Saturday, September 8, 2012

Schoepflin Dale E DA-4-550, N550YS: Fatal accident occurred September 08, 2012 in Viola, Idaho

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

 http://registry.faa.gov/N550YS

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA410 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Viola, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2014
Aircraft: SCHOEPFLIN DA-4-550, registration: N550YS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had been hired to do a flyby over a gathering at a private residence. Witnesses reported that the pilot was flying low, about 800 feet above ground level, over a large crowd. The airplane appeared to be in slow flight, and as it started to circle the group, the pilot began dropping streamers from the airplane. The airplane subsequently entered into a steep turn, and the airplane stalled and spun to the ground. Witnesses also reported that the engine was running and sounded "strong" throughout the accident sequence. After ground impact, a fire started and destroyed the majority of the airplane.

A postimpact examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control while maneuvering, resulting in an aerodynamic stall/spin with insufficient altitude to recover.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 8, 2012, about 1800 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur built Schoepflin DA-4-550 airplane (super buccaneer), N550YS, while maneuvering over a private residence, impacted the ground near Viola, Idaho. The pilot/owner operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business flight. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage in the post impact fire. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. 

Responding law enforcement personnel from the Latah County Sheriff's Department reported that the pilot had been hired to do a flyby during a Republican gathering. For some unknown reason, the airplane began circling the group and the pilot was dropping streamers from the airplane. 

Witnesses report that the pilot was flying low, about 800 feet above ground level (agl), over a large crowd. The airplane appeared to be in slow flight, and as the airplane entered into a steep turn, the airplane stalled and spun to the ground. Witnesses also reported that the engine was running and sounded "strong."

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector responded to the accident, and reported that the majority of the airplane had burned in the postimpact fire. The engine was recovered for further examination.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 56, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and sea. He held a third-class medical issued on September 6, 2011, with the restriction that he must wear corrective lenses for distant vision, and have glasses for near vision.

According to the pilot Airman and Medical Records Center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the pilot reported on his most recent medical application dated September 6, 2011, a total time of 1,800 total flight hours with 0 hours logged in the prior 6 months. At the pilot's previous medical, dated March 26, 2008, the pilot reported a total time of 1,868 hours with 75 hours logged in the prior 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane logbooks were not made available to the NTSB; however, the FAA reviewed the logbooks. The last annual inspection was on March 4, 2010. The FAA also reported that the Continental Motors, Inc., (CMI) engine, model IO-550-A7B, serial number 280445, was rebuilt and zero-timed by CMI on December 6, 1996. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest on a hill slope in a horse pasture. All flight control components of the airplane were identified at the accident site, and the burned area was about 100 yards in diameter with the airplane in the center. The majority of the airplane was thermally destroyed. The right wing remained intact, and the left wing was mostly thermally destroyed by the postimpact fire. The propeller assembly was partially separated from the crankshaft, but remained in its relative normal position at the accident site; one of the three propeller blades showed S-bending deformation, the other two propeller blade were not visible in the wreckage. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

According to the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), they made several attempts to contact the Latah County Coroner's department to obtain tissue samples for a toxicology analysis, and an autopsy report. Initial report from the coroner's office was that there were not enough remains to complete a full autopsy report.

TEST AND RESEARCH

An engine inspection was performed on September 11, 2012, at Discount Aircraft Salvage in Deer Park, Washington. At the conclusion of the examination, no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure was found that would have prevented normal operation and production of horsepower. 

A visual inspection of the engine revealed thermal and impact damage. The left and right magnetos were not recovered. The ignition harness sustained thermal damage. According to the Champion Aviation Check-A-Plug chart AV-27, the spark plug electrodes exhibited normal, worn out signatures, and the spark plugs had dark colored combustion spots. The fuel pump was not recovered; the fuel manifold valve sustained thermal damage. The safety wire remained partially intact. Disassembly of the fuel manifold valve revealed that the screen and body of the manifold was free of debris. The fuel nozzles and lines sustained thermal and impact damage; the nozzles were partially obstructed by soot. The throttle body/metering unit was not recovered. The oil pump sustained thermal damage. The oil sump and oil cooler were not recovered. The oil pick-up tube and screen sustained thermal and impact damage; however, the screen was free of debris.

The cylinders sustained thermal damage, and the valve covers were partially melted. The combustion chambers were inspected with a lighted borescope via the top spark plug holes. The piston faces, valve heads, combustion chambers, and lower spark plugs were unremarkable. The accessory gears sustained thermal and impact damage. The starter, vacuum pump, propeller, and propeller governor were not recovered with the engine, and the propeller was not examined. The starter adaptor and the alternator sustained thermal damage; the starter adaptor sustained impact damage as well.

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA410 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Viola, ID
Aircraft: SCHOEPFLIN DA-4-550, registration: N550YS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 8, 2012, about 1800 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur built Schoepflin DA-4-550 airplane (super buccaneer), N550YS, while maneuvering over a private residence, stalled, and impacted the ground near Viola, Idaho. The pilot/owner operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business flight. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage in the post impact fire. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed.

According to law enforcement personnel from the Latah County Sheriff’s Department, the pilot was overflying the area and dropping leaflets during a Republican fund-raising picnic at a private residence. Witnesses reported the airplane making a tight turn, stalling, and spinning to the ground; the engine sounded “strong.”

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector responded to the accident and reported that the majority of the airplane had burned in the post-impact fire. His examination of the airframe revealed no mechanical anomalies. The engine was recovered for further examination.


The Latah County Sheriff's Office has identified Randy Humble, 60, of Moscow as the pilot who died in an airplane crash Saturday afternoon off Saddle Ridge Road near Viola.

Humble and another pilot had been performing aerial tricks for about 40 Latah County Republicans who were picnicking at a private residence. Witnesses said Humble's plane, which was designed to land on water, made an engine revving noise before nosediving toward the ground. They then heard a thud and saw black smoke rising from behind a nearby hill.

The plane fell apart and began burning upon impact, and Humble died at the scene. Picnic attendees rushed to put out the flames before Moscow volunteer firefighters arrived.

Ministry Wings Aviation works to soar to new heights

AMARILLO, TEXAS -- Nearly 2,500 people gathered at River Falls Airport for a spectacular air and car show hosted by Ministry Wings Aviation.

Serving to infinity and beyond, Ministry Wings Aviation is working to provide private air transportation to those in need.

Executive Director of MWA Justin Miller said, "(MWA) helps children who are in need of medical treatment, disaster and humanitarian relief and churches, ministries, and missionaries. We do that to further the great commission of Jesus Christ to promote the gospel to people and to show God's love for others."

Saturday's air and car how did more than entertain a crowd; it's a benefit to raise money and awareness.

"It's benefiting Ministry Wings Aviation and to promote our empty flight plan, and currently today was the first official launch of our web based program that does the matching with the need and with the air craft," said Miller.

The organization has helped many around the area but hopes technology can take them to a national level, but locally their first event was a big success.

"We had the people come out with their little 'RC' planes and that was pretty cool," said spectator Spencer Nelson. "They had them up in the air, they were stalling and doing flips and missing each other. I think we've had a good time today it was this airport's first time doing this and I think they did a pretty good job."

Officials say it may have been their first, but definitely not their last.

"I like this because it has so many cool features, better than most air shows around that I've been to," said spectator Andrew.

If you'd like to look further into their organization, you can visit their website at www.ministryaviation.org

Source:   http://www.connectamarillo.com

Cessna 525, N520RM: Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing - Gypsum, Colorado


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 520RM        Make/Model: C525      Description: 525 CitationJet
  Date: 09/07/2012     Time: 1959

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: GYPSUM   State: CO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. GYPSUM, CO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   4     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DENVER, CO  (NM03)                    Entry date: 09/10/2012 

 http://registry.faa.gov/N520RM


VAIL, Colo. (AP) - All five people aboard a private jet escaped injury when the aircraft's nose gear collapsed during landing at Eagle County Regional Airport.

