Friday, August 19, 2016

Piper PA-31-325 Navajo, Atlantic Charters, C-GKWE: Accident occurred August 16, 2014 in Manan, Canada



WorkSafe New Brunswick is suing the Grand Manan charter service, Manan Air Services Inc. and the estate of a deceased pilot, in relation to a plane crash that claimed the life of a pilot and paramedic. 

The lawsuit claims Manan Air Services Inc. and the captain of the flight were negligent. 

Court documents show the lawsuit was filed on Aug. 12, on behalf of the estate of William Dwight Mallock. William (Billy) Mallock, 60, was the paramedic who died in the crash of a Piper PA-31 aircraft along with pilot and co-owner of the flight company, Klaus Sonnenberg.

Documents claim the captain of the airplane, Sonnenberg, commenced flight with a single headset onboard, and the flight took place in weather that obscured visual references needed for landing. 

The fatal plane crash took place in an open field next to the airstrip where the plane should have landed in the early hours of Aug. 16, 2014. Both Sonnenberg and Mallock were residents of Grand Manan.

Court documents filed almost exactly two years after the crash also allege carry-on baggage, equipment and cargo were not restrained on the flight and became "dangerous projectiles in the crash." It also claims Sonnenberg installed the Air Ambulance system without proper training.

None of the allegations have been proven in court. 

The Mallock estate, represented by Mallock's widow Katherine Mallock, is seeking damages for funeral expenses, loss of financial support, loss of future income, loss of available services, loss of parental guidance, and damages for pain and suffering.

Those who filed the lawsuit are not commenting on its filing.

"I spoke to my client about that, that it might be getting some publicity and she asked me not comment," said lawyer Peter MacPhail. "Not right now." 

New Brunswick laws allow WorkSafeNB to pay out benefits and then sue employers to collect money.

Source:  http://www.cbc.ca




Aviation Investigation Report A14A0067:  http://www.tsb.gc.ca

NTSB Identification: CEN14WA531
14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial Manan Air Service
Accident occurred Saturday, August 16, 2014 in Manan, Canada
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 2 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 16, 2014, about 0830 hours universal coordinated time, a Piper PA-31, Canadian registration C-GKWE, impacted terrain during approach for landing at the Grand Manan Airport (CCN2), Manan, New Brunswick, Canada. One pilot and one paramedic were fatally injured; the second pilot and second paramedic sustained minor injuries. The departure airport was not known at the time of the notification. The intended destination was CCN2.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB). This report is for informational purposes and contains only information provided by the government of Canada.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
200 Promenade du Portage
Place du Centre, 4th floor
Gatineau QC K1A 1K8
Canada

Tel: 819-994-3741
Website: http://www.tsb.gc.ca
Email: communications@bst-tsb.gc.ca

Aero Commander SR2 Thrush, N8870Q, registered to Air Care Leasing LLC and operated by Rocky Mountain Ag Inc: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2016 in Center, Colorado

Dusty Claunch, 27

Dusty James Claunch of Monte Vista was born December 13, 1988 to Billy & Elizabeth Claunch. Dusty went to heaven on August 19, 2016 doing on of the many things he loved (crop dusting). Dusty attended and graduated from Monte Vista High School in 2008. He later went on to become an EMT Basic, Deputy Coroner, Deputy Sheriff, farmer and Private and Commercial Pilot. Dusty enjoyed the outdoors, fishing, hunting and anything that kept him around people. His smile, passion for life and high spirits will be remembered by everyone that knew him.

“The greatest accomplishment is not in never falling, but in rising again after you fall.” I believe Dusty Claunch is the true definition of this quote. Dusty accomplished anything and everything he set his mind to; and he set his mind to a lot. Just to name a few he was a combine driver, EMT, Deputy Coroner, Deputy Sheriff, Crop Duster, a Friend, Brother, Son and Grandson. He played each role to the best of his ability. He had a smile that was contagious and a laugh that brightened any room. He was so lovable he could make you smile.

August 19, 2016 will forever be a hard day to handle, but knowing Dusty he would want us to smile and think of him flying in the sky. Dusty was taken from us far too soon, but there wasn’t much that he hadn’t done. He was doing what he loved when God called him home.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 
General Electric Aviation; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8870Q

Location: Center, CO
Accident Number: CEN16FA328
Date & Time: 08/19/2016, 1053 MDT
Registration: N8870Q
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER S2R
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 19, 2016, about 1053 mountain daylight time, an Aero Commander S2R airplane, N8870Q, impacted terrain near Center, Colorado, during a low-level agricultural spray flight. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Air Care Leasing LLC and operated by Rocky Mountain Ag under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (MVI), Monte Vista, Colorado.

A review of the operator's agricultural application records showed that the pilot departed for his first application flight of the day at 0645. The pilot returned to base, waited while the airplane was reloaded with chemical, and departed five additional times, with the last departure about 1025. According to the pilot's cell phone records, the pilot was texting during periods of time coinciding with flight times. During the accident flight, the pilot sent text messages at 1038 and 1039 and sent a picture text message at 1053. Police dispatch records indicated that the initial call to 911 to report the accident was received at 1053.

