Sunday, August 9, 2015

Zenith 601 HD, N740JB: Incident occurred August 09, 2015 near Stuart Powell Field Airport (KDVK), Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

The maiden flight of a home-built plane was cut short Sunday night when it crashed into a line of trees in rural Boyle County immediately after taking off.

Pilot James Board, who built the aircraft with a kit, was uninjured in the crash.

Board tried to land the plane in a hayfield when it became clear he didn't have enough lift, Boyle County Sheriff Marty Elliot said.

But Board didn't see a power line near the field as he attempted the emergency landing, Elliot said.

The small single-engine plane, registered through the Federal Aviation Administration as a Zenith 601 HD, caught a wing on the line and crashed into the trees about 6:45 p.m., Elliot said.

The trees "softened the blow," Elliot said. "The hardest hit he said he had was when he unbuckled and fell to the ground."

The plane had taken off from Stuart Powell Airfield in Boyle County.

It was an experimental, or kit plane, Elliot said.

"You can get a kit for eight grand or you can by a full aircraft for thousands and thousands of dollars," he said. "So this man got the kit."

FAA officials removed the plane from the crash site on Monday and are investigating the crash, Elliot said.

It was the second crash involving Stuart Powell Airfield in about a month, but this crash was in no way similar to the crash on July 18, Elliot said.

The plane that crashed in July had gone down while trying to land at the airfield to refuel, FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said. The pilot in that crash suffered minor injuries.


Date: 09-AUG-15
Time: 23:10:00Z
Regis#: N740JB
Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Aircraft Model: CH601
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: DANVILLE
State: Kentucky

AIRCRAFT CLIPPED SOME ELECTRICAL WIRES AND CRASHED BY A HIGHWAY. DANVILLE, KENTUCKY.

JAMES A. BOARD: http://registry.faa.gov/N740JB



BOYLE COUNTY, Ky. (WKYT)- Drivers got quite a scare in Boyle County, Sunday night, when a plane crashed beside a highway.


Pilot James Board took off out of Stuart Powell Field and says it wasn't long before he felt something wasn't right. Board said he ascended to about 350 feet before the plane wouldn't climb any higher. Realizing he wouldn't make it back to the airport, Board began looking for places to land.

"I kept trying to keep away from houses and anything other than open fields," said Board. "I looked at the highway and it was a lot of traffic so I spotted this field and that's where I was heading. Of course I clipped the electric line and there is where I wound up in those cherry trees."

Boyle County Emergency Management Director, Mike Wilder, says the plane came crashing down near Highway 127, north of Junction City.

One woman, said she saw the plane spiral out of control.

"We turned around and plane was sputtering. He clipped the power line and he went right next door to the field. He just crashed right into the field," Marie Wethington said.

Luckily, Board walked away from the accident with only a few cuts on his hands and a bruised shoulder.

"We were just like, you just hit the power line, you're standing up. We were just really shocked that he was ok. I was the one needing more help after running over there," Wethington said.

The FAA was on scene Monday looking into what exactly went wrong with the airplane.

Source:  http://www.wkyt.com

  

  BOYLE COUNTY, Ky. (WTVQ) - A pilot walked away with no injuries after the small plane he was flying crashed just outside of Danville Sunday night, emergency management officials say. 

The crash happened just after 7 p.m. Sunday. Emergency management officials tell ABC 36 News that the struck some high tension wires and went down into some trees along Highway 127, just south of Danville. 

"We are very fortunate," Mike Wilder, the director of Boyle County's emergency management says. The pilot was the only person on-board.

Wilder says small planes fly in and out of the Junction City airport all day long and it's a rare occurrence for a crash. But less than three weeks ago,  Boyle County first responders rushed out to a different plane crash along Simpson Lane in Junction City.

"It's probably been 15-to-20 years since we've had any kind of incident involving an airplane in Boyle County and we've had two in the last month," Wilder says. "We are getting our share."

In the crash three weeks ago, the pilot, who was the only person on-board, suffered non-life threatening injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be sending a investigative team to the crash site Monday morning. 




BOYLE COUNTY, Ky. —Drivers got quite a scare in Boyle County Sunday night, when a small aircraft crashed beside a highway.

Boyle County Emergency Management Director Mike Wilder said the plane went down near Highway 127, north of Junction City.

Wilder said the pilot was not injured.

Maire Wethington was at a yard sale nearby and saw the plane spiral out of control.

"We turned around and (the) plane was sputtering. He clipped the power line and he went right next door to the field. He just crashed right into the field," she said.

Officials have not said where the pilot was going or coming from.

They said the pilot was well enough to leave the scene with his family.

"We were just like, you just hit the power line, you're standing up. We were just really shocked that he was OK. I was the one needing more help after running over there," Wethington said.

The scene will remain secure until federal investigators can take a look at the crash scene.




A pilot walks away uninjured after crashing his small plane in Boyle county Sunday night. It happened about a half-mile south of Danville on Highway 127. Although the crash happened around 7 p.m., deputies will stay on the scene throughout the night to guard the scene until the FAA can investigate in the morning. 


It's the second aviation accident in a month in Boyle County, and both pilots were fortunate enough to walk away. The plane that crashed Sunday evening is a small, single-engine plane. Emergency management officials say it clipped the power line on its way down, reducing the impact when it slammed into the trees and fence near the highway.

Officials say the pilot is a younger man. They're not sure where he's from or where he was going. He left shortly after the crash and refused any sort of medical treatment.