Airport aviation director Greg Phillips tells The Vail Daily, the Cessna Citation aircraft was landing at about 2 p.m. Friday and skidded to a stop near the end of the runway. The group had left Hot Springs, Ark., earlier in the day.


Phillips says the plane was removed from the runway Friday afternoon, and no commercial flights were affected.

Lake County to temporarily close Lampson Field Airport (1O2) to general aviation traffic due to Scotts Fire

LAKEPORT, Calif. – In response to a wildland fire burning northwest of Lakeport, a Lake County official said Saturday evening that the county is issuing a temporary closure order for Lampson Field.

Lake County Department of Public Works Director Scott De Leon said the Notice to Airmen – or NOTAM – goes into effect at 7 a.m. Sunday, and will close Lampson Field to all general aviation traffic.

De Leon said Cal Fire will be using Lampson Field as its base of aerial operations on the Scotts Fire, burning since Friday afternoon at the northern end of Cow Mountain, west of Scotts Valley Road and east of Ukiah.

The closure will be in effect for five days, unless modified, De Leon said.

He said the closure order does not affect REACH Air Ambulance, which will continue to operate out of Lampson Field.

On Saturday evening Cal Fire said the Scotts Fire had grown to 3,000 acres, with five percent containment.

No date for full containment has yet been reported.

Earlier in the day, county officials issued a temporary closure order for Mt. Konocti County Park and suspended hunting in the Highland Springs area due to concerns about fire danger, as Lake County News has reported.

The county’s action to temporary close the park and halt hunting at Highland Springs also was in response to the already stretched state and local fire resources, which are being used not just on the Scotts Fire but also on the North Pass Fire in Mendocino County and the 16 Complex in Colusa and Yolo counties.


Source:  http://www.lakeconews.com

Beech 18/C-45: Suffolk plane runs into ditch

SUFFOLK

No one was injured when a plane ran into a ditch at a rural grass landing strip in the 900 block of Hare Road Saturday evening.

Dispatchers received a call for the incident around 5:20 p.m., according to a city news release.

The 1943 twin-engine Beech 18/C-45 plane was never airborne, but narrowly missed a telephone pole during the incident.

Pilot John Mosby Williams, of Bonita Springs, Fla., was undergoing test maneuvers on the plane's brakes when they failed, causing the plane to veer across the road and into the ditch, the release said.


Source:  http://hamptonroads.com

Piper J3C-65 Cub, N70108: Accident occurred September 08, 2012 in Kingsland, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA616
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Kingsland, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/06/2014
Aircraft: PIPER J3C-65, registration: N70108
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses indicated that the airplane was climbing slowly in a nose-up attitude during the initial climb. They noted a slow forward speed and that the engine did not sound like it was operating at full power. The airplane had climbed to an altitude of about 125 feet above ground level and then suddenly rolled to the left and descended in a nearly vertical attitude and impacted terrain on the left side of the runway. The airplane was equipped with a 4-point shoulder harness installation; however, the pilot was using only a lap belt restraint system. Records showed that the airplane had been flown only once in the past year and that the required annual inspection was overdue.

A postaccident examination of the engine showed that corrosion and oil glazing were present and the intake valve on the No. 1 cylinder was stuck in the open position. Based on the available evidence, it is likely that the No. 1 cylinder intake valve was stuck open and resulted in a partial loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed following a partial loss of engine power resulting from an engine intake valve that became stuck open. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s decision to operate the airplane when a required maintenance inspection was overdue. Contributing to the severity of the pilot’s injuries was his decision to operate the airplane without using the installed shoulder harness restraints.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 8, 2012, about 1843 central daylight time, a Piper Aircraft Inc., J3C-65 airplane, N70108, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during initial climb at Shirley Williams Airport (44TE), Kingsland, Texas. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. At the time of the accident the local flight was originating from 44TE.

The solo pilot was seated in the rear seat and began a takeoff from the far south end of runway 34. After liftoff about mid-field, several witnesses described the airplane as climbing slowly in a nose-up attitude with a slow forward speed. Several witnesses said the engine was operating, but did not sound like it was operating at full power. The airplane had climbed to an altitude of about 125 feet above ground level (agl) and then suddenly rolled to the left and descended in a nearly vertical attitude impacting terrain on the left side of the runway.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 53, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with ratings in airplane single engine land and in airplane single engine sea. He did not hold an instrument rating.

The pilot also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued on February 11, 2011, with a restriction "must wear corrective lenses."

Based on a review of the pilot's personal logbook, estimates from family members and friends, and FAA medical certification records; the pilot's flight experience in all aircraft was estimated as a total of about 254 hours with the last entry made in the pilot logbook on July 22, 2012. About 160 of those hours were in tail-wheel airplanes, which included a total of about 126 hours in the accident airplane. The pilot's logbook showed his most recently logged flight time in the accident airplane was on December 26, 2011. Records show the pilot completed the requirements for a flight review on August 11, 2011.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The model J3C-65 airplane, serial number 17082, was manufactured by Piper Airplane Corporation in 1946, and had been registered to the owner since 2007. It was a 2-place, high wing, fabric covered, metal tube and wood airplane with conventional (tail-wheel) landing gear. It was not equipped with flaps.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental model C-85-12F carbureted reciprocating engine, serial number 24867-6-12, which drove a modified McCauley model 1B90 CM 7142 fixed-pitch metal alloy propeller.

A review of aircraft maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on November 18, 2010, at an aircraft total time of 2,334 hours, an engine total time of 3,280 hours, and an engine time since overhaul of 1,263 hours. The tachometer reading in the cockpit showed a total of 24.6 hours had been recorded since the annual inspection. The most recent record of fabric recovering was on January 19, 1987, at an aircraft total time of 1,342 hours.

The airplane had been modified in 1967 with a "Reed Conversion" under STC SA811SW and Item 625 on the FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet. The conversion removed 40.5 inches from the inboard end of each wing, decreased the allowable gross weight of the aircraft from 1,220 pounds to 1,100 pounds, and restricted the allowable center of gravity (CG) from plus10.9 inches to plus 19.4 inches. The conversion also modified the location of the strut attach points in the wing and modified the aileron control and balance cables.

Placards in the cockpit read:

"THIS AIRCRAFT HAS BEEN HIGHLY MODIFIED FOR COMPETITIVE AEROBATICS – EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN DOING STALL MANEUVER".

"THIS IS A REED MODIFIED CLIPPED-WING AIRCRAFT"

"SOLO FLYING IN REAR SEAT ONLY"

The airplane did not have a wing tank but rather had only the original fuselage mounted 12 gallon fuel tank.

The cockpit was equipped with front and rear tandem pilot seats, and the pilot in either seat had access to all flight controls, engine controls, and wheel brakes.

The front seat was fitted with a 2-point restraint system which had a two strap lap belt. The rear seat had a 4-point restraint system with a similar lap belt system and a two strap shoulder harness system which fastened to the buckle at the center of the lap belt. The rear seat shoulder harness installation could be quickly removed from its attach point on the airframe at the top rear of the cabin, and could thus be converted to either a 2-point or 4-point restraint system. A postaccident examination showed that the removable shoulder harness system was stowed in a seat-back pocket on the back of the rear seat and was not connected to its attach point.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather reporting station was at Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport (KDZB), Horseshoe Bay, Texas, located 10 miles southeast from the accident location. At 1835, the automated weather observation station at KDBZ reported wind from 010 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear of clouds, temperature 28 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 4 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.03 inches of Mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The impact location was on the left edge of runway 34 about 2,300 feet north from the take-off position at 44TE, and about 300 feet south of the north end of the runway. The airplane came to rest in a nose down attitude of about 45 degrees and the fuselage was laterally oriented about 60 degrees to the right of the runway centerline. A crater corresponding to the impact was found under the airplane. There was evidence of a fuel spill at the scene; however there was no postimpact fire.