According to witness statements, the airplane was making spray passes over a field, and the flight appeared to be "normal." One witness reported that the airplane made a turn, "pulled up to the sky," and appeared to "stall at the top of the turn." The airplane "got quiet" and then spiraled toward the ground hitting nose first.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/19/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/15/2014
Flight Time: 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 27, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. According to the pilot's logbook, he had flown about 450 hours between December 4, 2013, and July 26, 2015. Of the 450 hours, 81 hours were in an Aero Commander airplane and 53 of those hours were in the accident airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued May 19, 2016, with no limitations. On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported about 2,000 total hours of flight experience and 600 hours in the prior 6 months. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERO COMMANDER
Registration: N8870Q
Model/Series: S2R UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 1470R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/21/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Walters Engine
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: M601E-11
Registered Owner: AIR CARE LEASING LLC
Rated Power: 740 hp
Operator: ROCKY MOUNTAIN AG INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:
Agricultural Aircraft (137) Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: NBTG 

The 1969- model-year, single-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane was designed for aerial agricultural application flights. It was powered by a Walter Engines model M601E-11 turboprop engine, serial number 894047, and equipped with an Avia V 508E-AG/106/A three-bladed propeller.

The most recent annual inspection was completed on May 21, 2016, at 11,388 hours total airframe time. The most recent 100-hour engine inspection was completed on July 16, 2016, at an hour meter reading of 4,601 hours. Maintenance records indicated that the engine was overhauled at Walter Engines on March 14, 2006. The engine was installed in the airplane on April 6, 2012, at an hour meter reading of 3,685 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALS, 7541 ft msl
Observation Time: 1052 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 157°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 7°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MONTE VISTA, CO (MVI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: MONTE VISTA, CO (MVI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.745000, -106.025833 

The airplane impacted the ground in a wheat field. Examination at the wreckage at accident site exhibited the nose section, fuselage, empennage, and landing gear were consumed by postcrash fire. About 75% of the outboard sections of both wings remained and exhibited impact damage with severe leading edge crushing along their wingspans. Following the on-scene examination, the wreckage was recovered to a secure storage facility.

On September 15, 2016, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge and personnel from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and GE Aviation (the current owner of the Walter M601 type certificate) conducted a layout of the wreckage. Flight control continuity was established from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. The flight controls to the control stick could not be verified due to the extensive thermal damage to the cockpit.

The engine sustained significant impact damage and was separated from the airplane. The engine mounts and mounting ring were separated. The exhaust case and exhaust nozzles were deformed and pressed inward towards the aft end of the engine. The fuel pump, fuel control unit, and starter generator were found separated from the accessory gearbox. The accessory gearbox, fuel pump, and fuel control unit showed signs of postimpact fire.

The fuel filter was removed from the fuel pump. A trace amount of fuel was found inside the fuel pump. Two nonmagnetic, metal, deformed balls were found in the fuel filter cavity. No internal, metallic engine components showed signs of wear, spalling, or deformation that would indicate the metallic balls were from a source internal to the engine. The source of these metallic balls could not be determined.

The engine generator would not rotate. The air breather valve was found in the open condition. The power turbine (PT) blades were separated at the airfoil area, consistent with the engine producing power at impact. The first stage axial compressor blade showed signs of rubbing against the stator, consistent with the engine producing power at impact. The reduction gearbox chip detector was clear of metal chips.

The oil filter was discolored; it appeared dark with small metal debris. According to GE Aviation, the condition of the filter was consistent with normal operation of the engine.

The propeller was impact-separated from the engine propeller shaft; two of the eight propeller attachment bolts were separated with the head portions still in the engine propeller shaft. The other six bolts were found on the engine propeller flange, but the threads were sheared from the bolt shanks. The propeller shaft did not rotate. Two of the three propeller blades were separated at the hub area and bent opposite to the direction of propeller rotation, consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact.

Medical And Pathological Information

The El Paso County Coroner, Colorado Springs, Colorado, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death for the pilot was multiple blunt force injuries, and the manner of death was accident. In addition, the pathologist noted early coronary artery disease with 10% to 25% stenosis in the right coronary artery. No other significant natural disease was identified.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on samples taken from the pilot during the autopsy. The pilot's toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and alcohol; 0.013 ug/ml of diphenhydramine was detected in iliac blood. Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine available over the counter in a number of cold and allergy products. It carries a warning about causing drowsiness, and it is commonly the active ingredient in over-the-counter sleep aids. Its therapeutic range is between 0.0250 and 0.1120 ug/ml, significantly above the amount found in this pilot.

According to the operator's agricultural application records, in the week prior to the accident, the pilot was applying a combination of agricultural spray products that included:

Warrior II - a lambda-cyhalothrin insecticide. (Side effects: minor skin irritation, facial paresthesias.)

