Friday, May 18, 2018

Accident occurred May 18, 2018 near Block Air Village Airport (MO71), Holt, Clinton County, Missouri



KANSAS CITY, Mo. — One person was injured in a plane crash in Clinton County, Missouri.

Missouri State Highway Patrol said the plane had a problem during takeoff and crashed shortly after. 

The plane crashed just to the side of C Highway. 

Story and video ➤ https://www.kshb.com





CLINTON, MO (KCTV) - A small plane has crashed in southern Clinton County in Missouri.

One person has sustained minor injuries.

The crash happened in the area of C Highway, one mile north of CC Highway. The area is east of Smithville Lake and is near a small private airport.

No other information is available at this time.

Original article ➤ http://www.kctv5.com

George Antoniadis: His business is like time sharing for airplanes

George Antoniadis’s PlaneSense has access to more than 4,000 US airports.



When it comes to frequent fliers, George Antoniadis may top the list.

He has promised his family not to travel across the Atlantic or Pacific for three weeks because lately he’s been absent a lot from home. Antoniadis recently returned from a trip during which he crossed 12 time zones in a week, flying from Boston to Zurich, then to Greece, Italy, China, back to Europe, and — finally — home. It’s all in a day’s work as CEO of a fractional aircraft business, PlaneSense, Inc. The job includes attending a lot of conferences and industry board meetings. PlaneSense doesn’t fly internationally yet, but offers Uber-style on-demand domestic service on elite private jets.

Fractional aircraft business is akin to airplane time-sharing or a renting a plane. The cost of a plane is split among several owners who buy shares and avoid the hassles of scheduling, maintenance, and crew. Last year, PlaneSense, based in Portsmouth, N.H., traveled to 920 destinations. With a fleet of Pilatus PC-12s and PC-24s – sleek single-engine turboprops that have been called the Swiss Army knives of the sky — this door-to-door air transportation cuts out commercial airline travel.

The Greek-born and Swiss-educated Antoniadis, a Harvard MBA who did a stint as a management consultant, first tested his aviation business acumen at Norwood Airport. “I saw planes sitting idle and unused for weeks at a time on the tarmac. I wondered why air time couldn’t be shared among several parties, driving costs down and improving operations,” said Antoniadis, 57, who is a commercial instrument-rated pilot.

He started by managing and renting small trainers, like Cessna 210s and Bonanza a36s, and eventually began acquiring a fleet of jets, flying to Switzerland to speak to manufacturers of high-end turboprops.

PlaneSense then moved its headquarters to modern, glass-enclosed offices in Portsmouth, where Antoniadis can view the airfield from his desk. The Globe spoke with him about his nonstop push to make fractional aircraft ownership work.

“On occasion, I fly commercially in the US when I think it’s more corporately responsible to do so. I was on a flight out of Orlando when a client walked onto the plane and said, ‘George, what are you doing on the bus?’ We had a conversation about fractional airplane ownership and a lot of people around us were intrigued by the discussion.

“Then the captain came on the loudspeaker and said, ‘Ladies and gentleman, there’s a technical issue. We have a one-hour delay.’ So my commercial air travel often ends up being a recalibration and reminder of why I’m in business.

“While private aviation is seen as a privilege and a perk, it maximizes time savings for entrepreneurs, vacationers, retirees, families, small-to-midsize companies, and large corporations. They are able to land at smaller airports, closer to their destination, bypassing hubs. PlaneSense is able to access more than 4,000 airports in the US with our PC-12 turboprop, versus 500 for the large airlines.

“With fractional aircraft ownership, you buy only as much of an airplane as you need. It’s a very well-oiled system. The average aircraft flies about 300 hours a year — less than an hour a day. But in our case, planes fly multitudes of times, and fleet dynamics drive costs down significantly.

“The idea for PlaneSense began over two decades ago, when I was a pilot and saw a need for small aircraft management, helping owners take care of planes and renting them out for others to use. It was my cautious foray into the field of business aviation, and served as a periscope into the industry. I became interested in the emerging field of fractional ownership, and started drawing up the idea for PlaneSense on a whiteboard.

“In the world of fractional ownership, jets are the dominant force. I decided to enter the space with a brand new airplane at the time, the Pilatus, a modern-turbo prop. It’s very efficient and can easily go to short runways such as Chatham’s 3,000 foot runway, Fisher Island — a very sought-after golfing location — or high altitude airports in the Rockies. These planes attract attention — if you want to be discreet about your arrival, take a bicycle.

