Sunday, July 15, 2012

Through Student Loans, Widening the Pilot Pipeline

SYDNEY — After more than a year studying theory in a classroom, the aviation students at the University of New South Wales were set to begin their first day of flight training, at Bankstown Airport here on a winter day late last month. 

They ran through their pre-takeoff checklists, making sure everything was in order. But one thing they can worry less about is the balance of their bank accounts. 

The university, a public institution, began offering flying lessons as an accredited graduate diploma in June, which means that students can now take government loans to finance their flight training. 

Previously, only the academic part of the degree was eligible for the loans. Flying lessons, aircraft rental and licensing, which can add up to more than 100,000 Australian dollars, or about $101,000 were additional costs that had to be paid upfront. 

Jason Middleton, the head of aviation at the university, said the move would broaden access for students with “a lower socioeconomic support base,” even though they would still have to pay approximately 40,000 Australian dollars in upfront fees. 

The University of New South Wales joins a growing number of Australian universities offering the government’s Higher Education Loan Program, known as Fee-Help, for flight training. 

Experts have been warning of a potential shortage of pilots in the Asia-Pacific region and industry groups are struggling to attract young people to the profession. 

The secretary general of the International Civil Aviation Organization, Raymond Benjamin, said in a speech last year that there could be a global shortage of 160,000 pilots worldwide over the next 20 years.

Read more here:    http://www.nytimes.com

Not Your Father's Crop Duster



July 10, 2012 by GE

The most advanced crop duster ever produced is now flying across the American heartland.  Powered by GE's H80 engine, this plane can fly at low altitude (as low as 15 feet), reach breathtaking speeds (over 150 MPH), and takes to the sky quickly -- using less than a third of the runway length needed for a small commercial airplane.

Whether your father owned a crop duster or not, after you see the way this aircraft soars through the air we think you'll agree it is a beautiful sight.  It's not just a pretty picture though -- H80 engines feature advanced science and technology, and the planes that are powered by it can help America's renewal continue -- one acre at a time.

Take a ride with us -- you'll get a bird's eye view from the cockpit and see how advanced engineering can turns ideas into reality. Learn more about General Electric and the H80 Engine: http://invent.ge/Nn5myV


Pilot killed in head-on crash - Hawke's Bay, New Zealand

A Masterton helicopter pilot has been killed in a head-on crash in Hawke's Bay. 

Brian Faulie Bowden, 39, was the front-seat passenger in a van that collided with a 4x4 utility vehicle just after 1pm on Friday near the intersection of SH50 and Whakapirau Rd, west of Hastings.

The driver of the van received serious injuries and was taken to Hawke's Bay Hospital. He was discharged the same day.

The sole occupant of the other vehicle received minor injuries.

Police Senior Constable Tim Rowe said the van was travelling south on SH50 when it was in a collision with the utility, which was travelling north.

"They hit head-on at the intersection, but whether the intersection is a factor in the accident, we are not certain," Mr Rowe said.

A death notice for Mr Bowden said he was the loved fiancee of Shirlene, and father to three children and a step-daughter. He will be farewelled in Gisborne on Friday.

Alix Chittock, Pahiatua-based owner of Tararua Heliwork, said Mr Bowden had been a pilot with Wairarapa Helicopters.

Mr Chittock said Mr Bowden was a good pilot and "an absolutely straight-forward sort of guy", whom he had come to know through shared industry connections.

Mr Bowden had been "fairly busy with spreading" several weeks ago, Mr Chittock said, when the pair last met while working.

Additional reporting Hawke's Bay Today

http://www.times-age.co.nz

Sequoia F.8L Falco, Doppelt Ventures LLC, N532FD: Accident occurred July 15, 2012 in Durango, Colorado

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N532FD 

NTSB Identification: CEN12CA4
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 15, 2012 in Durango, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/07/2012
Aircraft: DOPPELT FREDRIC F F. 8L FALCO, registration: N532FD
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was being flown by a private pilot, who had not previously flown this make and model airplane, and a flight instructor, who was providing dual instruction. The pilot lost directional control of the airplane during the takeoff ground run, and the airplane subsequently became airborne at too slow of an airspeed. The pilot reduced the power to land the airplane back on the runway. The instructor stated that he told the pilot to lower the nose and to watch the airspeed then took control of the airplane. The instructor lowered the nose, and the pilot increased the power. The instructor stated that the left wing dropped as the airspeed increased, but he was able to level the wings. The right wing then dropped “very quickly,” and he was not able to recover. The airplane came to rest inverted in the grass alongside the runway. The fuselage, wings, firewall, and the empennage were substantially damaged.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane and the instructor's delayed remedial action.

The airplane was being flown by a private pilot who just purchased it, and a certified flight instructor who was providing dual instruction. The private pilot stated that he had flown the airplane with the previous owner and that the previous owner made the takeoff and landing. The private pilot and instructor spent about 1 hour briefing and preparing for the flight. The private pilot stated that during the takeoff roll, the airplane veered to the left of the centerline. He stopped the airplane from drifting, but failed to pay attention to the airspeed. He looked at the airspeed which was about 55 knots, and when he looked back up, they were airborne. He stated his initial reaction was to reduce the power and put the airplane back on the runway. He then heard the instructor state that they were too slow so he advanced the throttle. He stated the airplane then settled to the ground off the left side of the runway.

The instructor stated the airplane drifted to the left during the takeoff. He stated that when the airplane became airborne, the pitch attitude was too high and he instructed the private pilot to lower the nose of the airplane. He stated that the private pilot “froze at the controls.” He stated he again instructed the private pilot to lower the nose and to watch the airspeed. When the instructor took control of the stick and lowered the nose in an attempt to gain airspeed, the private pilot advanced the throttle. He stated that as the airspeed increased, the left wing dropped, and he leveled the wings. The right wing then dropped “very quickly” and the instructor was not able to recover.

