Friday, March 18, 2022

In Memoriam: Jack C. Lewis, Jr.

Jack C. Lewis, Jr.
May 23, 1922 - February 27, 2022
~



Jack Lewis, a Bend resident since 1967, packed as much as he could into every minute of his 99 years and 240 days on this planet. He died February 27, 2022, diminished by blindness, hearing loss and a mind that played tricks on him, but he was no less the man who fiercely loved his family, fought for his country and worshiped his God.

One enduring theme that ran through his life was his love of speed - whether in an automobile, plane or boat. In 1939, in his hometown of Healdsburg, California, he outran a police car in his hopped-up Model A, only to learn that the police officer was his dad, Jack C. Lewis Sr., who took young Jack's license away for a year.

He earned his pilot's license while still in high school and years later would hold a world speed record. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps where he flew a P-38 Lightning fighter on 109 missions in the Pacific, including over China, Indonesia, New Guinea and the Philippines. He is credited with shooting down three Japanese Zeros and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. He relived his war stories to the end, often with regret for the terrible loss of life he witnessed.

After he returned home in late 1944, he went to Alaska to fish, hunt and fly, owned an airport in Novato, California, and taught dozens of people to fly until he was called back for the Korean War in 1950. The Air Force sent Lt. J.C. Lewis to Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico where he test-piloted F-86 Saber jets. On Aug. 18, 1951, he and three fellow pilots set a world speed record by flying the 237 miles from Chicago to Detroit in 21 minutes at 672 mph, a record they held for only two weeks.

In 1952, he left the Air Force and moved his wife Clara and their newborn daughter Lee to Ukiah, California, where the next three children - Kathy, Chuck and Jim - were born. The family later moved to Lake Tahoe, Portland, and Lakeview, finally ending up in Bend in 1967 where Jack worked as a realtor and ranch appraiser until he retired in his 80s.

He flew air ambulance and fire watch in Lakeview, including over Camp Cottonwood where he'd drop supplies with a note that said: "Smokey the Bear is watching Lee and Kathy Lewis to make sure their beds are made." In Bend, he owned several planes, including a 300 hp turbocharged Bellanca Viking, and occasionally buzzed his home on Dekalb Avenue at low altitude, a signal that he needed a ride home from the Bend Airport.

In 1975, he brokered a rare real estate deal on the Metolius Arm of Lake Billy Chinook for individuals eager to build summer homes there. He couldn't afford his own lot, but the kindness of the seller let him make payments, resulting in lakefront acreage where the family built a cabin over several years, doing most of the work themselves. Four generations of Lewises have spent summers there. Stories and adventures abound but one favorite is how Jack would pull his 300 hp Seaswirl (his substitute for a Corvette) alongside another boater and casually challenge the driver to a race. He'd stay neck and neck until the last moment when he'd throttle up, leaving the competitor in his wake and laughing all the way back to the cabin.

Jack's family remembers how he loved animals, especially small black poodles. They recall how he drove faster than reasonable on gravel roads, was early for everything and didn't like landing a plane for someone who had to pee. For a guy who owned a lake cabin, he rarely got in the water and preferred blowing off the decks and getting up early to wash dishes and watch eagles and osprey perform aerobatics over the lake. He drank his coffee black and despised pink. If a grandchild accidentally hit him in the head with a frisbee, he'd burn it in the woodstove. He was a jokester and loved telling stories, especially off-color ones that sometimes caused people to squirm.

He skied at Mt. Bachelor and occasionally golfed but had no real hobbies except "dinking around," whether at the cabin or planting and nurturing trees and then obsessively raking pine needles and cones to help prevent forest fire at the house he and Clara built on Bend's westside in 1981. They sold the home in 2019 and moved to Touchmark.

He was one of the oldest members of Central Oregon Band of Brothers and was able to go with the Honor Flight of Eastern Oregon to Washington, D.C. in 2011. He was a member of the Westside Church and a men's bible study group.

He's survived by his wife of 71 years, Clara Burnham Lewis; children Lee Lewis Husk and husband Dave; and their three children Lindsey, Casey and Jake Husk; Kathy Lewis and her four children Jessica Lloyd, Elizabeth Haase, Katy Wilhelm and Zachary Lloyd; Chuck Lewis and wife Eliza, and children Max and Ann Lewis; and Jim Lewis and wife Pam, and their two children, Andrea and Samantha Lewis. In addition, he left seven great-grandchildren: Jonathan Lloyd; Griffin and Orion Haase; Clara and Olivia Wilhelm; Finley Bah Bioh; and Kamilo Diego.

Dad, we miss you terribly, but we'll save you a seat at the pancake house.

A celebration of life will be held at 1 p.m., April 2, Westside Church, 2051 NW Shevlin Park Rd, Bend, with a reception to follow. Memorial contributions can be made to Partners in Care of Bend.