Examination of the wreckage noted that there was significantly more damage to the right wing leading edge with impact compression damage along about two thirds of the outboard span. The angle of the impact crushing damage was consistent with an impact in a right wing low, nose low attitude of about 70 to 80 degrees nose down. The inboard root end of the right wing displayed impact damage consistent in size to the engine. The top of the engine also showed blue paint transfer on the cylinder baffling which corresponded to the damage noted to the inboard right wing.

Both wings were secure to the fuselage and both lift struts. Both struts were secure at both ends and the fork bolts were of the heavy type.

The rear seat remained attached, the seat belts remained attached, and rear cockpit area maintained its structural volume.

Control continuity was verified to the aileron and both the control and balance cables were continuous to the control stick and the right aileron attach point. The postaccident examination of the airframe revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

After documentation at the scene, the wreckage was moved from the runway and the engine was further examined. The engine exhibited impact damage. The propeller hub remained attached to the propeller flange which had significant damage from the impact sequence and was impinged against the crankcase. The propeller exhibited signs of rotation during impact and both of the propeller blades displayed chordwise scratches. The propeller flange was partially separated from the engine crankshaft and the fracture surface appeared to be smeared and deformed in overload.

All of the ignition leads were examined and several showed impact damage. The spark plugs were removed and examined and all showed normal wear patterns according to the Champion Aviation Service Manual AV6-R.

To facilitate rotation of the crankshaft the propeller flange was removed from the remainder of the crankshaft. The crankshaft was then rotated using a pipe wrench. No binding or grinding was noted during the examination and rotation of the crankshaft and engine drive train continuity was confirmed throughout. Both magnetos were observed to produce spark during the rotation.

As the crankshaft was rotated by hand thumb compression was established on the number 2, 3, and 4 cylinders, but not on the number 1 cylinder where the intake valve was observed stuck in the open position. The number 1 cylinder intake valve was freed and the valve did not stick during subsequent manual operation.

The number 1 cylinder was then removed and examination revealed oil glazing and corrosion inside the base of the cylinder barrel. The intake rocker arm and the intake valve were removed and examination found corrosion at the top of the intake valve stem. The examination did not reveal whether the valve had become stuck before or during the accident.

All of the other cylinders and valves were examined using a borescope and no preaccident defects were noted.

The exhaust and engine intake systems were examined. The oil sump sustained impact damage, remained attached to the engine, and contained an unmeasured amount of oil. No evidence of lubrication distress was observed. The impact damaged carburetor and fuel system were examined and no residual fuel was present. The carburetor fuel screen was examined and no defects or debris was observed.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Airport/ Facility Directory, Southwest U. S., indicated that runway 16/34 at the 44TE airport was 2,600 feet long and 100 feet wide. The runway surface was composed of turf. The elevation was estimated as 880 feet msl.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Travis County Office of the Medical Examiner; Austin, Texas.

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA, Aeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report was negative for ethanol and was negative for drugs.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC No: 61-67C; Subject: Stall and Spin Awareness Training: Chapter 1: "If recovery from a stall is not made properly, a secondary stall or a spin may result. A secondary stall is caused by attempting to hasten the completion of a stall recovery before the aircraft has regained sufficient flying speed.

14 Code of Federal Regulations 91.107 (a) (3) requires that each person must occupy an approved seat with a safety belt and, if installed, a shoulder harness.


http://registry.faa.gov/N70108

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA616 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Kingsland, TX
Aircraft: PIPER J3C-65, registration: N70108
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

 On September 8, 2012, about 1843 central daylight time, a Piper Aircraft Inc., J3C-65 airplane, N70108, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during initial climb at Shirley Williams Airport (44TE), Kingsland, Texas. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. At the time of the accident the local flight was originating from 44TE.

Several witnesses saw the airplane during climb-out and one of them described it as climbing slowly in a nose-up attitude. Another witness said the engine was operating, but did not sound like it was operating at full power. When the airplane had climbed to an altitude of about 125 feet above ground level (agl) it then suddenly rolled to the left and descended in a nearly vertical attitude impacting terrain on the left side of the runway.


 
IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 70108        Make/Model: J3        Description: J-3 Cub (L-4, NE)
  Date: 09/09/2012     Time: 2345

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: KINGSLAND   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  CRASHED IMMEDIATELY AFTER TAKEOFF FOR UNKNOWN REASONS. KINGSLAND, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SAN ANTONIO, TX  (SW17)               Entry date: 09/10/2012 


KINGSLAND, Texas (KXAN) - A Houston man, the owner of a vintage airplane, was the victim in Saturday's plane crash on an air strip just north of Kingsland in Llano County.

Department of Public Safety officials said Monday his name is Thomas Robinson, 53.

The single-engine plane has crashed in Llano County on Saturday night, the second crash in as many weeks.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed a Piper J-3 Cub went down as it took off from the Shirley Williams Airport this evening around 7 p.m., an air strip about 15 miles north of Kingsland.

Early reports are that the plane took off from the runway, attempted to make a left-hand turn and crashed.

Witnesses said the Robinson was attempting to sell his plane in the Kingsland area. He got the plane up in the air but didn't gain enough speed. Law enforcement officials have yet to notify the victim's family. The National Traffic Safety Board will be on the scene on Sunday morning at 9 a.m.

Read more here:    http://www.kxan.com

 

Her HIGHness: Drunk airline passenger stole other passengers' food and demanded crew put some 'f****** music on' as she swigged from her own bottle of gin

  • Woman ranted at staff to play music and started bouncing around in her seat
  • Passengers subjected to seven hour flight of misery as woman stole their food   
  • Passenger, 39, blamed her abusive behavior on a 'fear of flying'
A drunken airline passenger who stole other flyers' food and demanded the plane 'play music' is facing a possible jail sentence.

Bela Chopra, 39, swigged from her own bottle of gin and demanded that music be played over the jet's loudspeakers, Uxbridge Magistrates heard.

The abusive woman, who admitted being drunk on an aircraft, blamed her appalling behavior and ranting on her fear of flying and a lack of sleep.

Problems began as soon as Chopra, from Mickleover, Derby, took her seat on the Emirates plane on the flight from Dubai, Uxbridge Magistrates heard.

When the in-flight meal was served she stole food from other passenger's plates and then opened a packet of cigarettes as if she was about to light up.

A passenger who was sitting with his wife and two children behind Chopra saw she was behaving in a threatening and abusive manner, said prosecutor Nikki Onuma-Elliott.

'As the aircraft was taxiing she got out of her seat and said very loudly that she needed to go to the ladies.'



Chopra was told to sit down and it was explained to her that she was not allowed to leave her seat during take-off.  

But she started a drunken rant and refused to follow instructions.

'She remained abusive, saying she just wanted music. She said: “I just want the f****** music on",' Ms Onuma-Elliott added.

Chopra's eyes were bloodshot, that she smelled of alcohol and while arguing with the crew was seen to remove something from her bag.

'She took a bottle from her handbag, and poured some gin into a plastic cup, which she consumed quickly,'said Ms Onuma-Elliott.

'She started taking food from other people's plates and also opening a packet of cigarettes.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Socata TBM 700, N850ZM: Accident occurred September 07, 2012 in Horseshoe Bay, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA672
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 07, 2012 in Horseshoe Bay, TX
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM 700, registration: N850ZM
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2012, at 1500 central daylight time, a Socata TBM 700, N850ZM, registered to the pilot, sustained substantial damage after its right main landing gear collapsed while landing on runway 17 at the Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, Horseshoe Bay, Texas. The private pilot and his 2 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plane was not filed. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The cross-country flight originated at 1230 from Abilene, Texas.

