Sunday, December 2, 2018

Facing a shortage of aircraft mechanics, North Valley Occupational Center’s Aviation Center is flying high with a new generation of students

Monica Hernandez, 20, and Sugun Ratti, 21, use a propeller protractor to measure a blade angle as aviation instructor Dave Bowerman supervises on November 27, 2018 during LAUSD North Valley Occupational Center Aviation Center’s Aircraft Mechanic School. With more mechanics retiring, opportunities are climbing in the field, especially for women. Both young women are working in the field, Hernandez is working in a clean room on flight hardware at JPL and Ratti is at JetWorx as an apprentice technician.


When she was a senior at Poly High School in Sun Valley, Monica Hernandez knew she didn’t want to go to an expensive college, leaving her and her parents with a financial burden.

So when she heard from a guidance counselor about a career in the trades and a district program that trains students to be aircraft mechanics, Hernandez was interested.

“To be able to say I’m going to be an airplane mechanic, that’s going to be cooler,” she said.

Hernandez, 20, is one of a growing number of young women who are enrolled at North Valley Occupational Center’s Aviation Center at the Van Nuys Airport, part of the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Adult and Career Education program.

The school offers daytime and evening classes for students to prepare for the Federal Aviation Administration licensing exam for airframe and powerplant mechanics. Of the school’s 150 students, about 10 percent are female, according to district figures, higher than the national average for women in the profession — less than 3 percent.

Ed Holyoke, who has taught at the school for five years and attended the school as an adult, said he’s seen a gradual increase in the number of women who have enrolled.

“The industry is more and more realizing that diversity is a plus, not a minus,” Holyoke said. “And that women tend to be meticulous, which in this industry, meticulous is where it’s about.  You have to get it right because lives are at stake.”

Hernandez said being one of a few girls in a program of mostly men and some older men, has challenges. Sometimes the guys question whether she is getting attention from the teacher or a job because she is female. Those types of comments used to bother Hernandez, but she has learned to brush it off.

“It does build a better character, a stronger character, but it’s nothing that should bring you down, not at all, because it is a great industry to work in,” she said.

The school opened in 1973 and appeals to students launching their careers or making a career shift. Classroom instruction is mixed with hands-on experience in a hangar at the site so students can practice on propeller aircraft, helicopters and jets, including a retired Learjet 24 donated by Clay Lacy Aviation.

Clay Lacy, a private jet charter and aircraft management and maintenance provider with a repair station at the Van Nuys Airport, has donated more than $10,000 in scholarships to reduce tuition costs for more than 100 students who attend the Aviation Center. Tuition for full-time students is $1,200 a year.

Scott Cutshall, Clay Lacy’s vice president of brand development, said the company started the scholarship program in 2015 to give back to the community.

“We just feel fortunate to have the school here, so that’s one of the big reasons why we want to support it,” Cutshall said.

Clay Lacy also benefits from having students graduate from the program. The company employs several of the school’s alumni.

“This is here and this is a very unique program,” Cutshall said. “This doesn’t exist, I don’t think, at any other airport that I’m aware of in California where it’s run by a local school district.”

The industry faces a shortage of workers because much of the workforce — 30 percent — is retiring or near retirement, according to the Aviation Technician Education Council.

“We do need more mechanics in our industry, there’s a massive shortage right now,” Cutshall said.

Clay Lacy has 15 open positions for aircraft mechanics and companies all over the industry are hiring, Cutshall said.

Programs like the Aviation Center are unique and many similar programs throughout Southern California have shut down, Ed Mirzakhanian, Clay Lacy’s vice president of maintenance and business development, said.

“For a long time there wasn’t a focus of schools like this to bring a lot of new students through,” Cutshall said.

A starting salary is about $30/hour and there are opportunities to advance. Top pay for technicians is $38 to $42/hour.

Hernandez has a hectic schedule to get work experience while attending school. She has 17-hour days Monday through Friday. She attends school during the day and works at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena in the evenings. She gets about four hours of sleep each night, she said.

Classmate Sugun Ratti, 21, of Northridge, also works and attends the school. She is a technician apprentice at JetWorx at the Van Nuys Airport.

Ratti is planning to go to air traffic control school.

“Once I started working, it just shows you how many opportunities there are, you don’t just want to be a mechanic,” she said.