Van's RV-6A, N447P: Accident occurred March 17, 2022 at Delta Airport (FD84), Lake City, Columbia County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Herndon, Virginia Location: Lake City, Florida
Accident Number: ERA22LA164
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 15:38 Local 
Registration: N447P
Aircraft: HARTZ PAUL RV-6A
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HARTZ PAUL
Registration: N447P
Model/Series: RV-6A NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLCQ,201 ft msl
Observation Time: 15:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C /8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lake City, FL
Destination: Lake City, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.150734,-82.661017 (est)

Vans RV-7A, N275PL: Incident occurred March 17, 2022 at Flanders Field Airport (4FD7), Polk City, Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft landed on a grass strip, lost control, veered off the runway and rolled over. 


Date: 17-MAR-22
Time: 19:26:00Z
Regis#: N275PL
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: POLK CITY
State: FLORIDA

Hughes 500 Defender, N500MZ: Accident occurred March 17, 2022 in De Soto, Dallas County, Iowa

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Ankeny, Iowa
MD Helicopters; Mesa, Arizona 
Rolls-Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana

Winco Inc


Location: De Soto, Iowa
Accident Number: CEN22LA146
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 14:30 Local 
Registration: N500MZ
Aircraft: Hughes 500D
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft ext. load

On March 17, 2022, about 1430 central daylight time, a Hughes 500D, N500MZ, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near De Soto, Iowa. The commercial pilot sustained minor injury. The helicopter was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 133 external load flight.

The mechanic reported that on March 5, 2022, the current engine was installed in the helicopter and that the work was performed in accordance with the Rolls-Royce M250-C20 Series Operation and Maintenance Manual. The engine had arrived with all the accessories
previously installed except for the starter generator. The tach generators, fuel control, governor, fuel nozzle, and bleed valve were already installed before they received the engine. The helicopter had several abnormal starts after the installation work and the maintenance team kept troubleshooting the abnormal starts.

On March 16, 2022, the fuel control was removed from the previously removed engine and was installed on the current engine for troubleshooting purposes. After the fuel control was installed, the fuel system was purged of air, a leak check was performed, and a ground run was performed.

On the day of the accident, the pilot performed a fuel sample check and the preflight checks with no anomalies noted. The pilot aborted the first start due to a high turbine outlet temperature (TOT). The mechanic adjusted the acceleration settings, and the second start was within TOT limitations. The pilot then departed for the landing zone.

During longline operations, and while flying to a structure, the helicopter sustained a partial loss of engine power. The helicopter was at 90ft agl and about 30 kts, and the pilot lowered the collective to enter an autorotation. He was unable to point the helicopter into the wind because a powerline was in the direction of the wind, so there was 20kt crosswind from the north (his left side). At that altitude and speed, the pilot was unable to build much inertia in the main rotor system, and the helicopter impacted a muddy grass hill. The helicopter came to rest on its right side. After the helicopter came to rest, the pilot noticed the engine was still, “at a slow run, less than idle.” The pilot performed an emergency shutdown and was able to egress from the helicopter without further incident. 

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, the main rotor system, and the tail rotor system. The helicopter was recovered from the accident site for a future examination of the airframe and the engine. During the recovery from the field, it was noticed by the operator that an airline on the governor to the fuel control was found not attached, via the b-nut. It appeared the b-nut had backed away to the elbow of the line. The Rolls-Royce M250-C20 Series Operation and Maintenance Manual provides a warning that states:

Failure to properly install, align, and tighten fuel, oil, and air fittings and tubes could result in an engine failure.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hughes 
Registration: N500MZ
Model/Series: 500D 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft external load (133), Agricultural aircraft (137)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDSM, 963 ft msl 
Observation Time: 13:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C /6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1000 ft AGL  
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / , 10°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 7000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 7 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: De Soto, IA 
Destination: De Soto, IA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude,  Longitude: 41.561048,-94.070565 (est)

CubCrafters CC11-160, N424Y: Accident occurred March 17, 2022 and Incident occurred June 09, 2021

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

GAM AV LLC


Location: Belgrade, Montana
Accident Number: WPR22LA129
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 13:30 Local 
Registration: N424Y
Aircraft: CUBCRAFTERS INC CC11-160
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CUBCRAFTERS INC
Registration: N424Y
Model/Series: CC11-160 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBZN, 4449 ft msl 
Observation Time: 13:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C /-7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Bozeman, MT (BZN)
Destination: Bozeman, MT (BZN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 45.90046,-111.17261 

March 17, 2022


Central Valley Fire District - 
 
Central Valley Fire District is on scene of a small aircraft crash off of Theisen Ranch Road.

No injuries reported. 

Central Valley Fire District was called to Theisen Ranch Road at 1:48 pm for a small aircraft crash. 

Initial reports provided that the plane was airborne, clipped the fence, and crashed.

Fire units arrived on-scene at 2:06 pm and found a small aircraft with a slight fuel leak.

Both parties involved reported no injuries. 

