Saturday, August 26, 2017

Washington specialty license plate for aviation buffs



Now available: Aviation enthusiasts can order the first ever Washington Aviation Specialty License Plate. 

Purchases may be made online by visiting the Washington State Department of Licensing or by visiting your local vehicle licensing office.

The initial cost is $40 for the actual plate + annual tab fees and other specialty license plate production fees.

Renewals are $30 for the renewal of the plate + annual tab fees and other specialty license plate production fees.

You can find out the total cost by contacting your local vehicle licensing office.

$28 from each plate purchase will support aviation-specific initiatives.

More information

Marines use Kinston Regional Jetport (KISO) for ’Realistic Urban Training”



The training was real. The location was fictitious.

Residents living near or around the Kinston Regional Jetport inside the N.C. Global Transpark may have heard an inordinate amount of the “sounds of freedom” emanating from the airspace above Stallings Field Friday evening or perhaps saw unusual activity in the natural areas surrounding the enormous 11,500-foot runway for several days last week.

Kinston was not being “cased” for an eminent invasion. But a make-believe-region called “Amberland” — with similarities almost exact to the Lenoir County’s largest town — was the target of the Camp Lejeune-based Marines. The Navy has taken the map of the United States from east of the Mississippi and removed state names and boundaries and replaced it with arbitrary borders and a set of least a dozen fictitious names coined after minerals, resins and natural deposits.

The 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit conducted a “Realistic Urban Training” (RUT) exercise at Kinston Regional Jetport Friday evening.

“The RUT is part of a pre-deployment training program that is designed to test and evaluate the MEU’s ability to plan and execute a variety of missions from combat operations to humanitarian aid,” said 1st Lt. Marco A. Valenzuela II MEF Public Affairs Officer. Valenzuela said Marines “use off-base facilities” such as Kinston’s Jetport because it “forces units to train in a new and unfamiliar environment that mimics what they might encounter while deployed.”

Plans for Friday’s exercise began in 2016 when staff from the Expeditionary Operations Training Group ll Marine Expeditionary Force began searching for suitable off-base locations to use to train troops during their work-up to deployments overseas. Initially, the Naval Criminal Investigative Service had plans to do a mock raid at Kinston’s airport but because of its unique features and close proximity to Camp Lejeune it was decided to use it for a Marine Corps drill. That drill was Aug. 25.

Ronald A. Jones, director of MAGTF Live Exercises, who was on hand Friday evening leading a presentation which would outline the night’s maneuvers to a small gathering of local citizens including Lenoir County Commissioner J. Mac Daughety, said Kinston was chosen for its “layout and geometry.” Planners also liked Kinston’s proximity to Camp Lejeune from where the 50 or so Marines used in the exercise embarked and New River Air Base from which the Tilt-rotor and rotor aircraft departed.

“We need a raid site with contiguous green space,” Jones said.

Prior to Friday’s simulated raid in which two CH-53 Super Stallions landed on the airport’s tarmac where two contingents of Marines wearing night-vision goggles breached buildings on either side of the passenger terminal and gathered intelligence material and insurgents, scenario planners embedded Marine snipers and observers in natural areas surrounding the airfield on Aug. 23 while young Marines acting as role-playing passengers relaxing inside an airport terminal created an air of real-life activity inside the waiting areas. Intelligence gathered by the observers was channeled back to command and used to fine tune the Friday raid. Close by residents were also informed about the exercise weeks in advance and as nightfall arrived Friday evening officers with the Lenoir County Sheriff’s Office manned entrance points to the airport.

“We had a couple of deputies out there but we didn’t have any incidents. Everything went smoothly,” said LCSO Maj. Ryan Dawson.

To keep the scenarios fresh and challenging to Marines in training, the need arises to move off base from where many “troops know every bump in the road or which doorway to enter after training in the same areas,” Jones said. While he travels the country he picks up marketing collateral from local businesses than uses them as props.

“We place collateral material around the airport such as Chinese restaurant menus from out-of-state or business cards from flight schools,” Jones said. These pieces of evidence when collected by the raiding party are then brought back to build a bigger picture by developing a broader picture allowing troops to begin connecting the dots on insurgents their training to eliminate.

Marines will be back at Kinston Jetport — tentatively scheduled on Oct. 17 — for a mass casualty event, according to Jones.

“Kinston has offered the world and didn’t take anything back,” Jones said. Both Jones and Barkes said the U.S. Department of Defense reimburses the State of North Carolina for expenses incurred in the use of the Kinston facility but neither one knew the dollar amount budgeted for the exercise.

N.C. Global Transpark Airport Director Rick W. Barkes said “we try to accommodate as best we can. We can take large fixed wing aircraft and rotorcraft as well.”

Barkes said even planes from the Presidential fleet based at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington, D.C. uses Kinston’s runways — the longest runways in the state — for take offs and landings of the Boeing 747.

The few local residents who were hand when the troops landed were impressed though visibility was limited and most of the troop action occurred out of sight yet a few explosions detonated to breach a doorway were audible to those standing outside what used to be the departing terminal gate.

