Friday, November 13, 2020

Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport (KBWG) Taxiway Alpha Project complete



BOWLING GREEN, Kentucky (WBKO) - The Bowling Green – Warren County Regional Airport Board announced Friday morning that the 8.4 million dollar Taxiway Alpha Project was completed and the new taxiway open.

Airport officials said in July that cracks and low spots holding water were making it difficult for aircraft to enter and exit the runway.

“Right now our taxiway is in dire need of rehabilitation, so that’s why they are going to reconstruct the whole taxiway,” said Interim Airport Manager, Susan Harmon at the time. “The Taxiway Alpha project is actually an eight million dollar project, seven million of it is federally funded, then we have five percent state-funded and two and a half that is city and two and a half that is county-funded.”

Officials said the project will make the airport more functional for all types of aircraft.

Man charged with pointing laser at Denver police helicopter

Logan Scott Debyle
 (credit: Denver Police)

DENVER (AP) — Logan Scott Debyle, a man who was arrested by Denver police during a post-election protest, has been charged in federal court with aiming a laser pointer at a police helicopter, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said Thursday. Court records show Debyle, of Denver, made his first court appearance earlier in the day after being charged with aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft. Debyle was released from custody after promising to appear back in court for future hearings.

Debyle was represented by David Kraut of the federal public defender’s office, which does not comment on its cases.

According to an affidavit from an FBI agent supporting the charge against him, Debyle allegedly aimed the laser at the cockpit of the police department’s helicopter on November 4th as it monitored civil unrest in Cheesman Park, the starting point of a protest march toward the state Capitol the day after Election Day.

The helicopter crew directed officers on the ground to two men seen near the laser, according to the document. After he was found and arrested, Debyle told a detective that he was “just sorta playing around with it,” according to the document. The other man told police he was worried about what Debyle was doing and tried to distance himself from him, the document said.

Debyle was arrested by Denver officers for allegedly having prohibited fireworks before the federal charge was filed against him on November 6th. He was arrested on Thursday on the federal charge, which carries a penalty of not more than five years in prison and a fine of not more than $250,000.

Westerly, Rhode Island: Town Council to discuss taking clearer position on airport proposal

WESTERLY — The Town Council will consider taking a firmer stance on proposed legislation that critics say would make it easier for the Rhode Island Airport Corporation to clear flight obstructions surrounding airports, including Westerly State Airport.

On Monday, during a meeting scheduled for 6 p.m., the council is expected to discuss a proposed resolution that would outline the council's opposition to the "Preservation of Safe Airspace" bill. In July, an amended version of the bill was approved by the state Senate by a 35-1 vote, with two senators not voting. The council resolution would be aimed at a state House of Representatives version of the bill.

In October the council voted to deny RIAC's request for it to write a letter in support of the bill. Councilor Sharon Ahern, during the council's Nov. 9 meeting, said the council had only gone "halfway" by denying RIAC's request for a letter. The  proposed resolution, she said, would clarify the council's position on RIAC's attempted "airspace grab."

"We left it undone but what we really need to do is to ask our representative that they not pass it when it comes before them at the House level," Ahern said.

The bill, according to a news release from RIAC, would affirm current state laws and "provide a statewide solution to address airspace obstructions by clarifying state law as consistent with federal law, while improving airspace protection coordination among local, state and federal jurisdictions for publicly owned airports."

The bill would add to the state Department of Transportation's authority by giving it a legal right to purchase or condemn (take by eminent domain) airspace in addition to its current authority to purchase or condemn land. The bill would also newly specify that the authority would apply to preserving or maintaining approach areas. Definitions of airport "approach, approaches and approach zones" to comply with definitions used by the Federal Aviation Administration are included in the bill.

Four Westerly property owners are suing RIAC and the state DOT, claiming the agencies did not have a legal right to take avigation easements on their property to remove trees that RIAC says have grown too tall and are obstructing safe air travel. The lawsuit is pending in Superior Court and the trees were left standing pending resolution of the lawsuit.

In June, RIAC announced that preliminary findings of an airspace analysis may lead to displacement of runways at Newport State Airport, where property owners have also resisted RIAC's efforts to negotiate for airspace easements.

State Sen. Dennis Algier, R-Westerly, and William Conley, who serves as Westerly's town attorney and is also a state senator, voted in favor of the state Senate version of the bill.