The scene was been turned over to Gallatin County Sheriff's Office and all Central Valley units returned to service.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

June 09, 2021:  Aircraft ground looped on landing and gear collapsed at Crystal Lake Airport (5M5), Decatur, Benton County, Arkansas. 


Date: 09-JUN-21
Time: 17:36:00Z
Regis#: N424Y
Aircraft Make: CUB CRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: CC11
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DECATUR
State: ARKANSAS

June 09, 2021


June 09, 2021

June 09, 2021


DECATUR -- Two flight crew members narrowly escaped injury on June 9 when their single-engine aircraft made a hard landing at Crystal Lake Airport about 1:30 p.m., causing the airport to be shut down for almost two hours.

It is unclear whether it was an instructor and student or the plane's owner receiving a check-ride in the CubCrafters CC11-160.

According to local law enforcement officers on the scene, the incident occurred as the small single-engine aircraft was touching down on runway 13 at Crystal Lake Airport when the CubCrafters CC11-160, equipped with tundra tires, broke hard, causing the right landing gear to buckle underneath the underside of the front cockpit. After the aircraft lost lift, the right wing hit the ground, causing the plane to veer slightly to the right before it stopped on the right edge of the runway.

The owner of the aircraft had just purchased the CubCrafters CC11-160 a few days before the incident and had just taken possession of the plane after it was flown in from a dealer in Washington State on Tuesday.

Decatur Police secured the scene and airport officials were able to tow the damaged aircraft to a hangar on the southeast end of the airport.

The weather was not reported to be a factor in this incident. The names of the flight crew were not released at the time of the incident.

NOTE: Tundra tires are large 26-inch low-pressure tires that are used on aircraft flying in the backwoods of Alaska and Canada. These tires are capable of landing on grass airstrips, open fields where the conditions are unknown, river banks, and sand bars. The normal operating size for aircraft like the original Piper Cub is eight inches.

Boeing 737-300, N397SW: Incident occurred March 17, 2022 at Dayton International Airport (KDAY), Montgomery County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aircraft lost a tire during departure. 

Swift Air LLC


Date: 17-MAR-22
Time: 15:24:00Z
Regis#: N397SW
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SWIFT AIR
Flight Number: SWQ257
City: DAYTON
State: OHIO

Czech Sport Aircraft PiperSport, N811PS: Fatal accident occurred March 17, 2022 in Homestead, Miami-Dade County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Read Aviation Inc


Location: Homestead, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA22LA162
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 13:45 Local
Registration: N811PS
Aircraft: CZECH SPORT AIRCRAFT AS PIPER SPORT 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On March 17, 2022, about 1345 eastern daylight time, an experimental light sport Czech Sport Aircraft Piper Sport airplane, N811PS, was lost from radar and presumed destroyed about 15 nautical miles west of Everglades National Park, Florida. The pilot has not been located. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Airplane wreckage and paperwork associated with both the airplane and the pilot were recovered and secured by the U.S. Park Service.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) preliminary flight track data showed that the airplane departed The Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (MTH), Marathon, Florida about 1312. The airplane eventually climbed to a cruise altitude of about 1,450 ft mean sea level (msl) and flew northwest toward Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida. The airplane maintained its altitude, 336° heading, and 125-knot groundspeed until 1323, when it descended and increased airspeed gradually. The track data depicted a rapid climb from 1,200 ft msl to 1,800 ft msl at 1324 while the target slowed to 74 knots groundspeed. The airplane then resumed its previous heading and groundspeed at an altitude about 1,450 ft msl until 1327, when it began a series of erratic heading, altitude, and groundspeed excursions.

The track depicted a brief climb before the airplane descended, accelerated, and completed a 240° teardrop turn to the east. During the turn, the altitude varied between 1,600 ft msl and 800 ft msl and groundspeeds varied between 83 and 143 knots. The airplane then continued in a wide, arcing left turn until it intercepted its original course. Once reestablished on its same approximate course, the airplane assumed a cruise profile about 800 ft msl and 100 knots groundspeed about 1331.

The altitudes varied only slightly between 800 and 900 ft msl, and groundspeed remained about 100 knots until 1343:38, when the airplane’s track ended on a 336° heading at 825 ft msl and 100 knots groundspeed. No further targets were identified, and preliminary air traffic control (ATC) records revealed that the airplane never established communication with any ATC facilities after departing
MTH. Figure 1 shows preliminary flight track information, with the accident flight depicted in green and the previous flight depicted in yellow.

The airplane was manufactured in 2010, and its maintenance history could not be immediately reviewed. According to the pilot’s family, both the airplane maintenance logs and the pilot’s logbook were likely aboard the airplane.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued May 20, 2014, and he reported 1,350 total hours of flight experience on that date. The pilot completed the BasicMed Course on August 30, 2017.

