Saturday, July 4, 2015

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N8075P, Air Ads Inc: Accident occurred July 04, 2015 in Carlsbad, California



The crash-landing of a small plane on Carlsbad State Beach that injured a 12-year-old boy was most likely due to pilot error and an empty fuel tank, according to a report released by the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Piper PA18, registered to Air Ads Inc., out of Gillespie Field in El Cajon, lost engine power while towing an advertising banner on the Fourth of July. It crashed on the crowded beach near Cannon Road, then flipped over by the waterline.

According to the report, which includes factual findings and a probable cause determined by NTSB officials, the pilot of the single-engine plane, Luke William Kanagy, most likely failed to “manage the fuel system properly,” and the lack of fuel resulted in engine failure.

Previous reports suggested that the engine malfunctioned during flight.

Kanagy was not injured in the accident, but the plane struck Nicholas Baer, 12, who was on the beach at the time. Baer suffered a concussion, a sizable gash to his head and a damaged skull. He underwent emergency brain surgery at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. Doctors later reported that the surgery was successful.

The report, which was released last week, comes in the midst of a lawsuit, filed by Nicholas’ family in San Diego Superior Court, against Kanagy, the banner advertising company Air Ads, and its owner James Oakley.

Attorney David S. Casey Jr., who is representing Nicholas’ family in the suit, said the final report helps prove that the boy’s injuries are directly due to Kanagy’s negligence.

“He just ran out of gas. It’s something that should never have occurred,” Casey said. “It’s a clear error on behalf of the pilot.”

NTSB investigator Howard Plagens, whose analysis of the plane and crash site was used to compile the report, said the aircraft had two fuel tanks, one on the left and right. The plane was also equipped with a fuel selector valve, which allows the pilot to switch fuel tanks when one is running low during flight.

Plagens said there was fuel in the right tank, but the plane’s selector valve was pointing to the left tank, which was empty.

The Carlsbad crash is one of more than 25 accidents involving banner planes in California over the past two decades, based on a San Diego Union-Tribune review of Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB records in August.

The cause of the California accidents vary. About a quarter were due to engine failure. More than half occurred while cruising or maneuvering the aircraft, records show, and 62 percent resulted in injury or death.

Aviation experts say banner flying isn’t necessarily dangerous, but planes do fly at low altitudes — usually above crowded areas.

Casey said Nicholas is still recovering from the accident, but he’s able to participate in sports again, which is “a step in a positive direction.”

Oakley, owner of Air Ads, said he could not comment on the accident or the report because of the pending lawsuit, but confirmed that Kanagy is no longer an employee with the company.

According to the most recent FAA Airmen Certification Database, Kanagy is licensed to fly commercially and is a certified flight instructor of single-engine planes.

Messages to Kanagy seeking comment went unanswered.

Source: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com



AIR ADS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N8075P

NTSB Identification: WPR15CA207 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 04, 2015 in Carlsbad, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/17/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N8075P
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was towing a banner along a beach when the engine gradually lost power, and applying carburetor heat had no effect. A forced landing was initiated on the beach, and during the landing roll the airplane struck a person before it nosed over into the surf. The engine mount, right wing, and right rear lift strut were substantially damaged. 

Postaccident examination on site revealed that the fuel selector valve was in the left tank position. A follow up examination determined that no fuel was visible in the left fuel tank site gauge inside the cockpit area. The right wing filler cap was removed, and fuel was observed in the right tank. Fuel drained from the sump at the rear of the right tank, but nothing drained from the sump at the rear of the left tank. No fuel drained from the gascolator on the firewall. The operator reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to manage the fuel system properly during a banner tow operation resulting in a loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA San Diego FSDO-09





CARLSBAD (CBS 8) - A 12-year-old boy remains in the hospital Sunday evening after being hit by a plane that crashed on a beach in Carlsbad. 

The crash happened Saturday along the 4600 block of Carlsbad Boulevard when a single engine Super Cub Plane towing a GEICO banner made an emergency landing on the beach in front of crowds of people.

"People were yelling for people to get out of the way, get out the water. It's crazy, crazy," said Darrell Hicks.

The boy was treated on the beach before being transported to Rady Children’s Hospital.

Bob Griscom, an aviation expert and lifelong pilot who served 25 years as an aircraft accident investigator with the FAA, says if the pilot had decided to land in the water instead of the beach, he may not have survived.

Bob says that unlike larger planes, the landing gears on smaller planes are not retractable.

"When you hit the water, it’s as if the landing gear hit a brick wall, then the airplane will pitch forward," says Griscom. "The windshield will immediately get a face full of ocean and the pilot will very likely become unconscious very quickly and the airplane sinks and he drowns."