Converting Reid-Hillview Airport (KRHV) into affordable housing


SAN JOSE, California (KRON) — The long-running effort to close Santa Clara County’s embattled Reid-Hillview Airport is once again on the front burner.

This time, airport foes are coming to the table with a plan that reaches beyond safety concerns.

Reid-Hillview Airport has fended off efforts to close it for decades over safety concerns. If closed, the 180 acre county-owned land in east San Jose would go a long way to solving the region’s affordable housing crisis, says Spur’s Teresa Alvarado.

“It is time to reimagine Reid-Hillview Airport as an accessible community asset that stimulates production of affordable housing and economic opportunities,” Alvarado said.

The airport was here long before the neighborhoods and shopping malls that surround it today.  There are more than 500 takeoffs and landings every day. 

Supporters say its safety record is excellent, but there have been several crashes through the years. 

Neighbors have long complained about noise and pollution as well, but supporters argue Reid-Hillview is a community asset and should not be closed.

Housing advocates showed how the airport land is three times the size of Levi’s Stadium and half again as large as San Jose State and the proposed Google Village in downtown San Jose.  

“Reid-Hillview has served a select few in this community for decades,” Alvarado said. “But the best use of that land is no longer to accommodate private planes or even teach students the basics of aviation.”

If the airport is closed, many of the pilots, flight schools and other traffic would likely move to a similarly-sized airport in San Martin in southern Santa Clara County.

Incident occurred November 13, 2020 at John Wayne-Orange County Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, California

A light plane experienced a faulty landing at John Wayne Airport on Friday evening, though the pilot was uninjured in the incident, officials said.

The Piper J-3 Cub’s tail had dragged during landing, causing the single-engine propeller plane to do a small spin on the runway before coming to a halt, said Deanne Thompson, spokeswoman for John Wayne Airport.

The accidental maneuver, called a taildragger ground loop, usually is not dangerous, Thompson said.

Orange County Fire Authority firefighters responded to the Irvine airport at about 5:30 p.m.

The pilot was able to exit the plane on his own and was not injured, said fire Capt. Daniel Yeh.

Firefighters and airport workers towed the small plane into a hangar to check the aircraft for any possible damage, Thompson said.

Earlier this week at John Wayne, a light plane experienced mechanical issues with its landing gears, causing the Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche to skid along the runway. The plane’s pilot and passenger were not injured.

Changes in how planes approach and leave Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU) may reduce noise, but will anyone notice?

 



MORRISVILLE -- The Federal Aviation Administration is changing the way planes approach and take off from Raleigh-Durham International Airport, and some people on the ground might notice the difference.

The FAA says the new procedures will allow planes to approach and leave the airport more efficiently and safely, by following pre-programmed routes that keep planes at a safe distance from each other.

Frequent flyers may notice a smoother glide to the runway or an uninterrupted climb to cruising altitude. There may also be fewer flight delays, because the procedures should help planes arrive and depart on time, according to the FAA.

The Federal Aviation Administration is changing the way planes approach and take off from Raleigh-Durham International Airport, and some people on the ground might notice the difference.

The FAA says the new procedures will allow planes to approach and leave the airport more efficiently and safely, by following pre-programmed routes that keep planes at a safe distance from each other.

Frequent flyers may notice a smoother glide to the runway or an uninterrupted climb to cruising altitude. There may also be fewer flight delays, because the procedures should help planes arrive and depart on time, according to the FAA.

“We’re not changing that, so those communities that are closer in shouldn’t see any changes,” O’Harra said in an interview. “We try to avoid over-promising, if that makes sense.”

The FAA will explain the new procedures and answer questions during a virtual meeting that begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17. For information on how to tune in, go to www.faa.gov/air_traffic/community_involvement/rdu/.

The new procedures can reduce noise from planes at higher altitudes as they both approach and depart the airspace around RDU.

In a traditional approach, pilots descend in a stair-step fashion, reducing altitude then revving the engines to level off before descending again.

But starting early next year, most planes approaching RDU will follow a steady descent programmed into their computers, allowing the plane to glide almost at idle, with less engine noise.

Similarly, the new process will allow pilots to climb more directly, with less leveling off on the way up. That means planes will get farther from the ground faster, theoretically causing less noise for people below.