Hernandez’s ultimate goal is to work in maintenance control in the offices in the maintenance department, but she wants to get experience on the ground first.

“It’s amazing to be a woman and being able to support yourself, always, no matter what you do,” she said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailynews.com

Editorial: New airport going nowhere

Every decade or so, the business leaders of Gainesville approach the business leaders of Ocala looking for help solving a recurring problem: the Gainesville Regional Airport needs more passengers.

The problem is, the Gainesville airport has too few flights going to too few places to attract much of a crowd from Ocala — or Gainesville, for that matter.

Nonetheless, a task force made up of business leaders from the two communities has been meeting over the past couple of months to once again try and figure out how to get more passengers and, hopefully, more flights in and out of the Gainesville airport.

So far, the task force, picked jointly by the Gainesville Chamber of Commerce and the Ocala/Marion County Chamber and Economic Partnership, agrees the Gainesville airport needs more traffic, passengers and planes. They also agree that because Ocala residents have so many other choices — and the Gainesville airport is on the far northeast side of Gainesville — that not much is likely to change given its present location. For Ocala/Marion County residents, it is not that much farther to go to Orlando or Tampa, where they can fly to just about anywhere in the world, and often on a direct flight and, importantly, for lower fares.

An idea the task force has bandied about is building a new airport between Ocala and Gainesville, providing more convenience to Ocala/Marion County residents and hopefully drawing from a wider region. Again, however, some significant challenges come with that idea.

First, there is the price tag, which some estimate would be $400 million and up. Gainesville has spent millions upon millions in recent years improving its existing airport, and some of that money that is still owed.

Then there is the need for Federal Aviation Administration approval, which would be difficult given the number of airport options already available within less than two hours of Ocala. Besides Tampa and Orlando, there is Jacksonville, Daytona, Sanford and St. Petersburg-Clearwater. And even if FAA approval could be obtained, getting carriers to utilize the new airport would be anything but assured, given the relatively small population of the region.

Finally, when they discuss building a new airport in between Gainesville and Ocala, that really means northern Marion County. We just went through a major public controversy when the state suggested building a highway through the area that is home to the county’s horse industry. Imagine the response to a new airport being proposed.

Studying the feasibility of a new airport does no harm and probably will provide valuable data. But we are all but certain what that data will show is a new airport is not feasible and unlikely to come to fruition under the best of circumstances.

If a new regional airport was deemed needed, the Ocala airport makes more sense than building a new one. It has plenty of space, is near Interstate 75, is located in the middle of the Gainesville-Ocala-The Villages population corridor and already has runways capable of landing just about any plane. But then that would not solve Gainesville’s problem.

We appreciate the Gainesville business community inviting Ocala into the discussion about the future of their airport. But from where we sit, this is a Gainesville problem and there is not enough money or passengers or political will to lead to the construction of a new regional airport. It would simply be an unwise, indeed unneeded investment.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ocala.com/opinion

Cessna TU206-G Turbo Stationair 6 II, CC-CXS: Fatal accident occurred November 21, 2018 in Pueblo Lo Barnechea, Santiago, Chile

NTSB Identification: ERA19WA053
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 21, 2018 in Puente Alto, Chile
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Chile has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a CESSNA TU206G airplane that occurred on November 21, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Chile's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Chile.


Un accidente protagonizado por un avión Cessna 206, matrícula CC-CXS, en el sector de El Arrayán, dejó a dos personas muertas.


La información fue entregada por la Dirección General Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC), quien agregó que las víctimas son el piloto de la aeronave y el operador del equipo de Aerofotogrametría, aunque sus identidades aún no han sido dadas a conocer.


El comunicado señala que “lamentablemente tanto el piloto de la aeronave como el operador del equipo de Aerofotogrametría se encuentran fallecidos”.


El avión había despegado desde el aeródromo de Tobalaba y se dirigía a la mina El Teniente, en la región de O’Higgins.


Equipo del Servicio de Búsqueda y Salvamento Aéreo de la FACH se encuentra en el sector en la labor de rescatar los cuerpos, mientras que la DGAC será la encargada de investigar las razones del accidente.

