Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Emirates in major network expansion to the East and West

Emirates is embarking on a major expansion of its route network with three additional destinations to be launched in the next six months, on top of the 12 new routes already being rolled out in 2012.

From November 1, Emirates will launch four weekly flights to Adelaide, rising to a daily service from 1st February 2013. Adelaide will be the airline’s fifth destination in Australia which is currently served with 70 flights per week.

The airline’s current double-daily service to Perth will grow to 19 weekly flights from December 1, becoming a triple daily operation from March 1 next year.

On the western side of the globe, the French city of Lyon will be added to the Emirates’ network from December 1, the carrier’s third point in France after Paris and Nice. Emirates will operate five weekly flights to this vibrant economic and tourism centre of south eastern France.

From February 6, 2013, Emirates will begin flights into Poland, where recently the World bank predicted the highest economic growth in the Central and Eastern European region. The airline will operate a daily service to the capital, Warsaw.

Read more here:  http://www.emirates247.com

AUDIO: Fighter pilots to get cockpit instructions from female voice 'because it relaxes them more' (but they've already nicknamed her Nagging Nora)

 
WILL YOU LISTEN!
A Joanna Lumley-sounding voice is giving danger warnings to Typhoon pilots

  
Nagging women drive men crazy, but in a fighter pilot’s cockpit she is the one he’ll sit up and listen to. 

In extreme and stressful flying conditions, fighter pilots are more likely to take notice of a female voice a study has found.

Plane makers BAE are letting loose a Joanna Lumley-type voice to give recorded warnings to fighter pilots in their state of the art Typhoon jets when things get heated.

The voice, which gets sterner and louder the longer she is ignored, has already been nicknamed ‘nagging Nora’.

Andrea Kay, from BAE, said: ‘We have conducted studies to find out what pilots who are flying under both stressful physical and mental conditions are more receptive to.’

It turns out that, particularly in combat situations, pilots were able to pick out the female voice amid the flurry of radio chatter in stressful situations.

‘If you don’t listen, she gets harsher and louder in both tone and volume,’ she said.

The male voice has been relegated to giving straightforward information like altitude and location.

‘There is as much psychology in the cockpit as there are clever systems. A voice warning and recognition system is one way of helping the pilots,’ Ms Kay said.

‘The female voice gets the most important messages across in the most effective way.’

The female warning system has taken years to develop and in the test stages a Lancashire voice was used.

She said: ‘It’s about making sure it’s intuitive and we are delivering the best information to them in the most effective way. It’s about making the aircraft the best that it can be’.


Pilots flying in one of BAE’s state-of-the-art Typhoon jets are being told what to do by a stern-sounding woman. 

 Studies have shown that pilots take more notice of the female voice under extreme conditions – and these findings have been used by BAE. 

It is the first time the company, which has bases in Samlesbury and Warton, have used a female voice – which has been nicknamed ‘nagging Nora’ – to deliver recorded warnings to pilots. 

Read more and audio:   http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk

Russia’s Yak-130 Combat Trainer to Debut at Farnborough 2012


MOSCOW, July 4 

(RIA Novosti)

 Russia’s Yakovlev Yak-130 Mitten trainer/light attack aircraft will be showcased for the first time at the Farnborough International Air Show as part of a large Russian exhibit. 

 Russian companies, including 19 defense industry firms, will take part in the airshow near London on July 9-15 to exhibit the latest achievements in the Russian aircraft industry.

The Yak-130 combat trainer is a subsonic two-seat jet aircraft developed by the Yakovlev design bureau. Development of the plane began in 1991, and the maiden flight was carried out in April 1996.

It is a highly maneuverable plane with an extended range of about 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) and a maximum speed of 1,060 km/h (600 m/h) in level flight. It can carry a combat payload of up to 3,000 kilograms (6,600 pounds), consisting of a variety of Russian and Western developed weapons.

In 2005, the plane won a Russian government tender for training aircraft and in 2009, the first planes entered service with the Russian Air Force, which placed firm orders for 55 aircraft.