Planes will follow the same paths in and out of RDU as they do now, with one exception. The approaches from the north will shift a bit, though O’Harra says most of the changes will occur “above 6,000 feet, so over a mile in the sky.”

The bottom line, he said: “If you hear planes today, you’re likely to hear planes in the future. And if you don’t hear planes today, you’re not likely to hear them in the future.”

AIRPLANE NOISE AN ISSUE IN MORRISVILLE

The new procedures come as RDU and the Town of Morrisville are debating how aircraft noise should continue to shape development in the town.

Town officials are proposing to allow apartments and condominiums north of N.C. 54, in a zone known as the Airport Overlay District. Residential development is currently banned from the district because of noise from planes approaching and taking off from RDU.

But town officials say planes are much quieter now than when the overlay district was created in the 1990s and that they take off and land in narrower flight paths. They say that with stricter insulation and window standards, the town should be able to let developers build multi-family housing in a planned transit-oriented development district near the Wake Tech Community College campus and in an undeveloped area made accessible by the recent completion of McCrimmon Parkway between Airport Boulevard and Aviation Parkway.

But RDU officials say allowing people to live closer to the airport will only invite hard feelings from residents as the airport grows. RDU spent millions fighting and then settling lawsuits over noise in the late 1980s, but Peter Kirsch, an attorney for the airport, said litigation is not the only concern.

“Much more important is the level of community unrest, the level of community concern, frankly the number of times that people come to speak at town council meetings and authority meetings,” Kirsch said during a meeting of RDU Airport Authority and town council members earlier this week.

“Almost all instances of noise problems around airports come from people who moved in to the area once the airport was there,” he continued. “Although we as lawyers can protect against liability, we can’t protect against political pressure and political concern.”

At least two council members replied that RDU has attracted far more political hard feelings by leasing 105 acres of airport land near Umstead State Park for a stone quarry. Council member Donna Fender said residents understand that having planes overhead comes along with living in Morrisville.

“I have not heard one complaint from a resident about airplane noise,” Fender said. “I’ve heard lots of complaints about the potential quarry going in right beside Umstead park. If you’re truly worried about angry residents, and truly concerned about doing no harm, you wouldn’t be leasing the public land for another quarry right beside our beautiful state park.”

Airport and town officials say they will continue talking about potential changes to the Airport Overlay District to try to find common ground.

“I think we’re trying to find the right answer to this,” Airport Authority chairman John Kane said as the meeting concluded. “And I think with continued dialogue we will find the right answer.”

As for the FAA, O’Harra said the agency is not likely to weigh in on zoning and land-use decisions in Morrisville.

“But obviously,” he continued, “we would be concerned about development that would create new noise concerns from houses around the airport.”

Embraer EMB-500 Phenom 100, N80EJ: Incident occurred November 10, 2020 at Chicago Executive Airport (KPWK), Wheeling, Cook County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greater Chicago

Aircraft landed and veered off the runway into the grass. 


Date: 10-NOV-20
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N80EJ
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: EMB500
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PROSPECT HEIGHTS
State: ILLINOIS

Bellanca 7ECA, N5062G: Incident occurred November 10, 2020 at Hayward Executive Airport (KHWD), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft veered off runway on landing.  

More Right Rudder LLC


Date: 10-NOV-20
Time: 20:20:00Z
Regis#: N5062G
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 7ECA
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HAYWARD
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N16TW: Incident occurred November 12, 2020 at John Wayne-Orange County Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Aircraft landed gear up.


Date: 12-NOV-20
Time: 00:09:00Z
Regis#: N16TW
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA30
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SANTA ANA
State: CALIFORNIA


A light plane on November 11th, experienced technical issues while coming down at John Wayne Airport in Orange County and skidded across a runway, but no injuries were reported.

The Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche pilot reported trouble with the plane’s landing equipment to air traffic controllers while approaching the airport at about 4 p.m., JWA spokeswoman Deanne Thompson said.

Preliminary reports indicate one of its landing gears was only partially lowered as it made contact with the runway, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

The two people aboard the plane were not injured, Thompson said.

The runway it came down on is designated for light aircraft, and was closed until an Orange County Fire Authority crew moved the plane out of the way at about 6 p.m. However, planes were able to use other runways, and flight schedules were not affected by the closure.