“Being a former Vietnam Veteran, you love to see the logistics of the military executed. Anything we can do to help the military, we‘re here as is Onslow and Craven counties. It’s all regional. We have to remember, our two biggest employers are military and agriculture so we’re blessed in eastern North Carolina that we got both,” Daughety said.

The youngest observer in the terminal Friday night was seven-year-old Keegan Wilson who was brought to the event by his father Lance, on works at the Global Transpark, and his mother, Talitha.

“I thought I was going to be a little scared but I wanted to see it,” Keegan said.

Jones gave Keegan an EOTG shirt for his fearlessness.

The practice raid began at 9 p.m. and concluded an hour later.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kinston.com

Police hogtie airplane passenger, carry him away



LOS ANGELES (Fox 32 News) - An airplane passenger was hogtied and arrested at Los Angeles International Airport on Saturday morning.

The man had apparently locked himself inside the restroom of American Airlines flight #362 to Chicago. He refused to come out, and thus all the other passengers were removed from the plane.

The restroom door was forced open by police.

The man, Collin Welk of Elizabethtown, Penn., was booked on charges of public intoxication and resisting arrest.

Passengers were later allowed back on the plane and left for Chicago without further incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox32chicago.com

Record year for fire retardant at Redmond Air Tanker Base: Planes used locally include super-sized DC-10

Central Oregon fire managers have set a new record this season, loading more than 1.3 million gallons of fire retardant at the Redmond Air Tanker Base.

Kassidy Kern, spokeswoman with the Deschutes National Forest, said planes loaded with the retardant chemical have flown 537 missions this year, dropping their payloads on fires across Central and Eastern Oregon.

Kern said the bulk of the retardant was used on the region’s larger fires — the Cinder Butte fire between Bend and Burns, the Nena Springs Fire on the Warm Springs Reservation, and the Whychus Fire and the still-burning Milli Fire near Sisters.

The prior record of 1.2 million gallons was set in 2002, the year the Biscuit Fire burned nearly 500,000 acres in Southern Oregon and Northern California. On average over the past 10 years, the tanker base has gone through 640,000 gallons a year, Kern said.

More retardant has been brought in to Redmond for the remainder of the fire season, but retardant-dropping planes have been grounded in recent days due to the heavy smoke in the region.

Retardant is primarily water, with the dry component brought in and mixed with water at the Redmond Air Tanker Base. The nonwater portion of the mixture is about 15 percent of its total weight and consists primarily of fertilizer, Jennifer Jones of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, said, along with chemicals to encourage even disbursement and colorant to allow firefighters to better see where it has been applied.

Fertilizer-based retardant can be highly toxic to fish and other aquatic life, Jones said, and the Forest Service has developed maps in order to avoid dropping retardant within 300 feet of a waterway or body of water or in areas with sensitive land-dwelling species. In the event of a fire that presents a pressing threat to human life, a fire manager can request retardant drops in areas where such drops would otherwise be avoided.

The Forest Service uses three different categories of planes to drop retardant, classified by the size of the payload they can carry. The smallest carry less than 1,000 gallons per mission, while the typical retardant plane carries a payload of between 3,000 and 5,000 gallons.

The biggest planes in the fleet, the VLAT — for Very Large Air Tanker — can carry upward of 8,000 gallons of retardant but are too large for the runway at the Redmond Airport. Tanker bases in Medford and Moses Lake, Washington, serve the largest planes when they fly missions in the Northwest.

Jones said because planes depositing long red plumes of retardant are one of the most visible aspects of fighting wildfires, observers often have misconceptions about their role in fighting fires.

Retardant is used on less than 10 percent of fires, and the Forest Service’s fleet of more than 100 water-dropping helicopters does many more flights than the 28 air tankers in service.

Although the retardant plume released by an air tanker resembles the discharge from a home fire extinguisher, it serves a different function. Jones said retardant is not particularly effective in knocking down flames but is instead dropped in the predicted path of the fire. Vegetation soaked with retardant will still burn, she said, but it burns cooler and slower, giving firefighters on the ground more time to dig lines with bulldozers, chainsaws and shovels.

Kern and Jones both said there’s been no change in firefighting tactics leading to the boost in retardant use this year, and that the decision to call in retardant drops rests with the on-the-ground fire managers.

“Aerial resources are great to have, they really are, but a fire will be won on the ground,” Kern said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.bendbulletin.com

People's drones are putting Hurricane Harvey rescue crews at risk





People may be tempted to fly a drone over the damage left by Hurricane Harvey. Officials say these drones are posing an extreme risk to crews on rescue missions.

The Texas Military Department says they have seen civilian drones that pose danger to their rescue pilots and crews.

A "Temporary Flight Restriction" is in effect for some areas near Corpus Christi, banning the use of private drones. However, the FAA warns drone pilots that even if there is not a TFR, they can face fines and put first responders at risk.

Drone laws vary city-to-city, county-to-county, but drone pilots should not fly drones in disaster areas.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.kens5.com

Huntsville, Alabama: Drone contractor to provide services to Huntsville Utilities

Huntsville contractor Avion Unmanned recently announced it is providing drone services to Huntsville Utilities.