Review of flight track information for the flight from APH to MTH earlier on the day of the accident revealed similar erratic altitude, heading, and speed excursions as those displayed during the accident flight. The data indicated that the pilot flew a left downwind leg for landing on runway 07 at MTH at an altitude of 200 ft msl. At a point consistent with a left base leg, the airplane completed a 180° turn and flew a right downwind for runway 25 at 200 ft msl, landing opposite the direction of traffic.

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that the accident airplane landed on runway 25 when a business jet was on short final for landing on runway 07. In written statements, the crew of the business jet advised that the accident airplane cleared the runway before they were required to abort their landing.

The data showed that the accident airplane taxied erratically on the airport surface with numerous heading changes and course reversals over a 6-minute span. Ground personnel stated that the pilot did not respond to radio calls and had to be told in person by a lineman that his party was parked at the opposite end of the airport. The airplane also experienced another head-on encounter with the landing
business jet while on the taxiway.

Two friends of the pilot were interviewed by telephone, and their versions of events were consistent throughout. The three had agreed to fly their individual airplanes from APH, where they were based, to MTH, take a shuttle to lunch, then fly back to APH. The accident occurred on the return flight. Neither heard the accident pilot over the radio, and they became concerned when they felt his arrival at APH was overdue.

The friends described the departure from APH, their arrival at MTH ahead of the accident pilot, and how his arrival “took longer than expected.” Each were retired airline pilots and the tracks of both flights were discussed with them. They said that the pilot explained his opposite-direction landing based on his interpretation of the windsock. Each was asked to describe the pilot’s appearance, behavior, and if any of those behaviors concerned him. One responded, “Yes, he didn’t eat his lunch, which was unusual.” The other individual said that the pilot was engaged in their lunch conversation, and that he would have acted if he had any concerns. He added, “My wife said he seemed off, but I didn’t notice anything unusual except that he didn’t eat the dinner he ordered.”

In a telephone interview, the lineman who parked the accident pilot next to his waiting friends said he had been an EMT “for 15 years” and immediately noticed that the pilot struggled to egress his airplane and appeared “befuddled” when he got out. He asked if the pilot wanted fuel or any other services, and the pilot “wouldn’t” respond. A pilot outside the party of three confronted the accident pilot about entering the traffic pattern and landing in the opposite direction without making any radio calls. The lineman said that the pilot did not respond, continued to appear “befuddled,” and his friends “defended him” and then took him away to go to lunch. The other pilots explained that the accident pilot “didn’t have a radio” as the radio in his airplane was inoperative. He added, “I feared for the pilot because he was ‘devastated’ by what he had done. He was wrong, both on the landing and when he taxied. He looked devastated.”




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CZECH SPORT AIRCRAFT AS
Registration: N811PS
Model/Series: PIPER SPORT 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMKY, 5 ft msl
Observation Time: 13:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 34 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C /21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 10000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Marathon, FL 
Destination: Naples, GA (APH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 25.470579,-81.430733 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N8357Y: Fatal accident occurred March 17, 2022 in Pond Creek, Grant County, Oklahoma



This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania


Location: Pond Creek, Oklahoma 
Accident Number: CEN22FA145
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 16:38 Local
Registration: N8357Y
Aircraft: Piper PA-30 Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On March 17, 2022, about 1638 central daylight time, a Piper PA-30 airplane, N8357Y, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Pond Creek, Oklahoma. The pilot and 2 passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Preliminary radar and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data indicated that the airplane first appeared at 1509 about 1.5 nautical miles west of the Mineral Wells Regional Airport (MWL), Mineral Wells, Texas. The airplane tracked north and climbed initially to a cruise altitude of 8,500 ft and then later climbed to 16,500 ft. The airplane began a descent after it passed over Vance Air Force Base (END), Enid, Oklahoma, and turned momentarily to the east. The airplane then turned west and back to the north while it descended. The ground speed decreased from over 200 kts to under 100 kts. About 1631, and 5 miles southwest of Pond Creek, Mode C position reporting data was lost followed by the loss of all track data.

The airplane was not in contact, nor was it required to be in contact, with Air Traffic Control.

A witness in the area reported that he heard what sounded like engines revving. He looked up and saw the airplane come straight down in a right-hand nose down spin. He followed the airplane until he could no longer see it. He reported that the tail of the airplane came off the airplane just before he lost sight of it. 

The accident site was located across several fields about 6 miles southwest of Pond Creek. The airplane main wreckage was located on the west side of a creek bed in a field. The elevation of the accident site was about 1,100 ft and the terrain was predominately flat and consisted of tall grass. The airplane main wreckage consisted of the forward fuselage, cabin, and baggage compartment, left and right inboard wings, left and right engines, and nacelles, and came to rest inverted. The wreckage was crushed aft and fragmented and showed evidence of a near vertical impact.

The aft fuselage and empennage consisted of the vertical stabilizer and rudder. The inboard sections of the horizontal stabilators were broken and held to the main wreckage by the flight control and trim cables. Both wings were broken about 5 ft outboard of the nacelles. The broken sections showed upward bending, aft twisting, and fractures consistent with overload failures. Several impact marks and paint transfers were found along the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer indicative of a component striking it before ground impact.