“As for me, I continue to be an avid aviator and exercise that privilege often. I’m intrigued by the innovation and elegance of engineering solutions behind every aircraft. I’m also fascinated by the efficiency and effectiveness of air travel in terms of distance, flexibility, and speed. Seeing the earth and weather from an airplane at 40,000 feet inspires awe.

“I fly daily, commuting to Portsmouth by air, using either one of our PC-12s or a smaller six-seater Bonanza. There’s no better signal to my troops then arriving and departing in an airplane. Good aviators know that you need to be current and trained, and that means you need to fly a lot.”

Original article ➤ https://www.bostonglobe.com

Rhinelander-Oneida County Airport (KRHI) director retires, Rhinelander native returns

Incoming Rhinelander Oneida County Airport director Matthew Leitner, right, is taking the helm from his mentor, Joe Brauer, who is retiring Friday.


Rhinelander-Oneida County airport director Joe Brauer has offically passed the baton to Rhinelander native Matthew Leitner as Brauer’s aviation career came to a close Friday. After 48 years serving the industry and its fliers, he couldn’t stop smiling as he chatted about his approaching retirement and reflected on his career.

Despite a career decorated with accolades and awards, Brauer was quick to attribute his success entirely to the people around him.

“At the end of the day, it isn’t because of Joe Brauer; it’s because of the employees,” he said. The colleagues and customers around him are what he’ll miss the most. “Walking through the terminal greeting people – that’s going to be the biggest adjustment.”

Brauer’s career started with a postcard. As a boy growing up on a dairy farm in Door County, he said he never planned to spend his life in aviation. That changed when a card arrived in the mail with the words, “Want to see the world?” A week later, he had signed up for the airline school and was headed to Minneapolis by the fall of that same year.

“I’ve never looked back,” he said.

He joined Air Wisconsin Airlines, a regional airline based at Appleton International Airport, and served as a customer service agent for five years before moving to Midstate Airlines, based at that time in Marshfield. He spent the next 15 years holding various positions in the airline industry until one day Bob Heck approached him, asking him to consider the Rhinelander airport manager position.

“It took me all of about 10 seconds to say, ‘Yes, I think I can do this,’” Brauer recalled. That was 28 years ago.

Today, Brauer counts several advancements at Rhinelander airport among the highlights of his tenure. Chief among those was an infrared deicer installed in 1998, the brainchild of former airport commission chairman Bob Heck and Brauer, and the first in the world of its kind. The deicer used infrared technology to remove ice and snow from airplanes “for less than a buck a minute,” Brauer explained. It took just six years to form the concept and create the first prototype in Rhinelander – an accomplishment Brauer said the Federal Aviation Association noted would normally take 20 years.
Another achievement that brought smiles to the faces of disabled passengers was a non-motorized disabled passenger lift, ending an era where such passengers would have to be carried up steps – at times a frightening and humiliating experience. A frequent flier came to Brauer after using it for the first time, he recalled.

“Mr Brauer, I want to thank you,” she said. “I finally got on an airplane with some dignity.”

“I’ve had a very, very blessed career,” Brauer finished. “I’ve been very lucky. I’m looking forward to retirement after 48 years of doing this.”

Matthew Leitner

Pilot, aircraft mechanic, instructor and experienced airport director, Matthew Leitner is stepping in to fill Brauer’s shoes. A Rhinelander native returning home, Leitner found his start in aviation at the very airport he will now manage. His lifelong passion for flying took its first step on his 11th birthday when his mother gifted him with an hour of flight instruction.

“As a child, I was smitten with flight,” Leitner recalled. But his passion was roadblocked by what many said was insurmountable: he is blind in his left eye. “I was told ad nauseum, ‘No, you can’t be a pilot,’” Leitner said. But despite that, he spent five years working odd jobs at the airport and scraping together money for flight instruction until he was 16, when he made his first solo flight.

“When I soloed, it was rapturous.” He took a flight test with the FAA and obtained a first class medical certificate, a waiver that would allow him to even fly for airlines. “I’ve never met anybody else that has it,” he remarked.

After graduating from Rhinelander High School in the late 1990s, he relocated to Atlanta, Georgia where he began amassing the education needed to pursue a career as an airport director. But when he finished graduate school in 2008, during the Great Recession, breaking into the workforce was “extraordinarily difficult.”