The airplane came to rest inverted in the grass alongside the runway. The fuselage, wings, firewall, and the empennage were substantially damaged.


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 532FD        Make/Model: EXP       Description: FALCO F8L
  Date: 07/15/2012     Time: 1510

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: DURANGO   State: CO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF CRASHED, DURANGO, CO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SALT LAKE CITY, UT  (NM07)            Entry date: 07/16/2012 
 
 
A single engine experimental aircraft crashed at the Durango-La Plata County Airport on Sunday.

A fixed wing single-engine experimental aircraft crashed this morning at the Durango-La Plata County Airport.

Two males on board the aircraft were transferred to Mercy Regional Medical Center by ambulances from the Los Pinos Fire Protection District and Durango Fire & Rescue Authority, said Don Brockus, a spokesman for the Durango–La Plata County Airport.

Brockus said he could not confirm the severity of either victim’s injuries at this time.

The crash occurred around 9:10 a.m. and the runway is now back open, after being closed for about an hour and a half, he said.

The plane went down on the east side of the runway.

To Brockus’ knowledge, there were no direct witnesses when the plane went down, he said.

Brockus said some debris from the crash will be left in place for the time being to assist with an investigation, which will be conducted by federal authorities.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the plane is registered to Doppelt Ventures LLC out of Missoula, Mont.

Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV) Fly Local Presentation

 

July 10, 2012 by Group5Videos 

 Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV) provides air service for the Gainesville, Florida area of North Central Florida. With multiple commercial carriers, the airport is critical in fueling our local economy. Gainesville Regional Airport invites you to Fly Local, Fly Gainesville.

TWA Museum to Honor Crash Victims with Memorial


KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Former TWA employees hope a memorial will shine a light on what they believe happened to Flight 800. On Tuesday, the TWA Museum will honor those who lost their lives in the plane crash over Long Island 16 years ago. 

 The crash happened on July 17, 1996 and killed 230 people. The four-foot tall memorial has three glass pieces. One shows the flight taking off. Another shows the flight in God’s hands and the third shows the airplane in the clouds. Former TWA employees say they feel hanging in the clouds describes what was determined to be the cause of the crash.

“I believe because there were maneuvers going on along the shore line there it was an accident. A missile hit that plane and took it out,” said former flight attendant Karen Martin.

Karen Martin says she feels so strongly about this she’s almost wearing her heart on her sleeve with a t-shirt depicting what she believes happened. However, the National Transportation Safety Board reports the cause of the accident was an explosion of flammable vapors in a fuel tank. Martin lost her dear friend flight attendant Maureen Lockhart on that flight. She says she remembers seeing the t-v reports that showed something hitting the plane.

“I watched that missile come up from the lower right screen hit the plane and the plane exploded over and over and over and over,” Martin said.

Read more here:  http://fox4kc.com/2012/07/15/twa-museum-to-honor-crash-victims-with-memorial/

Forensic Mondays class examines plane crashes - Upshur County Regional Airport (W22), Buckhannon, West Virginia

BUCKHANNON — The Upshur County Regional Airport served as the backdrop for the sixth Forensic Mondays session, which discussed aircraft crashes and emergency response. 

 The guest speaker for Monday’s class was Henrik Vejlstrup, who is a manager for the Federal Aviation Administration’s Safety Team, or FAAST.

Vejlstrup said he came to the FAA after flying for 23 years and has spent 16 years in the FAA, the last six as part of the FAAST.

Vejlstrup showed images of plane crashes he has worked on and discussed the reasons that were later discovered for each crash.

He said he rotates with other FAAST members being on accident standby after hours.

Local first responders are often the first on the scene of a plane crash, Vejlstrup said.

“Usually we don’t get to a scene when there are bodies still there,” he said.

Read more here:  http://www.therecorddelta.com

Sc Iar Sa Brasov IAR 825, N825BA: Accident occurred July 15, 2012 in Peru, Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N825BA


NTSB Identification: CEN12LA446 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 15, 2012 in Peru, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: SC IAR SA Brasov IAR 825, registration: N825BA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the airplane was topped off with fuel before departing on the cross-country flight. He stated that after flying for about two hours the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power while in the traffic pattern at the intended destination. He subsequently made a forced landing into a nearby cornfield because the airplane did not have sufficient altitude to glide to the runway. A postaccident examination revealed that the left wing fuel tank was void of any usable fuel. About 14 gallons of fuel were recovered from the right wing fuel tank during the disassembly and recovery of the wreckage. The supply line to the engine fuel control unit was void of any fuel. The fuel tank selector valve was positioned to draw fuel from both wing tanks. The engine started and ran uneventfully during a brief postaccident operational test run. Additional testing established that the fuel tank selector valve yielded equivalent flow rates in all positions. Although the fuel tank selector valve was found in the setting to draw fuel from both wing tanks following the accident, the loss of engine power was likely due to fuel starvation while operating with the selector valve positioned to the empty left wing tank.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel management, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.


On July 15, 2012, about 1215 central daylight time, a SC IAR SA Brasov model IAR 825 airplane, N825BA, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Peru, Illinois. The airline transport pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gazelle 175, Inc, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight departed Clark Regional Airport (KJVY), Sellersburg, Indiana, at 1015, and had the intended destination of Illinois Valley Regional Airport (KVYS), Peru, Illinois.