Bellanca 7GCBC Citabria, N57517: Accident occurred November 11, 2020 at Fallbrook Community Airpark (L18), San Diego County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Location: Fallbrook, CA 
Accident Number: WPR21LA052
Date & Time: November 11, 2020, 09:50 Local 
Registration: N57517
Aircraft: Bellanca 7GCBC 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:

On November 11, 2020, about 0950 Pacific standard time, a Bellanca 7GCBC, N57517 sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Fallbrook, California. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that during the initial climb, between 400 and 600 ft above ground level, the engine started to sputter, and the airplane began to lose lift. The pilot declared an emergency and executed a forced landing back to the runway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered off the runway and came to rest at the base of an embankment.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bellanca 
Registration: N57517
Model/Series: 7GCBC 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNFG,78 ft msl
Observation Time: 09:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C /-2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Fallbrook, CA 
Destination: Fallbrook, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.355782,-117.25139 (est)


A small plane that was experiencing mechanical issues went off the runway at Fallbrook Airpark November 11th, according to North County Fire Capt. John Choi. 

A small single-engine plane crashed near the Fallbrook Airpark Wednesday morning, November 11th, leaving the pilot with injuries.

The crash was reported at 9:51 a.m. near the airpark along South Mission Road, according to North County Fire Capt. John Choi.

The plane was having mechanical issues and came down for an emergency landing but ran out of runway space and went into an open field, according to information from Choi.

The plane did not catch fire, and the single occupant was taken to Palomar Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.



SAN DIEGO (KGTV) – A pilot suffered minor injuries Wednesday after a small plane landed hard at Fallbrook Airpark and skidded off a runway.

The incident involving a small aircraft was reported just before 9:55 a.m. at the Fallbrook Airpark on 2155 Air Park Rd., authorities said.

According to a North County Fire Protection District official, the plane was in the air when it experienced mechanical problems. 

The pilot landed at the airport, but the plane skidded 50-70 feet off the end of the runway and came to rest in a dirt area.

The plane did not catch fire, the department said.

The department said the pilot, who was the only person on board, suffered minor injuries and was taken to Palomar Medical Center for treatment.

ABC 10News learned the FAA will investigate the incident.

Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk, N6380A: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2020 near Nevada County Airport (KGOO), Grass Valley, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Piper Aircraft; Phoenix, Arizona


Location: Grass Valley, CA
Accident Number: WPR21FA044
Date & Time: November 10, 2020, 15:40 Local
Registration: N6380A
Aircraft: Piper PA38 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On November 10, 2020, about 1540 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-38-112 airplane, N6380A, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Grass Valley, California. The pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The owner of the accident airplane stated that the airplane was stored in a hangar at his home airport, the pilot’s departure airport, Cameron Park, California. Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADSB) data obtained through a commercially available third-party contained three different tracks that began the day of the accident about 1028 from the pilot’s departure airport. The first track showed the pilot depart to the northwest from his departure airport and turn to a southwesterly heading. He reached his next destination, University Airport (EDU), Davis, California, about 1100. The second ADS-B track appeared 23 minutes later during the pilot’s departure from EDU. The data showed that he flew to an area east of the airport where he performed numerous turns, climbs, and descents and subsequently performed two touch and go maneuvers at a nearby airport before he returned to EDU approximately 1200. The second ADS-B track terminated about 1210. According to the final track, the pilot departed EDU about 1419 and flew a northerly heading for about 35 nm, turned northeast and flew an additional 31 nm to an intermediate airport in Oroville, California. The pilot performed a touch and go maneuver and then departed to the southeast. He established a cruise altitude of 5,500 ft mean sea level about 1523 and maintained a southeasterly heading. At 1533:49 he passed an airport in Grass Valley, California about 2 minutes before he made a slight right turn to a southern heading. The pilot reported a loss of engine power to air traffic control about this time. At 1536:25 the pilot executed a 180° right turn to the north as the airplane began to descend. He made a 180° left turn about 2 minutes later, at which point the ADS-B data ceased at 1539:22, approximately 0.3 nm west of the accident site.