According to a press release, the partnership should lead to a reduction in the level of risk and agency costs associated with the inspection of power poles, line connections and associated equipment that is typically inspected using aerial vehicles (bucket trucks) or by the physical means of climbing a pole.

“Huntsville Utilities has been formally trained by Avion Unmanned UAS instructors on the proper, legal and safe use of aerial drones covering topics like aerodynamics, airspace, aviation weather, emergency operations, privacy, flight basics and most importantly, safety,” said a press release from Avion Unmanned.

Huntsville Utilities recently obtained a Certificate of Authorization from the FAA that typically takes agencies months to acquire. With Avion’s support, it has taken only a few weeks to gain access to the FAAs submission portal, and only four days to complete the approval process.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.enewscourier.com

John Glenn Columbus International Airport (KCMH), Ohio: Southwest flight makes safe emergency landing after 'wheel issue'




COLUMBUS -- Columbus firefighters are still on scene at John Glenn Columbus International Airport as a plane with a wheel issue landed safely.

According to the Columbus Fire Department, there was a 737 circling the airport. Multiple fire departments awaited the landing on the tarmac and are still on scene.

Southwest Flight 2803, bound for Fort Lauderdale, left the airport successfully, according to Manager of Communications for the Columbus Regional Airport Authority Angie Tabor, but tire remnants were found on the runway.

"Out of an abundance of caution, we called the plane back," Tabor said. According to Tabor there were 127 people on board.

According to Tabor, there was a chunk of one of the tires on the front landing gear missing, but it was still inflated.

The plane originally departed at 3:12 p.m. and landed safely about 4:40 p.m. in Columbus. No injuries were reported.

This statement from Southwest Airlines was sent to WBNS by Melissa Ford:

"Southwest Airlines Flight 2803, enroute from Columbus, Ohio to Fort Lauderdale, experienced a tire issue in the main landing gear during takeoff. Our pilots became aware and the decision was made to return to Columbus, where the aircraft landed safely and taxied to the gate to deplane the 127 Customers onboard. Each component of the landing gear is designed with redundant, multiple tires, and our pilots are trained to handle these types of landings. We apologize for the inconvenience to the customers onboard. The safety of our crew and customers is our top priority."

A new aircraft will be landing soon in Columbus to take customers to Fort Lauderdale, and they are expected to arrive about 4 hours behind schedule.

Story and video ➤ http://www.10tv.com

Cessna 175B Skylark, N8284T: Aransas County Airport (RKP), Rockport, Texas


http://registry.faa.gov/N8284T

A light plane sits upside done at Rockport Airport after heavy damage when Hurricane Harvey hit Rockport, Texas on August 26, 2017. 

Read more here ➤ http://www.wltx.com

Van's RV-8, N628GR: Incident occurred August 21, 2017 in South Carolina




http://registry.faa.gov/N628GR

Engine case cracked --> engine seizure.

Read much more here ➤ http://www.vansairforce.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, N8740E: Accident occurred July 19, 2015 near Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Clark County, Nevada



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada 
Piper Aircraft Inc; Chino Hills, California 
Lycoming Engines; Phoenix, Arizona 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8740E 


NTSB Identification: WPR15LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 19, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N8740E
Injuries: 4 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT
On July 19, 2015, about 1320 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28-181, N8740E, collided with terrain minutes after departing Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. The private pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane was destroyed by a postaccident fire. The airplane was registered to the private pilot, and operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated from Las Vegas about 1330, and was destined for San Diego, California.

The pilot reported that the takeoff seemed normal, but once airborne the airplane's climb was "sluggish" and the engine's rpm's at 200-300 rpm lower than normal. He was able to maintain straight and level flight about 300 feet above ground level (agl). When the pilot made a left-hand turn in an attempt to return to the airport, the airplane immediately began to lose altitude. The pilot selected a landing site, and executed a forced landing into an open area associated with a construction site. During the landing sequence into uneven terrain, the landing gear was torn off, and the airplane caught fire. As soon as the airplane came to rest, the front passenger door was opened and the occupants evacuated the airplane. The airplane was consumed by the postaccident fire.

The tower controller at Henderson Airport reported that the airplane appeared to not be climbing normally after takeoff, and he cleared the pilot to make any maneuvers necessary to return to the airport if he desired. A witness reported that he observed the airplane takeoff and struggle to gain altitude; it then made a left turn followed by a steep bank turn and crashed. The airplane crashed into an open construction site and the occupants egressed the airplane before it was completely engulfed in fire.