The pilot reported that earlier in the day he flew the turbo-prop airplane, an experimental exhibition-category military trainer, from Johnson City Airport (0A4), Johnson City, Tennessee, to KJVY. He stated that following that flight, which he estimated was 1 hour 30 minutes in duration, the airplane was topped-off with 64 gallons of Jet-A fuel before he departed on the accident flight. He reported that after flying for about 2 hours the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power while in the traffic pattern for runway 36 at the intended destination. He made a forced landing into a nearby corn field because the airplane did not have sufficient altitude to glide to the runway. The right wing was substantially damaged during the forced landing.

The pilot reported that the fuel consumption rate during the accident flight, according to an electronic fuel-flow instrument installed in the cockpit, was approximately 36.5 gallons per hour. He stated that although a majority of the cruise segment was flown at 84-percent engine power while at 5,000 feet mean seal level, various engine power settings and altitudes were used to avoid adverse weather encountered during the flight.

The airplane's total fuel capacity was 95 gallons (89.7 gallons usable), evenly distributed between the right and left wing tanks. A postaccident examination revealed that the left wing fuel tank was void of any usable fuel. Approximately 14 gallons of fuel were recovered from the right wing fuel tank during the disassembly and recovery of the wreckage. The supply line to the engine fuel control unit was void of any fuel. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the cockpit engine controls to their respective engine components. The fuel tank selector valve was positioned to draw fuel from both wing tanks. The engine, a Walter model M601D(8), serial number 291, started and ran uneventfully during a brief postaccident operational test run. Additional testing established that the fuel tank selector valve yielded equivalent flow rates in all positions.

A handheld global positioning system (GPS) device was found within the wreckage. Although the GPS device did not contain any track data, the device's software flight timer indicated that the last flight segment was 1 hour 47 minutes. If the accident flight duration was 1 hour 47 minutes, the resulting average fuel consumption rate was 42.5 gallons per hour. Comparably, performance data provided by the engine manufacturer indicated that an 86-percent engine power setting would result in a fuel consumption rate of 42.5 gallons per hour. The calculated average fuel consumption rate for the previous flight, from 0A4 to KJVY, was 42.7 gallons per hour. If the accident flight duration was 2 hours, as estimated by the pilot, the calculated average fuel consumption rate was 37.9 gallons per hour.

At 1215 cdt, the airport's automatic weather observing station reported the following weather conditions: wind from 330 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 28 degrees Celsius, dew point 21 degrees Celsius, altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury.



NTSB Identification: CEN12LA446
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 15, 2012 in Peru, IL
Aircraft: SC IAR SA Brasov IAR 825, registration: N825BA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

On July 15, 2012, about 1215 central daylight time (cdt), a SC IAR SA Brasov model IAR 825 airplane, N825BA, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Peru, Illinois. The airline transport pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Gazelle 175, Inc., San Luis Obispo, California, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight, which was operated without a flight plan. The cross-country flight departed Clark Regional Airport (KJVY), Sellersburg, Indiana, at 1115 eastern daylight time (edt), and was en route to Illinois Valley Regional Airport (KVYS), Peru, Illinois.

The pilot reported that earlier in the day he flew the turbo-prop airplane, an experimental exhibition-category military trainer, from Johnson City Airport (0A4), Johnson City, Tennessee, to KJVY. He reported that the airplane was topped-off with 64 gallons of Jet-A fuel following the flight, which he estimated was 1 hour 30 minutes in duration. The airplane's total fuel capacity was 96 gallons, with approximately 5.3 gallons unusable. The calculated average fuel consumption rate for the previous flight was 42.7 gallons per hour.

The pilot paid for the 64 gallons of fuel at 1055 edt (0955 cdt), according to the timestamp on a receipt obtained from the fixed-base operator that serviced the airplane at KJVY. The pilot reported that he departed KJVY at 1115 edt (1015 cdt) for the cross-country flight to KVYS. He noted that after flying for 2 hours the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power while in the traffic pattern for runway 36 (5,999 feet by 100 feet, asphalt) at KVYS. The airplane did not have sufficient altitude to glide to the runway and an off-airport landing was performed into a corn field. The right wing was substantially damaged during the forced landing.

After the accident the pilot reported that the fuel consumption rate during the accident flight, according to an electronic fuel-flow instrument installed in the cockpit, was approximately 36.5 gallons per hour. The pilot also noted that adverse weather encountered during the accident flight had required multiple climbs and descents at varying power settings.

A postaccident examination revealed the left wing fuel tank was void of any useable fuel. Approximately 14 gallons of fuel were recovered from the right wing fuel tank during disassembly and recovery of the wreckage. The fuel selector was positioned to draw fuel from both wing tanks. Assuming the accident flight was 2 hours in duration, as estimated by the pilot, the resulting average fuel consumption rate was 37.9 gallons per hour. A handheld global positioning system (GPS) device was found within the wreckage. The device did not contain any position track data; however, the software flight timer indicated the flight segment was 1 hour 47 minutes. Assuming the accident flight was 1 hour 47 in duration, the resulting average fuel consumption rate was 42.5 gallons per hours.

At 1215 cdt, the airport's automatic weather observing station reported the following weather conditions: wind from 330 magnetic at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 28 degrees Celsius, dew point 21 degrees Celsius, altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury.

FAA  IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 825BA        Make/Model: EXP       Description: IAR 825
  Date: 07/15/2012     Time: 1709

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: PERU   State: IL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES IN A FIELD, NEAR PERU, IL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SPRINGFIELD, IL  (GL19)               Entry date: 07/16/2012 



PERU (WLS) - The pilot of a small plane was uninjured Sunday afternoon when the plane crashed near an airport in Peru, Ill., about 100 miles southwest of Chicago. 

The accident happened sometime between noon and 1 p.m., according to FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro.

The pilot was the only person on the single-engine Brasov IAR823 plane, a small warbird aircraft made in Romania, Molinaro said. The plane was apparently on its way to the Illinois Valley Regional Airport in Peru, he said.