Bob Griscom says the FAA and NTSB will now be investigating why the engine quit and they will be taking a closer look at the pilot, including his conduct the day before the flight.

"They will also find out how much sleep the pilot had the day before and whether he was out partying, whatever it might be," says Griscom. "They will look into all of those factors."

According hospital personnel, the 12-year-old boy is expected to remain hospitalized for a few more days. The hospital has not released information about the boy's condition.

The pilot in the crash was not injured.

Story and video:  http://www.cbs8.com

Accident occurred July 04, 2015 at Duncan Airport, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada



Two people were seriously injured after a small single-engine plane crashed at the Duncan Airport last Saturday afternoon.

The crash happened around 1:30 p.m. when the aircraft went down on a sloped area near the runway. The plane sustained significant damage, and the occupants, a 55-year-old male pilot and 43-year-old female passenger, were badly hurt. 

The pilot was airlifted to Victoria General Hospital, while the passenger was taken by ground ambulance to Cowichan District Hospital.

Dave Morgan, president of the Duncan Flying Club, which runs the airstrip south of the city, confirmed that the pilot is a member of the club, but said he doesn't live in Duncan. He spoke with the man on Monday as he rested in hospital, recovering from surgery on his knee and foot.

Morgan wasn't sure of the cause of the crash, but was considering it might have been turbulence, based on the weather the Cowichan Valley was experiencing that day. "Nobody saw it," he noted.

According to Cpl. Darren Lagan of the Island District RCMP, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada was informed of the crash immediately and an investigation was under way.

He added that there was no indication of foul play.

Morgan expects the pilot to resume flying as soon as he is able.

"If you have a car accident, you don't stop driving," he said. "People don't realize that a plane that's 1,500 pounds only hits half as hard as a car that weighs 3,000 pounds."








Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N7985P, Aviate L LC: Accidnet occurred July 04, 2015 at Newton City/County Airport (KEWK), Kansas

AVIATE LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N7985P

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA178 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 04, 2015 in Newton, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/11/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-250, registration: N7985P
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a local instructional flight, the flight instructor reported that while on final approach at their destination airport, the landing gear did not illuminate down and locked. He reported that he tried to cycle the gear with the electric landing gear handle, but the down and locked green light would not illuminate. When the power was reduced to idle, the flight instructor reported that the audible gear unsafe horn sounded as well. The flight instructor performed a go-around, and the pilot receiving instruction reported that he began the manual gear extension checklist according to the "SureCheck" checklist. 

During the manual gear extension procedure, both pilots reported that a "spring tension" prevented the emergency gear handle from extending to the full forward position. Subsequently, the flight instructor reported that he reset the motor release arm and attempted to extend the landing gear again with the electric gear handle, but the landing gear electric motor circuit breaker popped and the motor release arm jammed. 

After receiving confirmation from ground personnel that the landing gear was only partially extended, the flight instructor performed an emergency landing. During touchdown, the landing gear collapsed and the airplane skidded to a stop on the runway. The fuselage was substantially damaged in the accident. 

During a postaccident examination, a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector found that the right main landing gear down-lock micro switch was operating intermittently within the electrical actuating system. According to the inspector, an intermittent micro switch on this landing gear can result in gear unsafe warnings and continuous electrical motor operation. Additionally, the SureCheck checklist used did not include instructions provided in the Pilot's Operating Handbook stating, "Do not re-engage landing gear operating motor in flight." The SureCheck checklist does contain a warning stating "this product is not a substitute for any operation manual which coincides with each specific aircraft." 

The flight instructor reported that he had two hours of flight time in this make and model airplane, and the pilot receiving instruction reported that he had no previous experience in this make and model airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the right main landing gear down-lock micro switch, which resulted in a landing gear collapse during landing, and the pilot/owner's unfamiliarity with the emergency landing gear extension procedure. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's lack of experience in this make and model airplane and unfamiliarity with the emergency landing gear extension procedure.

During a local instructional flight, the flight instructor reported that while on final approach at their destination airport, the landing gear did not illuminate down and locked. He reported that he tried to cycle the gear with the electric landing gear handle, but the down and locked green light would not illuminate. When the power was reduced to idle, the flight instructor reported that the audible gear unsafe horn sounded as well. The flight instructor performed a go-around, and the pilot receiving instruction reported that he began the manual gear extension checklist according to the "SureCheck" checklist. 