Outboard sections of the left and right wings and outboard tip tanks were located about 600 ft southsoutheast of the main wreckage. Also located in this area were the left and right propellers. An outboard section of the left wing was in a field about 1,146 ft west-northwest of the main wreckage. Pieces of wing skin, cowlings, plexiglass, and the outboard sections of the left and right horizontal stabilators were found in adjacent fields west and northwest of the main wreckage.

The left propeller hub was broken open and one propeller blade was broken out. The blade showed no damage. The blade that remained with the hub showed S-bending, chordwise scratches, and trailing edge gouges. Two inches of the blade’s tip was missing. The hub was attached to the flange and 3 inches of the left engine crankshaft. The right propeller was also attached to the flange and about 3 inches of the right engine crankshaft. Both blades were bent slightly forward and showed chordwise scratches and trailing edge gouges.

The wreckage was recovered and transported to a secure facility for further examination.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N8357Y
Model/Series: PA-30 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWDG, 1167 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:45 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 21.1°C /7.2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 50 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 90 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.64 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mineral Wells, TX (MML)
Destination: NE

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.628657,-97.887604 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


William (Bill) Joseph Lauber
December 19, 1962 ~ March 17, 2022 (age 59)


Revered funeral director, father, brother, and grandfather William (Bill) J. Lauber, of Milford, passed away on March 17, 2022, north of Pond Creek, Oklahoma at the age of 59.

Bill was born in Geneva, NE on December 19, 1962, the youngest child of Wendell W. Lauber and Norma R. (Kuiken) Lauber. Bill was a 1981 graduate of Geneva High School, attended Kearney State College, and graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor’s degree in Mortuary Science. During his college years he was also a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity. In January 1992, Bill purchased the Moore’s Funeral Homes of Friend, Milford, and Beaver Crossing where he spent many years conducting funerals for various families and communities. Bill’s career legacy was laced with achievement. In 2002-2003 he represented the State of Nebraska serving as the President of the Nebraska Funeral Director’s Association and also served as a Policy Board Member for the National Funeral Director’s Association. Bill later went on to serve a five year term on the Board of Examiners, Funeral Directors and Embalmers, and the Nebraska State Department of Health. Up until his passing he was the chairman of the Legislative Committee for the NeFDA and was instrumental in various legislative bill passages. In 2018 he opened Blue Valley Crematory as an addition to Lauber Funeral Homes to serve the communities increasing needs for crematory services. Bill was also a part of various community organizations including being a member of the Milford United Methodist Church, Milford Chamber of Commerce, Milford Kiwanis Club, Milford and Friend Masonic Lodges, Shrine, Scottish Rite and Order of the Eastern Star.

In addition to his lengthy career, Bill was known for his family values and larger than life personality. Bill was married to his high school sweetheart, Christine M. Merritt, on June 28th, 1986 in Norfolk, Nebraska. From this union came four children: Whitney, Michael, Madison, and Regan Lauber. Bill enjoyed the outdoors and lived life to the fullest, participating in many activities to include boating, flying, golfing and scuba diving. He particularly loved boating and created a family tradition of spending a week at the Lake of the Ozarks annually. Bill also had a passion for flying after obtaining his pilot’s license and spent the past several years traveling the country with his beloved wife and family flying his father’s Twin Engine Comanche plane. Bill will be remembered for his vivacious spirit, animated jokes and stories, and devotion to his Christian faith. He was an avid Husker football fan, sports connoisseur, and had a taste for eclectic music that ranged from punk to the classics.

Survivors include daughter and son in law, Whitney and Colton Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, son Michael Lauber and girlfriend Kaylee Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, and daughter Madison Lauber and boyfriend Caden Foster, of Austin TX, brother Jerry and sister-in-law Sharon Lauber of Geneva, NE, twin brothers Brad and Bryan Lauber of Geneva, step mother Louise Lauber of Lincoln, step brothers Chris and Sally Barnard of Lincoln, Paul and Linda Barnard of Aliso Viejo, CA, grandchildren Carver and Kyla Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, father and mother-in-law James and Elenore Merritt of Norfolk, NE, brother and sisters-in-law Steve and Kathie Merritt of Kearney, NE, David and Heidi Merritt, Brent and Cary Meyer, Patrick and Mary Hammond all of Norfolk, NE, Aunt Helen Witmer, cousin Eric and Susan Witmer all of Philipsburg, KS along with several nephews, nieces, cousins and relatives.

Bill was preceded in death by his parents, Wendell and Norma Lauber, and uncle Claiton Lauber.

Funeral services for Bill Lauber will be 2:00pm Saturday March 26, 2022 at the Milford High School gymnasium, 301 South G Street. Visitation’s will be Thursday March 24 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm and Friday March 25 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm with family greeting relatives and friends Friday from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Lauber Funeral Home, Milford. Services to be live streamed on Facebook, Lauber Funeral and Cremation Service.