According to the FAA, this plane, whose tail number is N825BA, is owned by Gazelle 175 Inc., of San Luis Obispo, California. It is classified as an experimental plane and was manufactured in 2005.

Molinaro noted that “this time of year you’re going to see” more experimental aircraft across northern Illinois, because of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s annual Fly-In Convention, held in Oshkosh, Wisconsin July 23-29.



PERU, Ill. (AP) — Authorities say a small plane flying from the southern half of the state had to make an emergency landing in a north-central Illinois corn field after reported engine trouble. 

 Peru police Sgt. Ed DeGroot says there were no injuries.

He says the pilot was en route from southern Illinois and passing over the area. DeGroot says the plane landed with no problems Sunday.

Peru police and fire officials, along with Illinois State Police, were called to the scene.

Passenger jets in near miss off Dubai

ABU DHABI // Two planes carrying more than 250 passengers and crew were involved in a "near miss" off the Dubai coast. 

On-board warning systems alerted the pilots to the danger of collision and advised one to climb and the other to descend. Both planes continued their journeys without incident.

The incident in April, involving an Air Arabia flight from Sharjah to Istanbul and a flydubai flight from Dubai to Doha, was reported immediately to the General Civil Aviation Authority.

"A situation developed during which the distance between the two aircraft as well as their relative positions and speed had been such that the safety of the aircraft involved may have been compromised," an authority spokesman said yesterday.

The Air Arabia flight had six crew and 147 passengers on board. The flydubai flight had six crew and 94 passengers.

The incident happened at 9.02pm on April 22, five nautical miles west of Dubai International Airport.

The authority said the cause, and the closest distance between the planes, would be disclosed in later reports.

Investigators are studying the data recorders from both flights. "The investigation has not yet determined the cause," the spokesman said.

"Later reports will specify the contributing factors. However, all aspects, opportunities for improvement and system enhancements are considered."

The preliminary report notes a change in air traffic control staff after the Air Arabia flight took off.

"A handover between controllers was conducted at Dubai Air Traffic Control Departures, which meant that another person was communicating with the aircraft on the radio for traffic instructions," it says.

Less than a minute later, the flydubai flight took off from Dubai for Doha.

Air Arabia and flydubai both said yesterday they could not comment on the possible cause of the incident because it was being investigated by the regulator.

But flydubai said it took such incidents seriously and Air Arabia said: "Our flight crew handled the situation safely and in a professional manner."

This is the first near- miss reported to the GCAA, but they are common globally.

In the UK, 35 such incidents involving passenger aircraft were reported in 2010, the most recent data available. Only five involved commercial aircraft, down from 11 in 2009.

In Canada, 105 near misses involving Canadian-registered aircraft were reported in 2011, down from 179 in 2010.

In Australia, it was the most common type of accident and serious incident in 2011, with 11 reported. These include both "aircraft proximity" incidents and the less serious "breakdown of separation".

Source:   http://www.thenational.ae

Council refuses Skydive request - New Zealand

The Queenstown Lakes District Council has refused a request to refer a resource consent application seeking a change of status for a Jacks Point airfield directly to the Environment Court. 

Skydive Queenstown wants the status of its base changed from an airstrip to an airport to enable more flights.

But the application has attracted objections from a stream of neighbouring residents concerned more flights would mean more noise.

Of the 82 submissions received, 79 were opposed, two were neutral and one was in support.

The council has decided the consent will be heard by independent commissioners.

On June 28, a week after submissions closed, the company asked the council to refer the consent directly to the Environment Court instead.

In a letter to the council, Skydive's agent, Russell Bartlett, said there was a "substantial likelihood" any decision made by the council would be appealed to the Environment Court whether the proposal was granted or refused.

"Dealing with the matter in a single process will ultimately be more efficient and economical for all parties than participating in a council hearing followed by an appeal," he said.

The council gave reasons for declining the request, including the large number of submitters who "may be excluded from the process if this application is first considered by the Environment Court".

The council maintained its independent commissioners were "well skilled" on noise assessment and aviation safety, and while there may initially be economic savings to Skydive [in going directly to the Environment Court], there was no overall economic advantage.

"Council considers that the principles of the Resource Management Act are best served in this case by the application being considered by council's commissioners," the council told Skydive Queenstown.

The council's strategy committee will discuss the issue tomorrow.

Skydive Queenstown operates a maximum of 35 flights per day.If consent was granted, the flights would increase, but by how many is unknown as yet.

Flights would be limited by noise controls and would depend on the type of aircraft used.

Many Jacks Point residents lodged submissions opposing the status change, with some saying they were already subjected to excessive noise emanating from the Skydive Queenstown base.

The council, which owns a reserve adjoining the site, made submissions against the proposal for much the same reasons as residents.

"Unrestricted increase in aircraft movements would have a detrimental effect on the public's quiet enjoyment of the reserve," the submission said.  

Source:  http://www.odt.co.nz/news/queenstown-lakes/217184/council-refuses-skydive-request

Piper Cub Cockpit Presentation - Geneseo Airshow, New York

 

July 15, 2012 by Lukeplanespotting

A look at the cockpit of a Piper Cub that was at the Geneseo Airshow on July 14 2012
 

F-22 pilot in Hawaii briefly suffers from oxygen deficit

HONOLULU - The Hawaii Air National Guard said Tuesday that one of its pilots briefly experienced an oxygen deficit while flying an F-22 stealth fighter this month. 

The pilot was heading back to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam from a routine training sortie when sensors indicated that he wasn't getting as much oxygen as he should, said Lt. Col. Charles Anthony, a spokesman for the Hawaii Guard.