During the manual gear extension procedure, both pilots reported that a "spring tension" prevented the emergency gear handle from extending to the full forward position. Subsequently, the flight instructor reported that he reset the motor release arm and attempted to extend the landing gear again with the electric gear handle, but the landing gear electric motor circuit breaker popped and the motor release arm jammed. 

After receiving confirmation from ground personnel that the landing gear was only partially extended, the flight instructor performed an emergency landing. During touchdown, the landing gear collapsed and the airplane skidded to a stop on the runway. The fuselage was substantially damaged in the accident. 

During a postaccident examination, a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector found that the right main landing gear down-lock micro switch was operating intermittently within the electrical actuating system. According to the inspector, an intermittent micro switch on this landing gear can result in gear unsafe warnings and continuous electrical motor operation. Additionally, the SureCheck checklist used did not include instructions provided in the Pilot's Operating Handbook stating, "Do not re-engage landing gear operating motor in flight." The SureCheck checklist does contain a warning stating "this product is not a substitute for any operation manual which coincides with each specific aircraft." 

The flight instructor reported that he had two hours of flight time in this make and model airplane, and the pilot receiving instruction reported that he had no previous experience in this make and model airplane.

FAA  Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64




HARVEY COUNTY, Kansas -

Two Wichita men are okay after making an emergency landing in Harvey County.

The Harvey County Sheriff's Office says the plane made a belly landing at the Newton City/County Airport, after the pilot reported the plane's landing gear failed.

The sheriff's office says there was some minor damage to the single-engine plane, but no one was hurt.

Story and photo:  http://www.kwch.com

Powrachute PEGASUS, N31762: Incident occurred July 04, 2015 on Dickinson Island, Clay Township, Michigan

Date: 04-JUL-15
Time: 17:15:00Z
Regis#: N31762
Aircraft Model: PEGASUS XL
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA  Flight Standards District Office: FAA East Michigan FSDO-23
City: ST CLAIR
State: Michigan

AIRCRAFT, PEGASUS POWERED PARACHUTE, CRASHED INTO A TREE, DICKINSON ISLAND, ST. CLAIR, MI

RICHARD J. VAN TIEM:   http://registry.faa.gov/N31762


 


Two men were rescued from a tree on Dickinson Island in St. Clair County Saturday afternoon after their ultralight aircraft malfunctioned and became entangled in branches.

A resident of the sparsely populated island, which is next to Harsens Island, called authorities about 1:15 p.m. to report a small manned two-seater aircraft stuck in a tree, according to Capt. Frank Bayly of the Clay Township Fire Department.

The machine and the men, ages 50 and 60 and both of Harrison Township, were found tangled in branches some 30 feet in the air.

The U.S. Coast Guard dispatched a helicopter to the scene with a rescue diver. The diver placed a harness around the men, who were lowered safely to the ground, Bayly said.

Neither man was injured during the crash or rescue, which took about three hours from the initial call.

"Both of the occupants were fine -- they had minor scrapes," he said. The fire department did not release the names of the men.

Their aircraft was still up in the tree as of early Saturday night and awaiting inspection from Federal Aviation Administration investigators.

Source: http://www.freep.com





DICKINSON ISLAND – A U.S. Coast Guard rescue diver had to make a dry-land rescue on Saturday.

Clay Township Fire Capt. Frank Bayly said two men from Harrison Township crashed their ultralight plane into a line of trees on Dickinson Island about 1:15 p.m.

The men, ages 66 and 50, were not injured but were stuck about 30 feet up in the trees.

There is no ferry service to the island, Firefighters responded in a fire boat with a 35-foot ladder but couldn’t reach the men.

A Coast Guard helicopter went to the scene. A rescue diver was able to descend on a tether and pull the men to safety.

Bayly said both men were checked out at the scene. They did not require hospitalization.

 

CLAY TOWNSHIP, Mich. -  Two men were rescued from a tree Saturday afternoon after their ultralight aircraft crashed on Dickinson Island.

The U.S. Coast Guard sent a helicopter to assist the Clay Township police and Algonac Fire Department.

The pilot and passenger were safely rescued.

Dickinson Island is near Harsens Island and is only accessible by boat.

Story:  http://www.clickondetroit.com

Aeronca 7BCM/L-16 Champ, N10497: Fatal accident occurred July 04, 2015 in Portland, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA291
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 04, 2015 in Portland, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: CHAMPION 7BCM, registration: N10497
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness reported seeing the airplane flying “right over the rooftop” of a home before turning along the shoreline at an altitude of 20-50 ft above the ground. He initially thought the airplane was going to land. The witness then observed the airplane climb straight up into a loop maneuver, roll inverted, then descend nose-first into the ground. Another witness said the airplane did 3-4 “wing waves” before it completed ½ of a loop, then descended straight down. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The impact damage to the airplane was consistent with a stall/spin, which resulted from the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack during the attempted loop. 