The first export orders were signed in 2006, when Algeria ordered 16 Yak-130s and Libya put an order in for 6 planes.

Deliveries to Libya were expected in 2011–2012, but after the downfall of the Gaddafi regime, the Libyan National Transitional Council canceled Libya's order for Yak-130s in September 2011 as part of a review of all existing arms contracts.

Syria agreed to buy 36 Yak-130s for $550 mln in 2011.

The overall foreign market capacity for the Yak-130 is estimated at 250 aircraft.

Source:   http://en.ria.ru

Bird’s eye view: Taking flight in an Allegro LSA ✈ Halifax-Northampton Regional Airport (KIXA), Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina


For more information on flight lessons or the Allegro, call LSA America at 252-586-1200.

July 4, 2012 

by Roger Bell

I’ve never been one to love flying, but my time in the Allegro aircraft just might have changed my mind.

The Allegro is a two-seat light sport aircraft manufactured in Littleton by LSA America, which recently broke ground at the Halifax-Northampton Regional Airport. LSA President Doug Hempstead, naturally, is a big believer in the plane, which, in addition to only costing around $100,000, has excellent fuel economy and can be powered by 87 octane automobile gas.

“You get more bang for your buck with the Allegro,” Hempstead said.

“What we deliver is real value. It’s not cheap, because cheap catches up with you, but it’s a real value.”

He added the Allegro is a very successful student airplane and is relatively easy to learn how to fly.

“This is one of the most fun things I’ve ever flown,” said Ross Kennedy, test pilot for LSA and the man with, perhaps, more hours flying the Allegro than any other person.

It was a clear, sunny, cloudless day when Kennedy and I climbed into the surprisingly roomy Allegro at Halifax-Northampton Regional Airport, and after putting on our headsets, the two of us were airborne only minutes later — it only took about 450 feet for the small plane to take off, and Kennedy said it can be done even more quickly.

For the first few minutes, I have to admit, I felt a little uncomfortable. In my childhood, long ago now, I used to have a fear of heights, and the Allegro’s visibility means you can see easily all around you and down to the ground. For a few minutes, the old fear came back, but I was able to tamp it down and started to take some photos of the Roanoke Valley from the air. 

Adirondack Regional (KSLK), Saranac Lake, New York: Airport adds more Boston flights

LAKE CLEAR, New York - Good news for travelers -- the Adirondack Regional Airport is adding more flights to and from Logan Airport in Boston. 

There will now be five flights daily.

The Plattsburgh Press Republican is reporting that increased demand has upped the number of daily flights until September 9. Flights take about one and a half hours.

Since Cape Air started serving the airport in 2008 more than 11,000 travelers have taken advantage of this service. 

Read more here:

Cape Air adds two more flights to Boston from Lake Clear

South Jersey: Atlantic Cape Aviation Information Session Rescheduled for July 17


MAYS LANDING — Atlantic Cape Community College will host an information session about its four aviation programs at 6 p.m., Tues., July 17, in Cafeteria B, at the Mays Landing Campus, 5100 Black Horse Pike.

Anyone interested in learning more about exciting careers in aviation, aerospace engineering and air traffic control should attend the session, which will give an overview on admission to Atlantic Cape’s programs and what the programs cover.

•Aviation Studies (Associate in Science): Prepares students to pursue further education in a variety of fields, such as airport management, aviation business administration, air traffic control and air transportation management.

•Aviation Studies – Option in Professional Pilot (Associate in Science): Leads to Federal Aviation Administration certification as a commercial pilot. Atlantic Cape will offer Private, Instrument and Commercial pilot courses through a partnership with Big Sky Aviation.

•Pre-Aerospace Engineering (Associate in Science): Students can begin their education in aerospace engineering and transfer to a four-year program on completion.

•Air Traffic Control Terminal (Associate in Applied Science): Through the use of simulation, learn the rules, regulations and procedures relating to a career in air traffic control.

To register for the information session, visit www.atlantic.edu/aviation.