After an uneventful cross-country flight, the pilot configured the airplane for landing and had cockpit indications that the landing gear was down and locked. Upon a normal landing, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway. Examination of the landing gear after the accident revealed that the right main landing gear actuator was separated from the actuator ball joint. No other anomalies were noted. Further inspection of the actuator rod and ball joint revealed that the ball joint appeared to be not centered and set in its normal position.

After several other events involving similar landing gear malfunctions, the manufacturer issued two Mandatory Service Bulletins (SB) in April, 2013. SB70-197 and SB70-206 outlined protocols for inspection of the pistons and rods of landing gear actuators and inspection of the ball joint centering of the landing gear actuators and ball joint mismatches. The FAA following by issuing AD 2014-06-06 in March, 2014, requiring compliance with the manufacturers SBs to inspect, repair or replace affected parts.


 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA672
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 07, 2012 in Horseshoe Bay, TX
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM 700, registration: N850ZM
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2012, at 1500 central daylight time, a Socata TBM 700, N850ZM, registered to the pilot, sustained substantial damage after its right main landing gear collapsed while landing on runway 17 at the Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, Horseshoe Bay, Texas. The private pilot and his 2 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plane was not filed. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The cross-country flight originated at 1230 from Abilene, Texas.

After an uneventful cross-country flight, the pilot configured the airplane for landing and had cockpit indications that the landing gear was down and locked. Upon a normal landing, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway. Examination of the landing gear after the accident revealed that the right main landing gear actuator was separated from the actuator ball joint. No other anomalies were noted. Further inspection of the actuator rod and ball joint revealed that the ball joint appeared to be not centered and set in its normal position.

After several other events involving similar landing gear malfunctions, the manufacturer issued two Mandatory Service Bulletins (SB) in April, 2013. SB70-197 and SB70-206 outlined protocols for inspection of the pistons and rods of landing gear actuators and inspection of the ball joint centering of the landing gear actuators and ball joint mismatches. The FAA following by issuing AD 2014-06-06 in March, 2014, requiring compliance with the manufacturers SBs to inspect, repair or replace affected parts.


NTSB Identification: CEN12LA672 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 07, 2012 in Horseshoe Bay, TX
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM 700, registration: N850ZM
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2012, at 1500 central daylight time, a Socata TBM 700, N850ZM, registered to the pilot, sustained substantial damage after its right main landing gear collapsed while landing on runway 17 at the Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, Horseshoe Bay, Texas. The private pilot and his 2 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plane was not filed. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The cross-country flight had originated at 1230 from Abilene, Texas.

After an uneventful cross-country flight, the pilot configured the airplane for landing and had cockpit indications that the landing gear was down and locked. Upon a normal landing, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: UNK        Make/Model: TBM       Description: TBM-700
  Date: 09/07/2012     Time: 1950

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: HORSESHOE BAY   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. HORSESHOE BAY, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SAN ANTONIO, TX  (SW17)               Entry date: 09/10/2012 

HORSESHOE BAY — A pilot and his family escaped serious injury after the aircraft's landing gear collapsed, damaging their plane and causing a fuel spill, officials said.

The episode occurred about 2:30 p.m. September 7 at the Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, according to police. The accident at the airstrip is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Officers said 54-year-old pilot Randell Vinson of Abilene, who is a part-time Horseshoe Bay resident, told investigators he attempted to land and "heard an unusual thump sound leading him to suspect a problem with the gear."

His wife and son also were aboard the 2010 single-engine Socata airplane, according to Police Chief Bill Lane. No injuries were reported.

"(Vinson) said that all of his gauges indicated landing gear lock-down and he proceeded to touch down," Lane added in a prepared release. "After landing he reversed his propeller as a part of a routine landing procedure to slow the speed of the aircraft and the right side landing gear collapsed."

The pilot told investigators he "immediately locked down the brakes to attempt to control the speed and to try to control the path of the aircraft to avoid collision with any ground objects."

The landing caused damage to the gear, and the plane came to rest in a parking area on the west side of the airport, the report stated.

Firefighters rushed to the scene to contain the spilled fuel from the accident, officials said.

The FAA interviewed Vinson by phone, then authorized the pilot to have an aviation repair company make temporary repairs so the plane could be stored in one of the hangars. Federal officials are expected to make an on-site inspection September 10, Lane said.

The small airport is located just off Clayton Nolen Drive.

Source: http://www.dailytrib.com

Batesville Regional Airport (KBVX), Arkansas: Severe storms damage airplanes, hangars

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - Authorities say strong winds from severe thunderstorms destroyed airplane hangars and damaged homes and vehicles as they moved across Arkansas.

There were no immediate reports of major injuries with Friday's storms, which knocked out electric power to thousands of customers.

In Independence County, the National Weather Service estimated winds were about 80 mph when they destroyed three hangars and damaged three airplanes at Batesville Regional Airport. In Desha, falling trees crushed three cars and damaged two houses.

An emergency dispatcher says the office didn't receive any reports of injuries.

Batesville radio announcer Michael Ferry says he was in the press box to call a high school game when winds shattered a window and cut him.

Under 15,000 were without power Saturday.

Source:  http://www.todaysthv.com

Boston one of seven cheapest United States airfares


 

(NECN) - Boston could be a hot fall holiday vacation destination. Fare Compare finds The Hub is one of the seven cheapest U.S. cities, airfare-wise. Also on the list: Washington D.C., San Antonio, Chicago and Denver. Across the pond, the best flight deals are to Germany, Ireland, Spain and London.

Aircraft Silencer Technology Seminar To Be Held In Santa Monica On September 22

The public, pilots, and aviation administrators are invited to a free Aircraft Silencer Technology Seminar on Sept. 22 from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the Santa Monica Museum of Flying. 

The seminar is part of the City of Santa Monica's continuing effort to enhance the Airport’s compatibility within the community by exploring new and emerging noise reduction technologies.

The presentation will be given by Hans-Peter Gomolzig, Chief Executive Office of Gomolzig Flugzeug- und Maschinenbau GmbH, the German aviation manufacturer that pioneered the low noise silencer system, Quietflight. 

The seminar will explain the concept, basic science and benefits behind Gomolzig’s Quietflight noise reduction system, which is currently in use in Europe. The session will include a question and answer period.

The seminar is part of the City of Santa Monica Visioning process, a rigorous three-phase public process regarding the 227-acre Santa Monica Airport Campus aimed at providing unique 

opportunities for the City and the community to discuss the range of possibilities for the future of the Airport Campus. For more information visit: http://smovisioning.org.


Gomolzig Flugzeug- und Maschinenbau GmbH has been involved in the aviation business for over 50 years. 

Read more here:   http://www.smmirror.com

Clear and present danger in Nigerian airspace

As the nation’ s civil aviation sector currently battles with the challenge of diminishing manpower, paucity of funds vis-à-vis infrastructural deficit, among other woes, experts have expressed fears over the continued viability and sustainability of the nation’s airspace. Ibrahim Apekhade Yusuf and Gbenga Oyebanji examine the issues
 

DESPITE tepid denials by the authorities concerned, there is growing fear out there that the nation’s airspace is anything but safe just as there are apprehensions by industry pundits over the sector’s future prospects considering its dwindling fortunes in the last decade.

Investigations by The Nation showed that the industry is being dogged by many challenges, from poor infrastructure, high cost of aviation fuel to huge expenditure on aircraft acquisition and maintenance, the safety of the country’s airspace is now a subject of controversy between the Federal Government and foreign airlines.

Experts’ damning verdict

If the verdict given by the investigative panel set up by the Federal Ministry of Aviation to review operations in the aviation industry is anything to go by, it is correct to say that the sector is in a mess.

The panel at the submission of its findings advised the Federal Government to declare a state of emergency in the sector in order to tackle its deficiencies.

