Friday, August 19, 2016

Piper PA-31-325 Navajo, Atlantic Charters, C-GKWE: Accident occurred August 16, 2014 in Manan, Canada



WorkSafe New Brunswick is suing the Grand Manan charter service, Manan Air Services Inc. and the estate of a deceased pilot, in relation to a plane crash that claimed the life of a pilot and paramedic. 

The lawsuit claims Manan Air Services Inc. and the captain of the flight were negligent. 

Court documents show the lawsuit was filed on Aug. 12, on behalf of the estate of William Dwight Mallock. William (Billy) Mallock, 60, was the paramedic who died in the crash of a Piper PA-31 aircraft along with pilot and co-owner of the flight company, Klaus Sonnenberg.

Documents claim the captain of the airplane, Sonnenberg, commenced flight with a single headset onboard, and the flight took place in weather that obscured visual references needed for landing. 

The fatal plane crash took place in an open field next to the airstrip where the plane should have landed in the early hours of Aug. 16, 2014. Both Sonnenberg and Mallock were residents of Grand Manan.

Court documents filed almost exactly two years after the crash also allege carry-on baggage, equipment and cargo were not restrained on the flight and became "dangerous projectiles in the crash." It also claims Sonnenberg installed the Air Ambulance system without proper training.

None of the allegations have been proven in court. 

The Mallock estate, represented by Mallock's widow Katherine Mallock, is seeking damages for funeral expenses, loss of financial support, loss of future income, loss of available services, loss of parental guidance, and damages for pain and suffering.

Those who filed the lawsuit are not commenting on its filing.

"I spoke to my client about that, that it might be getting some publicity and she asked me not comment," said lawyer Peter MacPhail. "Not right now." 

New Brunswick laws allow WorkSafeNB to pay out benefits and then sue employers to collect money.

Source:  http://www.cbc.ca




Aviation Investigation Report A14A0067:  http://www.tsb.gc.ca

NTSB Identification: CEN14WA531
14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial Manan Air Service
Accident occurred Saturday, August 16, 2014 in Manan, Canada
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 2 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 16, 2014, about 0830 hours universal coordinated time, a Piper PA-31, Canadian registration C-GKWE, impacted terrain during approach for landing at the Grand Manan Airport (CCN2), Manan, New Brunswick, Canada. One pilot and one paramedic were fatally injured; the second pilot and second paramedic sustained minor injuries. The departure airport was not known at the time of the notification. The intended destination was CCN2.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB). This report is for informational purposes and contains only information provided by the government of Canada.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
200 Promenade du Portage
Place du Centre, 4th floor
Gatineau QC K1A 1K8
Canada

Tel: 819-994-3741
Website: http://www.tsb.gc.ca
Email: communications@bst-tsb.gc.ca

Aero Commander SR2 Thrush, N8870Q, Air Care Leasing LLC: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2016 in Alamosa, Alamosa County, Colorado -and- incident occurred June 30, 2016 in Alamosa County, Colorado

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA328
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 19, 2016 in Center, CO
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER S2R, registration: N8870Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2016, about 1155 mountain daylight time (MDT), an Aero Commander S2R, N8870Q, impacted terrain near Center, Colorado during an aerial application operation under unknown circumstances. The airplane was destroyed by post-impact fire. The commercial-rated pilot, and sole occupant onboard, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Air Care Leasing LLC and operated by Rocky Mountain Ag under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (KMVI), Monte Vista, Colorado.

AIR CARE LEASING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8870Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Date: 19-AUG-16
Time: 16:53:00Z
Regis#: N8870Q
Aircraft Make: AYRES
Aircraft Model: S2R
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Destroyed
Activity: Aerial Application
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ALAMOSA
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT, AERO COMMANDER S2R, DURING AERIAL APPLICATION, CRASHED INTO A FIELD AND CAUGHT FIRE, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, NEAR ALAMOSA, COLORADO   

Date: 30-JUN-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N8870Q
Aircraft Make: PITTS
Aircraft Model: S2
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALAMOSA
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT MADE AN EMERGENCY LANDING IN A FIELD. ALAMOSA, COLORADO.
Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


CENTER — A Monte Vista man flying a crop duster was killed when the plane went down in a barley field east of town Friday morning.

Dusty Claunch, 27, was pronounced dead at the scene, just south of Colorado 112, said Deputy Alamosa County Coroner Harry Alejo.

Alejo said witnesses reported that the plane stalled briefly upon making a turn and then crashed in the midst of its next pass over the field it was spraying.

The plane broke into flames upon crashing and ignited the barley field.

Alejo said two people pulled Claunch from the wreckage.

The fire was extinguished by fire departments from Center, Mosca and Hooper.

Claunch had spent the summer working as a pilot for a local agricultural company but was scheduled to return to his job as a deputy for the Alamosa County sheriff in the fall, according to a Colorado State Patrol news release.

He had previously worked for the Rio Grande County Sheriff’s office and was also the deputy coroner in that county, Alejo said.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been dispatched to investigate the accident.