Bravo Ultrex - a chlorothalonil fungicide. (Side effects: contact dermatitis, conjunctivitis.)

Bravo Weather Stik - a chlorothalonil fungicide. (Side effects: same as Bravo Ultrex.)

Reglone - diquat herbicide that produces pre-harvest desiccation and defoliation. (Side effects: upper respiratory irritation, fingernail changes, skin irritation, delayed wound healing, nosebleeds. May also cause parkinsonism days after exposure.)

Compradre - contains deposition aid product, drift control agent, antifoaming agent, and a defoaming agent (Side effects: skin irritation.)

Perm-Up - permethrin insecticide (Side effects: stinging, burning, paresthesias, skin irritation.)

Fertilizer finisher ("hot mix")

Hot Mix ingredients from Stone Chemical:

1 Gallon/Acre of 7-25-5

1 Gallon/Acre of Convert 0-0-3

10.66 liquid ounces of Defender 15-0-0

The pilot's family reported that the pilot, on occasions, managed the filling of the airplane's spray tank with chemicals. It is unknown what, if any, personal protective equipment he used on these occasions. According to the operator, on the day of the accident, the pilot did not mix or fill the airplane's spray tank with chemicals. The airplane was not equipped with a ventilation system. There were no reports that the pilot complained of anything or displayed any unusual behavior on the day of the accident.

Tests And Research

The airplane was equipped with a SATLOC M3 system that included a differential GPS receiver and had the capability to record historical information to an internal, compact flash card. The SATLOC M3 was sent to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, in Washington, DC, for readout. However, examination of the device revealed that the unit had sustained severe heat damage that precluded recovery of any data.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA328
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 19, 2016 in Center, CO
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER S2R, registration: N8870Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2016, about 1155 mountain daylight time (MDT), an Aero Commander S2R, N8870Q, impacted terrain near Center, Colorado during an aerial application operation under unknown circumstances. The airplane was destroyed by post-impact fire. The commercial-rated pilot, and sole occupant onboard, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Air Care Leasing LLC and operated by Rocky Mountain Ag under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (KMVI), Monte Vista, Colorado.



CENTER — A Monte Vista man flying a crop duster was killed when the plane went down in a barley field east of town Friday morning.

Dusty Claunch, 27, was pronounced dead at the scene, just south of Colorado 112, said Deputy Alamosa County Coroner Harry Alejo.

Alejo said witnesses reported that the plane stalled briefly upon making a turn and then crashed in the midst of its next pass over the field it was spraying.

The plane broke into flames upon crashing and ignited the barley field.

Alejo said two people pulled Claunch from the wreckage.

The fire was extinguished by fire departments from Center, Mosca and Hooper.

Claunch had spent the summer working as a pilot for a local agricultural company but was scheduled to return to his job as a deputy for the Alamosa County sheriff in the fall, according to a Colorado State Patrol news release.

He had previously worked for the Rio Grande County Sheriff’s office and was also the deputy coroner in that county, Alejo said.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been dispatched to investigate the accident.

Source:   http://www.chieftain.com 



ALAMOSA — A Monte Vista High School graduate died in a crop dusting accident Friday morning after his plane crash landed in a barley field just inside the Alamosa County line off Road 6 East and Highway 112.

The pilot, Dusty Claunch, 27, of Monte Vista, was deceased at the scene. Dusty had worked for Rio Grande Sheriff’s Office for several years and recently started working for Alamosa County Sheriff’s Office. He had taken the summer off to work for a local agricultural company as a pilot but was scheduled to go back with the sheriff’s office this fall.

According to the Colorado State Patrol, the call on the crash came into their dispatch center at 10:53 a.m. The crash landing also sparked a fire in the immediate area. The plane was engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived on scene. The flames from the crash also ignited the barley field that the plane had crashed into. 

Volunteer fire units from Center, Mosca-Hooper responded to the call. A CSP trooper reported the blaze was extinguished within about 15 minutes of arrival.

The Colorado State Patrol was assisted by units from the Alamosa Sheriff's Department, Rio Grande County Sheriff's Department, Saguache Sheriff's Department and the Center Police Department. The FAA and NTSB are enroute to the crash scene to conduct an investigation.

Source:  http://www.montevistajournal.com

Bellanca 17-30A Viking, N9525E: Incident occurred August 19, 2016 at Philip Billard Municipal Airport (KTOP), Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9525E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

Date: 19-AUG-16
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N9525E
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 1730
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TOPEKA
State: Kansas

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH GEAR RETRACTED, TOPEKA, KANSAS.




A single-engine plane made emergency landing Friday afternoon at Phillip Billard Municipal Airport in northeast Topeka.

Emergency crews were called to the airport after the pilot contacted air traffic controllers to report that the plane’s front gear may not be locking. AMR and fire crews from Topeka Fire Department and Forbes Field Airport responded to the scene while the plane circled for at least an hour. Topeka police and the Kansas Highway Patrol blocked off the area around the airport.

