Thursday, February 21, 2019

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N206AT: Incident occurred January 12, 2019 at Concord-Padgett Regional Airport (KJQF), Cabarrus County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aircraft had a cabin fire preparing for takeoff.

Airline Transport Professionals Corp of USA

https://registry.faa.gov/N206AT

Date: 12-JAN-19
Time: 14:05:00Z
Regis#: N206AT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: CONCORD
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Beech 99A, registered to and operated by Freight Runners Express Inc, N899CZ: Incident occurred January 15, 2019 at General Mitchell International Airport (KMKE), Milwaukee and accident occurred April 24, 2017 at Waukesha County Airport (KUES), Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

January 15, 2019:  Aircraft made gear up landing on runway.

Freight Runners Express Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N899CZ

Date: 15-JAN-19
Time: 21:14:00Z
Regis#: N899CZ
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MILWAUKEE
State: WISCONSIN

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Waukesha, WI
Accident Number: GAA17CA244
Date & Time: 04/24/2017, 1225 CDT
Registration: N899CZ
Aircraft: BEECH 99
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 

The pilot flying the airplane reported that, during an instrument flight rules instructional flight, the airplane was established on a very high frequency omnidirectional range approach. The pilot reported that, during the approach, he observed a large bird dive into the airplane's nose section. The pilot recalled that there was no time to react between the initial observation and impact. He terminated the training flight and landed the airplane as soon as practical and without further incident. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage frame.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
An in-flight collision with a bird during the approach.

Findings

Environmental issues
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Ability to respond/compensate (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute
Birdstrike (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/26/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/28/2017
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 2568 hours (Total, all aircraft), 518 hours (Total, this make and model), 2425 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 154 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/10/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1244 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 588 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 170 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N899CZ
Model/Series: 99 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: U-96
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/03/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 10399 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 30823 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-28
Registered Owner: FREIGHT RUNNERS EXPRESS INC
Rated Power: 680 hp
Operator: FREIGHT RUNNERS EXPRESS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KUES, 911 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1724 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 200°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Milwaukee, WI (KMKE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Waukesha, WI (KEUS)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1610 UTC
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: WAUKESHA COUNTY (UES)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 912 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: Practice; VOR
Runway Length/Width: 5849 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.041111, -88.236944 (est)

Mooney M20M, N225KT: Incident occurred January 16, 2019 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft gear collapsed on runway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N225KT

Date: 16-JAN-19
Time: 01:05:00Z
Regis#: N225KT
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20M
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA18-150, registered to the pilot and operated by Gothenburg Flying Service Inc, N4234Z: Accident occurred May 24, 2016 in Cozad, Dawson County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N4234Z

Location: Cozad, NE
Accident Number: CEN16LA193
Date & Time: 05/24/2016, 1010 CDT
Registration: N4234Z
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On May 24, 2016, about 1010 central daylight time, a Piper PA-18-150, N4234Z, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain near Cozad, Nebraska. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to the pilot and was operated by Gothenburg Flying Service, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and no flight plan had not been filed. The local flight departed Fiese Airstrip (2NE5), Gothenburg, Nebraska, about 1000.

The pilot said he had just finished purging the spray booms of air and rinsate and was flying 25 feet above the ground when the airplane suddenly made an uncommand descent. The right wing struck the flat wheat field and the airplane skidded to a stop, coming to rest inverted about 120 feet from the initial point of impact. There was substantial damage to both wings, wing struts, fuselage, and tail surfaces.

The airplane had recently been rebuilt. The pilot/owner noted multiple discrepancies with the airplane following delivery. One discrepancy was that the jackscrew and drive pulley assembly for the horizontal stabilizer were not replaced as he had requested. He noted that the jackscrew assembly was worn and there was excessive slack in the drive cable. Pitch trim had to be constantly adjusted as a result. The builder had told the pilot that the assembly had been "tightened up." The pilot stated that this was not possible as the screw was made of steel and the housing was made of aluminum. The FAA conducted examinations of the airplane following the accident and noted play in the jackscrew assembly, but determined the slack was insufficient to cause the screw to slip. No other mechanical issues were found with the airplane.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/12/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/04/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6397 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100016 hours (Total, this make and model), 639710 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N4234Z
Model/Series: PA 18-150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 18-8460
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/15/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 7 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5607 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: Larry J Fiese
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: Gothenburg Flying Service, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As: Gothenburg Flying Service, Inc.
Operator Designator Code: OG6G