Source:   http://www.chieftain.com 



ALAMOSA — A Monte Vista High School graduate died in a crop dusting accident Friday morning after his plane crash landed in a barley field just inside the Alamosa County line off Road 6 East and Highway 112.

The pilot, Dusty Claunch, 27, of Monte Vista, was deceased at the scene. Dusty had worked for Rio Grande Sheriff’s Office for several years and recently started working for Alamosa County Sheriff’s Office. He had taken the summer off to work for a local agricultural company as a pilot but was scheduled to go back with the sheriff’s office this fall.

According to the Colorado State Patrol, the call on the crash came into their dispatch center at 10:53 a.m. The crash landing also sparked a fire in the immediate area. The plane was engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived on scene. The flames from the crash also ignited the barley field that the plane had crashed into. 

Volunteer fire units from Center, Mosca-Hooper responded to the call. A CSP trooper reported the blaze was extinguished within about 15 minutes of arrival.

The Colorado State Patrol was assisted by units from the Alamosa Sheriff's Department, Rio Grande County Sheriff's Department, Saguache Sheriff's Department and the Center Police Department. The FAA and NTSB are enroute to the crash scene to conduct an investigation.

Source:  http://www.montevistajournal.com

Bellanca 17-30A Viking, N9525E: Incident occurred August 19, 2016 at Philip Billard Municipal Airport (KTOP), Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9525E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

Date: 19-AUG-16
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N9525E
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 1730
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TOPEKA
State: Kansas

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH GEAR RETRACTED, TOPEKA, KANSAS.




A single-engine plane made emergency landing Friday afternoon at Phillip Billard Municipal Airport in northeast Topeka.

Emergency crews were called to the airport after the pilot contacted air traffic controllers to report that the plane’s front gear may not be locking. AMR and fire crews from Topeka Fire Department and Forbes Field Airport responded to the scene while the plane circled for at least an hour. Topeka police and the Kansas Highway Patrol blocked off the area around the airport.

Around 2:15 p.m., the plane landed behind a hanger on Runway 18 without its front wheel down. A loud scraping noise could be heard as the plane’s front end skidded across the runway. The plane sustained little visible damage and the pilot looked to be uninjured as he exited the aircraft 


Billard is located on the outskirts of the Oakland area. There are several homes near the airport.

Story and video: http://www.wibwnewsnow.com









A plane leans on its nose as crews investigate after its front wheel failed to lock into place upon landing, causing it to slide to a stop Friday afternoon at Philip Billard Municipal Airport.

After nearly two hours circling the sky above Topeka, a single-engine plane with a damaged front wheel landed safely Friday at Philip Billard Municipal Airport.

The blue-and-white plane touched down on its main back wheels, then tilted forward, loudly scraping its nose down the runway for several yards. The landing at 2:15 p.m. came two hours after emergency personnel were called to the airport on a report of a potential crash landing.

No one was injured in the landing.

After the plane landed, emergency personnel and people in civilian clothes walked around the crashed plane.

While the plane was still in the air, Eric Johnson, director of the Metropolitan Topeka Airport Authority, said the plane was a single-engine Bellanca with damage to its nose wheel. The plane circled while depleting fuel in advance of the landing. Occasionally, the plane would make a series of low passes over the runway. During that time the pilot and others researched possible ways to force the nose wheel down from inside the cockpit.

While the damaged plane was circling, at least four other planes, including a small passenger aircraft and a crop duster, were able to land and take off. In the meantime, a group of people gathered where the Topeka Police Department had blocked access to the airport runway. Some of the bystanders were pilots.

After the plane landed, all three of the engine’s propellers were clearly bent and scarred. Johnson said the damage wasn’t catastrophic, and this type of landing happens from time to time.

“This is really a best-case scenario,” Johnson said of the landing.

Based on the tail number, the plane is a 1976 Bellanca 17-30A with four seats.

A row of fire trucks, including equipment from the Air National Guard, lined a runway at the airport while the plane made passes overhead. More than a dozen Topeka Fire Department firefighters were on hand with personnel from American Medical Response and airport police. Having multiple agencies in place even for a small aircraft is protocol, airport police and fire department chief J.T. O’Grady said.

“That’s why we train together,” he said adding that the operation went smoothly. “Planes can be replaced; people can’t.”

Story and video:   http://cjonline.com

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Amelia Reid Aviation LLC, N98485: Incident occurred August 18, 2016 in San Jose, Santa Clara County, California

AMELIA REID AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N98485

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

Date: 18-AUG-16
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N98485
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: SAN JOSE
State: California

AIRCRAFT DURING FLIGHT STRUCK A POSSIBLE DRONE, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, INSPECTION REVEALED DAMAGE TO FUSELAGE AND WING, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA.

Cessna 152, R & R Aero Services LLC, N631TK: Accident occurred August 17, 2016 in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

R & R AERO SERVICES LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N631TK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA437

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 17, 2016 in Belle Plaine, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N631TK
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that during the soft field takeoff roll the airplane veered to the right, and she corrected with left rudder. She further reported that once the main landing gear lifted off the runway, she released the back pressure on the yoke and she "started to lose control" of the airplane. The flight instructor reported that after the loss of control the nose of the airplane "dropped to the ground rapidly", and the right wing impacted the ground and the nose landing gear collapsed.