The pilot also felt dizzy. He activated the emergency oxygen system until his symptoms abated and the plane's oxygen-generating system returned to normal.

The pilot landed safely after the incident, the first time a Hawaii F-22 pilot has experienced hypoxia, or oxygen deprivation, Anthony said.

A medical exam cleared the pilot for duty. All 14 of the Hawaii National Guard's F-22 planes are operational, Anthony said.

The nation's F-22 fighter jets were grounded for four months last year after pilots complained of experiencing a lack of oxygen that can cause dizziness and blackouts.

An Air Force advisory panel studied the problem for seven months but couldn't identify the cause. The panel supported a plan to keep the aircraft flying with pilots using special sensors, filters and other safety precautions.

In May, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta ordered that F-22 flights remain "within proximity of potential landing locations" so that pilots can land quickly in the event that they experience an oxygen-deficit problem.

The F-22 is the Air Force's most-prized stealth fighter. It was built to evade radar and is capable of flying at faster-than-sound speeds without using afterburners.

Five other bases are home to F-22s: Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska; Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va.; Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.; Holloman Air Force Base, N.M.; and Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.

Source:   http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/562984/F-22-pilot-in-Hawaii-briefly-suffers-from-oxygen-deficit.html?nav=5031
 

Ultralight ditches off Vancouver Island

An ultralight aircraft with two aboard has ditched in waters near Schooner Cove - that's north of Nanoose Bay on Vancouver Island. 

The pilot declared a mayday around 9:00 a.m. and brought the aircraft down for a water landing.

The pilot and his passenger have been rescued by the crew of a coast guard vessel out of French Creek.

An official at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Victoria says the two have since been transferred to an ambulance.

No word yet on their conditions. 

http://www.cknw.com

Reno Air Racing Association now asking groups who already contributed for money

RENO, Nev. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- The Reno Air Racing Association has not yet been able to come up with the money needed to pay insurance to cover the National Championship Air Races this fall, and now they're asking for more money from groups that have already contributed. 

President and CEO Mike Houghton went back to the Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority (RSCVA) today asking for an additional $100,000 in addition to the $75,000 RSCVA has already agreed to.

The Board decided to consider another $75,000 instead, which will be voted on at their next meeting.

Houghton says the Reno Air Racing Association is in a tight race to garner enough money to make their insurance payments of $2 million. He says they're about $300-400,000 away from reaching that $2 m  

Source:    http://www.msnbc.msn.com

Baltic Aviation Academy's International Open Door Day at Aerodrome

 


On the 30th of June the aviation training center Baltic Aviation Academy organized its first international open door day event in the Darius and Girenas aerodrome in Kaunas. The event entitled 'Mission: Pilot' welcomed guests not only from across various Lithuanian cities but also from Spain, Russia, Estonia and Latvia.
 

Unregistered gyrocopter crashed under unknown circumstances, Mount Pleasant, Utah

FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: UNREG        Make/Model: EXP       Description: UNREGISTERED GYROCOPTER
  Date: 07/15/2012     Time: 0205

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: MOUNT PLEASANT   State: UT   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  UNREGISTERED GYROCOPTER CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, MOUNT 
  PLEASANT, UT

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SALT LAKE CITY, UT  (NM07)            Entry date: 07/16/2012 



MT. PLEASANT, Sanpete County — A 45-year-old Moroni man is in critical condition following a small aircraft crash Saturday night.

Witnesses said a gyrocopter operated by Wade Roundy was being towed down the runway by Roundy's wife for an assisted takeoff about 8 p.m. when the pilot apparently lost control and crashed. The gyrocopter was likely an unpowered aircraft intended for training, according to the manager of the Mt. Pleasant Airport.

Roundy was taken to Sanpete Valley Hospital in critical condition and later flown by medical helicopter to another hospital in Provo.

Contributing: Roger Cary 

Photo Courtesy of Christian Probasco

 http://www.ksl.com

Van's RV-7A, N404JT: Accident occurred July 14, 2012 in Novato, California


http://registry.faa.gov/N404JT

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft photo

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA321 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 14, 2012 in Novato, CA
Aircraft: LOFLIN RV-7A, registration: N404JT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 14, 2012, about 1600 Pacific daylight time, an experimental Loflin RV-7A, N404JT, experienced a partial loss of engine power and attempted to make a precautionary landing on runway 31 at Gnoss Field Airport (DVO), Novato, California. The student pilot/owner operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall, fuselage, and horizontal stabilizer. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local area flight, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed DVO about 1545.

According to the pilot, his intent was to level the airplane at 4,000 feet, fly around the local area, and then head back to DVO and do some pattern work. While on climb out, at 3,300 feet, the pilot reduced the engine power setting; at that point the airplane was climbing about 1,500 feet per minute. Shortly thereafter, about 3,700 feet, the pilot reported that he didn’t feel any “pull” from the airplane. He looked down at the instrument panel and noted that the manifold pressure was at 5 inches. The pilot attempted to troubleshoot the problem, and when that did not work, he decided to return to the airport and make a precautionary landing. The pilot landed the airplane about midway down runway 31, and was not able to stop the airplane before it overran the runway, traversed over a ditch, and came to rest inverted.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector performed a visual examination of the engine, with no obvious mechanical malfunctions noted. The engine and airframe have been retained for further examination.


 
Credit:   Novato Fire District


NOVATO, Calif. — 

 The pilot of a small plane that crashed into marshland near a Novato airport Saturday afternoon was freed by a group of other pilots and walked away from the scene with just a cut on his arm.

According to the airport manager at Gnoss Field, the pilot, who is a student based at that airport, had gone out on a practice flight and was coming in for a landing around 3:45 p.m. when he reported having engine trouble.

