 2019 near Omaha-Millard Airport (KMLE), Douglas County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5256Q 

Location: Omaha, NE
Accident Number: CEN19LA186
Date & Time: 06/28/2019, 0451 CDT
Registration: N5256Q
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On June 28, 2019, about 451 central daylight time, a Cessna 150L, N5256Q, was damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power while approaching to land at the Millard Airport(MLE), Omaha, Nebraska. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane struck a fence and building during the forced landing resulting in substantial damage to the airplane. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on a visual flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Southwest Minnesota Regional Airport (MML), Marshall, Minnesota, about 3 hours prior to the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5256Q
Model/Series: 150 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMLE, 1050 ft msl
Observation Time: 0955 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Marshall, MN (MML)
Destination: Omaha, NE (MLE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.196111, -96.112222


Pilot Eugene Puttbrese and his Cessna 150L.


OMAHA, Nebraska  (WOWT) -- A Minnesota man flying his small aircraft from Fargo, North Dakota to Omaha got a rough introduction to the metro Friday morning when his plane made a hard landing on a Millard street.

Eugene Puttbrese of Frazee, Minn. was aiming for the Millard Airport but around 4 a.m. he knew there was something wrong.

"I couldn't figure it out," he said, “I thought I picked up a heck of a head wind and the plane just wasn't doing what it should do.”

Puttbreese believes he ran out fuel. "I know it was the fuel, pure and simple."

The plane came down on Discovery Drive, about a quarter mile away from the airport.

“I really should have made it to the airport,” he said. “When I came in I had plenty of altitude. It shouldn’t have been a problem but you start messing around doing things, like trying to get the engine running, you probably shouldn't be doing. You should just be flying the plane.”

It was supposed to be a quick stop to pick up his son.

“He had an appointment down here and we were going to fly back this afternoon. And it didn't quite work out.”

It could have been a lot worse but as Puttbrese said, “All is well that ends well.”

Puttbrese is an experienced pilot. He's been flying for nearly 40 years without incident. He was not injured and the damage on the ground was limited to a backyard fence.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wowt.com


Pilot Eugene Puttbrese, right, of Frazee, Minnesota, stands with Omaha Police after Puttbrese had to make a force landing with his Cessna 150L on June 28th.




OMAHA, Nebraska (AP) — Authorities say no one was hurt when a small plane landed in a southwest Omaha neighborhood, a few hundred feet short of a runway at a small airport.

Pilot Eugene Puttbrese, of Frazee, Minnesota, says he's sure his Cessna 150L ran out of fuel around 4 a.m. Friday, and he came down on a residential street.

Ground damage was limited to a backyard fence. The front gear was crunched up under the engine as the plane pitched forward onto its nose. The propeller blades were bent and another tire was flat.

Puttbrese says he'd intended to land at the nearby Millard Airport, having flown from Fargo, North Dakota, to pick up his son and return to Fargo.

Original article ➤ https://www.mankatofreepress.com







OMAHA, Nebraska — No one was hurt after a small plane made an emergency landing early Friday northwest of the Millard Airport on Discovery Drive.

Crews responded to the area around 4 a.m.

Pilot Eugene Puttbrese told KETV NewsWatch 7 the aircraft ran out of fuel on a flight to Millard from Fargo, North Dakota.

"I'm sure it was out of fuel. There are a lot of things that come together that do that," Puttbrese said. "I noticed some problems early on (in the flight)."

Puttbrese did not elaborate.

The pilot said he had full control of the aircraft until he hit a fence on Discovery Drive, on approach to the Millard Airport.

The plane then stopped in front of a driveway a few feet down the road.

Darrin Bengtson's house was attached to that driveway.

"My little brother comes in to my room and says 'There's a plane crashed into our driveway'," Bengtson said. "I didn't believe him 'til I looked out the window and saw the plane in our driveway."

He said he called 911 while his brother rushed to help the pilot.

Zach Barrientos woke up to learn from police that the plane crashed into his backyard. The plane damaged his fence and shed, but he says he's glad no one is hurt.

"At least (the damage) is minimal and nothing personal, as far as people," said Barrientos.

"It was unbelievable. I've never seen something like that," Bengtson said.