After failing to procure several openings, he traveled to Jamestown, North Dakota, where he made an “earnest appeal” for the airport there to take a chance on an inexperienced director. He got the job, and despite Delta pulling out of the market just months after starting, he went on to oversee the building of a new terminal, obtain government subsidies to procure jet airline service, and introduce much needed technical upgrades in the form of hangars, runway lighting, electronic gating and a rotating beacon light. Today, he says, the airport – comparable in size to Rhinelander – is breaking monthly boarding records and has become a primary commercial service airport.

In 2014, he moved on to Crescent City in northern California, where he says he essentially repeated the same story. Under his supervision, the airport got jet airline service, a new terminal and a higher classification of FAA certification.

“It was a real rush,” he remarked.

At a city council meeting Monday night, he said he had stayed in touch with Brauer through the years, turning to him for advice during his early days as a director. When he heard last year there was an opening, he jumped at the chance to return to his hometown.

“My objective is to enhance our collective quality of life here, as community, county and region,” he said of his goals for Rhinelander airport. Unlike Jamestown and Crescent City when he started, he remarked, the airport here is thriving and he wants to build on the foundation that Heck and Brauer have laid.

Reaching out to the young people to give them their start in aviation is a vision both Brauer and Leitner share for the future of aviation. Leitner says he wants to visit local schools and bring students to see the airport and get hands on experience that could potentially inspire them to direct their careers into aviation fields.

Though Brauer’s last day was May 18, but he plans to remain a “friend of the airport” and provide assistance to Leitner as needed.

Original article ➤  http://www.starjournalnow.com

Williamsport Regional Airport (KIPT) authority to review bids for fuel farm project

The Williamsport Municipal Airport Authority opened three bids ranging from $985,322 to $1.08 million for the second phase of its fuel farm relocation project at a special meeting Thursday.

The project includes a new fueling system and tank installation, which the authority’s engineers projected at $1,074,250. The project was bid out earlier in the year but did not receive responses at that time.

Three companies responded to the latest ad.

The companies and their totals were: Beavers Petroleum Equipment and Alternate Fuels, $1,084,951; Petroleum Technical Services LLC, $1,019,947; and the Fourth River Company, $985,322.

Vince Decario, of L.R. Kimball, lead engineer, and the state Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Aviation will further review the bids and make a recommendation to be voted on at the authority’s next meeting, June 14, said Christopher Logue, chairman.

In other business, the authority voted to go with Baker Tilly Virchow Krause LLP, which provides auditing services for Lycoming County, for its state-mandated audit, pending review of pricing.

“Our existing auditor, unfortunately, has run into a bit of a dilemma and is unable to perform our audit this year,” said Thomas Hart, airport executive director. “We have reached out to the county’s auditor to give us pricing.”

Original article ➤ http://www.sungazette.com

Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (KBZN) operations back to normal after fuel truck crash



BELGRADE - Operations are resuming as planned at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport after a fuel truck flipped over on the general aviation ramp Thursday afternoon.

A driver walked away with only minor injuries after losing control of the fuel truck when the weight from the fuel shifted while the driver was making a turn.

Airport Police and Fire, Central Valley fire department, and Best Rate Towing responded and are helping with cleanup

“It’s a process, obviously when you have fuel, it’s very important environmentally to handle that correctly and between us and the Central Valley Fire, and Best rate towing we’ve been making sure is done correctly,” said Brian Sprenger, airport director.

Yellowstone Jet Center is continuing to investigate the accident.

Story and video ➤ http://www.kbzk.com

Valdosta Regional Airport (KVLD) Authority welcomes new member

VALDOSTA — Hap Ertlschweiger served for the last time Wednesday as a member of the Valdosta-Lowndes County Airport Authority.

A former fighter jet and airline pilot, Ertlschweiger has served on the authority for four years. Taking his place will be George Page.

Page is the executive director of the Valdosta-Lowndes County Parks and Recreation Authority.

Ertlschweiger retired five years ago. Leaving the authority will relieve him of another set of responsibilities, he said. With his newfound free time, Ertlschweiger said he plans to spend time with family and soak up some sun on the beach.

He said if the authority needs his advice, the authority is more than welcome to call him.

Page spoke highly of the airport and referred to it as a “jewel."