Memorials may be directed to the family for future designation and scholarships.


Christine (Christy) Marie Lauber
May 14, 1963 ~ March 17, 2022 (age 58)


Beloved mother, sister, daughter and grandmother Christine (Christy) Marie Lauber of Milford, NE, passed away on March 17, 2022, north of Pond Creek, Oklahoma at the age of 58.

Christy was born in Fremont, Nebraska on May 14, 1963, the eldest child of James and Elenore (Hansen) Merritt. She was a 1981 graduate of Geneva High School and went on to attend Kearney State College where she obtained her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Elementary Education in 1986. During her college years she was also a member of the Alpha Phi Sorority. Christy was a teacher for several years at various schools including Beatrice, Milford, Lincoln Cavett and Pershing Elementaries. She was adored and coined a “favorite teacher” by many of her students. In addition to being an educator, Christy developed a passion for dancing at a young age which continued into her adult life as she opened her own dance studio “Step Above,” in Beaver Crossing, located above her husband’s mortuary. Many of her family’s dearest memories include times where she would spontaneously burst out in song and dance. In the past several years, Christy began pursuing another passion of interior decorating where she established her own business, Lauber Decorating Den. Christy enjoyed helping others transform their homes into beautiful masterpieces using her creativity, wisdom, and knowledge of aesthetics. Christy was also involved heavily in her community serving as a Sunday School teacher, Youth Group leader, and Bible School director along with various other roles within Milford’s United Methodist Church.

One of Christy’s biggest values was family and she is considered the “glue” that held her family together. Christy was married to her high school sweetheart, William (Bill) Lauber on June 28th, 1986, in Norfolk, NE. From this union came four children: Whitney, twins Michael and Madison, and Regan Lauber. Christy loved Bill and the two of them were considered partners in crime as they were avid travelers and companions. She enjoyed participating in several activities with her husband including boating, skiing, scuba diving, and flying. Christy is remembered for her kind, gentle spirit, ability to light up any room she entered, infectious laugh, along with being a cherished grandmother to her two grandchildren.

Survivors include daughter and son in law, Whitney and Colton Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, son Michael Lauber and girlfriend Kaylee Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, and daughter Madison Lauber and boyfriend Caden Foster, of Austin TX, grandchildren Carver and Kyla Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, mother and father James and Elenore Merritt, of Norfolk, NE, brother and sister-in-law Steve and Kathie Merritt of Kearney, NE, brother and sister-in-law David and Heidi Merritt, sister and brother-in-law Cary and Brent Meyer, sister and brother-in-law Mary and Patrick Hammond all of Norfolk, NE, brother and sister-in-law Jerry and Sharon Lauber, brothers-in-law Brad and Bryan Lauber all of Geneva, NE, aunt Leanna Jacobson of Ames, IA, cousins Melissa Downey of Overland Park and Joel Jacobson of Ankeny, IA, many nephews and nieces.

Christy is preceded in death by her grandparents Willis and Margaret Merritt, Carl and Marie Hansen, uncles Kenneth and LeRoy Hansen, father and mother-in-law Wendell and Norma Lauber.

Funeral services for Christy Lauber will be 2:00pm Saturday March 26, 2022 at the Milford High School gymnasium, 301 South G Street. Visitation’s will be Thursday March 24 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm and Friday March 25 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm with family greeting relatives and friends Friday from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Lauber Funeral Home, Milford. Services to be live streamed on Facebook, Lauber Funeral and Cremation Service.

Memorials may be directed to the family for future designation and scholarships. 


Regan Victoria Lauber
August 17, 2000 ~ March 17, 2022 (age 21)
 

Cherished sister, daughter, aunt and friend Regan Victoria Lauber, of Milford, Nebraska, passed away on March 17, 2022, north of Pond Creek, Oklahoma, at the age of 21.

Regan was born in Lincoln, NE, on August 17, 2000, as the youngest child of William (Bill) and Christine (Christy) Lauber. Regan was a Milford High School graduate of 2018 and was in her senior year of college at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, set to graduate in May 2022 with her Bachelor of Arts in English. Regan aspired to continue her education and wanted to move to Austin, Texas, to be with her sister, Madison, while attending graduate school. Regan was an exceptional reader and writer and particularly liked reading fiction, young adult, and gothic novels. She also wrote a book with her dear friend Kyhana that they were planning to publish. During Regan’s high school career she was heavily involved in dance, being a member of the Milford High School dance team along with participating in Milford’s Elements Dance Concept where she competed in dance doing ballet, point, jazz, pom, production and hip hop. Regan also helped teach dance as an instructor and was loved by her students. In addition to performing on stage as a dancer, Regan was part of the Milford Speech team where she excelled in acting and was known to be able to impersonate anyone.