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLXN, 2413 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1015 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 143°
Lowest Cloud Condition:  / 1000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Gothenburg, NE (2NE5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Gothenburg, NE (2NE5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Fiese Airstrip (2NE5)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 2535 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.947778, -99.930833 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA193
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 24, 2016 in Cozad, NE
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N4234Z
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 24, 2016, about 1025 central daylight time, a Piper PA-18-150 single-engine airplane, N4234Z, was substantially damaged after it impacted terrain during en route cruise near Cozad, Nebraska. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and was operated by Gothenburg Flying Service, Inc., as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 agricultural application flight. Low visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. The airplane had earlier departed from Fiese Airstrip (2NE5), Gothenburg, Nebraska, for the local flight.

The pilot reported he was flying at less than 50 feet above ground level (agl) when the airplane suddenly made an uncommanded descent. The right wingtip impacted terrain in a flat wheat field and the airplane came to rest inverted about 120 feet from the initial impact location. The impact resulted in substantial damage to both wings, both wing struts, the fuselage, and the tail surfaces. The pilot was able to exit the airplane without assistance and reported there had been adequate fuel onboard. There was no fuel spill and no postimpact fire.

The closest official weather reporting station was at KLXN, Lexington, Nebraska; located 12 miles southeast from the accident location at an elevation of 2,413 feet agl. At 1015 the automated surface observation system at KLXN reported wind from 180 degrees at 9 knots, visibility 10 miles, broken clouds at 1,000 feet above ground level, temperature 20 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 17 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.92 inches of mercury.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Cirrus SR22 N381DE: Accident occurred February 20, 2019 at Jones Riverside Airport (KRVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Veered off runway and cartwheeled.

Destinations Executive Flight Center LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N381DE


Date: 20-FEB-19
Time: 23:12:00Z
Regis#: N381DE
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA




A Cirrus SR-22 crashed at Jones-Riverside Airport near Jenks late Wednesday afternoon.

EMSA and Tulsa firefighters responded. Officials say one person was on board and did not suffer any injuries or require treatment.

Investigators say the plane began wobbling in crosswinds as it was descending toward the runway and crashed on the east side of the east taxiway.

Destinations Executive Flight Center in Tulsa confirmed to 2 News Works For You that the company owns the plane. The pilot is based in Green Country and flies regularly for business in the region, a spokesperson said. He was returning from a day trip to El Dorado, Arkansas, flight records show.

The airport was closed while crews clean up the wreckage, but everything is running smoothly again.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kjrh.com


A pilot was not injured after a small plane crashed Wednesday afternoon at Jones Riverside Airport in south Tulsa.

The sole occupant of the single-engine plane was able to exit after the crash and was not injured, authorities said.

He told first responders he lost control during his landing approach. The plane is a Cirrus SR22.

Firefighters about 5:20 p.m. were called to the crash on the south side of the airport, located in south Tulsa just north of Jenks.

Air traffic in and out of the airport was suspended while authorities investigated the crash.

The airport has three runways, over 200 commercial and private hangars, and over 500 based aircraft.

During 2011, the control tower recorded 202,539 operations (average of 555 per day).

Operations include charter, business, medical, law enforcement, government, and privately owned aircraft, according to the airport's website.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tulsaworld.com




TULSA, Oklahoma (KTUL) — The Jones-Riverside Airport in Jenks is shut down after an emergency involving a plane.

Crews are on scene investigating.

Story and video ➤  https://okcfox.com

Air Force F-15 Eagle: Incident occurred February 20, 2019 at Portland International Airport (KPDX), Multnomah County, Oregon



PORTLAND, Oregon (KOIN) -- About 4 hours after an emergency alert was issued, an F-15 made a safe landing early Wednesday afternoon at PDX as emergency vehicles were ready on the runway.

At 8:46 a.m., an aircraft emergency alert Level 2 was declared that centered around its landing gear. The 142nd Fighter Wing said the Air Force F-15 Eagle from the Portland Air National Guard Base had been taking part in a normal training flight. 

The plane landed safely and without incident around 12:38 p.m. with the help of a barrier cable. Several emergency vehicles and a fire truck met the plane along with an emergency vehicle at the end of runway 28-L at PDX.

Commercial air traffic was not affected.