Toxicological testing revealed the presence of several impairing substances, including alcohol, opiod medication (hydrocodone), a benzodiazepine (alprazolam), as well as evidence of withdrawal from cocaine. The pilot was likely significantly impaired by the combination of these substances, and this level of impairment contributed to his poor decision-making, as well as his inability to safely operate the airplane. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s ostentatious low-altitude aerobatic display, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin when he exceeded the airplane’s critical angle of attack. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s impairment due to alcohol and drugs. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 4, 2015, about 1420 central daylight time, a Champion 7BCM, N10497, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the 16th-tee box of the Northshore Gulf Course located on Corpus Christi Bay in Portland, Texas, while maneuvering at a low altitude. The pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the McCampbell-Porter Airport (TFP), Ingleside, Texas, at an unknown time. 

A witness reported that he observed the accident airplane flying about 100 feet above the bay and about 250 feet from the shoreline numerous times within the last month. On the day of the accident, he observed the airplane flying even lower over the bay – about 50 ft. However, he did not observe the accident. 

A witness reported seeing the airplane flying "right over the rooftop" of one the homes near the shoreline before turning north along the shoreline at a "really, really" low altitude of 20 to 50 ft off the ground. He initially thought the airplane was going to land. Then he saw the airplane go straight up into a loop maneuver, went upside down, and then "nosed dived" into the ground. Another witness said the airplane did 3 to 4 "wing waves" before it completed 1/2 of a loop, and then it went straight down. 

Witnesses attempted to assist the pilot and passenger until the local emergency responders arrived about 5 minutes after the accident occurred. The location of the accident site was near one of the pilot's relative's home that overlooked the bay and the golf course. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 28-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. He held a second class airman medical certificate that was issued on July 18, 2014, with the restriction to wear corrective lenses. During his medical examination in July 2014, the pilot reported that his total flight time was 700 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a tandem two-seat, single-engine Champion 7BCM, serial number 47-934. It was equipped with a 95-horsepower Continental C90-8F engine, serial number 15452-9-8R, which powered a two-bladed, wooden Sensenich propeller. The airplane's maintenance records were not obtained during the course of the investigation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1356 surface weather observation at the Corpus Christi Naval Air Station (NGP) located about 11 miles to the south the accident site was: wind 150 degrees at 18 knots gusting to 25 knots; 10 miles visibility; few clouds at 2,100 feet; scattered clouds at 4,000 feet; temperature 31 degrees C; dew point 26 degrees C; altimeter 29.99 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted the terrain in a steep, nose down attitude. There was no post impact ground fire. The engine compartment, fuselage, wings, and empennage exhibited extensive crushing and buckling, but otherwise remained intact. The propeller and engine compartment were crushed up and aft from the impact. The wings remained attached to the fuselage. The right wing was broken and buckled forward about mid-span. The inboard leading edge of the right wing was found resting over the engine compartment. The outboard leading edge of the right wing impacted the edge of the tee box where the terrain dropped down about 3 feet. The left wing exhibited aft crushing along its outboard lower leading edge. The ailerons remained attached to the wings. The tail and empennage exhibited forward buckling. There was no impact damage to the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The elevator trim continuity was confirmed from the elevator trim to the elevator trim control.

Witnesses, who arrived at the accident site before the emergency first responders, reported that they saw fuel leaking from the wings and smelled fuel. Both wing fuel tanks were split open along the leading edge of the fuel tanks. The grass exhibited fuel blight when it was examined about 48 hours after the accident occurred. 

The examination of the Continental 95-horsepower engine revealed that it had power train continuity when the propeller was turned. Thumb compression and suction were observed on all four cyliders. The left and right magnetos fired on all four towers when the magneto shaft was rotated. The spark plugs exhibited a light gray color and the electrodes exhibited normal wear patterns. The carburetor was broken at the air intake attachment. The carburetor bowl did not contain fuel and the carburetor floats were intact. 

The examination of the two-bladed wooden Sensenich propeller revealed that one blade was fractured about mid-span. About six to ten inches of the remaining wooden blade was splintered opposite the direction of rotation. The other blade remained intact, but it was cracked along the length of the span. The leading edge of the blade had a metal cap installed and it exhibited chordwise scratching.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The autopsy of the pilot was performed by the Medical Examiner, County of Nueces, Corpus Christi, Texas, on July 6, 2015. The cause of death was blunt head trauma and the manner of death was an accident. No significant natural disease was identified.