Around 2:15 p.m., the plane landed behind a hanger on Runway 18 without its front wheel down. A loud scraping noise could be heard as the plane’s front end skidded across the runway. The plane sustained little visible damage and the pilot looked to be uninjured as he exited the aircraft 


Billard is located on the outskirts of the Oakland area. There are several homes near the airport.

Story and video: http://www.wibwnewsnow.com









A plane leans on its nose as crews investigate after its front wheel failed to lock into place upon landing, causing it to slide to a stop Friday afternoon at Philip Billard Municipal Airport.

After nearly two hours circling the sky above Topeka, a single-engine plane with a damaged front wheel landed safely Friday at Philip Billard Municipal Airport.

The blue-and-white plane touched down on its main back wheels, then tilted forward, loudly scraping its nose down the runway for several yards. The landing at 2:15 p.m. came two hours after emergency personnel were called to the airport on a report of a potential crash landing.

No one was injured in the landing.

After the plane landed, emergency personnel and people in civilian clothes walked around the crashed plane.

While the plane was still in the air, Eric Johnson, director of the Metropolitan Topeka Airport Authority, said the plane was a single-engine Bellanca with damage to its nose wheel. The plane circled while depleting fuel in advance of the landing. Occasionally, the plane would make a series of low passes over the runway. During that time the pilot and others researched possible ways to force the nose wheel down from inside the cockpit.

While the damaged plane was circling, at least four other planes, including a small passenger aircraft and a crop duster, were able to land and take off. In the meantime, a group of people gathered where the Topeka Police Department had blocked access to the airport runway. Some of the bystanders were pilots.

After the plane landed, all three of the engine’s propellers were clearly bent and scarred. Johnson said the damage wasn’t catastrophic, and this type of landing happens from time to time.

“This is really a best-case scenario,” Johnson said of the landing.

Based on the tail number, the plane is a 1976 Bellanca 17-30A with four seats.

A row of fire trucks, including equipment from the Air National Guard, lined a runway at the airport while the plane made passes overhead. More than a dozen Topeka Fire Department firefighters were on hand with personnel from American Medical Response and airport police. Having multiple agencies in place even for a small aircraft is protocol, airport police and fire department chief J.T. O’Grady said.

“That’s why we train together,” he said adding that the operation went smoothly. “Planes can be replaced; people can’t.”

Story and video:   http://cjonline.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Amelia Reid Aviation LLC, N98485: Incident occurred August 18, 2016 in San Jose, Santa Clara County, California

AMELIA REID AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N98485

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

Date: 18-AUG-16
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N98485
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: SAN JOSE
State: California

AIRCRAFT DURING FLIGHT STRUCK A POSSIBLE DRONE, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, INSPECTION REVEALED DAMAGE TO FUSELAGE AND WING, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA.

Cessna 152, R & R Aero Services LLC, N631TK: Accident occurred August 17, 2016 in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

R & R AERO SERVICES LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N631TK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA437

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 17, 2016 in Belle Plaine, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N631TK
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that during the soft field takeoff roll the airplane veered to the right, and she corrected with left rudder. She further reported that once the main landing gear lifted off the runway, she released the back pressure on the yoke and she "started to lose control" of the airplane. The flight instructor reported that after the loss of control the nose of the airplane "dropped to the ground rapidly", and the right wing impacted the ground and the nose landing gear collapsed.


The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and firewall. 

The flight instructor reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses pilots actions after liftoff during short field takeoff's and states in part:

After becoming airborne, the nose should be lowered very gently with the wheels clear of the surface to allow the airplane to accelerate to VY, or VX if obstacles must be cleared. Extreme care must be exercised immediately after the airplane becomes airborne and while it accelerates, to avoid settling back onto the surface. An attempt to climb prematurely or too steeply may cause the airplane to settle back to the surface as a result of losing the benefit of ground effect. An attempt to climb out of ground effect before sufficient climb airspeed is attained may result in the airplane being unable to climb further as the ground effect area is transited, even with full power. Therefore, it is essential that the airplane remain in ground effect until at least VX is reached. This requires feel for the airplane, and a very fine control touch, in order to avoid over-controlling the elevator as required control pressures change with airplane acceleration.

Cessna U206A, N8076Z: Incident occurred August 17, 2016 in Sleetmute, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8076Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA455
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 17, 2016 in Sleetmute, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA U206, registration: N8076Z
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing flare at an unpublished dirt airstrip, he entered a "low level [aerodynamic] stall." He further reported that due to the aerodynamic stall, and a "small rise" on the runway, the airplane touched down hard. During the landing roll, the pilot reported that the fuel "belly tank" installed under the fuselage separated from the airplane and the fuselage sustained substantial damaged. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunction or failure with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's exceedance of the critical angle of attack during the landing flare, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and a hard landing.