The airplane's official weight and balance record was contained in the airplanes maintenance records. Using information from a PA-28-181 Pilot's Operating Handbook, the following was used to estimate expected airplane performance. The pilot reported having 30 gallons (180 lbs) of fuel onboard at the time of takeoff, and the estimated combined weight of all the occupants was 770 lbs. The empty weight of the airplane was 1502.5 lbs. and the listed maximum gross weight is 2,550 lbs. The calculated weight of the airplane at takeoff was 2,452.5 lbs. The airport elevation is 2,492 ft mean sea level (msl), the temperature was 33 C, and the pressure altitude was 30.10 inHg. The calculated density altitude for those conditions was 5,014 ft. Utilizing the climb performance chart for a PA-28-181 for these conditions resulted in an expected rate-of-climb of 520 feet per minute.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was performed on February 25, 2015, at a total airframe time of 4,040 hours. The mechanic who performed the annual inspection stipulated in the airframe logbook that the carburetor heat control bracket required repair, and that the number 2 navigation radio head required a placard indicating the radio was inoperative. Once those repairs had been made by an A&P mechanic then the entry stated, "this aircraft will be airworthy & ok for return to service." The A&P mechanic who performed the annual inspection stated to the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) that he did perform the engine static rpm check as part of the annual inspection, during which he noticed that the rpm was 10% to 20% below normal. He attributed that reduction in rpm to the loose carburetor heat door which could allow the carb heat to be in an unknown position. Maintenance records obtained from First Flight Corp, San Diego, CA, documented that the carburetor heat bracket was repaired on March 5, 2015.

The engine, a Lycoming O-360-A4A, capable of producing 180-hp, was overhauled on October 6, 1986, and had accumulated 1,461 hours since the overhaul. The airplane and engine had accumulated a total of approximately 150.4 hours over the 10 years preceding the accident.

On July 23, 2015, the engine was examined by a technical representative of Lycoming under the oversight of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. During the examination, the top spark plugs were removed, examined, and photographed. The crankshaft was rotated by hand utilizing the propeller. The crankshaft was free and easy to rotate in both directions. "Thumb" compression was observed in proper order on all four cylinders. The complete valve train was observed to operate in proper order. Clean, uncontaminated oil was observed at all four rocker box areas. Investigators noted that each of the intake valve rockers exhibited limited movement estimated to be about 50% less than normal. The intake valves of opposing cylinders share a common cam lobe. To facilitate further internal examination, holes were drilled through the top of the engine case material in-line with the rotational plane of each connecting rod. A lighted borescope was inserted to visualize each of the cam lobes at the respective cylinder position. Visual examination confirmed signatures of excessive wear on the intake cam lobes. Mechanical continuity was established throughout the rotating group, valve train and accessory section during hand rotation of the crankshaft. The bottom spark plugs were not removed. The combustion chamber of each cylinder was examined through the spark plug holes utilizing a lighted borescope. The combustion chambers remained mechanically undamaged, and there was no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The valves were intact and undamaged. There was no evidence of valve to piston face contact observed.

The left and right magnetos remained securely clamped at their respective mounting pads and had been thermally damaged due to the effects of the post impact ground fire. The ignition harness was secure at each magneto. The magnetos were removed for examination. The magnetos sustained varying degrees of thermal damage that rendered the unit inoperative and therefore, could not be functionally tested. Magneto to engine timing could not be ascertained.

There was no oil residue observed in the exhaust system gas path. There was significant ductile bending of the exhaust system components. The exhaust system was found free of obstructions.

A subsequent teardown examination of the engine was conducted September 01, 2015, under the oversight of the NTSB investigator-in-charge. The engine was completely disassembled. The cylinder(s) combustion chambers and barrels remained mechanically undamaged, and there was no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The valves were intact and undamaged. There was no evidence of valve to piston face contact observed. The pistons were intact. The ring assemblies at each piston were intact and free to rotate within their respective ring land. Mechanical continuity of the rotating group and internal mechanisms were established visually during the disassembly and examination of the engine. The accessory gears including the crankshaft gear, bolt and dowel were intact and remained undamaged by any pre-impact malfunction. There was no evidence of lubrication depravation found. The crankshaft and attached connecting rods remained free of heat distress. The valve tappet faces exhibited significant spalling damage.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin SB301B, dated February 18, 1977 provides guidance for maintenance procedures and service limitations for valves. In particular Paragraph 1,(b) states "Rotate the engine by hand and check to determine that all cylinders have normal lift and that rockers arms operate normally" a 400 hour inspection interval. The logbooks did not contain any record of a camshaft lobe inspection, camshaft replacement or compliance with this SB.

According to Lycoming Engines Service Instruction SI1009AW "Recommended Time Between Overhaul Periods" the subject engine should be overhauled at 2,000 hour intervals or before the twelfth year, whichever occurs first.

Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin SB480E provides guidance when inspecting oil system screens and filters for contamination during inspection cycles.







NTSB Identification: WPR15LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 19, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N8740E
Injuries: 4 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2015, about 1330 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28-181, N8740E, impacted terrain minutes after departing Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. The private pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane was destroyed by a post accident fire. The airplane was registered to the pilot, and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated from Las Vegas about 1330, and was destined for San Diego, California.

The controller at Henderson tower reported that the airplane appeared to not be climbing normally after takeoff, and he cleared the pilot to make any maneuvers necessary to return to the airport if he desired. A witness reported that he observed the airplane takeoff and struggle to gain altitude; it then made a left turn followed by a steep bank turn and crashed. The airplane crashed into a open construction site and the occupants egressed the airplane before it was completely engulfed in fire.

