Sunday, August 16, 2020

Aerotechnik L-13 SEH Vivat, N334BA: Accident occurred August 16, 2020 at William "Tiny" Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N334BA


Location: Frankenmuth, MI
Accident Number:CEN20CA337
Date & Time: 08/16/2020, 1454 EDT
Registration: N334BA
Aircraft: Evektor Aerotechnik L13
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

According to the pilot, following a landing and back-taxi in a motor glider, he failed to stow the speed brake prior to attempting a subsequent takeoff. During the takeoff attempt, the glider would not climb out of ground effect and departed the end of the runway and impacted terrain, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and serious injuries to both occupants.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot:No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Evektor Aerotechnik
Registration: N334BA
Model/Series: L13 SEH
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 940517
Landing Gear Type:
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: WM 'TINY' ZEHNDER FIELD (66G)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 639 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 43.314167, -83.711389 (est)


FRANKENMUTH, Michigan (WJRT) (08/16/2020)-Developing news out of Frankenmuth where police were on the scene of a powered-glider crash.

ABC 12 was within feet of the crash site, which dug into the ditch at the end of the runway.

Take a look at the scene outside of Frankenmuth just about an hour and a half ago.

Our news team got off the phone with Police Chief Mower, who told ABC 12 there were two people onboard the powered-glider when it crashed on take-off just prior to 3:00 Sunday afternoon, neither of whom were seriously injured.

The pilot, a Clio man in his 50s, is believed to have a potential broken wrist. The passenger, from Birch Run, also in his 50s, is believed to have a problem with his knee.

Police tell ABC 12 the pilot actually dialed 911 when they couldn’t get out of the powered-glider. The Frankenmuth Fire Department had to pull both of them from the cockpit.

A search of the tail number found the powered-glider was registered in Clio and is an Aerotechnik L-13 SEH Vivat.

What exactly happened remains unclear.

ABC 12 is still in touch with police and will bring you all of that information as it develops.

The FAA will launch an investigation to determine what went wrong.

https://www.abc12.com










Frankenmuth Fire Department

Frankenmuth Engine-1, Engine-2, Squad-4 and Brush-7 responded you the Frankenmuth airport around three o’clock this afternoon for a reported plane crash. Upon arrival both patients were stable and had minor injuries. Also on scene were Mobile Medical Response and Frankenmuth Police Department. Please try to avoid the area of Block and Curtis until the FAA and FPD can complete their investigation.


FRANKENMUTH TWP, Michigan – Two people were hospitalized with minor injuries after their powered-glider crashed Sunday afternoon in Frankenmuth Township.

Frankenmuth police and fire were dispatched shortly before 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 16 to William “Tiny” Zehnder Field off South Block Road for a report of a powered-glider crash.

Frankenmuth Fire Chief Phil Kerns said the plane went off the grassy runway, traveling an additional 150 feet before coming to a stop in a four-foot ditch near Block Road.

The two people onboard were middle-age men from western Saginaw County, Kerns said.

A minor extrication by police, fire, and MMR Ambulance was needed to remove both men from the aircraft.

They were transported by MMR Ambulance to a local hospital and were expected to be OK, officials said.

The incident remains under investigation.

Officials have asked residents to avoid the area of South Block and Curtis roads until the Federal Aviation Administration and Frankenmuth Police Department complete their investigation.

https://www.mlive.com

Piper PA-14 Family Cruiser, N91449: Fatal accident occurred August 15, 2020 at Susanville Municipal Airport (KSVE), Lassen County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N91449

Location: Susanville, CA
Accident Number: WPR20LA270
Date & Time: 08/15/2020, 1340 PDT
Registration: N91449
Aircraft: Piper PA 14
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 15, 2020, about 1340 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-14 airplane, N91449, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Susanville, California. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to a friend of the pilot who also witnessed the accident, the pilot, pilot-rated passenger, and him had planned to fly over a landmark in the Nevada desert and then stay overnight in a campground north of Susanville. The friend was in his own airplane, while the pilot and passenger were in the accident airplane. They departed Redding, California about 0930 and flew east, but during cruise flight they chose to discontinue the flyover and make an intermediate stop at Susanville Municipal Airport (SVE), Susanville, California. The friend landed on the airport's only asphalt runway and the accident pilot landed on the dirt runway. After lunch they returned to the airport and boarded their airplanes. The accident airplane's takeoff was not observed. While the witness was taxiing to the asphalt runway, he witnessed the accident airplane about 350 ft above ground level about midfield in a steep left bank angle. The airplane immediately transitioned into a nose down pitch attitude and descended rapidly toward the ground. The friend, a flight instructor, stated that the sequence resembled an aerodynamic stall/spin.