NTSB Identification: ANC93LA038
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Sunday, February 28, 1993 in WILLOW, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/30/1994
Aircraft: CESSNA U206A, registration: N8076Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

THE PILOT IN COMMAND WAS TAXIING THE AIRPLANE FOR TAKEOFF AND DID NOT SEE THE DOUBLE SNOW MACHINE TRACKS IN THE SNOW. THE AIRPLANE'S NOSE BOUNCED UP WHEN IT CROSSED THE TRACKS AND THE PILOT PUSHED THE NOSE BACK DOWN. THE NOSE WHEEL SKI TIP DUG INTO THE SOFT SNOW AND THE AIRPLANE'S NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
THE ABRUPT AIRCRAFT HANDLING BY THE PILOT IN COMMAND. FACTORS WERE THE COLLAPSE OF THE NOSE GEAR AND THE SOFT, SNOW COVERED TERRAIN.

On February 28, 1993, at 1800 Alaska standard time, a wheel ski equipped Cessna 206 airplane, N8076Z, registered to and operated by the Pilot in Command, collapsed its nose gear during taxi for takeoff on Kashwitna Lake located near Willow, Alaska. The personal flight, operating under 14 CFR Part 91, had departed Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, and the destination was Kashwitna Lake and return to Elmendorf. A visual flight rules flight plan was in effect and visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The Airline Transport certificated pilot and the one passenger were not injured, and the airplane received substantial damage.

According to the Pilot, he was taxiing at 15 to 20 knots when the airplane taxied over double snow machine tracks. He stated that the tracks were difficult to see. The nose of the airplane came off the ground and when he pushed the nose back on the ground the toe of the nose wheel ski dug into the soft snow, caused the airplane to turn to the right abruptly, and collapsed the nose gear. The airplane nosed up and struck the propeller and left wing on the snow.

Experimental Douglas T4-4K, Draken International Inc., N140EM: Accident occurred August 18, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada

DRAKEN INTERNATIONAL INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N140EM

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA166
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Thursday, August 18, 2016 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: DOUGLAS TA-4K, registration: N140EM
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 18, 2016, about 0739 Pacific daylight time, an experimental Douglas T4-4K, N140EM was destroyed when it collided with the ground following a reported loss of engine power shortly after entering the traffic pattern at Nellis Air Force Base (LSV) Las Vegas, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Draken International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Defense as a public aircraft in support of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a military flight plan was filed for the simulated combat training flight. The local flight originated about 0620. 

According to the pilot, he was the lead airplane of a flight of two, returning to LSV after completion of their area work. He led the formation to the overhead pattern and shortly after the break to downwind, the airplane experienced a loss of engine power. The pilot at first initiated a turn towards the airport; however, he realized that he was unable to make the runway and consequently turned left towards a field and then initiated ejection. The airplane subsequently struck terrain and was consumed by fire.

Examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane came to rest on its right side after breeching a stone wall, about 1 mile north of the approach end of runway 21R. All major components of the airplane were located in the wreckage.

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

============

A Vietnam War-era attack jet operated by a military contractor crashed about a mile from Nellis Air Force Base Thursday, but the pilot ejected and survived with nonlife-threatening injuries, a spokesman for the contractor said.

The aircraft was a Douglas A-4K Skyhawk, one of 10 of the A-4 jets at Nellis used to portray adversaries in Air Force Weapons School and Red Flag air combat exercises, said Scott Poteet, director of business development for U.S. Air Force Programs for the contractor, Draken International.

He said the jet that crashed at 7:40 a.m. was returning along with another A-4 from a weapons school mission over the Nevada Test and Training Range north of the Las Vegas Valley.

The jet that crashed had made its initial approach to the base prior to landing, he said, and was flying toward the Las Vegas Motor Speedway when it went down near North Sloan Lane and East Ann Road, north of the base.

Poteet said witnesses saw two parachutes even though the pilot was the only person in the aircraft. First responders transported the pilot, whom he declilned to identify, to the base’s medical center, where he was treated for minor injuries.

“All these pilots are highly trained. We’re all former Air Force, Marine and Navy fighter pilots that have extensive experience. In fact, he is one of the most experienced pilots in our squadron,” said Poteet, himself a former pilot with the Thunderbirds air demonstration team at Nellis.

During the Vietnam War, A-4 Skyhawks were flown primarily by the Navy.

Poteet said there were no munitions on the aircraft.

Nellis spokeswoman Lea Green said the crash site is a privately owned, mostly vacant lot. The aircraft impacted a cinder block wall, causing a portion of it to tumble down, she said.

Poteet wouldn’t speculate on the cause of the accident or whether the company’s A-4 fleet will be grounded.

“It’s obviously up to the Nellis leadership and Draken leadership as far as what measures we’re going to take at this point,” he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board and U.S. Air Force Accident Investigation Board are conducting a joint probe to determine what caused the accident.

A Nellis statement said the crash site “is contained and the aircraft poses no threat to the community or natural resources.”

“Thankfully there were no injuries on the ground,” it said.

Metropolitan and North Las Vegas police were among the local agencies responding to the crash site.