A witness located about 0.1 nm southeast of the final ADS-B data point and 0.3 nm southwest of the accident site, reported that he observed the accident airplane fly over him in a steep, controlled, left turn (see Figure 1). The airplane rolled into a level attitude on a northeastern heading as it flew past the witness in a steady descent and disappeared behind trees. The witness heard the airplane impact the ground about 4 seconds later. He did not hear an engine harmonic while the airplane was in view or after.

The airplane was located in wooded terrain at an elevation of about 2,710 ft mean sea level. All major sections of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The initial impact point (IIP) was marked by a severed tree that displayed an impact mark about 15 ft up from its base. The accident airplane was inverted and intact, oriented on a heading of 048° magnetic. The orientation between the IIP and main wreckage was 094° magnetic.

Both propeller blades remained attached to the engine crankshaft and were each bent aft slightly, However, neither blade exhibited any nicks, gouges, or chordwise striations.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6380A
Model/Series: PA38 112 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGOO,3153 ft msl
Observation Time: 15:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C /-5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cameron Park, CA (O61)
Destination: Grass Valley, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.190833,-120.99861
 
Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




CAMERON PARK (CBS13) — A third-generation Air Force captain died in a plane crash in Nevada County Tuesday.

Family members say the young pilot had a bright future. 

Ron Hooper was just 30-years-old.“I know he’s going to be missed,” Hooper’s brother-in-law David Williams said.

The Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk aircraft Hooper was flying went down about a mile and a half outside the Nevada County Airport in Grass Valley Tuesday afternoon.

The Federal Aviation Administration says Hooper reported engine problems before crashing into trees. He later died at the Sutter hospital in Roseville.Williams dropped Hooper off at the airport right before he took off.

“When I dropped him off at the airport I said, ‘Hey man see you later, have a safe flight,'” Williams said.

Hooper was getting in practice hours, training to become a commercial pilot. Ron, his sister Victoria and David all served at Travis Air Force Base together. He started flying helicopters for the Navy and transitioned to the Air Force Reserve.

“That was his passion, he loved everything to do with flying,” said Williams.

Aviation was in his blood, his father, and grandfather served in the Air Force as well. Williams says his family and his community will miss Ron’s calm energy and positive nature. They say he was a true leader on the ground and in the air.

“To see someone like that taken so drastically is terrible, but if people can emulate that nature, we’d all be better off,” said Williams.

Both the FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash.

Travis Air Force Base released the following statement about Hooper Wednesday:

“The 349th Air Mobility Wing is deeply saddened by the tragic loss of Capt. Ronald W. Hooper. Capt. Hooper was a highly respected and valued Air Force officer, wingman and friend. Our heartfelt condolences and prayers go out to his family, friends and all members of our wing.”












NEVADA COUNTY (CBS13) — A pilot from Rancho Cordova died after a plane crash in Nevada County Tuesday afternoon.

The Nevada County Sheriff’s Office has identified the pilot as 30-year-old Ronald Hooper.

The crash happened around 3:40 p.m. in the area of Meadow Drive and Highway 174, about a mile and a half outside of the Nevada County Airport in Grass Valley. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot reported engine problems before crashing into trees and landing upside down in an underdeveloped lot.

Witnesses told the sheriff’s office the plane lost power before crashing. First responders found Hooper trapped inside the cockpit. He was extricated and flown via air ambulance to Sutter Roseville, where officials say he died from his injuries.

Hooper was flying a Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk, the FAA said. He was the only person on-board.

Multiple agencies including the Peardale Chicago Park Fire Department and the Nevada County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

Hooper was part of the Air Force Reserve at Travis Air Force Base’s 349th Air Mobility Wing, officials confirmed to CBS13.

“Capt. Hooper was a highly respected and valued Air Force officer, wingman and friend. Our heartfelt condolences and prayers go out to his family, friends and all members of our wing,” wrote the 349th in a statement.

Pipistrel Sinus 912, N896SE: Incident occurred November 10, 2020 at Prescott Regional Airport (KPRC), Yavapai County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Sinus motorglider departing, ground looped and nosed over. 


Date: 10-NOV-20
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N896SE
Aircraft Make: PIPISTREL
Aircraft Model: SINUS 912
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PRESCOTT
State: ARIZONA

Cessna 182T Skylane, N939CP: Fatal accident occurred November 12, 2020 near Whiteman Airport (KWHP), Los Angeles County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California


Location: Los Angeles, CA 
Accident Number: WPR21FA048
Date & Time: November 12, 2020, 11:43 Local 
Registration: N939CP
Aircraft: Cessna 182 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Positioning

On November 12, 2020, about 1143 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182T airplane, N939CP, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Whiteman Airport, Los Angeles, California. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 positioning flight.