Piper PA-22-135, N8195C: Fatal accident occurred July 02, 2015 in Carey, Blaine County, Idaho

Neil “Spud” Wright MacNichol 





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho
Piper Aircraft Corporation; Lakeland, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Neil W. MacNichol: http://registry.faa.gov/N8195C



NTSB Identification: WPR15FA206
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 02, 2015 in Carey, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/09/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-135, registration: N8195C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot stopped at an intermediate airport during a cross-country personal flight, and added 22 gallons of fuel to the airplane. The family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT). The wreckage was located the following day.

On site examination by FAA inspectors indicated that the airplane was intact when it hit the ground in a nose low attitude with a rotational component.

The toxicology report contained findings for ethanol detected in the lung, heart, and blood. N-propanol was detected in heart, lung, and blood. The report noted putrefaction. The NTSB's medical officer noted that ethanol is the type of alcohol present in beer, wine, and liquor, and can cause impairment at low doses. Generally, the rapid distribution of ethanol throughout the body after ingestion leads to similar levels in different tissues. A small amount of ethanol can be produced in tissues by microbial action post mortem, often in conjunction with other alcohols such as N-propanol, acetone, and methanol. With the information available, it was not possible to determine how much, if any, of the identified ethanol was from ingestion.

Examination of the wreckage revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airframe or engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Undetermined because examination of the airplane wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 2, 2015, at an undetermined time, a Piper PA22-135 airplane, N8195C, collided with terrain near Carey, Idaho. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight departed Malad City Airport (MLD), Malad City, Idaho, about 1105 mountain daylight time with a planned destination of Stanley, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot originated the flight from the Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah; he then stopped at MLD, and added 22 gallons of fuel to the airplane.

A SPOT device, which is a handheld GPS tracking device that uses a satellite network enabling text messaging and GPS tracking services, was present on the airplane. Records from the satellite messaging provider contained four data points on July 2, including a test point at 0814:57 MDT was near CNY; a test point at 0959:11 about 23 nautical miles (nm) east of Ogden, Utah; a test point at 1046:14 was in the ramp area of MLD; and a final test point at 1214:36 about 13 nm southwest of the wreckage location.

An iPhone 5c that was found in the wreckage was examined. The pilot sent a text message at 1122:07 indicating his estimated time of arrival at Stanley would be 2 hours later. When the pilot did not arrive in Stanley when he was expected, the family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice at 1907. The Civil Air Patrol located the wreckage at 1018 on July 3.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The first identified point of contact was a principal impact crater (PIC) that was several feet in diameter with narrow ground scars extending in opposite directions from the center. The propeller was separated from the engine, and was partially buried in the PIC. A lens cap cover and red lens fragments were found at the end of the narrow ground scar farthest from the main wreckage. The main wreckage was upright, about 50 ft away from the PIC, and oriented perpendicular to the narrow ground scars with the nose pointing toward the PIC. Due to the condition of the wreckage, FAA inspectors were unable to establish flight control continuity.

There was a black liquid stain that led to the oil cooler.

The engine was under the cabin area, which was severely crushed and deformed.

The right wing remained in its position, but had sustained heavy aft crush damage.

The left wing had rotated about 70° clockwise from its position.

The airframe had buckled 90° down immediately forward of the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer, and twisted 90° counterclockwise. The trailing edges of the left elevator and rudder were on the ground; the outboard half of the right elevator and horizontal stabilizer were above the right wing. The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Blaine County Coroner conducted an autopsy of the pilot, and the cause of death was reported as blunt force trauma.

Toxicology testing of the specimens from the pilot by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Science's Research Laboratory were negative for carbon monoxide and tested drugs.

The testing detected 64 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in lung, 62 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in heart, and 61 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol in blood. N-propanol was detected in heart, lung, and blood. The report noted that putrefaction of the specimens had occurred.

Ethanol is the type of alcohol present in beer, wine, and liquor, and can cause impairment at low doses. Generally, the rapid distribution of ethanol throughout the body after ingestion leads to similar levels in different tissues. A small amount of ethanol can be produced in tissues by postmortem microbial action, often in conjunction with other alcohols such as N-propanol, acetone, and methanol.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA206
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 02, 2015 in Carey, ID
Aircraft: PIPER PA 22-135, registration: N8195C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On July 2, 2015, at an undetermined time, a Piper PA22-135, N8195C, collided with terrain near Carey, Idaho. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed during the accident sequence. The cross-country personal flight departed Moab, Utah, at 1726 mountain daylight time with a planned destination of Stanley, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.


The family reported the airplane overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT) at 1907 MDT.


The Civil Air Patrol informed the FAA at 1018 MDT on July 3 that they had located the wreckage.


FAA inspectors from the Boise, Idaho, Flight Standards District Office examined the wreckage on scene. They reported that the propeller had separated in the principal impact crater; the main wreckage was less than 50 feet away.


The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for a follow-up examination.