Pilot shortage - Why Iowans should be concerned

Members of the Iowa Public Airports Association

Air service is critically important to each of our state’s key economic drivers. Iowa’s largest employers rank commercial air service in the top three factors influencing expansion and relocation decisions. Recently, major business relocations in other parts of the country have supported what our employers have stated: After nearly a century, Caterpillar moved their corporate headquarters from Peoria, IL to Chicago, citing reliable air service as the top issue affecting the decision. The same story played out with Archer Daniels Midland, which moved from Decatur, IL to Chicago. Chiquita left Cincinnati for Charlotte and Krystal left Chattanooga for Atlanta. A severe lack of qualified pilots is causing a contraction of air service nationwide. Until we reverse that trend, we should expect more employers to chase reliable service.

The aerospace industry is an important part of the Iowa economy and supports thousands of jobs. The Iowa Department of Transportation Office of Aviation identified 25 businesses in which manufacture products or provide services that support the aviation and/or aerospace industries. Combined, these businesses account for over 30,000 jobs, an annual payroll of $2.1 billion, and an annual economic output of $3.9 billion. Without pilots, the airline industry suffers. As the industry declines, so do the thousands of jobs that support it.

By 2026, Iowa’s annual economic loss due to the pilot shortage will top $741 million and 7,000 jobs. The 10-year cumulative loss to Iowa’s economy is $3.9 billion. (Data from “A Man-Made Disaster” by Flight path Economics.)

Why should Iowa be concerned?

The national pilot shortage is a very real threat to air service connectivity for every community in Iowa. Iowa’s air transportation system consists of eight commercial service airports: six non-hub airports and two small hubs — Des Moines (DSM) and Cedar Rapids/Iowa City (CID).

To some extent, every airport in the state will be negatively impacted. In total, 77 percent of Iowa’s air service is on a regional airline. The majority of every airport’s departures is on regional aircraft: 63 percent of Des Moines, 84 percent of Cedar Rapids/Iowa City, and 100 percent of Waterloo, Burlington, Dubuque, Fort Dodge, Mason City, and Sioux City. (Data from the Regional Airline Association.)

Of equal value in Iowa’s aviation system is our General Aviation facilities. These facilities support valuable medical flights, charter flights, and ag aviation operations. All segments of Iowa’s aviation system and, therefore, our communities are feeling the negative economic consequences of the workforce shortage.

Regional airlines are the primary source for new hire pilots for mainline carriers. With Delta, United, Southwest, and American in a hiring frenzy the airlines that provide 77 percent of Iowa’s daily departures are experiencing a critical shortage of pilots.

Industry forecasts predict by 2021, the national system will be short 5,000 pilots. Without the pilots, 500 aircraft will be grounded. The pilot shortage swells to nearly 15,000 by 2026 and nearly 1,500 aircraft — currently flying regular routes — will be parked. This is despite the fact that pay for regional airline pilots is higher than ever. Even as pay increases, so does the shortfall of pilots. Money will not fly the airplane.

What can be done?

There is no silver bullet to solve this problem, but rather a handful of solutions for consideration.

First, the FAA needs to approve additional pathways for pilots to accrue the hours necessary to get licensed. This needs to be done carefully, according to the best available science and technology, and with safety as the top priority. By changing the way we think about training and time building, we can actually improve the quality of our young pilots and the safety of our skies.

Second, we need to make pilot training more accessible. Training is prohibitively expensive and not eligible for traditional student financial aid and education loans. Iowa boasts world-class aviation institutions that would benefit from reforms. Some of these institutions include; University of Dubuque, Indian Hills Community College, Iowa Lakes Community College, and Iowa Western. Additionally, Iowa’s airport system support numerous, often family-owned and operated, flight schools that would also benefit.

Pilot training needs to be modernized and data-driven. The system should move prospective pilots safely and efficiently through their education, not erect arbitrary barriers to entry and completion. Those in the aviation business need to encourage more young people to consider the profession.

More importantly, the entire industry needs to come together and work with government to address the problem. We cannot afford to see this through a competitive lens, pitting airlines, airports, and communities against each other.

What can Iowa do?

Working together, we can make a difference, but this is no time for “Iowa nice.” We need to talk openly and candidly about the economic impact of this growing problem. We need direct involvement from Iowa’s congressional delegation, community development leaders, state and local elected officials and airports. We need more voices. Iowa’s economy demands a strong and robust commercial air service system. The time to act is now. Please contact your elected representatives and urge them to act and help solve the national pilot shortage problem.