The plane stopped on the street, with its nose on the ground and one flat tire.

Puttbrese said he was flying here to pick up his son with the intent to return to Fargo later Friday. In 37 years of flying planes, Puttbrese said he never had to make an emergency landing.

He was not injured. Damage on the ground was limited to a backyard fence.

The Federal Aviation Administration has taken over the investigation. It is ongoing at this time.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ketv.com

Beechcraft 77 Skipper: Accident occurred June 28, 2019 at Leesburg International Airport (KLEE), Lake County, Florida

LEESBURG — A small plane crashed into a wooded area while trying to land at Leesburg International Airport Friday morning.

Airport Manager Tracy Dean said the student pilot and the flight instructor survived the crash. One suffered “minor scratches,” while the other victim’s injuries are unknown.

According to authorities, the Beechcraft 77 Skipper took off from the airport just after 10 a.m. and then returned minutes later. Rescuers initially thought the plane plunged into Lake Harris beyond the runway but soon discovered it went down in a marshy area near the end of the runway, complicating the fire department’s efforts to reach the wreckage. There is a City of Leesburg fire station at the airport.

The student pilot and the instructor were both taken to Leesburg Regional Medical Center, but authorities said their injuries were not life-threatening. They were listed in stable condition.

It was unclear if the student pilot and flight instructor were practicing takeoffs and landings when the plane crashed or whether it experienced a mechanical problem. Authorities, including the Federal Aviation Administration, were still gathering information about the mishap Friday but were able to confirm that the plane is owned by The Villages Flight Club.

Units from the Leesburg Fire Department, Lake County Fire Rescue, Tavares Fire Department, Leesburg Police Department and Lake County EMS responded to the incident.

Original article ➤ https://www.dailycommercial.com


LEESBURG, Florida — Two people were hurt Friday morning when a small plane coming in for a landing at Leesburg's airport failed to stop and crashed into woods.

The crash happened at about 10:15 a.m. just after Beechcraft 77 Skipper took off from Leesburg International Airport.

The plane then circled back around and came in for a landing at Runway 13, but it didn't stop, continuing through the airport onto a grassy area and into the woods, airport officials and the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The Leesburg Fire Department was called and brought buzz saws and other equipment to get into the woods and to the plane and survivors.

A flight instructor and student pilot were hurt but will be OK, the airport manager tells Spectrum News 13. 

Leesburg Fire transported the two by ground to a hospital, and their injuries weren't thought to be life-threatening, police said. Their identities have not been released.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

The airport, 35 miles northwest of Orlando has two runways and has more than 50,000 takeoffs and landings a year, according to its website.

Original article ➤ https://www.mynews13.com


LEESBURG, Florida - A small plane crashed in Leesburg on Friday morning, leaving two people injured, police said.

The crash was reported shortly after 10 a.m.

Police said they found the Beechcraft 77 Skipper in a marshy area near Leesburg International Airport.

"It's Florida swamp. It's muck and mud up to about your mid-thigh," Leesburg police Sgt. David Robison said. "One of the firefighters actually heard someone yell back, and at that point, we all converged on that location."

Firefighters said they took the pilot and a passenger to a hospital in stable condition.

Police said the pilot and the passenger's injuries do not appear to be life-threatening.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wftv.com




Leesburg Police Department

Both passengers have been transported to Leesburg Regional Medical Center for treatment. We've been in contact with the Federal Aviation Administration and they have an investigator who will be conducting the crash investigation. 
____________

We are currently working a plane crash on Leesburg International Airport property. The small plane has been located in the wood line and Leesburg Fire Department is now working to extricate the two injured passengers. The passengers do not appear to have life-threatening injuries.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N606JA: Accident occurred June 28, 2019 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aguila Aircraft Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N606JA


NTSB Identification: GAA19CA375

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 28, 2019 in Phoenix, AZ
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration: N606JA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Aircraft veered off runway after landing.

Date: 28-JUN-19
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N606JA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA









Friday, June 28th 1800z 

Aircraft bounced on landing and ran into light pole on tie down ramp severing right wing.

Two foreign nationals had minor lacerations.

Phoenix Fire Department did not respond.