"He was still a little shaken up and a little frightened, but he said that he was glad to be alright, and that was basically it," said Emergency Management Director Mike Wilder. 

This plane crash scene is located along the route of the World's Longest Yard Sale. Due to its location, officials are expecting higher traffic in the morning, meaning they're keeping the scene very secure as they wait for the FAA to arrive around 10 Monday morning. 

Source:  http://www.lex18.com

Aviat A-1 Husky, Wyoming Services LLC, N6090U: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2015 at Compton/Woodley Airport (KCPM), Compton, California

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA238
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Compton, CA
Aircraft: AVIAT INC A 1, registration: N6090U
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, at 1235 Pacific daylight time (PDT), an Aviat Huskey A-1, N6090U, impacted the ground during a banner tow pick up at Compton/Woodley Airport, Compton, California. Aviad Corporation was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and the postcrash fire. The local banner tow flight departed Compton at 1235 PDT. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses to the accident reported that the pilot had attempted unsuccessfully to pick up a tow banner 5 times; the pilot was successful on his 6th attempt. The banner deployed normally and the airplane engine sounded normal. The pilot radioed that he was unable to climb. The banner released and fell to the ground. The airplane was observed wallowing left and right until the airplane spun to the left as it descended and subsequently impacted the ground. The airplane burst into flames and was consumed by the postimpact fire.

The airplane came to rest in a nose down configuration. The underside of the airplane was facing west. The tail section was bent forward towards the east. The fabric of the airplane was thermally consumed by the postimpact fire.

The on scene examination of the airplane by investigators confirmed flight control continuity throughout the airplane. All flight control surfaces were located and attached at their respective locations. The engine was thermally damaged and will be recovered and examined at a later date. The tow hook on the airplane was photographed and examined, no abnormalities were noted. The hook was in the released position. There was no damage noted to the rudder horn or tail section.

The banner system and the banner tow hook were found between runway 25L & 25R. Examination revealed no damage to either the banner or the tow hook rope.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23

WYOMING SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6090U 

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

COMPTON (CBSLA.com) — New details have been released about fiery crash involving a banner-towing airplane at the Compton/Woodley Airport Sunday. 


Witnesses said the pilot had tried to hook the banner several times and after the fifth and final try, his plane took a nosedive onto a taxiway.

Cellphone video captured the aftermath of the crash in the 900 block of West Alondra Boulevard on Sunday morning.

The pilot appeared to have survived the crash but died after his plane caught fire.

“Not just any pilot can be a banner-tow pilot,” said Robin Petgrave, who is a flight instructor at the Compton/Woodley Airport and chief flight instructor for Celebrity Helicopters.

He says the most dangerous part about towing a banner is when the pilot has to dive toward the ground, then pull up at the last minute to hook the cable that carries the banner.

“People when they joke, they say it’s like you’re deciding you’re gonna commit suicide going up the ground had 5 feet above it, you change your mind,” Petgrave said.

Sunday’s crash isn’t the only recent accident involving a banner-towing aircraft. In fact, just a day before, another plane had to make an emergency landing in the Los Angeles River.

Records show there have been 25 accidents involving planes carrying banners in California over the previous two decades, including eight in Los Angeles County alone.

But Petgrave says that’s a very small number.

“It’s because you have very skilled pilots,” he said.





A pilot was killed Sunday when a single-engine plane crashed and burned as it attempted to tow a banner out of Compton-Woodley Airport.


The plane crashed at about 12:30 p.m. on a runway at the county-owned airport in the 900 block of West Alondra Boulevard, about two miles southwest of Compton's central business district. Images from the scene showed the plane on fire, sending thick smoke over the airport.

Several news outlets reported that Philadelphia Eagles fans had hired the plane to fly a banner over the Dallas Cowboys' training camp in Oxnard, but Dennis Lord, a commissioner with the Los Angeles County Aviation Commission, said the aircraft that crashed was attempting to tow a Bud Light banner. The plane with the Eagles banner never took off because of the crash, Lord said.

The pilot, whose name was not released, was the only person aboard the plane, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. A second person suffered minor injuries during a rescue attempt.

One person was killed when a small plane taking off from Compton-Woodley Airport crashed and burned. Kate Larsen reports for the NBC4 News at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. (Published Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015)

Witnesses said the pilot made several failed attempts at swooping down and hooking the banner before the crash.

"The pick up of the banner seemed to be pretty routine. What happened after he attached to the banner is to be determined by the NTSB," he said.

Good Samaritan Michael Robinson said he watched the pilot struggle to get ahold of the banner, eventually losing control of the plane over the runway and hitting the ground.

A few seconds later, Robinson, who is also a pilot, says the plane caught fire. He and five others raced to the wreckage to try and help the pilot, who was trapped inside.

"He said a couple times, 'Help me.' It was very vague, very weak," Robinson said.

Another good Samaritan, Enkone Goodlow, said fire extinguishers weren't enough, so members of the pilot's banner crew drove a crash truck to the wreckage. But none of the first six good Samaritans were airport employees.

"No one knew how to work the truck, so I'm like no, we have to save a life. I jumped in the back of the truck, I took off the hose," Goodlow said.

Lord said all three employees working at the airport were trained to work the crash truck, but two were out to lunch when the banner plane crashed. The third did not see the crash, Lord said.

The National Transportation Safety Board was investigating the crash.

"The NTSB will continue to look at that investigation and determine whether there needs to be some improvements in response or if indeed there was a lack of communication somewhere," Lord said.