The wreckage came to rest in dirt about 50 ft southwest of runway 11/29 on an eastern heading. (See figure 1) All major structural surfaces were accounted for at the accident site. The initial impact point was marked by left wing navigation light fragments that were in a small dirt impression a few feet north of the main wreckage. The nose and cabin were crushed aft and the propeller blades had separated from the propeller hub. Both wings were deformed, but remained attached to the fuselage. The left wing displayed an upward bend about midspan and the right wing displayed a slight upward bend at the wing root. The tail section remained attached to the airplane and was unremarkable.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Figure 1: Diagram of departure runway and main wreckage location on airport.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N91449
Model/Series: PA 14 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: , 4949 ft msl
Observation Time: 1335 PDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 12000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan File:
Departure Point:  Redding, CA (RDD)
Destination: Susanville, CA (1Q2)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.376667, -120.573056

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Krista Holstrom and Kevin Fore taking a photo in front of an Air Shasta helicopter at the Redding Airport.


Couple Kevin Fore and Krista Holstrom (in the middle) in front of their Piper PA-14 that went down on August 15th.

LASSEN COUNTY, California — A Redding couple was killed after their plane went down in Lassen County on their way back to Redding Saturday.

Family members have identified the fallen pilots as Redding couple, 45-year-old Kevin Fore along with 35-year-old Krista Holstrom.

The couple apparently took off for a day trip from the Redding Airport on August 15th, to Susanville to have lunch with family in the area. They were headed back towards Redding, stopping in Eagle Lake, when their plane went down.

According to a witness the couple was flying about 600 ft. in the air when the engine stalled. The left wing apparently dipped towards the ground and the plane spiraled down.

Fore and Holstrom are both well-experienced pilots and had made this trip several times. They were flying in their Alaskan bush plane when the crash happened.

Witness statements stated the two were killed on impact.

The aviation community lost two well-respected pilots according to friends and fellow pilots.

Holstrom was a flight instructor at the IASCO Flight Training School and a member of the 'Whirly Girls' (International women helicopter pilots).

Fore is owner of Palo Cedro Heating and Air Conditioning in Shasta County.

https://krcrtv.com

Aerotek Pitts S-2B, N600DF: Fatal accident occurred August 16, 2019 near Lakefront Airport (KNEW), Orleans Parish, Louisiana


The family of a New Orleans TV newscaster who was killed in a stunt plane crash a year ago has filed a $23 million lawsuit against the Federal Aviation Administration claiming the agency cleared the aircraft to fly despite allegedly knowing of its history of mechanical problems.

The husband of Nancy Parker, a veteran anchor for Fox affiliate station WVUE-TV, filed the wrongful death lawsuit in U.S. District Court in New Orleans on behalf of himself and their three children.

Parker, 53, and pilot Franklin J.P. Augustus, 69, were killed on August 16th, 2019, when the Aerotek Pitts S-2B aircraft, registered to Drug Fighter LLC, crashed shortly after taking off from New Orleans' Lakefront Airport. Parker and Augustus were the only two people aboard the biplane, which was scheduled to do skywriting stunts, officials said.

Parker's husband, Glen Boyd, claims in the lawsuit that FAA workers were aware of airplane's "lengthy and well-known history of substandard maintenance, mechanical problems and scant flight time" when they cleared the flight for takeoff, according to the lawsuit that was filed on August 6th, 2020.

Despite allegedly knowing of the maintenance and operational problems with the aircraft, "appropriate steps were not taken by FAA officials to ensure [the plane] was airworthy prior to clearing the aircraft for flight," according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit did not specify the maintenance history of the aircraft or cite specific evidence proving the FAA was aware of any alleged history of mechanical problems.

A placard had been placed in the aircraft in November 1983 warning that its smoke skywriting system should only be used on solo flights, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit also states the plane had been modified with a 14-gallon auxiliary fuel tank under the passenger seat in February 1992.