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N88F: Accident occurred December 04, 2015 at Millville Municipal Airport (KMIV), Cumberland County, New Jersey



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N88F




NTSB Identification: ERA16LA061 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 04, 2015 in Millville, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24, registration: N88F
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2015, about 1245 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-24-250, N88F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Millville, New Jersey. The private pilot/owner incurred minor injuries and the flight instructor was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey, about 1245, and was destined for South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilots, they had flown the airplane earlier in the day with no anomalies noted. Then, after a brief break, the private pilot/owner of the airplane completed a preflight inspection and engine run up with no anomalies noted. Then, they departed runway 32. After takeoff, about 150 feet above ground level, the private pilot/owner retracted the landing gear, and then the engine experienced a total loss of power. The private pilot/owner lowered the nose and noted that the airplane was "too low and fast to try a restart." He elected to land the airplane straight ahead between two taxiways on the airport. The airplane impacted a grassy area and sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left and right fuel tanks contained an undetermined amount of fuel, and no debris was noted in the fuel. All three propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, exhibited chordwise scratching, and were bent in the aft direction.

An examination of the engine revealed that there were no obvious oil or fuel leaks. In addition, the FAA inspector reported that the carburetor contained approximately two tablespoons of fuel. The auxiliary fuel pump was placed in the "ON" position and fuel was noted flowing from the carburetor drain plug. Throttle control cable continuity was confirmed to the engine. Both the left and right magnetos produced spark on all leads when rotated manually. The ignition leads were normal in appearance. All spark plugs appeared to be in "normal" condition with no fouling or damage. Suction and compression was observed on all cylinders when the engine crankshaft was rotated manually. The fuel system appeared normal and there were no contaminants in the tanks.

According to FAA records and maintenance logbooks, the airplane was manufactured in 1960, and registered to the private pilot/owner on November, 9, 2015. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540 series, 250-hp engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on November 30, 2015, at a tachometer reading of 152.7 hours, and a total time of 3455.47 flight hours. The tachometer indicated 154.3 hours at the time of accident.

According to the 1254 weather observation at the airport, the temperature and dew point were 50 degrees F and 32 degrees F, respectively. According to the carburetor icing probability chart in FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 (Carburetor Icing Prevention), dated June 30, 2009, the temperature/dew point at the time of the accident was conducive to the formation of serious icing at glide power.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 04, 2015 in Millville, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24, registration: N88F
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2015, about 1245 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-24-250, N88F, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Millville, New Jersey. The private pilot incurred minor injuries and the flight instructor was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey, about 1240 and was destined for South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilots, the private pilot/owner of the airplane completed a preflight and engine run up and no anomalies were noted. Then, they departed runway 32. After takeoff, about 150 feet above ground level, the private pilot/owner retracted the landing gear, then the engine experienced a total loss of power. The private pilot/owner lowered the nose and noted that the airplane was "too low and fast to try a restart." He elected to land the airplane straight ahead in a field. The airplane impacted a grassy area and sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane, by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, revealed that the left and right fuel tanks contained an undetermined amount of fuel. Fuel samples were retained from each tank. All three propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, exhibited chordwise scratching, and were bent in the aft direction. The engine was retained for further investigation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records and maintenance logbooks, the airplane was manufactured in 1960, and registered to the private pilot/owner on November, 9, 2015. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540 series, 250 hp engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on November 30, 2015, at a tachometer reading of 152.7 hours, and a total time of 3455.47 flight hours. The tachometer indicated a time of 154.3 hours at the time of accident.

Safari 400, N416JB: Fatal accident occurred January 16, 2015 in The Woodlands, Texas

Michael Gene Mims of Conroe, Texas
On February 3, 2007, Mike was ordained into the Permanent Deaconate in the Catholic Church. Mike then served his church, St. Anthony of Padua. 

Michael "Mike" Gene Mims
President of Imagi-Motive, a Magnolia, Texas, company.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Safari Helicopter; Marianna, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.govN416JB



NTSB Identification: CEN15LA104
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 16, 2015 in The Woodlands, TX
Aircraft: BAKER BOBBY J SAFARI, registration: N416JB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 16, 2015, about 1230 central standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Safari 400 helicopter, N416JB, impacted terrain following a loss of control in The Woodlands, Texas. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. 

Witnesses reported that the helicopter was flying in a south-west direction over the property of Woodland Church. The helicopter appeared normal as it neared the church, then the helicopter "turned sideways," banked to the left, and descended to the ground. One witness stated that he heard a breaking sound and saw the "back rotor" hanging. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 51, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. He held a second-class airman medical certificate that was issued on April 23, 2014, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for this medical certification, the pilot reported that he had accumulated 2,300 total flight hours of which 150 hours were in the previous 6 months.

According to the pilot's logbook, he had accumulated a total of 48.5 hours total helicopter time at the time of the accident. The pilot began his helicopter training in a Schweizer 269C on September 28, 2014. He accumulated a total of 24.0 hours (including 2.5 hours of solo time) in the Schweizer before transitioning to the accident helicopter on December 18, 2014. He had accumulated 25.7 hours total time (including 11 hours of solo time) in the Safari at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was constructed from a kit produced by Safari Helicopter. It was a two-seat, skid-equipped helicopter with two composite main rotor blades that rotated clockwise and a tail rotor for anti-torque control. The helicopter was equipped with an Aero Sport O-360 engine. Components such as the main rotor head and the tail rotor would typically be delivered to the customer fully assembled.