Source: http://www.nbclosangeles.com

Fundraiser: http://www.gofundme.com


Los Angeles News | FOX 11 LA KTTV






COMPTON (CBSLA.com/AP) — A pilot was killed when a small, banner-towing airplane crashed during takeoff from a Southern California municipal airport, authorities said on Monday.

The crash occurred as the single-engine Aviat Husky A-1 was picking up a banner at Compton/Woodley Airport located in the 900 block of West Alondra Boulevard on Sunday, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

Witnesses said the pilot tried several times to hook a banner advertising a beer brand before taking off with it.

The plane was engulfed in flames, leaving behind a wreckage of twisting metal.

A Los Angeles County coroner’s spokesman said the pilot has not been identified because his body was badly burned.

The FAA’s online registry shows the plane is owned by a firm called Wyoming Services in Laramie, Wyoming.

Matt Lombardo of NJ.com first reported that the plane was supposed to carry a banner over a Dallas Cowboys practice in Oxnard paid for by Philadelphia Eagles fans chiding “We’ve Got DeMarco” referring to off-season signing of former Cowboys running back DeMarco Murry.

“We’ve Got DeMarco” started apparently as a GoFundMe page that raised money to fly the banner. Organizers would now like to raise money for the pilot’s family. Eagles and Cowboys fans have both been contributing. For more about the fundraiser, click here.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board was investigating the crash.

Officials said the Compton/Woodley Airport has been shut down for the investigation.

The city of Compton is about 10 miles south of downtown Los Angeles.

---------------------

A pilot was killed Sunday afternoon when his small banner-towing plane crashed during takeoff at Compton/Woodley Airport, officials said.

The crash occurred about 12:30 p.m. Sunday, after the single-engine Aviat A1 hooked a banner, officials said. The pilot was the only person on board, said Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration's Pacific Division.

No one on the ground was hurt.

Enkone Goodlow, an artist who rents a hangar at the airport, said he and some spectators had watched the pilot repeatedly try to hook a Bud Light banner. The banner was tied to a mastpole on the ground and the pilot would fly by and try to snare it with a grappling hook dangling from the plane before pulling up.

"Usually, people get it the first time if not the second time, but it took [the pilot] seven times," Goodlow said. "We thought it was not normal. I wondered what was going on when after the seventh successful hook, all of a sudden, his plane nosed to the ground. We ran full blast toward it, thinking we could pull him out."

But they were too late. With the plane engulfed in flames, Goodlow said he jumped on an airport-based fire truck and headed to the crash scene.

"You never want to see accidents like this happen, but we were scrambling, just trying to respond," he added.

The pilot's name has not been released. The FAA's online registry shows the plane is registered to a company called Wyoming Services in Laramie, Wyo.

Officials from the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

Source:   http://www.latimes.com



COMPTON, Calif. (KABC) -- A single-engine plane crashed and burst into flames during takeoff at Compton/Woodley Airport in Compton Sunday afternoon, killing the pilot and severely injuring another person on the ground.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a banner-towing Aviat A-1 Husky crashed while picking up a banner at the airport in the 900 block of W. Alondra Boulevard shortly after 12:30 p.m.

"The plane was flying directly over my house, I say approximately 200 feet, which is way too low," neighbor Robert Ray said.

"Next thing you know, you see smoke, big smoke going up," witness Jennifer Culpepper said.

The pilot was the only person on board. A person on the ground attempting to aid the pilot suffered non-life threatening burn injuries.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Original article can be found here:  http://abc7.com

A pilot died Sunday when a single-engine plane attempting to pick up a banner at the Compton/Woodley Airport crashed, prompting a closure of the area, officials said.

The plane crashed at the airport, located at 901 West Alondra Blvd., for unknown reasons around 12:35 p.m., said Sgt. Ron Reynolds with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Compton Station.

The single-engine, banner-towing aircraft was the only plane involved, officials said.

It was not immediately known if anyone else was injured.

A National Transportation Safety Board official and one or more people with the Federal Aviation Administration were expected to respond to the scene, FAA’s Ian Gregor said around 2:15 p.m.

The airport was closed after the crash and it was not known when it would reopen, Reynolds said.

Source:  http://ktla.com

A pilot was killed Sunday afternoon when his small banner-towing plane crashed during takeoff at Compton/Woodley Airport, officials said.

The crash occurred about 12:30 p.m. Sunday, after the single-engine Aviat A1 hooked a banner, officials said. The pilot was the only person on board, said Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration's Pacific Division.

No one on the ground was hurt.

Enkone Goodlow, an artist who rents a hangar at the airport, said he and some spectators had watched the pilot repeatedly try to hook a Bud Light banner. The banner was tied to a mastpole on the ground and the pilot would fly by and try to snare it with a grappling hook dangling from the plane before pulling up.

"Usually, people get it the first time if not the second time, but it took [the pilot] seven times," Goodlow said. "We thought it was not normal. I wondered what was going on when after the seventh successful hook, all of a sudden, his plane nosed to the ground. We ran full blast toward it, thinking we could pull him out."

But they were too late. With the plane engulfed in flames, Goodlow said he jumped on an airport-based fire truck and headed to the crash scene.

"You never want to see accidents like this happen, but we were scrambling, just trying to respond," he added.

The pilot's name has not been released. The FAA's online registry shows the plane is registered to a company called Wyoming Services in Laramie, Wyo.

Officials from the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

Source:   http://www.latimes.com

Mooney M20J 201, N9142H: Incident occurred August 09, 2015 at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Florida

Date: 09-AUG-15
Time: 17:18:00Z
Regis#: N9142H
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH GEAR STUCK IN THE UP POSITION, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL.