 The retired Group Captain John Obakpolor-led panel told the Minister of Aviation, Mrs. Stella Oduah, that a state of emergency was required to check decayed infrastructure in the sector.

It also said N500billion was required by airlines to address some of the deficiencies in their operations.

The panel revealed that, “At the end of its deliberations, the committee came up with 59 findings and 41 recommendations, in line with the terms of reference.

“The Federal Government should immediately declare an emergency in the aviation sector and commence implementation of the Aviation Safety Emergency Programme.”

It added, “The Federal Government should intensify efforts to complete the ongoing reconstruction and remodelling of the terminal buildings and structures, as well as construct new ones across the country.

“The Central Bank of Nigeria should empower commercial banks to create a window for a long-term low interest funding for direct lending to aviation. The industry will require at least N500billion for this purpose.

“An aircraft leasing company with an initial investment of $10billion should be set up by the Federal Government to acquire modern aircraft directly from major manufacturers and lease to qualified Nigerian air operators at preferential rates. This will help in the reduction of operating cost and improvement of efficiency and competitiveness.”

 “Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) should ensure that airline operators are put under closer surveillance. Maintenance actions carried out by operators, if not routine, should always be queried to establish what necessitated the maintenance action and ensure the continuous proper use of the technical logbook.”

The panel recommended that greater emphasis should be placed on proper and adequate maintenance of aircraft, rather than age restriction.

Decades of deplorable infrastructure to blame

On the parlous state of the sector, the jury is out that things have since gone bad. Operators stated the fact that airplanes enter the Nigerian airspace without the knowledge of air traffic controllers, they only get to know of such flights through telephone calls from their counterparts in Nigeria’s friendly nations.

The implication is that virtually all the major foreign airlines have quietly refrained themselves from using the nation’s airspace.

The Nation can authoritatively report that at least 10 foreign airlines have stopped using the Nigerian airspace and prefer to use longer routes to get to their destination.

Among those affected are the British Airways flight 55K which goes from London to Johannesburg; Air Namibia 286 from Frankfurt to Windhoek; Belgian Airline 357 from Brussels to Kinshasa; Air France 889 goes from Kinshasa to Paris; Air France 995 from Johannesburg to Paris; Air France 900 from Yaoundé to Paris; Air France 928 from Luanda to Paris; Air France 896 from Brazzzaville to Paris; South African Airways 237 moves from London to Johannesburg; SAA 260 from Johannesburg to Frankfurt; SAA 261 from Frankfurt to Johannesburg; SAA 264 from Johannesburg to Munich; SAA 265 from Munich to Johannesburg; Emirates 261 runs from Dubai to Sao Paulo; Emirates 246 from Dubai to Rio De Janeiro; and Qatar 922 from Sao Paulo to Doha.

These airlines argued that the country’s airspace is dotted with moribund communications gadgets (visual and voice) such that air traffic controllers and pilots now have extreme difficulty in reaching one another.

Before the foreign airlines took the action, some key officials in the aviation agencies and workers’ unions had inundated the office of the Minister of Aviation with letters on the deplorable state of the communications equipment to no avail.

The Airspace Manager of Nigeria Airspace Management Agency (NAMA), J.I. Ekweonwa on July 9, 2012 informed the agency’s managing director that, “Kano Area Control Centre (ACC) radio communication frequencies - 124.1MHz and 128.5 MHz sectorised East and West respectively have deteriorated in quality and reception thereby making pilots/controllers communication terribly bad. In short, pilots and controllers hardly receive or communicate to each other within the Flight Information Region (Kano FIR). Sir, it would be pertinent to suggest that an expert, who will carry our members of staff along be sent to configure these TVHF into the system within these sectors -East and West for eventual quality and lasting services to our stakeholders.”

Also, on July 10, 2012, the Deputy General Manager for NAMA, Okwor .I. informed the Airspace Manager of Malam Aminu Kano Airport, that “Kano’s Very High Frequency radios on frequencies 128.5MHz (Kano West) and 124.1mhZ (Kano East) were “not only poor but deplorable,” adding that, “ communication based on these radios in their present state has not only become very difficult and ineffective in the provision of Air Traffic Management (ATM) but has also impeded the growth of air traffic in our FIR.”

Air traffic controllers and the National Union of Air Transport Employees (NUATE) in a presentation to the Minister of Aviation on July 18, 2012 on the status of the Total Radar Coverage of Nigeria (TRACON) facilities, safety of the Nigerian airspace said: “It is worrisome that the nation’s airspace is increasingly but gradually being avoided by the international over flyers due to poor communications between air traffic controllers and pilots.”

The economic implication is that the Federal Government is losing revenue, which would have accrued to the country if the airlines that now fly from South Africa to London had used the Nigerian airspace.

The document signed by the NUATE President, D.M. Safiyanu, which was received by the minister on July 20, 2012, stated that the provision of Controller-Pilot-Data-Link Communication (CPDLC) would have been a remedy to this “unfortunate situation,” regretting that, “all our neighbouring airspaces have such facilities.’’

He said this might probably account for the over flyers’ preference for nation’s neighbour’s airspace even though they make their trips longer.

Safiyanu urged the minister to call for global, African and Nigerian navigational chart routes for details. He also tasked her to consult the carriers for more details on the appalling danger of the nation’s airspace.

He said more often than not, air traffic controllers through NAMA do receive Air Safety Reports (ASRs) from airlines flying Nigerian airspace.

The ASR is an avenue in which pilot, crew-members in a data form, report or lay complaint to NAMA and copy to International Air Transport Association (IATA) on relevant safety matters or issues observed in the course of their flight.

According to him, “there are several cases where aircraft enter into Nigerian airspace unnoticed until neighbouring airspace notifies us through telephone, for example, Ndjamena, Chad. As a matter of fact, air traffic controllers on duty are facing operational hazards daily as they sometimes watch helplessly whenever aircraft are near collision and cannot provide air traffic control due to inability to communicate.’’

He said for the minister to get a clearer picture of the deplorable condition of the country’s airspace, she should contact IATA, the clearing-house for global airlines and call all the air traffic control closed logbooks for Lagos, Kano, Port Harcourt and Abuja from January 2012.

“The pilots of the presidential fleet can attest to these communication problems. Urgent remedies to these problems are very necessary because of its negative impact on safety, revenue and national security. Generally, history has shown that chief executives in the past misled former ministers, because they will never expose their deficiencies for you to help. We shall never allow that to happen again if you desire to hear regularly from workers who are the direct operators or end users of all aviation and airport facilities,” he said.

In the view of British Airways, British Airways Regional Commercial Manager, Africa, Mr. Ian Petrie, who spoke to journalists in London recently, said the situation coupled with soaring oil prices had taken their toll on the airline business as major clients from other industries including banks, oil firms among others have drastically reduced their budgets for travel.

Harrowing experience of an air traveller

Following the recent Dana airplane crash on June 3, 2012 in the residential area of Iju Ishaga, one would expect that the other companies plying the Nigerian air route would be cautious enough to lay to rest fears associated with air transport in Nigeria.This was not the case on 22nd August, 2012 when Aero flight AJ 301 took off to Enugu at 8:45am but couldn’t land in the state on two occasions due to bad weather condition.

According to a passenger on the plane, Mr. Ayodele Adesanmi, the plane went to Enugu twice during the same journey and never reached its destination. He said, ‘After experiencing several turbulence in air coupled with the bad weather, the plane return to Lagos around 11:00am, then we asked to disembark for refueling but just about 20min after, we were asked to get on board the second time. The plane took off around 11:30 and the same thing happened again, we could not land the second time. So we return to Lagos around 1:30pm. By this time nobody was willing to travel again by the same flight. Yet the airline management wanted us to. We had to protest before they cancel the flight and refund our money.”