• Members of the Iowa Public Airports Association include: Martin Lenss, Eastern Iowa Airport; Kevin Foley, Des Moines International; Mary Baird, Southeast Iowa Regional; Robert Grierson, Dubuque Regional; Rhonda Chambers, Fort Dodge Regional; Keith Kaspari, Waterloo Regional; Pamela Osgood, Mason City Municipal; Mike Collett Sioux, Gateway; David Sims, Mason City Municipal; Michael Tharp, Iowa City Municipal; Mike Roe, Washington Municipal; Greg Gobble, Keokuk Municipal; Don Mensen, Carroll Municipal; Bill Kyle, Northeast Iowa Regional; Ethan Nasalroad Johnson Aviation; Andy Maysent, McClure Engineering; and Iowa Todd Dalsing, Dubuque Regional.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.thegazette.com

Virus SW, N608US: Accident occurred July 30, 2018 at Big Creek Flying Ranch (GA18), Clayton, Georgia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N608US 


Location: Clayton, GA
Accident Number: GAA18CA458
Date & Time: 07/30/2018, 1330 EDT
Registration: N608US
Aircraft: ALLEN W INKS VIRUS SW
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The motor glider pilot reported that, during the approach, about 10 to 20 ft above the ground, the descent rate was higher than normal. He moved his hand from the spoiler to the throttle but before he could apply power to arrest the descent the glider landed hard and bounced. The glider then banked to the left, he added full power, but the left wingtip impacted a hedge and the glider rotated counterclockwise. Subsequently, the glider impacted the ground and came to rest on a dirt embankment.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage and engine mount.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2006
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/31/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 842 hours (Total, all aircraft), 95 hours (Total, this make and model), 763 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 38 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ALLEN W INKS
Registration: N608US
Model/Series: VIRUS SW
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 517 SWN 100 IS
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/02/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1322 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 89.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912IS SPORT
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTOC, 995 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1735 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 159°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3100 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Toccoa, GA (TOC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clayton, GA (GA18)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1245 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: BIG CREEK FLYING RANCH (GA18)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1650 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2800 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Valley/Terrain Following; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.832778, -83.409722 (est)

Beechcraft B300 King Air 350, registered to and operated by Atlantic Transportation of Wilmington LLC, N557AP: Accident occurred August 01, 2018 near Wilmington International Airport (KILM), New Hanover County, North Carolina

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N557AP


Location: Wilmington, NC

Accident Number: GAA18CA475
Date & Time: 08/01/2018, 1800 EDT
Registration: N557AP
Aircraft: Beech B300
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

The pilot reported that, he began the initial approach at the destination airport, about 1,800 to 2,000 ft mean sea level, and the airplane encountered a "widespread circling group of what appeared to be turkey vultures". The right wing struck a bird, and the airplane landed without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/26/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/06/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 5400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1200 hours (Total, this make and model), 4600 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 120 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/08/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/11/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 4700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 330 hours (Total, this make and model), 120 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N557AP
Model/Series: B300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Commuter
Serial Number: FL-879
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 11
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/09/2018, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 15000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 1256 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: P&W Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-60A
Registered Owner: Atlantic Transportation Of Wilmington Ll
Rated Power: 1050 hp
Operator: Atlantic Transportation Of Wilmington Ll
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KILM, 38 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 42°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 12000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Rock Hill, SC (UZA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Wilmington, NC (ILM)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1715 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D; TRSA   

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.226389, -77.944722 (est)

CubCrafters CC18-180, registered to United States Department of the Interior and operated by Bureau of Land Management, N437CC: Accident occurred August 01, 2018 in Fairbanks, Alaska

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
United States Department of the Interior

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N437CC

Location: Fairbanks, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA521
Date & Time: 08/01/2018, 1200 AKD
Registration: N437CC
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS CC18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that he was conducting a public aerial observation flight, during takeoff from an off-airport gravel airstrip, the airplane became airborne quickly. He added that, the airplane settled back on the airstrip in a tail low attitude, but he continued the takeoff. He "did not feel or hear any objects strike or damage the aircraft", and, due to adverse weather conditions, the flight continued to the alternate airport without further incident.