SAMAND AVIATION HOLDINGS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9142H





FORT LAUDERDALE (CBSMiami) – A small plane was forced to land on its ‘belly’ at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport on Sunday.

An airplane reported an unsafe landing gear indicator as it approached the airport according to Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue.

The pilot then burned off fuel in a safe area around the airport before making a gear up landing on runway number 27.

The small plane landed safely without any incident or injuries.

Once the aircraft is towed the runway will reopen. 

Raw Video: https://twitter.com/FtLaudFire 


Story, video and photo: http://miami.cbslocal.com

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, N726JB: Accident occurred August 09, 2015 at Clovis Municipal Airport (KCVN), New Mexico

JAMES L. BOSTWICK: http://registry.faa.gov/N726JB

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA354
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Clovis, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA C421B, registration: N726JB
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, at 0925 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 421B, N726JB, impacted terrain following a loss of left engine power during final approach for landing at Clovis Municipal Airport (CVN), Clovis, New Mexico. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of accident. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Melrose, New Mexico, and was destined to CVN.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


James Bostwick
~

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) - Monday, a Clovis pilot remains in serious condition at University Medical Center following a plane crash yesterday.

It happened at the Clovis airport at around 9 a.m. Sunday morning.

The pilot, 66-year-old James Bostwick, was traveling from Melrose to Clovis when he reported mechanical failure which resulted in the crash landing.

James’ oldest brother, Wendell Bostwick, says James has been a pilot for many years.

He was flown here to UMC yesterday by aero care. 

We were told by the hospital that he is still in serious condition, but family are here with him and say he has been conscious this whole time. Wendell says James will face several surgeries down the road of recovery

"And, whenever you get a phone call and it says, 'Is your brother James Bostwick? Yes. He's been in an airplane accident.' That is pretty traumatic, but they come real quick and say that he's still breathing and he's got some gashes… and we're loading him in the ambulance," Wendell Bostwick said. 

Wendell says James has been a pilot now for 42 years. He actually got his pilot's license the day he graduated from college.

"He's an excellent, excellent pilot,” Wendell said. “He's one of these, that if the book says you go check this, he'll check it at least once and if it's handy, he'll check it twice."

Wendell says James took off from Melrose and says when he was preparing to land his twin engine plane at the Clovis airport, the left engine started to flutter. James try to correct it, but when he did- the right engine started to flutter. But, before he could try to correct the right engine, the plane crashed.

A trip James has taken hundreds of times.

"I know he did his walk around, his pre-flight,” Wendell said. “He does all of that regardless, if he flies in and he's gone 20 minutes, he does his pre-flight again. So, that's just the kind of pilot he is."

Wendell says though James is in serious condition and has a long road of recovery, he is in good spirits.

"Personality is the same,” Wendell said. “We're believers and know that this is all in God's hands and he's going to take care of this deal."

The plane crash is still under investigation by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Bostwick's family say they are just asking the community to have him and his doctors in their thoughts and prayers.

Source:  http://www.kcbd.com



James Bostwick felt the left engine of his Cessna 421B Golden Eagle plane “start fluttering” just as he was coming in for a landing at Clovis Municipal Airport on Sunday morning.

“He was high enough to get it corrected, but then it cleared up and the right engine started fluttering,” said Bostwick’s brother, Curry County Commissioner Wendell Bostwick.

Wendell Bostwick said his brother was making allowances for the left-engine problems, and they turned out to be “double wrong” when the right engine sputtered.

“It all happened in about 20 seconds,” he said.

James Bostwick suffered a broken left ankle, collapsed lung, broken shoulder blade and nine broken ribs in the crash, his brother said.

He also suffered a gash on his forehead that required 50 stitches to close.

He’s hospitalized in Lubbock’s University Medical Center where he’s expected to undergo a series of surgeries in the next few days.

James Bostwick, who was alone on the plane, was flying to Clovis from his hometown of Melrose, where the Cessna had been hangared about four months, Wendell Bostwick said.

Another brother had done some maintenance on the plane in Melrose, but Wendell Bostwick said the maintenance was unrelated to the problems his brother experienced while landing.

Officials have not determined a cause of the crash, but Wendell Bostwick said, “James thinks there may have been some fuel issues.”

Wendell Bostwick said he did not want to speculate on a cause beyond that.

James Bostwick, 66, has been flying about 40 years, his brother said, and owns four planes.

Wendell Bostwick said his brother was talking to rescuers who helped him out of the demolished plane and has been able to communicate well with family members since.

The accident happened about 9:30 Sunday morning and forced the airport to close its runway until around noon Sunday.

Airport Manager Cody Mills said Boutique Air has been able to keep its scheduled flights to and from Dallas.

Mills said Monday the Bostwick plane was still on site and a taxiway near the accident would remain closed until the plane could be removed.

Source:  http://cnjonline.com


CLOVIS, NM -   A Clovis man remains hospitalized at UMC tonight, after his plane crashed while trying to land the morning of August 9.

It happened at the Clovis airport around 9: a.m.

After first responders arrived they immediately flew the pilot here to Lubbock. 

He suffered critical injuries, but KCBD has now told he's in serious condition. 

The pilot, James Bostwick, was flying from Melrose to Clovis when the Curry County Sheriff's office tells us he reported a a mechanical failure as he was approaching the Clovis Municipal Airport. 

That malfunction is thought to be what led to Bostwick's crash landing. The crash is being investigated by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board. 