According to Adesanmi, “Passengers on board had to forfeit appointments and those who have not flew in several years had a bad experience of air transport in Nigeria. Some who were determined to travel on that day resort to traveling by road…”

Aviation budget

The aviation gulped a total of N48.9billion naira which is 1.1% of the 2012 budget, even the CBN has estimated that the N300billion will be required to bring the aviation sector to a satisfactory condition. Akin Omotunde, an economics argues that aviation industry is of immense and strategic importance to the rapid development of Nigeria’s economy, as she depends mostly on air transport to link people with each other and the rest of the world at large.

A safe, secure and efficient aviation industry, Omotunde contended, “Is crucial to Nigeria’s growth and prosperity. The development of the industry is threatened by a plethora of socio-economic, policy, and political issues including public perception that the industry in Nigeria is unsafe and inefficient. “

30 years ago, International Civil aviation Organisation (ICAO) estimated that Nigeria needed 500 Air traffic controllers to effectively man its airspace but presently that goal is not realistic because of the high turnover skilled personnel in the sector.

Echoing similar sentiment, in an interview with Akin Oni, Managing Director at Bristow Helicopters, recently, he lamented the huge capital outlay required to finance the Nigerian Content Act, training of aviation personnel, import duties on aircraft, and other challenges in the aviation industry.

“We are talking about a maintenance hangar for Nigeria, has anyone asked where we would get the engineers from? We are struggling today looking for Nigerian engineers. We don’t have engineers,” Oni lamented.

Captain George Santos, the Director, Employee Development and Resource Management with Caverton Helicopters, while giving an overview of the financial status of the sector, said it costs well over $200,000 to train a qualified pilot for four years.

This cost, he said, can hardly be borne by an individual. A development, he said may be affecting the availability of highly trained personnel like pilots in the country.

Market share in aviation
In the economic calculus of the sector, Nigeria’s impact account for nothing. The largest market share by any African airline in 2007 according to a World Bank research conducted by Henrich c. Bofinger for World Bank on Air transport industry, South African Airways 10.7%, Kenya Airways had 3.6% share, out of 15 airlines collated no Nigeria airline carrier was among the top 15. Five years after it has not change.

Last year Egypt Airline led the trend, followed by South African Airline, Ethiopian Airline and Kenya airline are still leading the fronts, they are among the top 9, and none of the top Nigeria airline could be in rank, base on market share, customer relation management we are still lacking behind.

Road show to nowhere

Perhaps, in the Federal Govern


ment‘s quest to address the budget deficit in the sector, the supervising minister of the sector, Mrs. Stella Oduah, embarked on a three-nation road show ostensibly in search of foreign direct investments remains diversionary.

But in the view of aviation pundits, this was diversionary. According to Mr. Wale Alabi, an aviation analyst, “Granted that the Federal Government has announced plans to borrow N106 billion from the Chinese in order to expand six airports across the country such as Lagos, Abuja, Rivers, Kano and Enugu, which they want us to believe is a fallout of the road show, many Nigerians are not deceived.”

Minister’s response

From information released by the ministry, the road show received positive responses as many Chinese companies are willing to do business in Nigeria; major aircraft manufacturer, Bombardier is interested in helping Nigeria build maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facilities and also may reach a term with government to facilitate Nigerian airlines acquire Bombardier aircraft.

Aviation minister, Stella Oduah said: “As we travel round the world, we see and admire international airports in other countries and wish that our nation could boast of just one that can truly go by the name international airport. Today, following the approval of FEC, we have concluded arrangements to commence construction of not just one, but five brand new, world class international airports.

 “The company that is doing the execution is a Chinese company. When the Chinese NEXIM or any country NEXIM gives a loan, that country’s contractor will have to do the execution. That is the process we follow.

 “They will have to decide on who will do the awarding of the project, so ours is for Bureau of Public Procurement (BPP) to check if its in line with our regulation to ensure that the loan is in order. Once BPP gives no objection then we are free. Secondly, on what it will be spent upon, I want to say they are five international airports and six international perishable cargo terminals and all that is N106 billion all inclusive.”

The airports will be completed within two years with a concessionary loan of 22 years and five years moratorium of an interest rate of 2 per cent.

Read more:  http://www.thenationonlineng.net

Not for state to keep Air India flying

By Atanu dey

Air India is a prime example of what’s wrong with Governments getting involved in business.

There’s absolutely no reason why any Government should be in the business of running airlines, least of all the Government of a developing country. There are many reasons why the Government of India should not be in any business, least of all a business like commercial aviation. The first and foremost reason is that it serves no social purpose.

The service that commercial aviation provides is a private good, just like dentistry or accounting. People’s consumption of private goods — the demand — is adequately provided by a competitive marketplace through firms that compete for customers. The market is fully able to discipline firms by weeding out those which are unable to make a profit — which is another way of saying that the benefits that they provide (which is measured by their revenues) exceed their costs. Profits of firms in competitive markets are a proxy for the benefits that accrue to society.

Government intervention in the provision of private goods has to be limited to only regulating of competitive firms. In those specific cases where the operations of private firms in the provision of private goods lead to any form of harm (so-called ‘externalities’ such as the emission of pollutants) does the Government have a role in interfering in the market. But under only very special circumstances is the Government justified in the actual provisioning of a private good.

One special case would be if the private sector were incapable of providing the private good. Consider the case that there is a very large fixed cost involved — such as building a high speed nationwide railway network which would require an investment of say $300 billion just for the capital costs. No single private firm could possibly invest that amount, although a consortium of very large private firms could do it. The Government’s role in coordinating investments in such a large project would be justified on the grounds that the project would lead to social welfare gains that could not be otherwise obtained.

Not too many years ago, before the liberalisation of the commercial aviation sector, the only option available to domestic air travellers was Indian Airlines, the public sector monopoly. The aviation sector was small, severely capacity constrained, and expensive. Being a monopoly, the service was bad and the service providers were generally rude. But that is what one normally expects from monopolies — whether they be in the business of providing services or goods. Many of us remember those days when telecommunications services were a luxury for which the waiting time was measured in years and bribes were an accepted part of reality.

The Air Corporation Act of 1994 liberalised India’s aviation sector, and the Government monopoly was ended. That was a welcome development and it benefited Indian travellers. Private sector airlines have done a great job of meeting the demand for domestic and international air transportation. Service quality has improved dramatically and prices have come down — as would be expected in any competitive market. If there were any doubts about the Indian private sector being able to adequately supply to the demand for air transportation, they have been laid to rest years ago.

So why does the Government of India continue to run Air India? It should not have even if Air India were not losing money. The Government has not demonstrated competency even on those essential public services where it has to be the sole provider. That alone is sufficient argument for it not to be in aviation. The case against the Government gets even stronger when Air India is so mismanaged that it loses money in thousands of crores of rupees.

The answer to why Air India exists as a public sector corporation is quite straightforward — and extremely sad for India.

 Read more:   http://www.niticentral.com

Did the Federal Aviation Administration Push Staff to Vote For Democrats? Cause of Action Exposes Potential Hatch Act Violation at the FAA

By Jenny Manning 

Imagine being told the future of your job depends on how you chose to vote in the upcoming November election.

According to the government transparency group "Cause of Action," that's exactly what John J. Hickey, deputy associate administrator for aviation safety at the FAA, and Raymond Towles, deputy director of flight standards field operations told employees at a May 23, 2012 staff meeting in Renton.

The two reportedly told subordinates, “if the Republicans win office [their] jobs may be effected [sic]…if the Democrats win office then [their] jobs would not be effected [sic],” according to a statement from Cause of Action. Hickey and Towles are also said to have made similar comments at other mandatory meetings.

If the allegations are true, the FAA may be in violation of the Hatch Act, which prohibits Executive agency employees from engaging in political activity intended to affect the result of an election.