Toxicology testing performed by AIT labs in Indianapolis, Indiana, at the request of the medical examiner identified alprazolam at 3.0 ng/ml, its metabolite, 7- aminoclonazepam at 12.2 ng/ml, benzoylecgonine at 116 ng/ml, hydrocodone at 18.7 ng/ml, and ethanol at 0.163 gm/dl in femoral blood.

A Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report was prepared by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. No carbon monoxide was detected in the blood (heart). 153 (mg/dL, mg/hg) of ethanol was detected in the blood (femoral); 159 (mg/dL, mg/hg) of ethanol was detected in the urine; and 160 (mg/dL, mg/hg) of ethanol was detected in the vitreous. N-Propanol was detected in the urine.

Anhydronecgonine methyl ester was not detected in the blood (heart), but it was detected in the urine. 0.133 (ug/ml, ug/g) of benzoylecgonine was detected in the blood (heart), and 2.9091(ug/ml, ug/g) of benzoylecgonine was detected in the urine. Dihydrocodeine was not detected in the blood (femoral), but 0.019 (ug/ml, ug/g) of dihydrocodeine was detected in the urine. Ecgonine methyl ester was detected in the urine and the blood (heart). 0.085 (ug/ml, ug/g) of hydrocodone was detected in the urine, and 0.021 (ug/ml, ug/g) of hydrocodone was detected in the blood (femoral). Hydromorphone was not detected in the blood (femoral), but 0.026 (ug/ml, ug/g) of hydromorphone was detected in the urine.

The National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Chief Medical Officer provided the following information concerning the toxicology results. (The NTSB Medical Factual Report is in the docket material associated with this accident report)

Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine prescription medication available as a Schedule IV controlled substance. Benzodiazepines cause dose-related central nervous system depression varying from mild impairment to hypnosis. The usual therapeutic window for alprazolam is between 6 ng/ml and 20 ng/ml and it carries the following warning: The side effects of alprazolam are typical of benzodiazepines and include sedation, impaired coordination and muscle relaxation. Warnings - may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery).

Benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester are inactive metabolites of cocaine and anhydroecgonine methyl ester is a metabolite of cocaine that is only present after cocaine has been smoked. Cocaine is rapidly metabolized; its half-life is approximately 0.8 ± 0.2 hours, while the half- life of benzoylecgonine is 6 hours.3 Smoking cocaine acutely results in euphoria, excitation, feelings of well-being, general arousal, and increased sexual excitement; higher doses may result in psychosis, delusions, hallucinations, irritability, fear, paranoia, antisocial behavior, and aggressiveness. After the brief "high" wears off, users may exhibit dysphoria, depression, agitation, nervousness, drug craving, fatigue, and inability to sleep.

Hydrocodone is an opioid analgesic available as a prescription medication and listed as a Schedule II controlled substance, most commonly in combination with acetaminophen (also known as Tylenol). It is commonly sold with the names Vicodin, Lortab, and Norco. Hydrocodone does not undergo significant post mortem redistribution and post mortem levels likely represent antemortem ones. Its usual therapeutic range is between 0.010 and 0.050 ug/ml and it carries this warning: Hydrocodone is more toxic than codeine, with a greater addiction liability. May impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery). Hydromorphone and dihydrocodeine are metabolites of hydrocodone and are both also active opioid analgesics.

Ethanol is the type of alcohol present in beer, wine, and liquor. It is a social drug that acts as a central nervous system depressant. After ingestion, at low doses, it impairs judgment, psychomotor functioning, and vigilance; at higher doses ethanol can cause coma and death. Generally, the rapid distribution of ethanol throughout the body after ingestion leads to similar levels in different tissues. Federal Aviation Regulations, Section 91.17 (a) prohibits any person from acting or attempting to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft while having 0.040 gm/dl or more alcohol in the blood. The effects of alcohol on aviators are generally well understood; alcohol significantly impairs pilots' performance, even at very low levels.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The pilot's iPhone 6+ and the passenger's iPhone 5S were sent to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division for examination. The pilot's iPhone 6+ had received severe internal damage which precluded data recovery. (The NTSB Personal Electronic Devises Factual Report is in the docket material associated with this accident report)

The passenger's iPhone 5S was not damaged and it contained text messages, photos, and videos pertinent to the accident. The in-flight videos taken by the passenger showed the following (all imagery was from N10497):

1. The male pilot was not wearing a shirt throughout the flight and had an orange audio cable coming out of his left front pants pocket (the cable was identified as belonging to the pilot and was plugged into his iPhone). The pilot was wearing a headset. N10497 had no door on the right side. The female passenger was wearing a headset. Pilot and passenger were not wearing parachutes.