The single pilot inside the aircraft was not injured. An investigation was launched to figure out what caused the in-flight emergency.

Story and video: https://www.koin.com

Piper PA-24 Comanche and Cessna 320 Skyknight: Incidents occurred February 20, 2019 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Englewood, Arapahoe County, Colorado

CENTENNIAL, Colorado  — South Metro Fire Rescue responded to two separate aircraft incidents Wednesday afternoon at Centennial Airport. 

The first occurred shortly before 3 p.m., when a Cessna 320 Skyknight nose gear collapsed upon landing. Two people were aboard the plane, but were not injured. 

About an hour later, a Piper PA-24 Comanche with two people aboard skidded off the runway and into nearby grass. No injuries were reported in that incident either. 

Both runways, which run parallel, will remain closed until the aircraft can be removed. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.9news.com

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colorado — Two runways at Centennial Airport were closed Wednesday afternoon due to two separate incidents that occurred within one hour of each other.

The first incident occurred shortly after 2:45 p.m., when a Cessna 320 Skyknight nose gear collapsed while landing. The plane did not catch on fire and neither of its two occupants were hurt. Runway 17L was shut down for the plane’s removal. As of about 4 p.m., it remained closed.

The airport tweeted about the second incident at 3:42 p.m. It said a Piper Comanche was in the grass next to Runway 17R.

Two people were aboard the Piper. The plane did not catch fire and neither person was injured. However, Runway 17R was closed. As of about 4 p.m., it remained closed.

Runways 17L and 17R run parallel.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://kdvr.com

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colorado — A plane’s nose gear collapsed while landing at Centennial Airport Wednesday afternoon.

According to the airport, the plane involved in the incident is a Cessna 320 Skyknight.

The plane was landing on Runway 17L shortly after 2:45 p.m. when the nose gear collapsed.

There are two people on board. The plane did not catch on fire and no one was injured.

Crews with South Metro Fire Rescue responded to the scene.

The airport closed the runway for the plane to be removed.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://kdvr.com

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Pilot Mulls Pursuing Case Against Man’s Estate In Reward Money Spat

Cessna 560 Citation V, owned and operated by Chen Aircrafts LLC, N188CW: Fatal accident occurred December 20, 2018 near Fulton County Airport (KFTY), Atlanta, Georgia


Wei Chen


A woman who maintains that she’s the first Asian person of her gender to fly a single-engine plane around the world and was wrongfully denied a promised award by a man who later died in a plane crash is thinking about pursuing her legal case against his estate, her lawyers told a judge Tuesday.

Zheng (Julie) Wang sued Wei Chen in March 2018, alleging he reneged on a 2014 promise of a six-figure award to the initial Chinese female to accomplish the task.

Chen was on board a small plane headed to Memphis when it crashed in a northwest Atlanta park, killing him and everyone else on board on December 20th. A well-known Memphis businessman, he founded Sunshine Enterprises, which focuses on the wholesale distribution of Chinese construction and industrial equipment, in 1998.

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dennis Landin said Tuesday morning that he will defer ruling on a defense request for dismissal of Wang’s lawsuit on grounds it should have been brought in China. He previously issued a final decision denying the motion on November 7th, but left open the possibility that he could grant Chen’s motion if the defendant agreed to take specific legal steps. His attorneys state in their court papers that he complied before his death.

Landin said he wants to know if any of the members of Chen’s estate have contacts in California. He scheduled another case management conference for April 23rd.

Wang is seeking triple and punitive damages, including the $163,000 prize money, on allegations of fraud, negligent misrepresentation and breach of contract. The promoter that helped prepare her financially for the flight, China General Aviation LLC, also is named as a plaintiff.

Chen, 47, had a net worth of more than $30 million, according to the plaintiff’s court papers.

Attorney Samantha Gavin, of behalf of Chen, previously argued that the money at issue is in a Chinese bank and that none of the witnesses are from this state.

Plaintiff’s attorney Keith Wesley countered that both Chen and Wang are Americans. He said Chen wanted to move the case in order to make it so difficult for Wang to move forward with her case that she may have to consider dropping it.

According to Wang’s complaint, Chen announced in September 2014 at the International Aircraft Owner and Pilot Association in Beijing that he was willing to pay the prize — which amounts to a million Chinese yuan — to the “first Chinese woman to complete an around-the-world flight.”