According to the lawsuit, Parker was not notified by the FAA or employees at the Lakefront Airport of the "foreseeable risk of harm to life and limb associated with flying in the aircraft" nor was she advised of the plane's history of mechanical problems prior to boarding the aircraft.

On the day of the crash, the flight was delayed from taking off for several hours because of "mechanical problems with the aircraft engine which negatively impacted engine performance and safety of flight," the lawsuit reads.

Parker, who won multiple Emmy awards as a journalist, was filming a piece on the stunt plane with Augustus to honor the Tuskegee Airmen, a pioneering group of Black pilots who fought in World War II.

Shortly after takeoff, Augustus radioed the Lakefront Airport's air-traffic control tower requesting immediate clearance to return to the airport but did not specify why, according to a preliminary investigative report from the National Transportation Safety Board. As Augustus attempted to return to the airport the plane made a sharp descent and crashed into an open field bursting into flames, according to the NTSB report.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the NTSB. Shortly after the crash, the NTSB said the investigation could taken 12 to 24 months before a determination of probable cause for the crash is issued.

FAA officials declined to comment on the lawsuit.

An initial statement from the FAA said the stunt plane was manufactured in 1983 and "crashed under unknown circumstances" in an empty field about a half-mile south of the Lakefront Airport.

"The NTSB will lead the investigation, and the FAA's investigation will become part of the NTSB's series of reports," the statement reads.

The federal government has 60 days from the date the lawsuit filed to respond, according to court records.

https://abcnews.go.com

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N600DF 

Location: New Orleans, LA
Accident Number: CEN19FA270
Date & Time: 08/16/2019, 1506 CDT
Registration:  N600DF 
Aircraft: Pitts S2
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 16, 2019, about 1506 central daylight time, a Pitts S2B aerobatic airplane, N600DF, registered to Drug Fighter LLC, was destroyed following a forced landing shortly after takeoff from the New Orleans Lakefront Airport (NEW). The commercial pilot and one passenger sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The passenger, who was a TV news anchor, was doing a documentary on the pilot. Part of the documentary was a local flight in the pilot's aerobatic airplane. The takeoff was filmed. The film shows the airplane's run up and takeoff from runway 36R at NEW. Initial review of the film shows the airplane lift off the runway and climb out, then turn to the left toward a downwind. Tower personnel at NEW reported that the pilot requested a return to the airport via radio shortly after takeoff. The pilot did not specify the reason for wanting to return. The tower acknowledged the pilot to return to the airport.

According to witnesses and tower personnel, the airplane was flying on what appeared to be a left downwind toward runway 36, heading south of the airport. The airplane continued flying south and did not return toward the airport. Witnesses observed the airplane in what appeared to be in a steep descent, before impact in an open field about .8 miles south of the airport.

Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane impacted the ground about 45-degrees nose down. A post impact fire consumed most of the airframe. The accident site was documented and the wreckage was transported to a secure facility for detailed examinations of the airframe and engine. A review of the airplane's historical maintenance logs was conducted and no deficiencies were noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pitts
Registration: N600DF
Model/Series: S2 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Drug Fighter LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NEW, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 320°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: New Orleans, LA (NEW)
Destination: New Orleans, LA (NEW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.025556, -90.030000

Van's RV-8, N360JL: Incident occurred August 16, 2020 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft was running, pilot got out to swap out passengers and a passenger hit the throttle and ran into a hangar.

https://registry.faa.gov/N360JL

Date: 16-AUG-20
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N360JL
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 91
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

An experimental aircraft crashed into a hangar Sunday at the Spruce Creek Airport, authorities said.

A dispatch supervisor declined to say what the aircraft crashed into but said it “crashed into something while moving” on the runway at 1990 Hawk's Nest Drive at the Spruce Creek Fly In community near Port Orange around 12:20 p.m.

Authorities said the preliminary reports indicate the plane hit a hangar door at the Spruce Creek Fly-In.

Three people (3) were found walking by the aircraft with minor injuries and they all declined transportation to a hospital, officials said.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the experimental aircraft was built in 2002 and is registered to Stanford D. Williams of Illinois.

Emergency workers arriving on scene reported that the plane had a hole in its door and was leaking fuel, authorities said.

The aircraft had twenty-five (25) gallons of fuel in its tank and about 8 to 10 gallons spilled at the scene of the crash, which a hazardous materials team was called in to contain, emergency dispatchers said.

https://www.news-journalonline.com

A small private plane crashed into the door of a hangar at Spruce Creek Airport on Sunday, according to the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office.