Regan was the youngest sibling of the Lauber family, with older siblings Whitney, Michael and Madison. She will be remembered for her artistic qualities, her uncanny humor, her admiration for One Direction boy band, love for music and making playlists for her friends and family, her tendency to stay up playing SIMS computer game relentlessly, her beauty and being a renowned make up artist. Anyone who met Regan was inspired by her tenacity for life and genuine kindness.

Regan is survived by her sister and brother-in-law, Whitney and Colton Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, nieces Carver and Kyla Chrisman of Lincoln, NE sister Madison Lauber and boyfriend Caden Foster of Austin, TX, brother Michael Lauber and girlfriend Kaylee Chrisman of Lincoln, NE, grandparents James and Elenore Merritt of Norfolk, NE, uncle and aunt Steve and Kathie of Kearney, NE, aunts and uncles Cary and Brent Meyer, Mary and Patrick Hammond, Heidi and David all of Norfolk, NE, uncle and aunt Jerry and Sharon, uncles Bryan and Brad Lauber all of Geneva, NE, cousins Mackenzie and Ryan Swogger of Omaha, NE, Tessa and Emerson Meyer, Benjamin and Max Hammond, Maggie and Kate Merritt all of Norfolk, NE, cousins Bradley Jr and Stacy Lauber, Dana and Whitney Lauber, Phil Lauber all of Geneva, NE along with second cousins Macye and Kyle Witmer and Malorie Greene, among other relatives.

Regan is preceded in death by her parents, Bill and Christy Lauber, grandparents Wendell and Norma Lauber, cousin Karoline Lauber, and great-grandparents, and dear friend, Trevyn Roth.

Funeral services for Regan Lauber will be 2:00pm Saturday March 26, 2022 at the Milford High School gymnasium, 301 South G Street. Visitation’s will be Thursday March 24 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm and Friday March 25 from 1:00pm to 9:00pm with family greeting relatives and friends Friday from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Lauber Funeral Home, Milford. Services to be live streamed on Facebook, Lauber Funeral and Cremation Service.

Memorials may be directed to the family for future designation and scholarships. 

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N78SA and Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster, N9469B: Incident occurred March 17, 2022 at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW), Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Houston

Martinaire Aviation LLC


Martinaire Aviation LLC


Location: Grapevine, Texas
Accident Number: CEN22LA149
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 21:00 Local 
Registration: N78SA (A1); N9469B (A2)
Aircraft: Cessna 208B (A1); Cessna 208B (A2)
Injuries: 1 None (A1); 1 None (A2)
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi and commuter - Non-scheduled (A1); Part 135: Air taxi and commuter - Non-scheduled (A2)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A1)

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N78SA
Model/Series: 208B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter air carrier (135)
Operator Designator Code: MT9A

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A2)

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9469B
Model/Series: 208B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter air carrier (135)
Operator Designator Code: MT9A

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDFW, 544 ft msl
Observation Time: 20:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 25000 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 360°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information (A1)

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.883344,-97.047607 (est)

Wreckage and Impact Information (A2)

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.883344,-97.047607 (est)

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, N1972K: Incident occurred March 17, 2022 at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Houston, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing. 


Date: 17-MAR-22
Time: 15:14:00Z
Regis#: N1972K
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Ex-Boeing Pilot Heads to Court Over 737 MAX Charges

U.S. accuses Mark Forkner of misleading air-safety regulators; he says he is being singled out for broader aviation disasters




The Wall Street Journal 
By Dave Michaels and Andrew Tangel 
March 18, 2022 6:00 am ET

A former Boeing Co. pilot accused of misleading federal air-safety regulators before two 737 MAX jets crashed is set to go on trial starting Friday.

Lawyers for Mark Forkner, who was the 737 MAX’s chief technical pilot during its development, are planning to argue that their client is being singled out as the scapegoat for broader aviation disasters. Mr. Forkner is the only person charged with crimes related to the crashes by the Justice Department, part of the agency’s efforts to hold individuals accountable for corporate misdeeds.

Mr. Forkner, whose trial will take place in Fort Worth, Texas, faces four counts of wire fraud that each carry a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison.

Accident investigators blamed a flight-control system known as MCAS—which Mr. Forkner briefed regulators about during the plane’s development—for sending two 737 MAX jets into fatal nosedives in 2018 and 2019. The crashes claimed 346 lives and prompted a nearly two-year grounding of all 737 MAX planes, disrupting the global aviation industry.

Mr. Forkner is accused of misleading the Federal Aviation Administration about MCAS to reduce how much training pilots would need to fly it, thus making the jet more attractive to airlines.

What Mr. Forkner told FAA training specialists about MCAS, as well as what other Boeing engineers told their agency counterparts, are likely to be the subject of critical testimony. In a settlement with the Justice Department, Boeing last year agreed to pay $2.5 billion to resolve charges that its employees misled the FAA. The deal included a $244 million fine as well as almost $2.3 billion in compensation to airline customers and families of the crash victims.