Postflight examination revealed leading edge damage and a hole in the left horizontal stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/05/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/27/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3130 hours (Total, all aircraft), 500 hours (Total, this make and model), 3080 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CUB CRAFTERS
Registration: N437CC
Model/Series: CC18 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: CC18-0059
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/28/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 838.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-C4P
Registered Owner:  U S Department Of The Interior
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Bureau of Land Management
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PACE, 920 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 50 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1956 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 92°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 9000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 11000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.67 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fairbanks, AK (FAI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Fairbanks, AK (FAI)
Type of Clearance: Traffic Advisory; VFR
Departure Time: 0915 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  65.607222, -146.778889 (est)

Van's RV-6A, N56LK: Accident occurred August 04, 2018 at Greeley-Weld County Airport (KGXY), Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


http://registry.faa.gov/N56LK


Location: Greeley, CO
Accident Number: GAA18CA473
Date & Time: 08/04/2018, 1130 MDT
Registration: N56LK
Aircraft: Vans RV6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during approach, he airplane encountered the usual amount of sink, he added power, but applied too much back stick. The airplane aerodynamically stalled, landed hard, and the airplane came to rest 1,500 ft down the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 85, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/30/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6866.4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25.7 hours (Total, this make and model), 6393.6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25.7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N56LK
Model/Series: RV6 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 123
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/01/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1300 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGXY, 4697 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1756 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 49°
Lowest Cloud Condition:  Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Denver, CO (FTG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greeley, CO (GXY)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1050 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: GREELEY-WELD COUNTY (GXY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4696 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5801 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.429722, -104.641389 (est)

PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader, registered to and operated by Jersey Devil Dusters LLC, N851EJ: Accident occurred August 04, 2018 in Dansville, New York

Additional Participating:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


http://registry.faa.gov/N851EJ

Location: Dansville, NY
Accident Number: GAA18CA502
Date & Time: 08/04/2018, 1400 EDT
Registration: N851EJ
Aircraft: WSK PZL MIELEC M-18A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

The pilot reported that he was performing an aerial application flight to a corn field which had a tree line running west to east on the north side of the field and another tree line running north to south on the east end of the field. He was making application passes from east to west and started at the south side of the field progressing northward toward the tree line with each pass. He added that he noticed that the wind speeds increased, to about 10 to 12 mph. During the second to last spray pass, while heading west, he came over the east end tree line and descended to 5 to 10 ft above the crop. About 300 ft into the field, the airplane began to descend rapidly, and he pitched the nose of the airplane up. He added that the descent rate continued, and the airplane began to lose airspeed. The landing gear struck the corn, the airplane impacted terrain and came to rest inverted.

The pilot added that he believed a combination of descending air that rolled over the north line of trees, wind shear, and the low altitude flying, and reduced margin of error for the proper application of pesticide caused the accident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A weather station, located about 3 miles to the northeast of the accident site, about the time of the accident, reported temperature 85.3°F, dew point 68.3°F, and wind from 293° at 6 mph, gusting to 8 mph.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 30, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/23/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1396 hours (Total, all aircraft), 28.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 1339 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 101.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 65.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 7.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: WSK PZL MIELEC
Registration: N851EJ
Model/Series: M-18A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 1Z017-24
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/07/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 10340 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2795.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: WSK-PZL
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: ASZ-62IR-M18
Registered Owner: JERSEY DEVIL DUSTERS LLC
Rated Power: 980 hp
Operator: JERSEY DEVIL DUSTERS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDSV, 662 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1754 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:356° 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4900 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hornell, NY (HTF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hornell, NY (HTF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1345 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.272222, -77.684722 (est)

Tango XR, N454WS: Accident occurred August 06, 2018 at Galion Municipal Airport (KGQQ), Crawford County, Ohio

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N454WS


Location: Mansfield, OH
Accident Number: GAA18CA470
Date & Time: 08/06/2018, 1100 EDT
Registration: N454WS
Aircraft: WALTER C SMYTHE TANGO XR
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced multiple times, he added power to go around, the left wing dropped, and the airplane "veered" left and dropped to the ground. The airplane touched down in the grass to the left of the runway, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/29/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/29/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 217.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 183.1 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5.2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: WALTER C SMYTHE
Registration: N454WS
Model/Series: TANGO XR
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 029
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/01/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 77.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Titan
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IOX370
Registered Owner: Smythe, Walter C.
Rated Power: 205 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMFD, 1312 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1452 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 67°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brunswick, ME (BXM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mansfield, OH (GQQ)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0630 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: GALION MUNI (GQQ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1224 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3504 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.755000, -82.721667 (est)