No major injuries were reported, deputies said.

Deputies said the pilot, Stanford Williams, exited the plane and his granddaughter accidentally pushed the stick forward with her foot. The pilot attempted to reenter the plane before it went into circles then crashed into a hangar, deputies said.


https://www.clickorlando.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS G3 Turbo, N949CG: Fatal accident occurred August 16, 2020 near Grand Glaize Airport (K15), Osage Beach, Camden County, Missouri

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.
 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

https://registry.faa.gov/N949CG

Location: Osage Beach, MO
Accident Number: CEN20LA336
Date & Time: 08/16/2020, 1320 CDT
Registration: N949CG
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries:2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 16, 2020, about 1320 central daylight time (CDT), a Cirrus SR22, N949CG, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Osage Beach, Missouri. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Witnesses observed the flight preparing to depart Grand Glaize-Osage Beach Airport (K15), Missouri, for a cross country flight. The pilot was observed "flooding the engine" during startup to the point fuel was observed coming out of the engine cowling and down the nose wheel. Black smoke was seen coming out of the engine compartment after the engine started and before the airplane taxied. The flight was seen conducting a run up prior to takeoff. Black smoke was seen coming from the left side of the engine compartment during takeoff and several witnesses said the engine did not sound normal. The pilot reported on the CTAF frequency that he was returning to the airport. The airplane was seen to enter a left turn back to the airport at about 100 ft above the trees and then descend steeply into the ground. The airplane wreckage was mostly consumed by post-impact fire. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N949CG
Model/Series: SR22 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Osage Beach, MO (K15)
Destination: Fairfield, IA (FFL)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.106944, -92.672500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Scott Lowe

Amy Lowe





























MT. PLEASANT — Whether it was saving the town’s movie theater or creating new housing units downtown, Scott and Amy Lowe always kept the Mt. Pleasant community’s best interest in mind.

“When I think of Scott and Amy, they’re the epitome of Mt. Pleasant people — incredibly kind and good to work with,” Kristi Perry, executive director of the Mt. Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, said.

The Lowes were killed Sunday afternoon when their small plane crashed and exploded near Grand Glaize Airport in central Missouri. The couple were the only people on board the plane when it crashed and no other injuries were reported, according to a news release from the City of Osage Beach.

The Lowes were in the southern state to celebrate a 55th wedding anniversary with Scott’s parents, Tom and Betty.

Perry worked closely with the Lowes when the couple owned Main Street Cinemas, now the Temple Theatre. The couple were finalists for the Chamber’s Small Business of the Year award in 2015.

“They were true family people as well. A lot of Mt. Pleasant people will miss them,” Perry added.

Lisa Oetken, director of Main Street, said the couple were “great community members,” and “did a lot for downtown.”

One of their biggest contributions included buying and renovating the town’s theater, which the Lowes purchased in late-2011, according to Oetken. The couple later sold the theater to Eisentraut Theatres in the summer of 2019.

“If they hadn’t purchased and saved the theater for us, we would have lost it. They remodeled the whole building and created the loft apartments above it,” Oetken said. In total, the couple added 11 new upper story housing units to the town.

The Lowes also purchased and renovated a building on the west side of the square where antique store The Vintage Raven now sits.

Sam Riepe, co-owner of the store and Scott’s high school classmate in Mt. Pleasant Community High School’s Class of 1989, said the couple were instrumental in helping the business navigate and stay afloat during the pandemic.

“They were great landlords for us, in particular with everything going on. They were really helpful and supportive,” Riepe said.

Riepe recalled ways the couple tried to give back to the community, including running kids movies at reduced prices when they owned the theater.

“It’s really heartbreaking. Scott was an avid pilot. I don’t know if he owned his own plane, but he told me how much he enjoyed flying. He had a job where he had to fly a lot and he enjoyed being able to do it himself,” Riepe added. At the time of their deaths, Scott worked as the senior vice president of sales at Dansons and Amy was the executive vice president of Packers Sanitation Services.

A witness reported seeing the plane crash and explode in a wooded area, according to KMIZ TV in Columbia, Mo.

“This plane was kind of acting odd, and then all the sudden it just kinda went up and rolled over then went straight down, then I took off running down there,” Alan Blair told the TV station.

He said he saw an explosion before he could get to the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have taken over the investigation.