The 2019 crash scene in Ethiopia of Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302.



The case echoes an earlier prosecution of several BP PLC staff involved in the 2010 blowout on the company’s Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, which killed 11 workers and caused the largest oil spill off the U.S. Gulf Coast. Two former BP employees were acquitted in 2016; the government secured three guilty pleas to misdemeanors. One of those acquitted was represented by David Gerger, a Houston attorney who now represents Mr. Forkner.

Mr. Gerger declined to comment, as did the Justice Department, FAA and Boeing.

Boeing admitted in its settlement with the Justice Department that former employees deceived the FAA. The deal blamed two employees, although only Mr. Forkner was charged, and said senior management wasn’t involved in the misconduct.

Boeing initially designed the 737 MAX’s MCAS system to activate during certain high-speed flying conditions that pilots would rarely encounter. But during the aircraft’s development, company engineers expanded the system’s authority to push down the plane’s nose in certain low-speed conditions, too.

Mr. Forkner is accused by prosecutors of becoming aware of the change in November 2016 during a simulated test flight and not disclosing what he learned to FAA officials who would decide how much training airline pilots needed to fly the 737 MAX. Upon learning of the change, he wrote to a colleague: “So I basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly),” according to the indictment.

The training classification, which might have changed if the FAA knew more about the MCAS system, carried financial consequences for Boeing and its airline customers. If the FAA required 737 pilots to undergo simulator training for the new MAX models, it could prove costly to airlines and potentially hurt demand for the new jet.

Mr. Gerger has said Mr. Forkner always acted honestly in his dealings with the FAA. The defense attorney has said Mr. Forkner didn’t lie and was referring to a flight simulator not working properly.

Prosecutors allege that Mr. Forkner misled the FAA, which had the effect of defrauding Boeing’s airline customers. The carriers were deprived of information about the jet that may have influenced their decision to buy the 737 MAX, according to the indictment.

“It’ll be very difficult for the defense to paint Mr. Forkner as some peripheral player or as the scapegoat or fall guy in an otherwise grand scheme to mislead the FAA because he did play a central role in the certification,” said Kenneth Quinn, a former FAA chief counsel who has represented clients in criminal probes arising from air crashes and is now a partner at Clyde & Co in Washington, D.C.

Among the witnesses that prosecutors plan to call, according to court records, are an FAA training official, Stacey Klein, who is expected to testify about what Mr. Forkner told her about MCAS, and David Loffing, a senior Boeing engineer who interacted with Mr. Forkner about the 737 MAX.

Mr. Forkner’s lawyers plan to rebut claims that he deceived Ms. Klein by showing the FAA knew how MCAS worked, while Ms. Klein had access to information about how the system operated, according to a February court filing.

Defense lawyers plan to potentially call their own FAA witnesses, including an official who sent a presentation to the Justice Department saying Mr. Forkner is a scapegoat and not responsible for Boeing’s engineering errors in MCAS’s design, according to court records. Regulators later mandated that Boeing add safeguards to the flight-control system before the 737 MAX could again carry passengers.

Prosecutors recently asked U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor to prohibit mention of the crashes during the trial, arguing the case is about the allegation that Mr. Forkner misled the FAA and defrauded two airline customers.

Mr. Forkner has said the crashes are relevant to his claim that he is the fall guy for a broader failure. Judge O’Connor ruled this week that Mr. Forkner could argue he is a scapegoat for the crashes.

“The government recognizes the very significant risk that a jury will see this as an attempt to scapegoat a low- or middle-level employee for something that jurors will see as a corporate failure,” said Sean Hecker, a defense attorney at Kaplan, Hecker & Fink LLP who isn’t involved in the trial. “And it seems like the government strategy is to try to take that away from the defense by making the case very narrow and almost devoid of context.”

Quickie Q200, N3QP: Accident occurred March 17, 2022 in Spring Hill, Hernando County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida


Location: Spring Hill, Florida
Accident Number: ERA22LA159
Date and Time: March 17, 2022, 11:30 Local
Registration: N3QP
Aircraft: DWYER MICHAEL D Q 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DWYER MICHAEL D 
Registration: N3QP
Model/Series: Q 200 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBKV, 76 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:32 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 280°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2600 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Saint Petersburg, FL (PIE)
Destination: Spring Hill, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 28.491776,-82.487623 






SPRING HILL – A single-engine airplane has crashed near Powell Middle School, according to the Hernando County Sheriff’s Office.

The crash site is at Barclay Avenue and Powell Road, Sheriff Al Nienhuis said in a statement posted on Facebook. 

The Quickie Q200, an experimental amateur built aircraft built in the mid-1980s, experienced loss of engine power, Nienhuis said, and was trying to make it to the airport. The pilot, the only person aboard, was ambulatory and appeared to have minor injuries.

According to the federal N-number registry, the aircraft is registered to a 67-year-old Seminole man. It is not known if he was the pilot.

The plane sustained substantial damage.