The pilot then crashed his plane near the runway, somehow flipping the aircraft upside down before touching down.

According to Novato Fire crews, several other pilots who witnessed the accident rushed to the scene to aid the pilot.

“There were several other pilots who either heard or witnessed the incident and rushed over, lifted the rear aircraft up off the ground, and that allowed the pilot to exit,” said Novato Fire Dept. Battalion Chief Gerald McCarthy.

Paramedics arrived soon afterward, treated the pilot for a cut on his arm and sent him home.

The pilot was also interviewed about the incident by FAA investigators over the phone, according to the airport’s manager.

The manager also said that airport operations were back to normal in a matter of hours. he was interviewed by a FAA investigator over the phone.

The pilot was flying a RV7A, which the Gnoss Field manager described as an experimental plane that the pilot built himself.  

Watch video:  http://www.ktvu.com

Grand Strand Airport (KCRE), North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina: Banner tow plane off runway

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF)- At around 9 a.m. Sunday morning, a small banner tow plane ran off the runway at the Grand Strand General Aviation Airport near Atlantic Beach. 

According to Michael LaPier, the Director of Airports, it was a minor incident and the pilot did not suffer any injuries. The pilot was the only person in the plane at the time of the accident.

There was no severe damage done to the plane, and it is unknown at this time whether the plane was taking off or landing at the time of the accident.

Fairfield, New Jersey: New Flight School Takes Wing, With Fischer Aviation, Lands Eclectic Array of Student Pilots - Essex County Airport (KCDW), Caldwell

 
Tom Fischer, certified flight instructor and owner/operator of Fischer Aviation in Fairfield, with one of his Piper Cherokee airplanes from the flight school's fleet. Credits: Fischer Aviation 

 
For more information about flight training with Fischer Aviation, contact Jodi Fischer at  learntofly@fischeraviation.com or (973) 575-1900, or visit www.fischeraviation.com.


Caryn Starr-Gates
The Alternative Press
 July 10, 2012

When an airplane mechanic’s nine-year-old daughter wanted to take flying lessons, her father thought of only one certified flight instructor he would trust to teach his child: Tom Fischer, owner of Fischer Aviation in Fairfield. N.J. In fact, Fischer’s skills as a flight instructor bring him a wide array of students including several teens, first-timers, and seasoned pilots seeking to improve their flying skills.

Operated by Fischer and his wife Jodi, Fischer Aviation opened in March 2012 and continues a family tradition. Fischer’s uncles ran the original Fischer Aviation in the 1960s and 1970s at Teterboro Airport; the younger Fischer grew up around airplanes and had his first lesson from his father at age 12.  Jodi, who has known her husband since their teen years, said Tom always dreamed of becoming a pilot. Today, he is a sought-after flight instructor who holds several advanced certifications, has more than  6,000 hours of flight time (most of that teaching student pilots) and a majority of students—70%—traveling to Fischer Aviation from New York City to study with him.

A Passion for all Things Aviation

“We stand out because of three main reasons,” said Fischer, “the quality of our staff, our instructors, and our fleet.” He noted that most other flight schools hire newly licensed instructors who only teach to gain enough hours to go on to the commercial airlines, but that he is a career flight instructor with one goal in mind: to develop the next generation of pilots. He will only hire others who are equally dedicated to the development of their students.

Piper PA-32R-301, N9253N: JFK JR CRASH COVER-UP - The National Enquirer. Accident occurred Friday, July 16, 1999 in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

Published on: July 15, 2012
The National Enquirer 

Secret documents reveal the truth behind JFK Jr.s tragic death!

John F. Kennedy Jr. went bravely to his watery grave, trying valiantly to save the lives of his passengers - his wife Carolyn and her sister Lauren.

But a government cover-up has stopped the truth of what really happened inside Kennedy's small plane before it crashed into the Atlantic Ocean on July 16, 1999, from ever being made public.

A year after the tragedy, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) blamed the crash on a "graveyard spiral" that hurtled the plane toward the sea at nearly 5,000 feet per minute.





NTSB Identification: NYC99MA178.
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Friday, July 16, 1999 in VINEYARD HAVEN, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/06/2000
Aircraft: Piper PA-32R-301, registration: N9253N
Injuries: 3 Fatal.
 
The noninstrument-rated pilot obtained weather forecasts for a cross-country flight, which indicated visual flight rules (VFR) conditions with clear skies and visibilities that varied between 4 to 10 miles along his intended route. The pilot then departed on a dark night. According to a performance study of radar data, the airplane proceeded over land at 5,500 feet. About 34 miles west of Martha's Vineyard Airport, while crossing a 30-mile stretch of water to its destination, the airplane began a descent that varied between 400 to 800 feet per minute (fpm). About 7 miles from the approaching shore, the airplane began a right turn. The airplane stopped its descent at 2,200 feet, then climbed back to 2,600 feet and entered a left turn. While in the left turn, the airplane began another descent that reached about 900 fpm. While still in the descent, the airplane entered a right turn. During this turn, the airplane's rate of descent and airspeed increased. The airplane's rate of descent eventually exceeded 4,700 fpm, and the airplane struck the water in a nose-down attitude. Airports along the coast reported visibilities between 5 and 8 miles. Other pilots flying similar routes on the night of the accident reported no visual horizon while flying over the water because of haze. The pilot's estimated total flight experience was about 310 hours, of which 55 hours were at night. The pilot's estimated flight time in the accident airplane was about 36 hours, of which about 9.4 hours were at night. About 3 hours of that time was without a certified flight instructor (CFI) on board, and about 0.8 hour of that was flown at night and included a night landing. In the 15 months before the accident, the pilot had flown either to or from the destination area about 35 times. The pilot flew at least 17 of these flight legs without a CFI on board, of which 5 were at night. Within 100 days before the accident, the pilot had completed about 50 percent of a formal instrument training course. A Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular (AC) 61-27C, "Instrument Flying: Coping with Illusions in Flight," states that illusions or false impressions occur when information provided by sensory organs is misinterpreted or inadequate and that many illusions in flight could be caused by complex motions and certain visual scenes encountered under adverse weather conditions and at night. The AC also states that some illusions might lead to spatial disorientation or the inability to determine accurately the attitude or motion of the aircraft in relation to the earth's surface. The AC further states that spatial disorientation, as a result of continued VFR flight into adverse weather conditions, is regularly near the top of the cause/factor list in annual statistics on fatal aircraft accidents. According to AC 60-4A, "Pilot's Spatial Disorientation," tests conducted with qualified instrument pilots indicated that it can take as long as 35 seconds to establish full control by instruments after a loss of visual reference of the earth's surface. AC 60-4A further states that surface references and the natural horizon may become obscured even though visibility may be above VFR minimums and that an inability to perceive the natural horizon or surface references is common during flights over water, at night, in sparsely populated areas, and in low-visibility conditions. Examination of the airframe, systems, avionics, and engine did not reveal any evidence of a preimpact mechanical malfunction.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a descent over water at night, which was a result of spatial disorientation. Factors in the accident were haze, and the dark night.