“We are very blessed to have such a wonderful airport in our community,” he said.

Page said he looks forward to contributing his expertise to the authority and help make it an even better asset in the community.

Meanwhile, plans to purchase the land contiguous to the airport have hit a small snag.

The State Historic Preservation Office has asked the authority to perform an environmental study on the property because of an existing structure that has cabinets considered to be historical, Airport Manager Jim Galloway said.

The environmental study pushes the authority’s plans back by about a year; however, Galloway is pursuing alternate options to try and expedite the process, he said.

Originally, Galloway told property owners the land transaction may not happen until October, he said. He is still trying to find a way to honor that claim so as to not cause any more burden on the property holder.

The airport is trying to purchase the land to remove trees to improve the airport safety rating.

Galloway said there is no update on the new air traffic control tower. The authority will know if the project will move forward after May 22.

The project is dependent on the passage of the Transportation Local Options Sales Tax that is on the ballot Tuesday.

The airport authority meets 8 a.m., the second Wednesday of every month in the airport manager’s office. The meetings are open to the public. 

Original article ➤ http://www.valdostadailytimes.com

Cessna 172E Skyhawk, N3000U: Incident occurred May 18, 2018 in Superior, Boulder County, Colorado

West Star Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.govN3000U






SUPERIOR, Colo. (CBS4) – Emergency crews in Boulder County responded to the Superior area at midday after a small plane made an emergency landing in a field after it lost power.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s office said no one was hurt in the incident west of Superior.

All three people on board escaped injury when the plane lost power.

Copter4 video showed the single engine propeller plane in the middle of a grassy field and police officers interviewing what appeared to be the pilot.

The pilot told authorities rather than try to make it to Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, he decided to land in the field. 

Story and video ➤ http://denver.cbslocal.com

Zivko Edge 540T, N540ZA: Fatal accident occurred January 24, 2020 at Iztapa Airfield (MGIZ), Escuintla, Guatemala

NTSB Identification: GAA20WA110
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Friday, January 24, 2020 in Iztapa, Guatemala
Aircraft: EXTRA E54T, registration: N540ZA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Guatemala has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a EXTRA E54T airplane that occurred on January 24, 2020. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Guatemala's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Guatemala.




Una práctica de piruetas aéreas en avioneta terminó en tragedia en Iztapa, Escuintla. La aeronave se precipitó a tierra y en el accidente arrolló a un grupo de personas y provocó la tragedia.

La tarde de alegría se convirtió en pesadilla para los pilotos que tenían previsto participar este sábado en un show aéreo. La avioneta que cayó dejó a dos mujeres fallecidas y a varios heridos.

Las autoridades de la Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC)  confirmó vía Twitter sobre el trágico accidente registrado a eso de las 17:00 horas.

Francis Argueta, director de la DGAC, lamentó el accidente, mientras ensayaban maniobras de exhibición que estaban programadas para este sábado 25 de enero. Durante la tarde de este viernes se realizaban pruebas cuando ocurrió la tragedia.

En el accidente fallecieron el piloto de la avioneta y dos espectadoras. La información preliminar indica que Steven Andelin piloteaba la aeronabe. Andelin junto a Kirby Chambliss fueron los dos pilotos de Red Bull que vinieron a Guatemala para el show aéreo.

Las mujeres que murieron en el percance son María Luisa Schlesinger Sempe, de origen norteamericano, y Johanna Passarelli Schlesinger. Ellas fueron arrolladas por la avioneta cuando se precipitó a tierra.

https://crnnoticias.com

Cessna S550 Citation S/II, ZS-CAR, South African Civil Aviation Authority: Fatal accident occurred January 23, 2020 in Outeniqua Mountains, Ruiterbos, South Africa

NTSB Identification: WPR20WA082
14 CFR Part 129: Foreign
Accident occurred Thursday, January 23, 2020 in George, South Africa
Aircraft: CESSNA S550, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On January 23, 2020, about 0853 coordinated universal time, a Cessna S550, ZS-CAR, impacted mountainous terrain under unknown circumstances while conducting aerial surveying operations near George, South Africa. The two crew members and one passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was operated under the pertinent civil regulations of the government of South Africa.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of South Africa. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of South Africa. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Civil Aviation Authority
Accident & Incident Investigation Division
Private Bag X 73
Halfway House 1685
South Africa
Tel.: +27 (0) 11 545-1055/1050
Website: http://www.caa.co.za



Wreckage was found on Thursday in the hunt for a SA Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) plane with three people aboard that disappeared in the southern Cape.