Wang, then 43, embarked on her flight from Addison Airport near Dallas on August 17th, 2016, and successfully returned from the global trip at the same airport on September 19th, 2016, according to her lawsuit.

Wang says she became not only the first Asian woman to accomplish such a task, but also the first person of Chinese descent to do so by herself and the eighth woman of any ethnicity to fly around the world solo.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://mynewsla.com




The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N188CW 

Location: Atlanta, GA

Accident Number: ERA19FA071
Date & Time: 12/20/2018, 1210 EST
Registration: N188CW
Aircraft: CESSNA 560
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 20, 2018, about 1210 eastern standard time, a Cessna C560, N188CW, was destroyed when it impacted a field after takeoff from Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia. The air transport pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Chen Aircrafts LLC. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Millington-Memphis Airport (NQA), Millington, Tennessee.

A review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after departing from runway 8 at FTY, the airplane turned left toward the north climbing to about 3,225 ft msl (2,385 ft agl), then made a descending right 180-degree right turn to the south before radar contact was lost at an altitude of about 1,175 feet msl (335 ft agl).

A video obtained from a security camera positioned on top of a building, located about a half mile from the accident site, captured the airplane in a descending left turn prior to rolling inverted until it was lost from view behind a tree line.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held an air transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multiengine land and a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. The pilot was issued a second-class medical certificate on May 31, 2018 and reported 2,300 hours of total flight experience and 150 hours of flight experience in the previous 6 months.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1991, and was most-recently registered to a corporation in July 2017. It was equipped with two Pratt & Whitney Canada, JT15D series engines, which could each produce 3,050 pounds of thrust.

The 1216 recorded weather observation at FTY, which was about 1 mile to the southwest of the accident location, included wind from 050° at 10 knots, visibility 7 miles, overcast clouds at 600 ft above ground level (agl), temperature 8° C, dew point 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.52 inches of mercury.

The airplane impacted a tree prior to impacting the field about 50 feet beyond the initial tree strike. All major components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the wreckage. The debris path was about 325 ft long and was located on a 142° heading.

The airplane was highly fragmented and dispersed along the debris path. The main wing spar was separated from the airframe and came to rest about 200 ft from the initial ground impact point. The empennage was impact-separated and located about 275 ft from the initial impact crater. Both engines were impact-separated from the airplane. The cockpit, cabin, and wings were highly fragmented.

A cockpit voice recorder and an enhanced ground proximity warning system were located along the debris path and retained for data download.

The airplane was moved to a secure facility and retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N188CW
Model/Series: 560 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Chen Aircrafts Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FTY, 840 ft msl
Observation Time: 1716 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.52 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Atlanta, GA (FTY)
Destination: Millington, TN (NQA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.790556, -84.495000

Man arrested for pointing laser at San Antonio Police Department helicopter



SAN ANTONIO – Playing with a laser pointer lands a man in jail after police say he pointed it at a San Antonio Police Department helicopter.

Fox San Antonio dug into federal records showing the crime is on the rise in San Antonio.

Eagle helicopter is SAPD’s eye in the sky.

"We see everything,” Ofc. Eddie Ramirez says.

He says on Monday, the flight crew was scouring the city’s east side after getting reports of gun shots.

During the search, police say 37-year-old Justin Shorey pointed a laser at the helicopter and temporarily blinded the pilot.

"So much so that he was seeing spots, blurred vision,” Ofc. Ramirez says.

The pilot’s now had his eyes checked and fortunately, there’s no permanent damage. He’s been cleared to go back to work very soon.

Pointing a laser at any type of aircraft is considered a federal offense. The Federal Aviation Administration hears about thousands of reported incidents each year.

"We've had numerous reports,” Ofc. Ramirez says. "You'd be surprised at the number of arrests we've made.”

In 2016, the FAA got 48 reports of lasers pointed at aircraft in San Antonio. In 2017, the FAA got 62 reports. And through November 2018, the agency tracked 74 reports.

The numbers show a steady rise in a crime that impacts police, medical AirLIFE and even commercial airlines.

In this case, Ofc. Ramirez says police on the ground helped pinpoint where the laser was coming from and knocked on Shorey’s door.

"Sure enough, ended up talking to the individual and recovered the laser, a green light laser,” Ofc. Ramirez says.

Shorey is now charged with a Class A misdemeanor. But federal charges for the crime can come up with to five years in prison.