Read more:  http://enumclaw.patch.com/articles/cause-of-action-letter-calls-for-investigation-of-faa-read-it-here-tell-us-what-you-think-54da5f42#comment_4627864


Related: http://causeofaction.org/2012/09/05/cause-of-action-exposes-potential-hatch-act-violation-at-the-faa/

Dreamliner has landed: Brand new plane, the first of 27 ordered, arrives after 15-hour flight from South Carolina via Germany

 

 Air India's first Boeing 787 Dreamliner touched down at the Indira Gandhi International Airport here on Saturday, welcomed by the customary water-cannon salute on the tarmac.

The plane, painted in the red and yellow livery of Air India, landed after a 15-hour flight from Boeing's Charleston factory in South Carolina, US, with a 90-minute refuelling stop at Frankfurt.


Captain A.S. Soman landed the aircraft - the first of 27 ordered by Air India - at 5.05 pm. 'It was a very smooth flight. It has a very quiet cabin and there is much less fatigue (for the pilot). It is both a pilot and passenger friendly airplane,' he said.

Edward R. Moore MXS, N21MX: Accident occurred September 08, 2012 in Borrego Springs, California

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA407
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Borrego Springs, CA
Aircraft: MOORE EDWARD R MXS, registration: N21MX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT
On September 8, 2012, about 1235 Pacific daylight time (PDT), an experimental Edward R. Moore MXS, N21MX, departed controlled flight and impacted terrain near Borrego Valley Airport (L08), Borrego Springs, California. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot was fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage by impact forces. The local personal aerobatic flight departed L08, about 1225. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The owner/builder of the airplane had loaned the airplane to the pilot to "try out" his airplane. The pilot did own another make and model of aerobatic airplane.

Witnesses reported that during an aerobatic flight the airplane appeared to have departed controlled flight, and the pilot was observed leaving the airplane followed by his parachute deploying. The parachute did not fully deploy before the pilot impacted the ground.

On scene examination and documentation was performed by investigators, and the airplane was recovered for further examination.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the 58-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane.

The pilot held a third-class medical certificate issued on April 17, 2012. It had the limitations that the pilot must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision.

No personal flight records were located for the pilot. The IIC obtained the aeronautical experience listed in this report from a review of the FAA airmen medical records on file in the Airman and Medical Records Center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The pilot reported on his medical application that he had a total flight time of 4,500 hours with 50 hours logged in the last 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was an experimental amateur built-Edward R Moore- MXS, serial number 008. A review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that the airplane had a total airframe time of 311.8 hours at the last annual condition inspection. The logbooks contained an entry for the annual condition inspection dated March 30, 2012.

The engine was a Lycoming-Ly-Con, AE10-540EXP, serial number L-52636-08E. Total time recorded on the engine at the last 100-hour annual condition inspection was 311.8 hours.

The builder/owner reported the total time on the airplane as 351 hours at the time of the accident. No Hobbs meter was recovered at the accident site.

The airplane was completed and issued an amateur built experimental airworthiness certificate on March 11, 2009.

A logbook entry dated March 11, 2009, stated that the airplane had been assembled using the kit and plans supplied by MXR Technologies. The entry was made by an Airframe & Power Plant (A&P) Mechanic who was not the builder of record of the airplane per the FAA records.

On March 21, 2009, the builder of record made a logbook entry stating that the airplane had completed Phase I of the operating limitations. He also recorded that the airplane had a total time of 42.5 hours.

No logbook entries were made in the logbooks for the year of 2010.

On March 5, 2011, a logbook entry for an annual condition inspection was completed with a recorded total time of 225.52 hours.

The last entry was on March 30, 2012, for an annual condition inspection with a total time of 311.8 hours.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Investigators examined the wreckage at the accident scene. The airplane wreckage was located about 200 yards north of the Borrego Springs Airport runway 08/26. The accident site was level sandy desert terrain with sparse vegetation. The airplane was recovered and transported to storage for further examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The San Diego County Coroner completed an autopsy of the pilot on September 10, 2012. The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, performed toxicological testing of specimens of the pilot.

Analysis of the specimens contained no findings for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and volatiles. The drug "Minoxidil" was detected in the urine, but not detected in the blood.

The medication "Minoxidil" found during the pilot's toxicological testing does not cause impairment or incapacitation.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Investigators examined the wreckage at Aircraft Recovery Service, Littlerock, California, on September 18, 2012.

The engine was examined with no mechanical anomalies identified. A copy of the examination report is attached to the docket.

The airframe was examined, and no evidence of any airframe structural failure was noted. The control systems including the push rods, bearings, rudder controls, elevator controls, and ailerons were present with no abnormalities that would have precluded normal operations.

The flight control Torque Tube Assembly was examined, and all major components of the torque tube assembly were present and accounted for. Visual inspection of the torque tube assembly had witness marks that indicated that the torque tube was not engaged in the forward bearing prior to accident impact. In addition, the structure that supported the forward bearing had been constructed in an alternate manner than the other MXS airplanes by using aluminum sheet of approximately 0.040 thickness, and attaching them to the side rails using AN type hardware. Two pieces of aluminum extruded channel had been placed on either side of the forward torque tube bearing. A copy of the examination report is attached to the accident docket.

The torque tube assembly was sent to the NTSB materials laboratory for examination.

The complete NTSB materials laboratory factual report number 12-118, dated October 12, 2012, is attached to the accident docket.

Findings in the factual report indicated that the forward and aft bearing housings were installed in reverse of the proper direction of installation, and aluminum alloy flanges were used to attach the bearing support panel to the sidewalls, which allow the panel to flex.

According to representatives of MX aircraft, the aluminum flanges were inconsistent with the other MXS airplanes as built. Examination of photographs of an exemplar airplane with a reportedly proper installation of the bearing support panel showed flanges located on the aft side of the forward bearing support panel, and the flanges were made of composite material.

The other 13 aircraft which were manufactured by or for MX Aircraft were built with the front bulkhead for the torque tube assembly made with a glass reinforced epoxy laminate and attached to the side rails with carbon fiber structural brackets which were bonded to the fuselage structure.

The forward face of the flight control torque tube had a number of sliding contact marks, and the sides of the face were bent aft in the areas of contact. The location and shape of the contact marks were consistent with sliding contact with the aileron control stop assembly on the forward bearing support panel. The aft faces of the aileron control stop assembly also showed missing paint and evidence of contact damage.

VIDEO RECORDER

The accident airplane had a GoPro HD2-14 "Hero2" camera that had been mounted to the left side of the airplane, and was recovered at the accident site. The camera was submitted to the NTSB vehicle recorders laboratory for download. A copy of the On Board Image Recorder Factual Report is included in the accident docket.

The specialist's factual report was dated January 25, 2013. The report identified that the camera had sustained minor damage, and the removable 32 GB SD card was intact. The video information was copied from the SD card for review.

The accident video was recorded at 1280x960 resolution, at 30 frames per second. The video was 16 minutes 17.1 seconds in length.

The view of the recording included the left side of the airplane from forward of the tail section of the airplane. The complete left wing was visible including the aerobatic sight gauge, which was installed on the left wingtip, with a small piece of yarn attached to the aft portion of the sight gauge.

The video times were converted into local Pacific daylight time (PDT.) The video started at 1219 PDT. The video was continuous from start up, taxi to takeoff, takeoff, and continued through the pilot's aerobatic flight maneuvers until the end of the video.

The airplane began a series of aerobatic maneuvers at 1228:10 PDT, which continued until the end of the recording. During the aerobatic flight maneuvers, the power varied, and the left aileron was observed to move up and down consistent with the flight maneuvers.