Military recovers debris from 1952 plane crash

ANCHORAGE — Perched around crevesses crisscrossing a glacier deep in the mountains east of Anchorage, military personnel continued recovering debris Thursday from a 1952 plane crash that killed everyone onboard. 

 The C-124 Globemaster is thought to have slammed into a cliff face on Mount Gannett on Nov. 22, nearly six decades ago. The plane, one of the largest in the U.S. air fleet at the time, was nearing the end of a flight from Washington state to Alaska and carried 52 military servicemen. A pilot found the plane days after it crashed, but snow buried it and searchers, battling severe weather, were never able to recover the plane, its passengers or its crew.

In June, a National Guard helicopter crew spotted pieces of the historic plane on Colony Glacier, more than 12 miles from where it was last seen. That triggered a new effort to bring back and identify pieces of the plane — and the people who died in the crash, in the hopes of bringing closure to their families.

Read more here:  http://juneauempire.com/state/2012-07-15/military-recovers-debris-1952-plane-crash#.UALEYqb3u70

Aero L-39 Albatros: Take off and Aerobatics

 
 

Air crash girl's mum to go to United States for answers about her daughter's death: Cessna 172K, N84249, registered to Flight Training Express (FTE) LLC. - Accident occurred September 24, 2010 in Chatsworth, Georgia

"Jas' first flight as a pilot, somewhere near Reading. Jaskinder Kaur Samra, we will miss you always."


THE heartbroken mum of a trainee pilot who was killed in a horror US plane crash is taking her quest for answers to her daughter’s death to America. 

 Jaskinder Samra, 21, from Wolverhampton, died with flying instructor Abraham George, 24, when their Cessna Skyhawk aircraft ran out of fuel en route to Chattanooga, Tennessee.

A third passenger, friend Shaun Thacker, from Monmouthshire in Wales, miraculously survived the crash by wrapping himself in a duvet which smothered the impact.

Last week an inquest found Jaskinder’s death was the result of an accident. It also heard how the plane’s engine could have been modified, causing it to use too much fuel.

Now Jaskinder’s devastated mum Mindie wants to know whether documents in the US show the Cessna had been modified and if George Abraham was told.

“As a family we just want answers for our daughter,” she said.

“She left us so suddenly and we’re at such a loss without her.

“Maybe having some concrete answers and knowing that it wasn’t meant to be her time would give us some comfort.

Source:   http://www.sundaymercury.net
NTSB Identification: ERA10FA502
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 24, 2010 in Chatsworth, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/16/2011
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N84249
Injuries: 2 Fatal,1 Serious.
 

Prior to departure, the pilot filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan to his destination airport and calculated a fuel burn rate of 9 gallons of fuel per hour. Approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes after departure, the pilot canceled his IFR flight plan with the air traffic controller without giving a reason and changed his destination airport. One minute later, the pilot declared an emergency with air traffic control, reporting his engine had failed. Witnesses in the vicinity of the crash site observed the airplane flying at tree top level, and reported they could not hear the engine running. The airplane made a steep right turn, struck the top of a tree, and collided with the ground.
Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies. The right main fuel tank was not ruptured and contained 1 quart of fuel. The left main fuel tank was not ruptured and contained 2 1/2 gallons of fuel, 2 of which were considered unusable fuel. Review of the airplane logbooks revealed the engine horsepower had been increased to 160 horsepower, and the airplane's fuel burn rate was increased due to a modification by a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) 8 years prior to the accident. A copy of the STC was not located in the airplane wreckage. The registered owner reported the pilot had received instruction on the STC; however, no documentation was provided substantiating this instruction. He further stated the STC only increased the fuel burn rate for the first 5 minutes of flight at takeoff power. Review of the engine Operator's Manual revealed the maximum fuel usage at full power, is about 13.6 gallons per hour. At 82 percent power the fuel burn rate is about 11.25 gallons per hour.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate flight planning and in-flight fuel management resulting in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the operator's failure to ensure aircraft records pertaining to engine modifications and fuel burn rates were available to flight crewmembers.
Full narrative available
 

CESSNA 172 (N84249)

 
CESSNA 172 (N84249)

Liberia, Guanacaste, Costa Rica: Landing Runway 25 MRLB DHC6-300 Twin Otter

 

 July 5, 2012 by meneses24

Landing runway 25 at Liberia, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Capts Arguedas and Sibaja. Very smooth landing! One of the passengers decided to take pictures and appears on the video.
 