The last military aircraft accident in Southern Nevada was June 7 when an unmanned MQ-9 Reaper drone from Creech Air Force Base crashed during a training mission 20 miles northwest of the 215 Beltway.

The last fatal crash involving an aircraft out of Nellis Air Force Base was June 28, 2011, when Capt. Eric Ziegler was killed when his F-16C crashed on public land near the test and training range.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.reviewjournal.com

Thrush S2R-T660, registered to Arnt Aerial Spraying Inc and operated by the company, N40499: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2016 in Ruthton, Pipestone County, Minnesota

James Robert Arnt 
February 18, 1948 - August 19, 2016


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Ruthton, MN
Accident Number: CEN16LA326
Date & Time: 08/19/2016, 0807 CDT
Registration: N40499
Aircraft: THRUSH AIRCRAFT INC S2R T660
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 19, 2016, at 0807 central daylight time, a Thrush S2R-T660 agricultural airplane, N40499, was destroyed when it impacted a tower guy-wire and the ground during aerial spraying operations near Ruthton, Minnesota. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Arnt Aerial Spraying, Inc., and it was operated by the company under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight originated from Worthington Municipal Airport (OTG), Worthington, Minnesota, at 0651.

A Satloc agricultural aerial guidance system that included a GPS receiver was installed on the airplane. Review of the downloaded flight track data from the Satloc system showed that the airplane departed OTG, flew about 50 miles to the northwest, and sprayed a field about 1.5 miles west of the accident site. At 0749, the airplane flew from the first field to the field where the accident occurred. The airplane made 16 spray passes over that field in a north-south direction using a race-track type pattern. Several of those passes were near a tower located near the southwest corner of the field. During three of the passes to the north, the airplane passed over the tower before descending into the field. After the 16th pass, which was conducted on a northerly heading, the airplane made a 270° right turn to a westerly heading for a perimeter spray pass along the northern border of the field. After completing the perimeter pass, the airplane began a left turn. The final data point was recorded at 0807:48 and showed the airplane located about 0.75 mile and 300° from the accident site. The tower that was struck was located about 600 ft. west of the accident site. The final recorded location and flight path were consistent with a turn for a perimeter pass along the south border of the field.

The manufacturer reported that the Satloc unit buffered data before saving the data to non-volatile memory and that the amount of buffered data depends on the update rate and the available memory.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/26/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/08/2015
Flight Time:  16791 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot, age 68, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with an airplane single-engine rating. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued on April 26, 2016, with a limitation to wear corrective lenses when exercising the privileges of his airman certificate.

The pilot's logbook was reviewed; he did not record each individual flight, and no entries for 2016 were recorded. The most recent logbook entry had a note "2015 spray season" and listed 16,791 hours total flight experience. This was the same flight experience that the pilot reported at the time of his most recent medical examination. Records indicated that the pilot's most recent flight review was conducted on April 8, 2015. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: THRUSH AIRCRAFT INC
Registration: N40499
Model/Series: S2R T660 T660
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2005
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: T660-113
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time:  4042 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-65AG
Registered Owner: ARNT AERIAL SPRAYING INC
Rated Power: 1300 hp
Operator: ARNT AERIAL APPLICATION
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: PUJG

The 2005-model-year airplane, serial number T660-113, had fixed conventional (tailwheel) landing gear, provisions for one occupant, and was intended for use as an agricultural spray platform. It was powered by a 1,220-horsepower Pratt & Whitney PT6A-65AG turboprop engine, serial number PCE32627, driving a 5-blade, constant-speed Hartzell HC-B5MP-3F propeller, serial number EVA2873.

The airplane maintenance records indicated that the most recent annual inspection was completed on April 12, 2016, at an airframe total time of 4,042 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PQN, 1736 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1301 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 215°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2400 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 2 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Worthington, MN (OTG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Worthington, MN (OTG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0651 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

At 0901, the weather conditions recorded at Pipestone Municipal Airport, Pipestone, Minnesota, located about 16 miles southwest of the accident site, included wind from 290° at 2 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 2,400 ft above ground level (agl), overcast clouds at 3,400 ft agl, temperature 19°C, dew point 18°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.69 inches of mercury.

According to data from the U.S. Naval Observatory's Astronomical Applications Department, at 0810, the sun was 16.3° above the horizon and 88.1° east of north. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 44.217222, -96.077222 

The airplane came to rest facing east in a nose-down attitude about 600 ft east of a tower that was estimated to be about 200 ft tall. The tail section of the airplane was completely separated and was located near the main wreckage. The flight control cables within the tail section had separated, and the breaks were consistent with overload failures. The wings remained attached to the fuselage. The left aileron remained attached to the left wing. The right aileron was separated from the wing and was located near the main wreckage. A portion of a tower guy-wire cable was found wrapped around the right wing. The cable portion started about 3 ft from the wing root and extended along the wing's bottom surface to about 7 ft from the wing root where it wrapped around the wing leading edge. The cable loosely wrapped back over the wing trailing edge and under the fuselage. An 8-ft section of the tower, with guy-wire cables still attached, was found about 30 to 40 ft east of the airplane.