KCBD did find an aviation based article online that says Bostwick was recognized by the FAA in 2013 for setting a positive example. 

He is included into the prestigious FAA Airmen Certification Database, which names him and other pilots who have meet or exceeded the high educational, licensing and medical standards established by the FAA. 

Story, video and photo: http://www.kcbd.com




Airlines still not ready to invest in direct Asia Pacific flight from Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania

Philadelphia has long wanted a direct flight to the Asia Pacific region. A survey of business travelers here in 2012 found the top desired international business destinations were Tokyo, Shanghai, Beijing and Mumbai, India.

Philadelphia already has a lot of international service to Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. But attracting a nonstop flight to China, Japan, Hong Kong, or Korea has proven difficult.

"We are the largest metropolitan area in the United States without direct nonstop service to the Asia Pacific," Philadelphia International Airport CEO Mark Gale said in a recent interview.

But it's not for lack of trying. "I talk to carriers about this almost on a weekly basis," Gale said.

Still, Philadelphia's proximity to New York and Washington, as well as the presence of a dominant hub carrier, and uncertainty whether there would be enough daily top-paying corporate travelers are key reasons the local airport has struggled to get off the ground with a direct flight to Asia.

American Airlines, Philadelphia's hub carrier with more than 450 daily flights after merging with US Airways, is serious about expanding service to Asia. The world's largest airline has dedicated some of its newest airplanes to flying there - from Dallas-Fort Worth, Chicago, and Los Angeles. But not Philadelphia.

"For the foreseeable future, our Asia growth is going to be focused on growing out our Los Angeles gateway," American president Scott Kirby said last month on a quarterly earnings conference call.

Philadelphia may one day get an Asia flight, but not anytime soon. "We will continue to look at it over time," CEO Doug Parker said. "We're not saying that it won't make sense at some point in time."

A big hurdle to Philadelphia getting a nonstop flight to Asia is its location - sandwiched between Newark, N.J., and New York John F. Kennedy International airports, which have lots of direct Asia flights - and to the south, Washington Dulles airport, which has Asia service.

"I've had many discussions, particularly with foreign flag carriers that look at Philadelphia and say, 'How easy is it for folks to get to New York?' " Gale said. "In many cases, they already have a flight, and there's fear if they add a flight in Philadelphia it will cannibalize one of their other routes."

Besides proximity to three airports with direct Asia flights, Philadelphia is a hub for American, which controls 76 percent of the market and could threaten a rival airline's ability to make an Asian flight from here viable. Companies often have corporate travel accounts with a hub carrier, and corporate sales are the bread and butter for airlines.

"If an airline were to come into Philadelphia and not be aligned with American, either through a code share or a revenue share, they need to make sure they are going to get enough passengers on those aircraft to make a profit," Gale said.

"It's a lot easier to fill that aircraft, if you are a foreign flag carrier, and you have a business relationship with the hub carrier," Gale said. "I think, ultimately, Philadelphia will gain an Asia Pacific flight, if not by American Airlines directly, then by a foreign carrier that potentially has an arrangement with American."

By contrast, Boston, which does not have a hub airline, has flights to Asia operated by several foreign airlines. Boston tried for years to get the service. The city's location 220 miles from New York was an added advantage.

To attract any new air service to Asia, Philadelphia airport officials must make the case that the planes would be filled regularly with full-paying business travelers, as well as budget-conscious leisure travelers.

From Philadelphia, a flight to Beijing, Shanghai or Seoul would take 14 hours and require two aircraft, one on either end, plus a third plane if parts or maintenance were required. The latest-generation airplanes capable of such a long-haul route cost $250 million to $300 million.

That's a hefty investment that an airline must recover from passenger and cargo revenue.

"You've got to make certain the economics are right, not that they won't be at some point," one American executive said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because he did not want to speak for management. "Philadelphia's prospects for international service to Asia got much better post-merger" with the combination of American and US Airways.

American has orders for 42 Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft and 22 Airbus A350s through 2019. The long-range aircraft are smaller - with fewer seats - and are cheaper to operate because they burn 20 percent less fuel than older Boeing 767 and 777s.

Now, American funnels East Coast passengers to Asia through Dallas, Chicago or Los Angeles. Should there be a flight to the Far East from Philadelphia, it would head north over the North Pole. The "catchment"area for the majority of passengers would be the East Coast.

"Half the U.S. population lives on the East Coast," said  Seth Kaplan, managing partner of Airline Weekly, an industry publication. "The benefit of Philadelphia vis-a-vis New York or Washington is that it's a rather robust hub for American with a lot of feeder flights that they don't have at JFK."

For example, an Asia flight from here might start in Miami or Charlotte, which are both American hubs. The Philadelphia flight would likely depart midday, after morning connecting traffic had arrived, bringing potential travelers to go onward to Asia.

About 70 percent of American's international passengers in Philadelphia connect from elsewhere, and 30 percent are local. On some flights to Europe and the Middle East, as few as 10 percent of passengers originated in Philadelphia, American said.

Philadelphia's "Holy Grail" is lower operating costs than Newark, Dulles, and JFK airports. "Keeping those costs down potentially opens up new markets out of Philadelphia," said a former US Airways official, who requested anonymity because he no longer works for the company.

Gale and his airport staff, in talking to airlines about flying to Asia, provide regional data and statistics from the Chamber of Commerce, Select Greater Philadelphia, Visit Philly, and the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau.