The accident helicopter, serial number CH2181, was built by the owner of Safari Helicopters on March 1, 2010. A special airworthiness certificate for the helicopter was issued by the FAA on March 6, 2010. The helicopter was sold about 5 days later to a private individual who owned the helicopter until the accident pilot purchased it on November 6, 2014.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1153, the George Bush Intercontinental Airport (KIAH) automated surface reporting system, located 17 miles southeast of the accident site, reported the following weather conditions: calm winds, 10 miles visibility, ceiling broken at 2,500 ft, temperature 8ºC, dew point 3ºC, and altimeter 30.93 inches of mercury.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) did not travel to the accident scene. According to photographs taken by the FAA on-site, the main wreckage consisting of the fuselage, main rotor, tail and tail rotor came to rest at the fenceline of a treed area. The horizontal stabilizer had separated from the tail boom and was found about 65 feet northeast of the fuselage. The right door frame was found about 85 feet northeast of the fuselage.

The helicopter wreckage was examined at the facilities of Air Salvage of Dallas on February 24-25, 2015, under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. The examination revealed that the horizontal stabilizer's spar (a steel tube) had separated at the weld area just outboard of a round steel plate (the stabilizer mounting flange) that was welded to the spar. The fracture exhibited signatures of corrosion and fatigue at the weld line. The inboard portion of the spar remained bolted to the tail boom at the mounting flange. Paint transfers were observed on one tail rotor blade. These transfers were located on the side of the blade where the horizontal stabilizer would be mounted. Additionally, both tail rotor blades exhibited impact damage on the leading and trailing edges of the blades. 

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls through the tail rotor system. The control pedal cable leading from the tail rotor assembly to the right control pedal was found in the full right control pedal position. (In this helicopter, the right pedal is used to counter the torque of the main rotor.) The stationary swash plate (controlling right/left, fore, and aft cyclic) was fractured and separated at all three push-pull tubes. The right door upper and lower hinges were intact, and the upper and lower latching points appeared normal.

The governor friction clutch was found loose. The friction clutch was found to rotate freely and was characterized by a Safari Helicopter representative as slightly loose. According to the Safari Helicopter representative, an excessively loose friction clutch could prevent effective throttle manipulation by the governor, and an overly tight friction clutch could prevent the pilot from over-riding the governor. An instructor pilot for Safari who had recently flown with the accident pilot in the accident helicopter stated that the governor appeared to operate properly.

Engine continuity was confirmed by turning the crankshaft to establish compression at all four cylinders. The four top and four bottom spark plugs were removed from the engine. All eight spark plugs appeared unremarkable. The magneto was turned by hand and sparked at all four connection wires.

The carburetor was in the full throttle position. Blue colored fuel (consistent in appearance with 100 low-lead aviation fuel) was found in the carburetor. The gascolator and carburetor fuel filter screens were void of contaminants. The air filter was examined and appeared unremarkable.

Main Rotor System

The main transmission pinion, tail rotor output shaft, and clutch assembly were separated from the main transmission and free of their mountings. The bottom of the clutch assembly showed evidence of a rotational impact of the clutch drive plate on one of the six clutch drum mount bolts consistent with rotation at the time of impact.

Both composite main rotor blades were deformed upward. One main rotor blade was broken through the laminate and spar about 2 feet outboard of the grip; however, the brass rod along the leading edge was intact but severely deformed. Both main rotor blades exhibited impact marks along the outboard 3 to 4 feet of the leading edges. The main rotor blades rotated normally about the feathering axis when rotated by hand at the grips.

The shear line from the transmission to the main rotor shaft was intact consistent with movement of the gears of the main shaft. The drive gear was still coupled to the shaft.

Tail Section

Impact marks on the tail structure and tail rotor drive shaft were observed. The damage was consistent with a right to left main rotor strike, when looking forward.

The tail rotor drive shaft was impacted at 14.5 inches aft of the forward edge of the fifth bearing frame. The fractured end of the tail was near the forward end of the tail boom. The sixth bearing, along with the tail rotor input coupling and the aft end of the drive shaft (about 24 inches) were missing.

The tail rotor output from the main transmission spun freely; however, the bearings did not rotate smoothly. The tail rotor pitch arms were fastened in their grips. The tail rotor pitch links were deformed and still attached. 

Flight Deck Observations

The ignition switch was found in the right ("R") position. A test of the magneto switch and the ignition module pin (#1) indicted the electronic ignition was open, and the magneto was grounded. Only the electronic ignition would have been operating at this switch setting.

The helicopter had warning indicator bulbs for the main rotor, tail rotor, governor, fuel low, and low oil pressure; examination of all five bulbs revealed that none exhibited the typical filament stretching found when a bulb is lit at impact. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was conducted under the authority of Montgomery County Forensic Services, Conroe, Texas. The cause of death for the pilot was attributed to "multiple blunt injuries."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing for the pilot. The pilot's toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and alcohol. The medications colchicine, doxazosin, and valsartan were detected.