Toledo, Ohio: Area man achieves his dream of becoming a pilot

 
Flight student Don Coburn, from Sylvania, does a preflight check on a Cessna 182 before proceeding with Instrument flight rules (IFR) training with Suburban Aviation, Inc. Flight Instructor Nick Zink. 
THE BLADE/AMY E. VOIGT

Don Coburn grew up with the quintessential childhood dream that for the vast majority of us is far, far out of reach.

 He wanted to be an astronaut or a fighter pilot, a person who challenges gravity and wins. Then comes reality, that great equalizer that sends all but a tiny percentage of us on to jobs hauling freight, staring at computer screens, crunching numbers, or some other prosaic, unexciting gig.

"Flying has been in my blood since the day I was born," said Mr. Coburn, a 41-year-old Sylvania-area businessman. "I was just born wanting to fly. I wanted to be an astronaut, but my vision wasn’t really good enough to be an astronaut or fighter pilot."

Unlike a lot of guys, he actually did something about it, accepting his limitations and then learning how to fly planes both for pleasure and business. He recently began training for his instrument flight rating, which will allow him to fly into clouds and use only his instruments to navigate in low visibility.

An aeronautical engineer with a degree from Ohio State University, he has been in sales for the past 15 years and runs a business that helps other companies cut their overhead costs. About four years ago he earned his pilot’s license and he owns a share of a Cessna 182 Skylane with a group of other people.

Ogdensburg International Airport (KOGS), New York: Authority seeks air service to Quebec

OGDENSBURG — The operators of the Ogdensburg International Airport are pushing to bring passenger air service to Quebec into the area. 

 Wade A. Davis, executive director of the Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority, pitched the idea to Cape Air of Hyannis, Mass., which provides daily flights between Ogdensburg and Albany.

“We talked to our essential air service provider about air service to Quebec,” he said. “Cape Air was not interested.”

But Andrew W. Bonney, Cape Air’s vice president of planning, said the proposed service was a bad fit for the company.

“Montreal to Ogdensburg is not far enough that the aircraft we fly could provide a competitive service with the automobile. On the other hand, Quebec City is just too far for our airplane,” he said. “It is not so much that we’re not interested; it is just not a great fit for the service we provide.”

The OBPA was encouraged to create closer connections with Quebec in a marketing plan unveiled last month by DCG Corplan, a West Orange, N.J., strategic planning firm.

Though Cape Air declined to provide the service, Mr. Davis said, it recommended another carrier that could provide flights to Quebec.

Meanwhile, ridership continues to grow at the airport, with the total number of passengers increasing from 568 in June 2011 to 832 this June. Part of that increase is due to a surge in Canadian fliers who cross the border to take advantage of cheaper airfares.

“Seeing those numbers continue to go up is encouraging,” said Frederick S. Morrill, OBPA deputy executive director.

Mr. Bonney said if numbers at the airport keep increasing, Cape Air would offer additional flights. “Some of our markets have been so successful that we have been able to add unsubsidized flights,” he said.

Cape Air offers three flights daily between Ogdensburg and Albany, subsidized by the Federal Aviation Administration’s Essential Air Service program. One flight daily continues from Albany to Boston Logan International Airport.

Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel International Airport, India: Central Industrial Security Force man dazzles landing aircraft

AHMEDABAD: It has been a 'happening' week at Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel International Airport. After a close shave for 66 passengers aboard an Air India Mumbai-Ahmedabad flight, another incident has cut into the passenger safety claims of the Airports Authority of India (AAI).

A pilot of a private chartered flight has filed a complaint with Ahmedabad air traffic control department that a Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) official flashed a torch while he was landing early in the morning. He said that the light confused him for a few seconds as it made it difficult to identify the runway. In air navigation, runway periphery lights play a critical role and even street lights and lightbulbs around the airport area are covered from above.

"During their routine security check, CISF officials generally flash lights at distant areas around the runway. Last Tuesday at 1.30 am, a CISF official by mistake flashed a torch towards an incoming flight. The pilot later complained to air traffic control officials that the glare made it difficult to judge the runway's position while landing. The CISF official was warned after the incident," said a city airport official.

Confirming the incident, Ahmedabad airport director R K Singh said, "The incident was brought to our notice and the official procedure was followed."

Senior CISF officials said that no personnel flash torches during take-offs or landings, but we have been informed about the incident last week and taken the possible action. Also last week, an Air India flight was given permission to even as a jeep was still on the runway.

"At 7.35 am, an Air India flight was given permission to land. Soon after the pilot touched ground he spotted a jeep on the runway and applied emergency brakes and a major tragedy was averted. The runway incursion incident happened due to gross negligence of two ATC tower officials and a report has been sent to Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA)," said a senior airport official.

Sources said that the ranking for the two officials will be suspended as per the punitive action and they will be sent for corrective training for 15 days. 


Source:  http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Piper PA-44-180, N 580ND: Aircraft landing gear collapsed while on runway, Grand Forks, North Dakota


FAA  IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 580ND        Make/Model: PA44      Description: PA-44 Seminole, Turbo Seminole
  Date: 07/15/2012     Time: 0420

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: GRAND FORKS   State: ND   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED WHILE ON RUNWAY, GRAND FORKS, ND

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Training      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: FARGO, ND  (GL21)                     Entry date: 07/16/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N580ND

A small aircraft had a bad landing at Grand Forks International Airport around 11:20 p.m. Saturday, but no one was injured, according to a Grand Forks Police Department dispatcher. 

The aircraft's landing gear appeared to have malfunctioned, she said.

Emergency responders were on the scene, but she said the two people in the plane were OK.

Source:    http://www.grandforksherald.com