When Qatar Airways began flying from Philadelphia to Doha, the Qatari capital, in April 2014, the deal was sealed with the merger of US Airways and American, Gale recalled. American is a member of the Oneworld global airline alliance, and so is Qatar.

As alliance members, American and Qatar share passengers and revenue on legs of a journey. Qatar may bring travelers from Pakistan or Tanzania, who then board American flights to go to Detroit or Pittsburgh.

Kaplan said the lowest-risk "starter Asian market" for Philadelphia might be Tokyo. "It's a high-volume route, a well-developed market with hubs on both endsin Philadelphia and Tokyo for American and Japan Airlines. You can sell the connections on either end."

American and Japan Airlines have a joint business venture on trans-Pacific routes, which is a "closer relationship than an alliance," Kaplan said. American also has joint ventures with British Airways, Iberia, and Finnair to Europe.

"China and India are moving up constantly in Philadelphia, even without direct nonstop flights," said Jack Ferguson, CEO of the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Middle-class consumers in those countries are traveling more, and their visas now are valid for 10 years. "When you have a 10-year visa, it opens up travel to more U.S. cities," Ferguson said.

China had the second-largest number of international visitors and overnight hotel stays in Philadelphia in 2014, according to the Commerce Department's Office of Travel and Tourism. India was fifth and Japan was in the top 10. The greatest number of foreign visitors - 87,000 - was from the United Kingdom.

Last year, Philadelphia saw a 52 percent increase in visitors from China, to 61,000. The 21,000 travelers from Japan was a 40 percent increase from 2013.

"Asians are definitely traveling and they are figuring out ways to get here," Ferguson said. "Any time we can create an opportunity where they can get here easier than they do today, we win."

Original article can be found here: http://www.philly.com

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N8075P, Air Ads Inc: Accident occurred July 04, 2015 in Carlsbad, California



The crash-landing of a small plane on Carlsbad State Beach that injured a 12-year-old boy was most likely due to pilot error and an empty fuel tank, according to a report released by the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Piper PA18, registered to Air Ads Inc., out of Gillespie Field in El Cajon, lost engine power while towing an advertising banner on the Fourth of July. It crashed on the crowded beach near Cannon Road, then flipped over by the waterline.

According to the report, which includes factual findings and a probable cause determined by NTSB officials, the pilot of the single-engine plane, Luke William Kanagy, most likely failed to “manage the fuel system properly,” and the lack of fuel resulted in engine failure.

Previous reports suggested that the engine malfunctioned during flight.

Kanagy was not injured in the accident, but the plane struck Nicholas Baer, 12, who was on the beach at the time. Baer suffered a concussion, a sizable gash to his head and a damaged skull. He underwent emergency brain surgery at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. Doctors later reported that the surgery was successful.

The report, which was released last week, comes in the midst of a lawsuit, filed by Nicholas’ family in San Diego Superior Court, against Kanagy, the banner advertising company Air Ads, and its owner James Oakley.

Attorney David S. Casey Jr., who is representing Nicholas’ family in the suit, said the final report helps prove that the boy’s injuries are directly due to Kanagy’s negligence.

“He just ran out of gas. It’s something that should never have occurred,” Casey said. “It’s a clear error on behalf of the pilot.”

NTSB investigator Howard Plagens, whose analysis of the plane and crash site was used to compile the report, said the aircraft had two fuel tanks, one on the left and right. The plane was also equipped with a fuel selector valve, which allows the pilot to switch fuel tanks when one is running low during flight.

Plagens said there was fuel in the right tank, but the plane’s selector valve was pointing to the left tank, which was empty.

The Carlsbad crash is one of more than 25 accidents involving banner planes in California over the past two decades, based on a San Diego Union-Tribune review of Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB records in August.

The cause of the California accidents vary. About a quarter were due to engine failure. More than half occurred while cruising or maneuvering the aircraft, records show, and 62 percent resulted in injury or death.

Aviation experts say banner flying isn’t necessarily dangerous, but planes do fly at low altitudes — usually above crowded areas.

Casey said Nicholas is still recovering from the accident, but he’s able to participate in sports again, which is “a step in a positive direction.”

Oakley, owner of Air Ads, said he could not comment on the accident or the report because of the pending lawsuit, but confirmed that Kanagy is no longer an employee with the company.

According to the most recent FAA Airmen Certification Database, Kanagy is licensed to fly commercially and is a certified flight instructor of single-engine planes.

Messages to Kanagy seeking comment went unanswered.

Source: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com



AIR ADS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N8075P

NTSB Identification: WPR15CA207 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 04, 2015 in Carlsbad, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/17/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N8075P
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was towing a banner along a beach when the engine gradually lost power, and applying carburetor heat had no effect. A forced landing was initiated on the beach, and during the landing roll the airplane struck a person before it nosed over into the surf. The engine mount, right wing, and right rear lift strut were substantially damaged. 

Postaccident examination on site revealed that the fuel selector valve was in the left tank position. A follow up examination determined that no fuel was visible in the left fuel tank site gauge inside the cockpit area. The right wing filler cap was removed, and fuel was observed in the right tank. Fuel drained from the sump at the rear of the right tank, but nothing drained from the sump at the rear of the left tank. No fuel drained from the gascolator on the firewall. The operator reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to manage the fuel system properly during a banner tow operation resulting in a loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA San Diego FSDO-09





Nicholas Baer, 12, of Carlsbad, recovering after being hit by an airplane's propeller as the aircraft crashed onto a Carlsbad beach on the Fourth of July. 

CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8




Nicholas Baer, 12, planned to spend his Fourth of July body boarding with friends at Carlsbad State Beach, but plans changed about an hour into the visit. There’s been a plane crash, a family friend told the boy’s mother on the phone. 

“I think he got hit in the head by the propeller,” the friend said.

The aircraft was a Piper PA18 towing an advertising banner, and a federal report about the crash is expected this week. Meanwhile, U-T Watchdog decided to check and see how common such crashes are.

Accidents involving “banner towing” are tracked by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Records show that there have been 25 aircraft accidents involving such planes in California over the past two decades, and more than 62 percent resulted in injury or death. Four accidents occurred in San Diego, and eight in Los Angeles County.

Aviation experts say banner flying isn't necessarily dangerous, but planes do fly at low elevations — usually above crowded areas — and the drag from towing a banner can put strain on the single-engine planes, which are typically used to fly advertisements.

In May 2012, a Cessna 150 towing a banner crash landed in San Diego Bay because of a mechanical malfunction. No one was injured.

According to reports from the NTSB that conducted an investigation of the incident, “both occupants reported that they did not have time to troubleshoot, due to low altitude.”

Incident records show that advertisements in the air can also distract surrounding pilots. Following a 2003 incident near Pearland, Texas, a pilot admitted to NTSB investigators that he was distracted while landing by banner towing activity adjacent to the runway. The pilot landed at the edge of the grass runway and struck a ditch, causing substantial damage to the plane.

Cities including Huntington Beach and San Francisco have attempted to ban aerial ads in recent years for safety reasons or aesthetic purposes, but dropped the efforts in fear of lawsuits or pressure from the FAA, which regulates all flight activity.

The cause of other California accidents vary. About a quarter were due to engine failure, records show, and more than half occurred while cruising or maneuvering the aircraft.

“Cars quit on a freeway. Cars sometimes fail to start,” said Barry Bardack, chief flight instructor for the Golden State Flying Club at Gillespie Field in El Cajon. “Airplane engines have an amazing ability to revive mid-air, but they also occasionally fail.”

Air Ads owner Jim Oakley declined to comment on the crash or identify the man flying the aircraft, but said the pilot was licensed to fly commercially and had the required qualifications to tow banners.

Oakley said his staff tends to be young, about 26 years old, since banner towing is a way for aspiring pilots to rack up flight time and advance to a career flying commercially.

Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA Pacific division, said in an email that the agency requires all pilots or companies to meet certain standards before banner-towing flights can take place. An inspector will examine banner attaching devices or hitches to ensure that release cable mechanisms are functioning.

All pilots must have successfully completed a banner towing training program, have a reliable record of past flight experience and be able to demonstrate a sample banner pickup to FAA inspector, Gregor said.

“The most challenging part is picking up the message. Not towing it,” Oakley said. “It’s the part that creates the most excitement for a pilot.”

Planes usually take off without the banner, loop back around to the airport, and align the plane in between two poles, where the banner tow rope is suspended. If done correctly, Oakley said, a hook behind the plane will latch on to the rope and begin pulling the banner into the air.

On December 31, 2006, a pilot at Gillespie Field missed the banner tow line, pitched upward and then went into a nose-down spiral. According to incident reports, witnesses said the plane spun more than one and a half times before colliding with the runway. The pilot was killed.

In July 2013, a pilot was conducting a low fly-by for ground crew to inspect the banner. After the pass the plane began to climb and airspeed deteriorated. The airplane stalled, hit wires and crash-landed on a hillside in Long Beach. The pilot suffered minor injuries.

Lee Anne Lardy, projects manager for San Diego County airports, said pilots or companies must be approved by the FAA and have proper insurance to receive a 10-year license with the county. Information pertaining to the license must also be updated each year.

Two companies, Air Ads and Aerial Sign North Inc., are the only companies licensed with the county, Lardy said.

The Watchdog used data collected from the NTSB and FAA and reviewed accidents categorized as banner tows under the purpose of flight. The review found 191 banner-related accidents between April 1995 and July of this year. Florida reported the most accidents at 51. California had the second most with 25, followed by New Jersey and South Carolina.

In the Carlsbad crash, officials at the scene reported that the single-engine plane lost power while towing a banner advertisement over the holiday crowd on the beach near Cannon Road. It was registered to Air Ads Inc. out of Gillespie Field.

The pilot wasn’t hurt, but the boy suffered a concussion, a sizable gash to his head and a damaged skull. He underwent emergency brain surgery at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. Doctors later reported that the surgery was successful and the boy is recovering well.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

CARLSBAD (CBS 8) -   Bob Griscom, an aviation expert and lifelong pilot who served 25 years as an aircraft accident investigator with the FAA, says if the pilot had decided to land in the water instead of the beach, he may not have survived.

Bob says that unlike larger planes, the landing gears on smaller planes are not retractable.

"When you hit the water, it’s as if the landing gear hit a brick wall, then the airplane will pitch forward," says Griscom. "The windshield will immediately get a face full of ocean and the pilot will very likely become unconscious very quickly and the airplane sinks and he drowns."

Bob Griscom says the FAA and NTSB will now be investigating why the engine quit and they will be taking a closer look at the pilot, including his conduct the day before the flight.

"They will also find out how much sleep the pilot had the day before and whether he was out partying, whatever it might be," says Griscom. "They will look into all of those factors."