"We've had cases where a person has lased an aircraft and the next thing you know, now they're doing hard time in a federal prison,” Ofc. Ramirez says.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://foxsanantonio.com

Eurocopter AS350 B2, N350ST: Accident occurred February 18, 2019 in Glacier View, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

During skiing operations struck a rock and rolled over.

Rota Aviation Consulting LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N350ST

Date: 18-FEB-19
Time: 23:55:00Z
Regis#: N350ST
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: AS350B2
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GLACIER VIEW
State: ALASKA

Volaris Airlines, Airbus A320-200, XA-VLO: Incident occurred February 18, 2019 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

Luggage cart entered runway and struck aircraft. 

Date: 18-FEB-19
Time: 00:04:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: VOLARIS AIRLINES
Flight Number: 1919
City: LOS ANGELES
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 402C, N5849C: Accident occurred February 15, 2019 at Siskiyou County Airport (KSIY), Montague, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Went off the end of runway, landing gear tore off.

Redding Aero Enterprises Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N5849C

Date: 15-FEB-19
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N5849C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 402C
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: MONTAGUE
State: CALIFORNIA

Cameron A-250, N6953U: Incident occurred February 17, 2019 in Napa, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Landed on an island surrounded by water.


https://registry.faa.gov/N6953U


Date: 17-FEB-19

Time: 15:37:00Z
Regis#: N6953U
Aircraft Make: CAMERON BALLOONS
Aircraft Model: A 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: SIGHT SEEING
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NAPA
State: CALIFORNIA




VALLEJO (KPIX 5) — A dozen people had to be rescued from a marsh near Vallejo Sunday morning after the hot air balloon they were riding in was forced to make an unexpected landing.

According to first responders, the pilot of the balloon told them the winds were blowing up to 50 miles per hour during the flight, which was pushing the balloon toward power lines. The pilot landed the balloon in a marsh area near Skaggs Island. When the tides started to rise, a helicopter from CHP Air Ops Golden Gate in Napa was called in to help.

“This balloon had a bright yellow balloon on it, so that stood out pretty well against the brown background it was laying down on,” said CHP helicopter pilot Rich Jones. Officer Jones was the first one to spot the downed hot air balloon and recorded everything he was seeing using the on-board cameras.

“We were able to use our camera system and zoom in and start getting a headcount and we could see everyone was up on their feet and it didn’t appear that anyone was injured,” said Officer Jones.

The balloon came to rest in a marsh area directly across the Napa River from Vallejo. CHP pilots say the balloon captain used his cell phone to talk with emergency dispatchers.

“Luckily we had the details that said no body was injured, so we were able to leave a majority of our medical gear behind so that way we could load more people in,” said Officer Jones.



The balloon pilot, Jeff Spear, did not want to talk with KPIX 5 on camera, but he said he took off from the usual location at Sonoma Skypark at sunrise around 7:00 a.m. He said there were 11 passengers on board.

Spear said half were employees of the balloon company, Sonoma Ballooning Adventures, and the other half were paying customers. He said the plan was to land near the Napa Airport.

“Maybe they got caught up in some wind that they weren’t expecting,” said CHP Officer Rich Jones.

The CHP pilots were able to fly three people out of the marsh at a time, carrying them across the Napa River to nearby Delta Meadows Park in Vallejo, where the passengers were met by waiting paramedics. They said everyone made it out just in time.

“By the time we flew the last three off the island, we were in about ankle deep to about a foot of water at that point, so the tide was definitely coming in, and I’m glad we were able to get to them when we did,” said officer Jones.

The helicopter ride wasn’t supposed to be part of the scenic wine country balloon tour, but pilots said everyone seemed to take it in stride.


“You know we got a lot of ‘thank you’ and taps on the shoulder saying thank you for getting them out of where they were,” said Officer Jones.

Amazingly, no one was injured during the ordeal. A company spokesperson for Sonoma Ballooning Adventures said even though the landing site isn’t normal for them, it wasn’t unsafe in any way for the pilot or passengers.

This is the second time a CHP helicopter has come to the rescue of stranded balloon passengers. The balloon company involved in today’s rescue – Sonoma Ballooning Adventures – is partnered with Balloon Pacific, which also operates Napa Valley Balloons.

On May 17, 2016 a balloon from Napa Valley Balloons made an unexpected landing on a levy near the Napa River with a passengers from a Robert Mondavi wine tour. The same CHP helicopter had to rescue that group as well.

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