Review of the preliminary Air Traffic Control tower audio revealed that the pilot reported a loss of engine power while on final approach to the airport. Shortly thereafter, the airplane impacted power lines and then struck several vehicles before it impacted the ground. Local law enforcement, the Federal Aviation Administration, and National Transportation Safety Board personnel responded to the
accident site, which was located on a road in a residential area. A survey of the accident site revealed that all major components of the airplane necessary for flight were located and that there was a postimpact fire.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for future examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N939CP
Model/Series: 182 T 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWHP
Observation Time: 10:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0.5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C /0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Bakersfield, CA (BFL)
Destination: Los Angeles, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.259325,-118.41343 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

 



PACOIMA, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A Civil Air Patrol pilot was killed when a small plane slammed into multiple vehicles that were parked on a residential street in Pacoima on Thursday morning, igniting a fire near several homes, officials said.

No other injuries were reported in the crash, which occurred shortly after 11:30 a.m. in 10000 block of North Sutter Avenue, the Los Angeles Fire Department said. The deceased pilot, the only person onboard the aircraft, was not immediately identified.

The Civil Air Patrol California Wing later identified the pilot as a member of that organization, but did not release the pilot's name.

The plane was identified as a Cessna 182T Skylane.

"Our hearts go out to the family of the member involved, and to all of the volunteer Civil Air Patrol members in California Wing who diligently serve their state and country with pride and professionalism," said Col. Ross Veta, Commander of the California Wing, Civil Air Patrol.

The Civil Air Patrol is a citizen auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. In California, there are more than 3,600 members in eight groups and 72 squadrons and wing units providing emergency services, cadet programs, and aerospace education. They operate a fleet of 27 aircraft and 45 ground vehicles. The volunteer members help with emergency search missions, promote education and other public service functions.

Firefighters responded to the scene and extinguished flames that engulfed several parked vehicles near a Whiteman Airport runway. The wreckage of the plane was nearly obliterated.

Initial reports that the aircraft had struck a house appeared to be unfounded.

In a statement, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the crash happened as the Cessna 182T Skylane was approaching the airport's Runway 12.

LAFD Capt. Erik Scott said the plane hit "energized power lines" which then fell to the street below. "Firefighters then immediately cordoned that area off with yellow tape to ensure safety, so no one gets electrocuted," he told reporters at the scene, adding that the LAFD was working with the city's Department of Water and Power to deenergize the lines.

The cause of the incident is under investigation by the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board.

Learjet 45, N385MH: Incident occurred November 12, 2020 at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (KCOS), El Paso County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft on departure felt an extreme shimmy and declared emergency to return and the left engine cowling was missing. 

Rocket Air LLC


Date: 12-NOV-20
Time: 16:49:00Z
Regis#: N385MH
Aircraft Make: LEARJET
Aircraft Model: 45
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: COLORADO SPRINGS
State: COLORADO

Van's RV-9A, N847RS: Incident occurred November 12, 2020 at Baldwin Municipal Airport (7D3), Lake County, Michigan

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aircraft bounced during landing and the nose gear collapsed. 


Date: 12-NOV-20
Time: 15:40:00Z
Regis#: N847RS
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV-9A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BALDWIN
State: MICHIGAN

Boeing 737-800, N76519: Incident occurred November 12, 2020 at Newark Liberty International Airport (KEWR), New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft landed and on post flight inspection a bird appeared to have been ingested in the #1 engine and damage to left wing leading edge.  

United Airlines Inc


Date: 12-NOV-20
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N76519
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: UNITED AIRLINES
Flight Number: UAL655
City: NEWARK
State: NEW JERSEY

Embraer ERJ-135, N831AE: Incident occurred November 12, 2020 near Charlotte/Douglas International Airport (KCLT), North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aircraft reported severe turbulence while being vectored around weather, a passenger sustained minor injuries. 