At 1235:26, the airplane nosed up from level upright flight, and the left aileron began to deflect up as the airplane rolled rapidly to the left. The left aileron deflection achieved its full upward deflection before 90 degrees of bank. After the airplane had rolled through inverted to about a 60-degree right bank, the left aileron deflection began to decrease. By 1235:28, the airplane was in level flight, and the left aileron was neutral again.

At 1235:30.9, the airplane began another pitch up, similar to that at 1235:26. The left aileron began a downward displacement, and the airplane began to roll rapidly to the right, similar to the prior roll to the left. After the airplane passed inverted flight by about 45 degrees and was in about a 135-degree left bank, the left aileron displacement reduced. By the time the airplane rolled to about 120 degrees left bank, the left aileron was about to neutral, and the airplane's rolling motion stopped. The nose began to drop towards the horizon at 1235:32.7, as the pilot could be seen moving his head in either direction in the cockpit. The nose continued to drop below the horizon; the airplane was in about a 120-degree left bank turn, and the airplane was facing runway 8 at L08, at 1235:35.

At 1235:43, the pilot's hand moved towards the left side of the cockpit, as the nose was still below the horizon, and the left bank angle had reduced to about 90 degrees. The left aileron was still about neutral, and not moving.

At 1235:44, the canopy began to crack open, and then quickly opened towards the right. It separated from the airplane, and moved back along the fuselage. Within about 1 second, the canopy left the field of view of the camera to the aft. While the canopy was visible, pieces of materials, similar to Plexiglas, were observed, as was some insulation-like material. As the canopy was separating, the left aileron deflected momentarily sharply up and then back to neutral.

From about 1235:45 until the end of the recording at 1235:49, the pilot's head was visible and moving forward in the wind stream. The bank angle decreased to about a 60-degree left bank; the pitch attitude became less nose down, though still slightly below the horizon. The needle on the airspeed indicator moved from about the 8 o'clock position on the indicator to about the 4 o'clock position.

Garmin GPSMAP 496

The accident airplane was equipped with a GARMIN GPSMAP 496 installed in the panel. The GPS unit was recovered post accident, and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Lab for data recovery. A copy of the factual report is located in the accident docket.

The accident flight was the last recorded session in the GPS. The recording started at 19:16:03 UTC and ended at 19:36:39 UTC on September 8, 2012, there were a total of 207 data points recorded.

At 19:35:32, the airplane was heading westerly, at 4,216 feet msl. At 19:35:36, the airplane began to lose altitude while changing direction by 360 degrees to the left. By the end of the 360-degree turn, the airplane had descended to 2,743 feet at 19:35:44. The airplane then continued to descend, and calculated ground speed slowed, as it began to change direction towards the south. The last point with a reasonable altitude reported was at 19:36:05 at 709 feet msl.

Electronics International MVP-50P

The accident airplane was equipped with an Electronics International MVP-50P. The MVP-50P unit was recovered post accident, and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Lab for data recovery. A copy of the factual report is located in the accident docket.

The recording began at 19:20:24. Before the presumed takeoff, there was a brief period of RPM values of about 1,700 between 19:24:22 and 19:24:57. The presumed takeoff was at 19:26:12, when CHT, EGT, RPM, MP, Fuel Flow, Oil Pressure, and HP all increased. During the flight, MP, RPM, Fuel Flow, and Oil Pressure all fluctuated. The manifold pressure and RPM decreased at 19:35:35; thereafter the RPM increased slightly as the recording ended.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 20-27F, Certification and Operation of Amateur-Built Aircraft, "Amateur builders are free to develop their own designs or build from existing designs. We do not approve these designs and it would be impractical to develop design standards for the wide variety of design configurations, created by designers, kit manufacturers, and amateur builders."

A review of the FAA aircraft registration records in Oklahoma City, revealed that there were a total of 14 model MXS airplanes produced, 9 of them were manufactured by MXR Technologies, Inc., 3 of them were manufactured by MX Aircraft LLC, and 1 of the airframes was exported out of the USA as a kit. The accident airplane was sold as a kit to the owner/builder, and was the only MXS model manufactured as an experimental amateur built that was reported to be built by an individual.

On January 28, 2009, MX Aircraft sent an e-mail to the owner/builder and to Angel Fire Aero to warn them that they had concerns regarding the construction of the accident airplane, specifically the torque tube assembly. On January 29, 2009, Angel Fire Aero replied to the e-mail and assured the owner that there was no issues with the concerns raised by MX Aircraft, and stated regarding the torque tube, "Seem highly unlikely that the part would ever come loose, let alone cause life threatening results."

The January e-mail was dated 3 months prior to the accident airplane being certified airworthy which occurred on March 11, 2009.

Post accident, MX Aircraft, LLC notified all of the remaining operators of the MXS series airplanes that an inspection of the torque tube assemblies should be completed to insure proper installation and security. In September 2013, there was an article published regarding the proper inspection procedures for the MXS series airplanes. A copy of the article is attached to the accident docket.


 NTSB Identification: WPR12LA407 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 08, 2012 in Borrego Springs, CA
Aircraft: MOORE EDWARD R MXS, registration: N21MX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 8, 2012, about 1235 Pacific daylight time (PDT), an experimental Edward R. Moore MXS, N21MX, departed controlled flight and impacted terrain near Borrego Valley Airport (L08), Borrego Springs, California. The pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot was fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage by impact forces. The local personal aerobatic flight departed L08, about 1225. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses reported that during an aerobatic flight the airplane appeared to have departed controlled flight and the pilot was observed to leave the airplane followed by his parachute deploying. The parachute did not fully deploy before the pilot impacted the ground.

On scene examination and documentation was performed by FAA inspectors and the airplane was recovered for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 21MX        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- MXS
  Date: 09/08/2012     Time: 1940

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: BORREGO SPRINGS   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED WHILE DOING AEROBATICS. BORREGO SPRINGS, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Maneuver      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SAN DIEGO, CA  (WP09)                 Entry date: 09/10/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N21MX

A month ago, Dr. Reinaldo Beyer took 33rd in the 15th FAI World Advanced Aerobatic Championships in Nyíregyháza, Hungary, as part of an American team that took third place.

BORREGO SPRINGS — A pilot who was a longtime San Diego County cardiologist died in Borrego Springs after he unsuccessfully attempted to parachute from his experimental plane this afternoon, colleagues and authorities said.

He was identified as Dr. Reinaldo Beyer of Del Mar by Sharp Rees-Stealy officials.

"It is with profound sadness we note the sudden passing of longtime Sharp Rees-Stealy cardiologist Reinaldo Beyer, MD." said Dr. Donald Balfour III, president and medical director of Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group.

Balfour sent employees a statement this evening, saying Beyer died "when the plane he was flying experienced mechanical difficulties. Our hearts go out to his wife and fellow SRS cardiologists."

Beyer had worked with Sharp Rees-Stealy for more than a decade, a spokesman said.

The pilot of the home-built MXS aerobatic plane was doing a practice run at the Borrego Valley Airport, located 90 miles northeast of San Diego, when he began having trouble with the plane about 12:30 p.m.

He attempted to escape the plane and deploy his parachute, but it malfunctioned, and he crashed to the ground with the aircraft, an airport official said.

The plane suffered substantial damage, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer.

Beyer was described as a regular at the desert airfield. His name was not released by authorities as of late Saturday.

The plane is registered to Edward Moore of San Diego. A woman who identified herself as Moore's wife said that he was in Borrego Springs with the pilot, who is a family friend.

Borrego Springs fire officials are on the scene of the crash. Kenitzer said the FAA is cooperating with the National Transportation Safety Board, which is leading the investigation.

The NTSB typically releases a preliminary report within a week or two of the incident, but it typically takes months for the agency to come up with a probable cause of the accident, Kenitzer said.

Fire officials gave initial reports that the victim was performing acrobatic stunts atop the plane.

http://ramona.patch.com

Source:  http://www.utsandiego.com