2. The aircraft took off on a paved runway, accelerated in ground effect above the runway, then climbed rapidly, turned to the right, descended, and flew within 10 feet of grass and brush covered land before climbing rapidly.

3. The aircraft flew through thin clouds as the pilot and passenger reached their arms out into the airstream.

4. The aircraft flew one complete aileron roll or barrel roll and attempted another roll; in both instances, the aircraft lost altitude.

5. The last video ended at 13:28:10 CDT, as the aircraft was descending, in a slight nose down attitude (similar to a normal, power-off descent), with the engine at idle. The accident was not captured.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA291
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 04, 2015 in Portland, TX
Aircraft: CHAMPION 7BCM, registration: N10497
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2015, about 1420 central daylight time, a Champion 7BCM, N10497, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the 16th-tee box of the Northshore Gulf Course located in Portland, Texas, while maneuvering at a low altitude. The pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed.The flight's origination and destination are unknown.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane flying at a low altitude before the airplane impacted the terrain in a steep, nose down attitude. The engine compartment, fuselage, wings, and empennage remained intact and there was no post impact ground fire. The propeller and engine compartment were crushed up and aft from the impact. The wings remained attached to the fuselage and exhibited crushing on the underside of the leading edges. The right wing was broken and buckled forward about mid-span; it impacted the edge of the tee box where the terrain dropped down about 3 feet. The ailerons remained attached to the wings. The tail and empennage exhibited forward buckling. There was no impact damage to the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The elevator trim continuity was confirmed from the elevator trim to the elevator trim control. Witnesses, who arrived at the accident site before the emergency first responders arrived, reported that they saw fuel leaking from the wings and smelled fuel. The grass was examined about 48-hours after the accident occurred and it exhibited fuel blight.

The examination of the Continental 95-horsepower engine revealed that it had power train continuity when the propeller was turned. Thumb compression and suction were observed. The left and right magnetos fired on all four towers when the magneto shaft was rotated. The spark plugs exhibited a light gray color and the electrodes exhibited normal wear patterns. The carburetor was broken at the air intake attachment. The carburetor bowl did not contain fuel and the carburetor floats were intact. 

The examination of the two-bladed wooden Sensinech propeller revealed that one blade was fractured about mid-span. About six to ten inches of the remaining wooden blade was splintered opposite the direction of travel. The other blade remained intact, but it was cracked along the length of the span. The leading edge of the blade had a metal cap on it and it exhibited chordwise scratching.

The 1356 surface weather observation at the Corpus Christi Naval Air Station (NGP) located about 11 miles to the south the accident site was: wind 150 degrees at 18 knots gusting to 25 knots; 10 miles visibility; few clouds at 2,100 feet; scattered clouds at 4,000 feet; temperature 31 degrees C; dew point 26 degrees C; altimeter 29.99 inches of mercury. 

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA San Antonio FSDO-17
ISAAC  LUNDELL:   http://registry.faa.gov/N10497

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov .


Catherine George, of Portland, was killed in a small airplane crash on NorthShore Country Club golf course on Saturday, July 4, 2015. George was the passenger of the aircraft.








Catherine George
~


Catherine George and Jeffrey Ross Mitchell, both of Portland, were killed in a small airplane crash on NorthShore Country Club golf course on Saturday, July 4, 2015. The family has placed flowers to memorialize George. 



Jeffrey R. Mitchell

PORTLAND — Jeffrey Ross Mitchell died July 4, 2015. He was 28.

Service will be 7:30 p.m. July 9 at Hunt Airport, 2852 Private Hunt Road in Portland, Texas.

All Faith Cremation & Funeral Services.


CORPUS CHRISTI (Kiii News) -  3News heard Monday from the family of a pilot who was killed in a plane crash Saturday.

It happened just before 2:30 p.m. The small plane crashed in Portland at the North Shore Country Club. Both the pilot, 28-year old Jeffrey Ross Mitchell, and the passenger, 27-year old Catherine George, died at the scene.

Mitchell's family said in a statement Monday, "The loss of our son Ross in this tragic accident has broken our hearts. He was dearly loved by so many of his friends and adored by his extended families. Also losing his girlfriend Catherine in this senseless misfortune is nothing less than devastating to our spirits."

The FAA and NTSB are still investigating the cause of the crash.

Source:  http://www.kiiitv.com


PORTLAND - The family of Catherine George called her a source of love and affection, always ready with a smile or positive word. 

George, 27, was killed when a small plane crashed Saturday near the 16th hole of the NorthShore Country Club in Portland.