Story and video:  http://www.cbs8.com

Cessna 150J, Banner Joe, N50814:
El Cajon fire fighters gather around a plane which crashed at Gillespie Field in 2006.
~



NTSB Identification: LAX07LA067
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Sunday, December 31, 2006 in San Diego, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/31/2008
Aircraft: Cessna 150J, registration: N50814
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a banner pickup maneuver between two poles, witnesses saw the airplane approach the poles at the correct altitude with the flaps extended as prescribed; however, it appeared to be flying at a slower than normal speed for the pickup. Procedures dictate that just before the airplane reaches the pickup poles, the pilot is supposed to apply full power, and pitch the nose of the airplane up approximately 45 degrees to swing the hook into the towline strung between the pickup poles. As the airplane reached the poles, the engine noise did not increase and the airplane did not pitch up enough initially to capture the towline, but it did pitch to the correct 45-degree angle seconds after the miss. The engine power did not increase as the airplane continued to climb until it stalled, and then rolled over to the left into the ground. Investigators noted no preimpact anomalies with the engine, engine controls, or airframe.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper use of the throttle and failure to maintain an adequate airspeed that resulted in a stall/spin.

On December 31, 2006, about 1100 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 150J, N50814, collided with terrain at Gillespie Field, San Diego, California. Banner Joe was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The commercial pilot was killed. The airplane was substantially damaged. The local banner tow flight departed Gillespie about 5 minutes prior to the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. 

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector interviewed the owner of the company who described a normal banner pickup procedure. Company personnel lay out the banner for pickup on the north side of runway 27R between the runway and the north ramp. The towline is strung between two 10-foot-tall poles, and the banner is laid out to the west of the poles. The towing airplane takes off with 40 feet of towline and a grapple hook. The line is secured to the left horizontal stabilizer and the left wing strut by tape. The remaining line and the hook is secured in the cabin. After takeoff, the pilot throws out the hook and towline. The tape breaks away and the line and hook trail behind the airplane. The pilot flies over the banner pickup location, and an assistant on the ground verifies the proper deployment of the towline and hook. The towing airplane makes another circuit of the traffic pattern, and approaches the banner by flying parallel to runway 27R at 20 feet above ground level (agl). The pilot makes the approach to the banner with partial engine power at 55 to 60 mph, with 10-20 degrees of flap extension, and the grapple hook trailing behind on approximately 40 feet of towline. Just before the airplane reaches the pickup poles, the pilot is supposed to apply full power, and pitch the nose of the airplane up approximately 45 degrees. This maneuver will swing the hook into the towline strung between the pickup poles. The airplane will continue to climb at approximately 45 degrees, "peeling" the banner off the ground. The pilot is to then level out at approximately 200 feet agl. The flaps stay at 10-20 degrees, and the banner is towed between 55 and 60 mph the entire flight.

At the time of the accident, the owner was at the banner pickup poles. He stated that the airplane approached the poles at the correct altitude, but it appeared to be flying at a slower than normal pickup speed. The flaps were extended as prescribed. The owner reported that as the airplane reached the pickup poles, he did not hear an increase to the engine noise and the airplane did not pitch up enough initially to capture the towline, but it did pitch to the correct 45-degree angle seconds after the miss. The engine power did not increase, and the airplane continued to climb until it rolled over to the left and into the ground.

Another witness, a certified flight instructor who had observed many banner pickups, stated that the airplane approached the towline at the usual low cruise power setting. It did not hook up with the banner, but the nose of the airplane pitched up steeply as usual. He did not hear the usual engine roar; the power setting appeared to remain the same as the approach. The airplane continued climbing in a steep nose up pitch attitude to approximately 400 feet agl, and the airspeed appeared to bleed off. The wings remained level as the nose pitched forward. The airplane's pitch attitude leveled off momentarily, and the airspeed was very low. The engine sounds remained the same throughout the maneuver. He thought that the airplane stalled, and then it went extremely nose down and turned left. He said that it entered a spin, and made 1 3/4 turns before the airplane collided with the runway surface. He did not see anything fall off the airplane, and thought that the airplane operated normally throughout the maneuver.

The FAA indicated that the 30-year-old commercial pilot had about 1,200 hours total time. Banner towing training and actual banner towing accounted for 21.8 hours, with eight banner towing flights, solo and dual.

During the airframe examination, it was noted that the airplane had been modified with a Cessna tow release mechanism, the installation of a Lycoming O-360 engine, and an 18-gallon auxiliary fuel tank. It also had a wing leading edge cuff, long range fuel tanks, and Madras Air Service "Super Tips." Control continuity was established throughout the airplane. The flap actuator was measured at 4 inches, equating to a 20-degree flap extension position. The elevator trim tab actuator's extension measured 1.125 inches, which equated to a 5-degree down trim tab position.

The engine examination revealed no evidence of preimpact catastrophic mechanical malfunction or fire. The crankshaft was manually rotated and gear and valve train continuity was established. Each cylinder displayed "thumb compression." The spark plug electrodes displayed coloration consistent with normal operation. A borescope examination of the cylinders was unremarkable. The engine driven fuel pump was disassembled and no discrepancies or contaminates were noted. All engine fuel lines were in place and secure. Engine control cables were compromised in the impact. The magnetos produced a spark on all leads.

The crankshaft separated aft of the propeller flange. The spinner exhibited aft crush and rotational scoring. One propeller blade displayed deep and extensive chordwise scratches, leading edge damage, and twisted. The second propeller blade was bent aft approximately 5 degrees in a large radius bend starting about 15 inches from the hub. The separation surfaces on the crankshaft displayed signatures consistent with ductile overload (45-degree sheer lips and no beach marking).