Envoy Air on behalf of American Airlines Inc


Date: 12-NOV-20
Time: 16:09:00Z
Regis#: ENY3796
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: ERJ135
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: ENY3796
City: CHARLOTTE
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N350SU: Accident occurred November 12, 2020 in Columbus, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aircraft struck a bird damaging left wing leading edge. 

Ohio State University


Date: 13-NOV-20
Time: 00:50:00Z
Regis#: N350SU
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: FAR 141 PILOT SCHOOL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
Flight Number: OSU35
City: COLUMBUS
State: OHIO

Cessna 182R Skylane, N7306H: Fatal accident occurred November 12, 2020 near Ralph M. Hall Rockwall Municipal Airport (F46), Rockwall County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas


Location: Rockwall, TX 
Accident Number: CEN21LA055
Date & Time: November 12, 2020, 13:06 Local
Registration: N7306H
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:

On November 12, 2020, about 1307 central standard time (CST), a Cessna 182, N7306H, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Rockwall, Texas. The certificated private pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane had departed the Abilene airport (ABI) about 1139 on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The last communications with air traffic control occurred at 1303 when the pilot cancelled the IFR flight plan and proceeded to Rockwall Municipal Airport (F46).

A review of archived Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that as the airplane approached F46, it appeared to enter a left downwind leg for runway 35, although the traffic pattern indicators as part of the segmented circle indicated a right traffic pattern for runway 35. Other pilots already in the traffic pattern were utilizing runway 17 and did not hear the pilot of N7306H make any radio transmissions on the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency.  One pilot was holding short of runway 17, about to depart, when another pilot in the pattern instructed him to hold short of the runway since there was someone else landing the opposite direction.

Multiple surveillance cameras positioned around F46 captured the accident sequence. One camera, located at a fixed-base operator on the southeast corner of the airport, adjacent to the runway 35 threshold, captured the airplane about 10 ft over the runway’s surface and it did not appear to touchdown within the video frame. A witness located on the ground about that same location stated that he never saw the airplane touchdown as it crested the peak of the sloped runway. A second camera, located on the northwest side of the runway, adjacent to the windsock, captured the airplane shortly after cresting the peak of the runway. In this video, the airplane appeared to be on the runway, but not stopping. The camera angle was limited to the displaced threshold for runway 17 and when the airplane passed from its field of view, it was still on the ground. A third and final camera captured the remaining runway and accident sequence. Shortly after the airplane passed the segmented circle, smoke could briefly be seen emitting from the main wheels. Immediately thereafter, the airplane overran the departure end of the runway and descended towards lower terrain before it ascended slightly. During this time, the airplane appeared to be in a nose high pitch attitude before impacting transmission power lines with the left wing that were located about 440 ft north of the departure end of the runway. Subsequently, the airplane spiraled to the ground and out of the camera’s field of view. The pilot of an airplane holding short of runway 17 had his window open and heard an increase in engine noise, which he described as consistent with an engine developing full power.

A post-accident examination revealed free movement of both main wheels with no flat spots noted. Flight control continuity was established to the ailerons, elevators and rudder and the flaps were found in the retracted position. Cylinder compression and rotational continuity throughout the engine and valve train was confirmed at the accident site. Additionally, the left and right magnetos produced spark on connected ignition leads. No mechanical anomalies or malfunctions were found that would have precluded normal operation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7306H
Model/Series: 182
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KF46,575 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 290°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 7000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Abilene, TX (KABI) 
Destination: Rockwall, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.936653,-96.436255 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.
 
Donald L.Wehmeyer, 75, and Curtis G. Robertson Jr., 67, both from Abilene, Texas.

Obituary of Donald Lee Wehmeyer

Donald L. Wehmeyer, M.D. was born on August 9, 1945, to George and Virginia Wehmeyer and passed away on Thursday, November 12, 2020.  He was raised in High Ridge, Missouri and graduated from Northwest High School in 1963.  Don attended the University of Missouri at Columbia where he was a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity.  It was there he met his future wife, Pat Morrow, and they were married on August 24, 1968.   Upon graduation from Mizzou in 1967, he attended the University of Missouri School of Medicine, graduating in 1971, and then completed his general surgery residency at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita, Kansas in 1975.  
 