Jen Schwartz, a family friend of the Lowes, remembers being included in the family at a time when her home life was not especially good.

Schwartz said she was “taken under [Tom Lowe’s] wing” as a high schooler when Tom served as the Mt. Pleasant Community High School principal. She added that his children, including Scott, were “just as sweet to her.”

When Schwartz’s daughter was looking for her first apartment, Scott and Amy would become her first landlords.

“I was nervous even though I live in New London, and she would be here [in town]. They told me ‘Don’t worry, we’ll take care of her,’” Schwartz said.

“I’m going to miss seeing them walk around, asking me ‘How are the kids?’ We all spent time with them,” she said.

https://www.southeastiowaunion.com


CAMDEN COUNTY, Missouri (KY3) - Two people have died from an afternoon plane crash near the Grand Glaize Airport in Osage Beach.

The victims have been identified as Scott and Amy Lowe of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, according to a news release from the city of Osage Beach.

The plane crashed around 1:30 p.m. near Sleepy Hollow Road.

Local police secured the area until the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board can investigate. Deputy Chief Steve Lucas with the Osage Beach Fire District tells us that the investigation could take awhile because of where the plane crashed.

“It’s in a wooded, very steep hilly area, not easily accessible,” said Lucas. “There’s a lot of destruction to the plane. From what we can tell we found remnants of two individuals. At this time the identities are not known. The registration of the aircraft is unknown at this time, it burned up quite a bit.”

It’s unknown how long the recovery efforts will take once the location is deemed safe for crews to access the area. Officers are still on scene awaiting the arrival of the National Transportation Safety Board.


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will take over the investigation upon arrival. The Osage Beach Police Department, Camden County Sheriff’s Office, Missouri Highway Patrol and other local authorities assisted with the investigation.

https://www.ky3.com

OSAGE BEACH, Missouri — Two people were killed when the airplane they were flying in crashed near Grand Glaize Airport in Osage Beach, Missouri, Sunday.

A news release from the city of Osage Beach said police officers were called out to the airport at around 1:35 p.m. for a report of a crash. When they arrived, they found the plane crashed in the area of Sleepy Hollow Road, less than a mile from the small airport.

Police said both of the people inside the plane at the time of the crash were killed. They were identified as Scott and Amy Lowe of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were called to the scene. They will take over the investigation.

https://www.ksdk.com

OSAGE BEACH — A plane crash killed two people near the Grand Glaize Airport Sunday in Osage Beach.

According to a press release, Osage Beach Police Department responded to the crash site near Sleepy Hollow Road around 1:37.

Officials said the single-engine plane went down in a wooded area.

There were 2 people onboard when it crashed.

The two inside the plane were identified as Scott and Amy Lowe of Mt Pleasant, Iowa.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.  

The Osage Beach Police Department was assisted by the Osage Beach Ambulance Service, Osage Beach Fire Protection District, Missouri State Highway Patrol, and Camden County Sheriff’s Office.

https://krcgtv.com

OSAGE BEACH, Missouri — Two people died in a plane crash in Osage Beach during the afternoon hours of Sunday, August 16th.

Osage Beach officials released a statement saying the crash occurred around 1:30 p.m. near Sleepy Hollow Road.

The two people onboard the plane both died. Officials identified them as Scott and Amy Lowe of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.

According to Osage Beach officials, officers are currently awaiting the arrival of the National Transportation Safety Board.

There is no word yet on what caused the crash.

This crash is currently an ongoing investigation.




OSAGE BEACH, Missouri - Authorities are investigating a plane crash in Osage Beach.

According to a press release, the Osage Beach Police Department received calls of a plane crash at Grand Glaize Airport around 1:30 p.m.

Police found the site of the crash near Sleepy Hollow Road.

Police say two people were onboard the plane at the time of the crash, and both were killed. They have identified the victims as Scott and Amy Lowe of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.

Emergency services were still at the scene investigating as of 6 p.m. on Sunday.

Osage Beach Police Department was assisted by the Osage Beach Ambulance Service, Osage Beach Fire Protection District, Missouri State Highway Patrol, and Camden County Sheriff’s Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been contacted and will take over the scene and investigation.

The crash happened in a wooded area near residential areas. Alan Blair lives right next to the woods where the plane crashed and saw it going down while mowing his lawn.