The pilot reported use of doxasozin and valsartan on his most recent FAA medical examination. Both of these prescription medications are used to treat high blood pressure and are not considered to pose a hazard to flight safety. The prescription medication colchicine, which is used to prevent and/or relieve the pain from gout attacks in adults, was not reported previously to the FAA. Some possible side effects of colchicine include nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, and weakness.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Horizontal Stabilizer

The horizontal stabilizer and the tail rotor cross and sleeve assembly were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC, for further examination. The phenolic sleeve on the tail rotor cross was fractured at the end flange. Examination of the flange fracture revealed a brittle overstress separation with no indications of discontinuities.

The spar tube of the horizontal stabilizer was fractured just outboard of the mounting flange and adjacent to the inboard edge of the airfoil section. The forward side of the end plate was bent slightly outboard but no impact damage was apparent on either the end plate or the airfoil skin of the stabilizer. 

As manufactured, the mounting flange of the spar is welded (on the outboard side) to the spar tube and positioned immediately adjacent to the inboard edge of the airfoil skin. As assembled, the fracture location and weld are partially hidden by the airfoil skin and not directly visible.

Most of the fracture followed the outboard edge of the mounting flange weld. As initially received, large areas of both fracture faces were obscured by red and brown corrosion products. These surfaces were cleaned for a more detailed examination. Magnified optical examinations of the fracture surfaces identified features consistent with fatigue cracking. Three fatigue origins were found on the outer surface of the spar tube at the outboard toe (edge) of the assembly weld. The fatigue propagated generally radially through the wall thickness with some circumferential spreading. The fatigue cracking progressed through about half of the total spar cross section. The fatigue origins and propagation were all on the aft portion of the spar. No corrosion or other obvious damage was apparent at any of the origins.

Examinations also uncovered a rust-covered crack slightly inboard of and undercutting the main fracture plain. The undercutting crack intersected the outboard fatigue and formed part of the overall fracture. Magnified examinations of the crack faces without opening revealed fatigue features with at least one fatigue origin on the outer surface of the spar. The crack morphology was consistent with additional fatigue origins in the unopened portion of the crack.

The remaining fracture surface displayed separation features and deformation patterns consistent with overstress separation. The deformation pattern was consistent with forces associated with the stabilizer tip moving forward and outboard.

Visually, the weld exhibited good workmanship with no apparent undercutting, weld cracking, or surface discontinuities. A small pore and a single area of lack of fusion were uncovered by the weld fracturing in the overstress regions.

The inboard fracture face was viewed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) after it was cleaned and the corrosion removed. The fracture area near one fatigue origin point displayed a corrosion-damaged surface, while fracture two other surfaces were much less damaged by corrosion and displayed features consistent with fatigue cracking in alloy steels.

Energy dispersive x-ray spectra of the spar material acquired during SEM examinations were typical of an AISI2 4100 series alloy steel as indicated on the stabilizer engineering drawing.

Ignition System

Examinations of the LSE Plasma III CD Ignition Module (S/N: 43546), the Hall Effect Module (S/N: 1440), and the ignition coils (P/N: 356120) were conducted on March 31, 2015, at the facilities of Light Speed Engineering in Santa Paula, California, with NTSB oversight. No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction was noted during the examinations.

Handheld GPS Device

A Garmin GPSMAP 296 hand-held GPS device was retrieved from the accident site and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for examination. No tracklog information was present on the device after download using the manufacturer procedures. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

As a result of the fatigue cracking of the horizontal stabilizer spar found during this investigation, Safari Helicopter issued a mandatory inspection and modification bulletin titled, "Horizontal Stabilizer Mandatory Inspection and Modification," on April 6, 2015. The bulletin specified a liquid penetrant inspection (LPI) of the horizontal stabilizer as follows:

"On helicopters in operation less than 24 months, this inspection should be accomplished at the next annual condition or 100-hour inspection. On helicopters older than 24 months, the inspection should be accomplished before next flight. This inspection should be added to the annual condition inspection for your particular aircraft."

The bulletin stated that, if cracking was found on the horizontal stabilizer spar, it must be replaced with a new spar. If no cracking was found during LPI inspection, Safari indicated that a steel tube insert must be installed into the end of the stabilizer to extend the "full length of the tail boom mount."

The bulletin also noted that the loss of the horizontal stabilizer "would change the attitude of the helicopter." Given that the stabilizer provides a downward-acting force on the tail section of the helicopter, this attitude change would be experienced by the pilot as an abrupt, uncommanded nose-down pitch.








NTSB Identification: CEN15LA104
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 16, 2015 in The Woodlands, TX
Aircraft: BAKER BOBBY J SAFARI, registration: N416JB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On January 16, 2015 about 1230 central standard time (CST), a Safari Helicopter, N416JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain in The Woodlands, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight which operated without a flight plan. 


Witnesses reported seeing the helicopter flying overhead when it began to "turn" and descended into the trees, followed by the sound of impact. 



At 1153, the George Bush Intercontinental Airport (KIAH) automated surface reporting system reported the following weather conditions: calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility, ceiling broken at 2,500 feet, temperature 8 degrees Celsius, dew point 3 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 30.93 inches of mercury.