Don served his country at Dyess Air Force Base as a general surgeon from 1975 to 1977.  He then continued his medical training at the University of Florida in Gainesville doing a plastic surgery residency from 1977 to 1979.  His fascination with how the hand functions led him to complete his hand and microsurgical  fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at Denver in 1980.  
 
Don and Pat had three criteria regarding a place to settle down, begin a practice and raise their family.  Those were:  a small town, parades on holidays and no need for a snow shovel! That’s what brought them back to Abilene, Texas.  Don opened his practice in July 1980, and he continued serving Abilene and the surrounding area until his retirement in May 2018.  During his medical career, he was instrumental in organizing one of the first independent physician associations in West Texas, Premier Physicians Alliance.  Don served as President of the board directors for many years.  
 
Throughout his thirty-eight year career as a hand surgeon, he developed a love of travel, a sense of adventure and giving of his time.  Don and Pat enjoyed traveling all over the world with family and friends. From attending the Winter Olympics in Yugoslavia, France and Norway to exploring the depths of the oceans around the world as a certified scuba diver to enjoying the beauty of South Africa on safaris, Don savored every trip.   
 
Don was a dedicated Boy Scout and had achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. Throughout his adult life he gave of his time by serving on the staff of several National and World Scout Jamborees.  He was very proud of his two grandsons in their involvement in scouting as they earned their way through the scouting ranks.  He certainly lived up to the Boy Scout motto “Be Prepared”.   
 
Don was a talented photographer and captured priceless photos of his life’s adventures that will be treasured by his family and friends for years to come.  
 
Don was preceded in death by his parents, George and Virginia Wehmeyer and his sister, Brenda Wehmeyer.
 
He is survived by his wife, Pat, his son Michael Wehmeyer and wife Melissa of Abilene, Texas, his daughter Wendy Wehmeyer of Rockwall, Texas, his son Jeff Wehmeyer and wife Julie and grandsons Andy and Nick all of Lake Bluff, Illinois.  He is also survived by numerous cousins, friends and colleagues.  
 
Visitation will be on Thursday, November 19, 2020 from 6 to 8 p.m. at The Hamil Family Funeral Home at 6449 Buffalo Gap Road.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Meals on Wheels or the charity of your choice.  


Obituary of Curtis Grady Robertson

Curtis Grady Robertson, 64, of Abilene, passed away on November 12 in Rockwall, TX. Visitation will be Wednesday, November 18 from 6-8 pm at The Hamil Family Funeral Home, 6449 Buffalo Gap Road. Funeral services will be held at 2 pm Thursday, November 19 at First Baptist Church with C.V. Blake officiating. Burial will follow at Elmwood Funeral Home and Memorial Park. Services are under the direction of the Hamil Family Funeral Home.

Curtis was born in Abilene to Grady and Sibyl Robertson on August 18, 1956. He attended school at Abilene High and graduated from Hardin Simmons University with a Bachelor of Business Administration. He married Susie Price on October 22, 2004 in Abilene. He started Underwater Connection in 1984 which eventually became Abilene Sports Connection. He attained the highest level of scuba certification (Instructor Certifier) and traveled the world scuba diving. He competed in Artistic Pool (trick shots on the pool table) and retired with a 5th World Ranking. He went on a mission trip with Tom "Dr. Cue" Rossman to Honduras for the Gospel Trick Shot Ministries. He was accepted into the American Cuemakers Association (one of only 44 at the time). He was a U.S. Representative of Lategan Safaris of South Africa.  He was a world traveler, visiting five continents, 31 countries, and 48 states.  

Curtis was preceded in death by his father and mother, Grady and Sibyl Robertson.  

Curtis is survived by his wife Susie Robertson and stepson Brandon Price, along with several cousins.  

Pallbearers will be David Jackson, John Jackson, Andy Reeder, Stan Chapman, John Dearing, and Derral Reed. Honorary Pallbearers are Buddy Warren, Mark Odom, and Grady McNabb.

The family of Curtis Robertson wishes to extend our sincere thanks to the Wehmeyer family for a lifetime of friendship and memories.




 






ROCKWALL, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Two people aboard a Cessna 182R Skylane were killed when the plane crashed after striking a power line near Ralph M. Hall Rockwall Municipal Airport, sources confirmed.

It happened around 1:00 p.m. Thursday, November 12th, near the 1900 Block of State Highway 66 the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The victims identities have not been released.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.