The pilot of the 1947 Aeronca Champ L-16 was Jeffrey Ross Mitchell, 28, of Portland also died. The George family said the two were dating.

"We are devastated by the loss of our daughter and sister, Catherine," a family friend told the Caller-Times in a text message. "This is a very difficult time for us, but we have been moved by the many expressions of love and support from our family, friends and community. Still, we are so very saddened by Catherine's untimely passing. We cherish the time we were given, but miss her terribly nonetheless."

Portland police received a call about a plane crash at 2:20 p.m. Saturday. Along with Portland fire department emergency personnel, officers were able to recover George and Mitchell who were then taken to a funeral home.

George's family asks for prayers for all families involved. Flowers have been placed in George's memory near the golf course where the plane crashed.

The Federal Aviation Agency and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash. Cory said investigators arrived at 8:30 a.m. Sunday and both agencies remained in town Monday afternoon.

An NTSB investigator will spend as many as four days in Portland examining the crash, said Eric Weiss, spokesperson for the agency. A preliminary report will be available in 7-10 days, he said.

"He'll be looking at and documenting exactly where the aircraft impacted the ground," Weiss said. "He'll be looking at the dirt, if there are any broken tree branches, clues, documents, photographs. He'll be looking at not only the wreckage itself, but the accident scene."

The investigator will also peruse any GPS information from the plane or devices used in the plane.

"He'll also do witness interviews, look at radar data, listen to any tapes and see if they had contact with (Air Traffic Control) and meteorological and weather reports," Weiss said.

It's unknown where the plane was headed, or which airport it departed.

Source:  http://www.caller.com

PORTLAND (Kiii News) -     The family of one of the two people who died in a plane crash on Saturday released a statement Sunday evening. 

The pilot has been identified by police as 28 year old Jeffrey Ross Mitchell. 

The passenger was 27 year old Catherine George.

It was just after two o'clock on Saturday when nearby homeowners heard the crash and found the plane's wreckage near the North Shore Country Club.

Catherine's family told 3 News she and Ross were dating, and say they are surrounding themselves with family as they remember her.  

They released a statement and pictures of Catherine.

The family says quote "we are devastated by the loss of our daughter and sister, Catherine.  

Catherine was such a source of love and affection, devoted to her family and always with a ready smile or positive word for her friends.

This is a very difficult time for us, but we have been moved by the many expressions of love and support from our family, friends, and community.

Still, we are very saddened by Catherine's untimely passing.

We cherish the time we were given, but miss her terribly.

Please keep the George, Hunt, and Mitchell families in your prayers."

The NTSB and FAA are currently working on their investigation as to what caused the crash.

Source:  http://www.kiiitv.com



PORTLAND (Kiii News) - Portland Police have released the names of the two victims in Saturday's fatal plane crash.

 The pilot has been identified as Jeffrey Ross Mitchell, 28 years old.

 The passenger was Catherine George, 27 years old. Both are from Portland.

The NTSB and FAA are currently working on their investigation as to the cause of the crash.

 Emergency crews responded just after 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, when neighbors reported hearing a loud "boom." 

Police say the plane is a 1947 Champ L-16 and the two had departed from a local airport. 

We spoke to neighbors who live right here on the water and say they've seen this same plane flying extremely low over the last month and were startled when they watched it zoom by their back window again.

 Nick Longo told 3 News, "This is the first time we had visitors over you know the 4th of July.  

They just jumped because the sound.  

He was lower this time for sure probably 50 feet lower, and then you just heard the engine rev, and then he was out of the picture and then all of the sudden we heard the crash."



KiiiTV.com South Texas, Corpus Christi, Coastal Bend










PORTLAND - Two people were killed when the small plane they were flying in crashed Saturday in Portland. 

Portland police responded to the crash near the 16th hole of the NorthShore Country Club located at 801 E. Broadway Blvd.

A man and a woman were in an Aeronca L-16 Champ and died instantly after it crashed near the edge of the water of Corpus Christi Bay, Portland Police Chief Mark Cory said.

Authorities got the call about 2:20 p.m. Cory said the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident.

Portland police and fire department emergency personnel crews helped recovered the bodies, which were taken to a funeral home. Cory said the families of the two had been notified but did not provide their names or their ages.

Cory did not immediately have information on the relationship between the two people. It is unclear where they were headed, or which airport they flew out of.

As of Saturday evening, police did not have information as to what may have caused the crash or if the strong winds Saturday may have been a factor. It is unclear who the plane belonged to and which of the two was the pilot of the two-seater aircraft.