A photograph sent to TimesLIVE by an aviation source appeared to show the tail of the Cessna Citation, with the registration mark ZS-CAR.

The plane, which was used for calibration of airport systems, is believed to have crashed in the mountainous Ruiterbos area between Mossel Bay and Oudtshoorn in the Western Cape.

The CAA confirmed that it had not been able to make contact with its flight inspection unit aircraft which took off earlier from George Airport, east of the aircraft's last known location.

“The crew, two males and one female, took off at 10.40 (local time) from the George airport on a flight calibration mission of navigational aids of the same airport,” said a statement.

“The air traffic control tower could not make contact with the aircraft 10 minutes after take-off.

“Air traffic and navigation services immediately activated search and rescue. The regulator is in contact with the search and rescue team for further updates.

“The SACAA will issue a further update later today.”

CAA spokesperson Kabelo Ledwaba said he could not comment on the photograph that appeared to show wreckage of the plane.

Earlier, an aviation source told TimesLIVE: “As they've not yet found any wreckage or picked up any emergency locator transmitter signals, they are not yet ready/able to confirm that it has crashed.”

Quinton Oerson, who works at the Eight Bells Inn in the area where the plane disappeared, said search efforts were being hampered by mist.

Staff had neither seen nor heard anything that might indicate a crash, he said.

“The mountains are still covered in mist, and that makes it difficult — we haven’t seen any smoke.”

He said search and rescue personnel were on site, and the inn had received queries from aviation officials.

The 33-year-old plane was a calibration aircraft used to enforce airport safety both in SA and at airports in neighbouring countries.

The aircraft was grounded in November 2019 after smoke billowed into the cockpit just before take-off from Lanseria airport in Johannesburg.

The Sunday Times reported in December that the twin-engined 12-seater screeched to a halt on the runway on November 8. The take-off was aborted and the plane limped back to a hangar. Both rear tyres deflated as a result of heat generated by the emergency braking.

TimesLIVE understands that the pilot during the Lanseria incident was also at the controls when the plane disappeared on Thursday.

An SAA pilot said on Thursday: “I hope it (the suspected crash) had nothing to do with smoke in the cockpit they’d experienced before.”

The November emergency was described in a detailed, preliminary serious incident report on the CAA website.

According to the report, the crew of the Cessna also encountered smoke in the cockpit the previous day while flying at altitude, resulting in maintenance checks on both engines after the plane landed.

“After landing, the crew conducted an inspection of both engines and there was no oil visible on the dipstick on the No 1 engine,” the CAA report said.

The defect was addressed, a ground test of the engines was conducted and the plane returned to service.

“The following morning, the aircraft with four on board was scheduled to depart Lanseria International Aerodrome for a flight to Polokwane International Aerodrome,” the CAA report said. “The start-up and flight profile set-up were uneventful.

“During the take-off roll from Runway 07, the crew experienced smoke in the cockpit. The crew decided to abort the take-off and the aircraft was taxied back to the hangar area before the engines were shut down.

“After the aircraft was parked, it was discovered that the right main-gear tyre deflated and minutes thereafter the left main-gear tyre also deflated. The crew did not report any injuries.”

The plane’s airworthiness certificate, first issued in October 1986, was due to expire in October this year.

Cessna 180, N54AF: Incident occurred May 03, 2018 in Talkeetna and Accident occurred September 02, 2016 in Yakutat, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft ground looped on landing damaging wing tip.

http://registry.faa.gov/N54AF

Date: 03-MAY-18
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N54AF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TALKEETNA
State: ALASKA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska  

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Yakutat, AK
Accident Number: GAA16CA474
Date & Time: 09/02/2016, 1700 AKD
Registration: N54AF
Aircraft: CESSNA 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll on a grass field the airplane encountered standing water and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing, the right wing strut, and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported as a safety recommendation to conduct a more thorough pre-landing reconnaissance of the intended landing zone.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's inadequate inspection of the off-airport landing area, which resulted in an encounter with standing water and a nose over. 