The propeller assembly separated and was located about 400 ft and 120° from the main wreckage. Four propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, and one blade had separated. The separated blade was found about 370 ft and 310° from the main wreckage about 6 weeks after the accident by the farmer during crop harvesting. Several of the blades that remained attached to the hub exhibited leading edge scratching and scoring consistent with impact with a foreign object during rotation. The separated blade recovered by the farmer was damaged by farm equipment during crop harvesting.

Examination of the airplane did not reveal any anomalies that could be attributed to a preimpact mechanical deficiency. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The pilot had reported a history of hypertension to the FAA and on his last medical certificate application reported using a combination of amlodipine and benazepril for treatment. Both of these blood pressure medications are not considered impairing. No significant abnormalities were identified during his physical exam.

The Ramsey County Medical Examiner, Saint Paul, Minnesota, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The pilot's death was attributed to multiple traumatic injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing that was negative for all tested-for substances. The lab was unable to test for any evidence of exposure to the pesticide agents being sprayed by the pilot at the time of the crash, which were lambda cyhalothrin and chloryrifos. 

Tests And Research

The tower location did not appear in the FAA Digital Obstacle File, nor was it depicted on the Omaha Sectional Aeronautical Chart that included the accident site location. The tower location was within the bounds of a windmill farm depicted on the Omaha Sectional Chart. The windmill farm was listed as having a top elevation of 2,380 ft above mean sea level (msl); the ground elevation at the accident site was about 1,900 ft msl.

Title 14 CFR Part 77, titled "Safe, Efficient Use, and Preservation of the Navigable Airspace," specifies the following information.

The requirements to provide notice to the FAA of certain proposed construction or the alteration of existing structures.
The standards used to determine obstructions to air navigation and navigational and communication facilities,
The process for aeronautical studies of obstructions to air navigation or navigational facilities to determine the effect on the safe and efficient use of navigable airspace, air navigation facilities, or equipment.
The process to petition the FAA for discretionary review of determinations, revisions, and extensions of determinations.
Title 14 CFR 77.9, "Construction or alteration requiring notice," states that any construction or alteration of a structure that is more than 200 ft agl requires notification of the FAA.

Title 14 CFR 77.17, "Obstruction Standards," stipulates the standards used to determine if an object is an obstruction to air navigation. The criteria used for determination includes a height of more than 499 ft agl in general or a height of 200 ft agl or more if within 3 miles of an airport.

The accident tower height was estimated to be about 200 ft agl, but the exact height was not determined during the investigation. There were no airports within 3 miles of the accident site.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA326
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 19, 2016 in Ruthton, MN
Aircraft: THRUSH AIRCRAFT INC S2R T660, registration: N40499
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2016, about 0810 central daylight time, a Thrush model S2R-T660 agricultural airplane, N40499, was destroyed when it impacted a tower guy wire and the ground during spraying operations near Ruthton, Minnesota. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Arnt Aerial Spraying, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from an unconfirmed location at an unconfirmed time.



Jim Arnt was born to Henrietta and James Arnt on February 18, 1948 in Tracy, MN. He graduated from Tracy High School in 1966 and enlisted in the United States Navy. After discharging from the Navy in 1969 for family reasons, Jim began flight training in Tracy, MN. He continued as a flight instructor and moved to Florida to learn more about aerial spraying. In 1972, Jim founded Arnt Aerial Spraying in Worthington, MN with the help of his dear friend, Bill Miller. Pat Uttech was united with Jim in marriage on May 28, 1995 at St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Worthington, MN. His business prospered for 44 years until he passed away on August 19, 2016 at the age of 68. Over the years, Jim logged over 16,000 hours of flight. Jim was an active member of St. Matthew Lutheran church where he served as an elder for many years. Jim devoted his life to his family and treasured flying for over 45 years.

Many who met Jim witnessed his integrity and honesty. In every avenue of his life, he daily asked God for wisdom and strength to make the right choices for his business and family. He was truly a gift from God. He always was positive that God was his copilot and took control many times to watch over him. Now, we can be assured the two best pilots are flying high together in heaven. We are selfish and want his physical body here on earth but his spirit has written on all our hearts and we take that and make this world a better place by his request. May all glory be given to God for his wonderful life and may God rest his soul in eternity forever. Blessed be his memory. Amen.

Grateful for having shared his life with him are his mother, Henrietta Arnt of Tracy, MN; his wife, Pat Arnt of Worthington, MN; 6 children, Brittany Baerenwald of Colorado Springs, CO, Tabitha Baerenwald of Fulda, MN, Jessica, JR, Autumn and Faith Arnt of Worthington, MN; his granddaughter, Violet; his 6 sisters Lynn (Gene) Teufert, JoAnn (Ed) Assad, Barb Arnt, Ellen (Paul) Malone, Ann (Darriel) Boerboom, Loretta (Harry) Algyer and his one brother Jay (Jeanine) Arnt.
He was preceded in death by his father, James Arnt, brother, Jon Arnt and sister, Jean Arnt.

Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 at St. Matthew Lutheran Church with Pastor Mark Schreiber officiating. Burial with military honors will be at the Worthington Cemetery. Casket bearers are Jay Arnt, Paul Malone, Darriel Boerboom, Harry Algyer, Ed Assad and John Penning. Honorary casket bearers are Bill Miller and Gene Teufert.

Visitation will be from 5-8 p.m. on Monday, August 22, 2016 at the Benson Funeral Home in Worthington and will continue from 9:30-10:30 a.m. on Tuesday at St. Matthew Lutheran Church.


https://www.bensonfh.com



Pipestone, Minn. -  Friday morning officials responded to a report that a plane had crashed near Ruthon, Minnesota, or around 20 miles northeast of Pipestone, Minnesota. Upon arriving on scene they found the plane as well as the deceased body of the pilot, 68 year old James Arnt.

The call of the plane crash came in at 8:11am and responders from Pipestone County Sheriffs Office, Ruthton Fire Department, Ruthton First Responders, Pipestone County Ambulance, Tyler Ambulance, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Pipestone County Emergency Management, Sanford Air Care and Minnesota State Patrol all arrived on scene.

The plane crashed near the corner of 231st Street and 130th Avenue roughly 20 miles northeast of Pipestone after the pilots plane hit a wind monitoring tower for nearby wind turbines.

231st Street has been closed off since this morning as investigators from the Pipestone County Sheriff's Office as well as the FAA continue to investigate the scene. In addition, crews from Xcel Energy and NextEra Energy were on scene as well.

Arnt's sister was at the scene Friday afternoon. She wished to remain off camera due to the nature of the incident but spoke to KDLT News about her brother James. She said that she, along with James, come from a family of 10 siblings with James being the third to have passed. 

Arnt's sister said that James was a farmer but also was an avid pilot and had been flying planes since the 1970s and was planning on stopping flying later this year due to his age while his son, who recently got his aviation license, takes over. She also said that James was a Vietnam War Veteran would was able to come home on a Hardship Discharge to take care of their father would had cancer at the time.

The investigation will be handed over to the FAA, there's no date on when a full assessment of the crash will be released, says Pipestone County Sheriff Keith Vreeman.


Story and video:  http://m.kdlt.com

RUTHTON, MN- Chief Deputy Mike Hamann with the Pipestone County Sheriff's office confirms that a 68-year-old man died in a plane crash Friday morning around 8:00 AM. It happened in a rural part of Ruthton, Minnesota in Pipestone County.

Chief Deputy Hamann said when first responders arrived on the scene, they found that a single passenger agricultural spray plane struck a guy line structured radio tower. The plane and tower were severely damaged.

The pilot of the plane, James Arnt from Worthington MN, was pronounced dead at the scene. The crash is now under investigation by the FAA and the NTSB. The Chief Deputy says more information will be released as it becomes available to them.

Source:   http://www.ksfy.com


RUTHTON -- The Pipestone County Sheriff's Office has released the name of the pilot killed in a Friday morning plane crash of a crop duster in rural Pipestone County.

James Arnt of Worthington was the pilot and lone occupant of the crop dusting plane.

RUTHTON -- The Pipestone County Sheriff's office reports a 68-year-old male has died at the scene of a plane crash in rural Pipestone County.

The sheriff's office was notified at 8:11 a.m. today of a single passenger agricultural spray plane that had crashed in Fountain Prairie Township Section 1. Upon arrival, responders found the plane had struck a guy-line structured radio tower. The pilot was deceased at the scene and the airplane and the tower sustained severe damage.

Assisting at the scene were the Ruthton Fire Department, Ruthton First Responders, Pipestone County Ambulance, Tyler Ambulance, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Pipestone County Emergency Management, Sanford Air Care and the Minnesota State Patrol.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are responding to the scene to assist in the investigation. 

Source:   http://www.dglobe.com




RUTHTON, Minn. - A plane crash five miles west of Ruthton, Minn. kills the pilot after hitting a guide wire on a wind metering tower.

Chief Deputy Mike Hamann with the Pipestone County Sheriff's Office says that responders were called to the scene  at 8:11 a.m. Friday after the crop dusting plane crashed into a bean field.

The pilot, 68-year-old James Arnt of Worthington, Minn. was pronounced dead at the scene.


Source:   http://www.kdlt.com




Pipestone County -- Authorities say the plane clipped a tower used by the local power company to measure wind.

Crews in southwest Minnesota are responding to a reported plane crash near Ruthton.

The Pipestone County Sheriff's Office said a crop-dusting plane crashed Friday morning in the northern area of the county. The plane was found near 231st Street and 130th Avenue, west of Ruthton and south of Lake Benton.

Officials say the pilot, 68-year-old James Arnt of Worthington, MN, clipped guide wire near a tower used by a local power company and crashed into a field. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are helping in the investigation.