There was no reported damage to nearby homes, Cory said.

NorthShore Country Club officials said the back nine holes of the golf course will remain closed through Sunday.

Source:  http://www.caller.com




     

Piper PA-25-260 Pawnee, N4792Y, Aerial Banners Inc: Incident occurred July 04, 2015 near Star Island in Miami, Florida

Date: 04-JUL-15
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N4792Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA25
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Banner Tow
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA  Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT DURING BANNER TOW OPERATION, DROPPED THE BANNER AND LANDED IN BISCAYNE BAY, MIAMI, FL

AERIAL BANNERS INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N4792Y


The pilot of the banner tow plane.









MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (WSVN) -- The pilot of a banner plane is lucky to be alive after, witnesses said, his aircraft plunged into Biscayne Bay off Miami Beach, narrowly missing the MacArthur Causeway, Saturday afternoon.

When asked how he was doing, the pilot, who did not give out his name, told 7News, "I'm doing good, just a scratch, no big deal."

On this busy Fourth of July, many people saw the small plane go down west of Star Island, about 15 to 20 feet from the shoreline, at around 3 p.m. "All of a sudden, it cut out, and then it just started to drop, drop, drop, drop," said a witness.

"I thought he was going to pull up, and the next thing you know, he goes right into the bay," said area resident Ralph Bias, who saw the ordeal unfold from the 35th floor.

"I think this guy, he might be a hero today, because I saw him avoid the [MacArthur] Causeway," Bias said. "He came very, very close to it. I saw him bank to the right, and he went right into the water, 'cause he was heading right towards it."

Minutes later, Miami Beach Police and the Coast Guard pulled the pilot to safety. Miami Fire Rescue Capt. Ignatius Carroll praised the pilot for being able to avoid hitting any structures or vessels, and thus preventing what could have been a tragedy. "We do credit the pilot for being able to bring this plane down in an area where it did not strike any other boats," he said. "It did not hit the bridge, and he was able to leave the plane safely."

His skill likely saved many lives this Independence Day, including his own. "I'm good, safe. No one got hurt; that's the important part," he said.

There is no word as to what caused the crash. It is currently under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board.


MIAMI (CBSMiami) — A pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after his small plane went down near Star Island Saturday afternoon.

“Pretty loud engine. All of a sudden I heard a loud engine go out, it goes dead silent.  And then I see it start to lose altitude gradually,” said Miami Beach resident Andy George.

From his pool at a nearby waterfront condo, George watched as one of the many banner planes flying above Miami Beach sputtered downward.

“I thought he was gonna make a crash landing which was a pretty safe bet. I didn’t know if it was gonna be a hard landing or what.  But, I knew the guy was gonna be in trouble,” he said.

The pilot landed just feet from traffic on the MacArthur Causeway – on one side boats and homes all over the other.

He was the only person on the single engine plane, managing to get out with just a few scratches, his elbow in a bandage.

“We do credit the pilot for being able to bring this plane down in an area where it did not strike any boats, it did not hit the bridge.  and he was able to leave the plane safely,” said Miami Fire Capt. Ignatius Carroll. 

“During the holiday weekend we have a lot of boats that are out here, a lot of people that are on the water. As you can see the highways are crowded so this could’ve ended pretty tragically had he not been able to maneuver this plane into the water.”

As for the pilot, he didn’t say much.

“I’m good. Safe. No one got hurt, that’s the important part,” he said.

Source:  http://miami.cbslocal.com








Aero Commander 112, C-GNEJ, Buchan, Lawton, Parent Ltd: Incident occurred July 03, 2015 in Orangeville, Ontario, Canada





A father and daughter were apparently unhurt after their small plane crashed at a campground near Orangeville, Ont., on Friday, according to an eyewitness.

Lee Graham, the owner of Rainbow Ridge Resort, which is about 76 kilometres northwest of Toronto, told CBC News that the occupants seemed "to be OK with no major injuries."

Graham said the single-engine plane crashed close to the pool area, and brought down a power line.

"It sounded like a transport truck was slamming on its brakes, and I heard a big bang," he said. "I ran out and there was an airplane lying on the ground."

Graham rushed toward it and was surprised to see its occupants alive.

"The girl got out of the passenger side and was calling for her dad," he recalled. "He wasn't moving for a bit, but then I see him shutting off all these switches. He gets out and pats himself down and said, 'I don't even have a bruise on me!"

The Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

The plane was bound for Ottawa.

Police say it appears the plane was having mechanical problems.

The OPP say investigators with the Transportation Safety Board are being called to look into the crash.

Story and photo:  http://www.cbc.ca