"This plane was kind of acting odd, and then all the sudden it just kinda went up and rolled over then went straight down, then I took off running down there," Blair said.

He said he saw an explosion before he could get down to the plane.

"I made one circle around the plane and then a bigger one just trying, hoping someone got thrown clear, but that just wasn't meant to happen," Blair said.

When he called the authorities, he said the line was tied up so he figured plenty of people had also called in the crash. He said the fire and rescue team and police showed up about 10 minutes later.

"There was nothing I could do. I just backed off and waited for someone to get there just to see if they needed anything," Blair said. "It was obvious there wasn't going to be any survivors from that, from what I saw."

Blair mentioned how heartbroken he feels for the families of the two people who lost their lives in the crash.

Police on the scene could not provide any additional information. Officers did not allow reporters near the site of the crash, saying it was on private property.

https://www.abc17news.com


Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N2510H: Accident occurred August 15, 2020 at Chandler Field Airport (KAXN), Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N2510H

Location: Brandon, MN
Accident Number: CEN20LA343
Date & Time: 08/15/2020, 1307 CDT
Registration: N2510H
Aircraft: Piper PA18
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 15, 2020, about 1307 central daylight time, a Piper PA18, N2510H, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Brandon, Minnesota. The airline transport pilot and 1 passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, he was taking off to the north from his private grass runway. The engine lost power shortly after the airplane became airborne. He contemplated landing on the remaining runway as he thought that the engine regained normal power. Due to the length of runway, he elected to continue the takeoff, but because of the obstacles at the departure end of the runway, he turned the airplane to the east towards a cut wheat field. While maneuvering toward the field, the landing gear struck a steel post attached to a fence in the field. The airplane came to rest upright in the field. After the occupants exited, a post crash fire consumed the airplane.

Figure 1. Airplane Wreckage after Post Crash Fire.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck the steel post about 4-ft above the ground. The airplane came to rest about 150 ft from the impact with the post. Evidence at the site showed that the airplane rotated about 90° to the right before it struck the ground. Although a post impact fire consumed most of the airplane, all flight control continuities were confirmed. Due to the extensive fire damage, the engine could not be rotated and a detailed examination was not possible.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N2510H
Model/Series: PA18 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXN, 1411 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:23°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Brandon, MN
Destination: Brandon, MN

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 45.965278, -95.598611 (est)





The pilot of a Piper PA-18 Super Cub and his teenage passenger escaped serious injury Saturday after a crash 1 mile east of Brandon.

According to the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, dispatch received a report at 1:07 p.m. that a light aircraft had crashed near 13393 Aldrich Road N.W.


The pilot was 53-year-old Paul Charles Erickson while the passenger was 15-year-old Alicia Allison Erickson. 


Erickson told deputies that he was attempting to takeoff and experienced momentary engine failure. During his attempt to land he struck a small pole and some brush at the end of the grass runway.


The plane immediately started on fire but the two Alexandria residents were able to exit the aircraft. The pilot was uninjured. His passenger sustained a small burn on her leg. Both were evaluated at the scene by North Ambulance personnel and released without transport.


Also at the scene was the Brandon Fire Department.


The cause of the crash is under investigation by the FAA and the NTSB.



https://www.fergusfallsjournal.com

Douglas County Sheriff's Office
NEWS RELEASE
Case Number: 20009311

Date, Time Reported: 08/15/20, 1:07 pm

Location: 13393 Aldrich Rd NW, Brandon Minnesota

Pilot: Paul Charles Erickson Age : 53

Alexandria, Minnesota

Passenger: Alicia Allison Erickson Age: 15

Alexandria, Minnesota

On 08/15/20 at approximately 1:07 pm, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office received a report of an aircraft that had crashed and was now on fire. 


All occupants were out of the plane and not requesting medical assistance.


The plane, piloted by Paul Erickson, was a Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub. 


Erickson stated that he was attempting a takeoff and experienced momentary engine failure. He then attempted to land and struck a small pole and brush at the end of the grass runway. 


The plane came to rest and immediately started on fire. Erickson and his passenger were able to exit. 


Paul was uninjured and Alicia sustained a small burn to her leg. 


Both were evaluated on scene by ambulance personnel and released without transport.


The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the FAA and NTSB.


Responding to the scene to assist: Brandon Fire Department and North Ambulance.


Sgt. Paul Trautman, #236

Douglas County Sheriff's Office