Findings

Personnel issues
Monitoring environment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Water - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Nose over/nose down (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/12/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/27/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 14300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 990 hours (Total, this make and model), 14209 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 68 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 28.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N54AF
Model/Series: 180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 30943
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3874.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 10520ACC
Registered Owner: J. D. FLYING LLC
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAYA, 31 ft msl
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 280°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Yakutat, AK
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Yakutat, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1655 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 59.712222, -140.348056 (est)

Midget Mustang M-II, registered to and operated by Bald Eagle Aviation LLC, N527JT: Accident occurred August 11, 2018 at Gebauer Airport (5V6), Akron, Washington County, Colorado (and) Incidents occurred May 17, 2018 & February 25, 2018 at Front Range Airport (KFTG), Watkins, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N527JT

Location: Akron, CO
Accident Number: GAA18CA486
Date & Time: 08/11/2018, 1330 MDT
Registration: N527JT
Aircraft: Bushby MUSTANG II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, while flying over the grass runway, it appeared "rough but serviceable". During landing, he found the surface was extremely rough with tall weeds.

During departure, acceleration was "less than normal" due to the vegetation. When the airplane reached the pilot's planned abort point, the pilot realized that he had misjudged the abort point for the runway. He initially thought his selected abort point was about 800 to 1,000 ft before the end of the runway, but, was about 100 to 200 ft before the end of the runway. The airplane overran the runway, crossed a road, and struck a barbed wire fence.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration Airport Facility Directory for the accident airport, in part stated:

"[Runways] not recommended for [takeoff or landing]." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/31/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3280 hours (Total, all aircraft), 154 hours (Total, this make and model), 3034 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bushby
Registration: N527JT
Model/Series: MUSTANG II No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 129
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/04/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 278.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-D3G
Registered Owner: Bald Eagle Aviation Llc
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: Bald Eagle Aviation Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAKO, 4663 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 231°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots / 21 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  La Veta, CO (07V)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Akron, CO (5V6)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1215 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: GEBAUER (5V6)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf; Gravel
Airport Elevation: 4509 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Holes; Rough; Vegetation
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 70 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.242500, -103.096111 (est)

May 17, 2018:  Occurrence while tower was closed; aircraft discovered in the runway safety area off the side of the runway.

Date: 17-MAY-18
Time: 13:05:00Z
Regis#: N527JT
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: MUSTANG II
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

February 25, 2018: Aircraft reported possible flat on landing.

Date: 25-FEB-18

Time: 20:36:00Z
Regis#: N527JT
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: MUSTANG II
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Diamond DA-42NG Twin Star, N306ER: Incident occurred May 17, 2018 in Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Passenger door detached during flight over heavily wood area.

Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N306ER

Date: 17-MAY-18
Time: 13:35:00Z
Regis#: N306ER
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: D 42 NG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Diamond DA-20C-1 Eclipse, registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy, N143MA: Accident occurred May 13, 2018 at LaGrange Callaway Airport (KLGC), Georgia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N143MA

Location: LaGrange, GA
Accident Number: GAA18CA282
Date & Time: 05/13/2018, 1720 EDT
Registration: N143MA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

The flight instructor reported that, during a soft field takeoff, the student kept the stick back and allowed the nose of the airplane to come up. The airplane drifted to the left and he reminded the student to apply right rudder and right aileron. He added that it seemed like the student applied too much right aileron and the right wing was close to dragging on the runway. The flight instructor prepared to take the flight controls and the student overcorrected to the left and the left wing impacted the ground. The flight instructor took control of the airplane, reduced power, and taxied to park without further incident.

The student pilot reported that, during a soft field takeoff, about 30 to 35 knots, the airplane lifted off the ground and encountered a crosswind that rolled the airplane to the right. The right wing dragged on the ground, he rolled the airplane to the left, and the left wing impacted the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left aileron.

The chief flight instructor of the school reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 34 hours (Total, all aircraft), 34 hours (Total, this make and model), 1 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/05/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 635 hours (Total, all aircraft), 246 hours (Total, this make and model), 564 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 239 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 77 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC
Registration: N143MA
Model/Series: DA 20 C1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: C0243
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/05/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6429.9 Hours
Engine Manufacturer:  Continental
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-240-B
Registered Owner: Falcon Aviation Academy
Rated Power: 125 hp
Operator: Falcon Aviation Academy
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCCO, 970 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2115 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 40°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Atlanta, GA (CCO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: LaGrange, GA (LGC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1600 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: LAGRANGE-CALLAWAY (LGC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 693 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5599 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.009167, -85.069722 (est)