The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and firewall. 

The flight instructor reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses pilots actions after liftoff during short field takeoff's and states in part:

After becoming airborne, the nose should be lowered very gently with the wheels clear of the surface to allow the airplane to accelerate to VY, or VX if obstacles must be cleared. Extreme care must be exercised immediately after the airplane becomes airborne and while it accelerates, to avoid settling back onto the surface. An attempt to climb prematurely or too steeply may cause the airplane to settle back to the surface as a result of losing the benefit of ground effect. An attempt to climb out of ground effect before sufficient climb airspeed is attained may result in the airplane being unable to climb further as the ground effect area is transited, even with full power. Therefore, it is essential that the airplane remain in ground effect until at least VX is reached. This requires feel for the airplane, and a very fine control touch, in order to avoid over-controlling the elevator as required control pressures change with airplane acceleration.

Cessna U206A, N8076Z: Incident occurred August 17, 2016 in Sleetmute, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8076Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA455
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 17, 2016 in Sleetmute, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA U206, registration: N8076Z
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing flare at an unpublished dirt airstrip, he entered a "low level [aerodynamic] stall." He further reported that due to the aerodynamic stall, and a "small rise" on the runway, the airplane touched down hard. During the landing roll, the pilot reported that the fuel "belly tank" installed under the fuselage separated from the airplane and the fuselage sustained substantial damaged. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunction or failure with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's exceedance of the critical angle of attack during the landing flare, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and a hard landing.

NTSB Identification: ANC93LA038
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Sunday, February 28, 1993 in WILLOW, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/30/1994
Aircraft: CESSNA U206A, registration: N8076Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

THE PILOT IN COMMAND WAS TAXIING THE AIRPLANE FOR TAKEOFF AND DID NOT SEE THE DOUBLE SNOW MACHINE TRACKS IN THE SNOW. THE AIRPLANE'S NOSE BOUNCED UP WHEN IT CROSSED THE TRACKS AND THE PILOT PUSHED THE NOSE BACK DOWN. THE NOSE WHEEL SKI TIP DUG INTO THE SOFT SNOW AND THE AIRPLANE'S NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
THE ABRUPT AIRCRAFT HANDLING BY THE PILOT IN COMMAND. FACTORS WERE THE COLLAPSE OF THE NOSE GEAR AND THE SOFT, SNOW COVERED TERRAIN.

On February 28, 1993, at 1800 Alaska standard time, a wheel ski equipped Cessna 206 airplane, N8076Z, registered to and operated by the Pilot in Command, collapsed its nose gear during taxi for takeoff on Kashwitna Lake located near Willow, Alaska. The personal flight, operating under 14 CFR Part 91, had departed Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, and the destination was Kashwitna Lake and return to Elmendorf. A visual flight rules flight plan was in effect and visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The Airline Transport certificated pilot and the one passenger were not injured, and the airplane received substantial damage.

According to the Pilot, he was taxiing at 15 to 20 knots when the airplane taxied over double snow machine tracks. He stated that the tracks were difficult to see. The nose of the airplane came off the ground and when he pushed the nose back on the ground the toe of the nose wheel ski dug into the soft snow, caused the airplane to turn to the right abruptly, and collapsed the nose gear. The airplane nosed up and struck the propeller and left wing on the snow.

Experimental Douglas T4-4K, Draken International Inc., N140EM: Accident occurred August 18, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada

DRAKEN INTERNATIONAL INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N140EM

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA166
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Thursday, August 18, 2016 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: DOUGLAS TA-4K, registration: N140EM
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 18, 2016, about 0739 Pacific daylight time, an experimental Douglas T4-4K, N140EM was destroyed when it collided with the ground following a reported loss of engine power shortly after entering the traffic pattern at Nellis Air Force Base (LSV) Las Vegas, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Draken International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Defense as a public aircraft in support of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a military flight plan was filed for the simulated combat training flight. The local flight originated about 0620. 

According to the pilot, he was the lead airplane of a flight of two, returning to LSV after completion of their area work. He led the formation to the overhead pattern and shortly after the break to downwind, the airplane experienced a loss of engine power. The pilot at first initiated a turn towards the airport; however, he realized that he was unable to make the runway and consequently turned left towards a field and then initiated ejection. The airplane subsequently struck terrain and was consumed by fire.

Examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane came to rest on its right side after breeching a stone wall, about 1 mile north of the approach end of runway 21R. All major components of the airplane were located in the wreckage.

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

============

A Vietnam War-era attack jet operated by a military contractor crashed about a mile from Nellis Air Force Base Thursday, but the pilot ejected and survived with nonlife-threatening injuries, a spokesman for the contractor said.

The aircraft was a Douglas A-4K Skyhawk, one of 10 of the A-4 jets at Nellis used to portray adversaries in Air Force Weapons School and Red Flag air combat exercises, said Scott Poteet, director of business development for U.S. Air Force Programs for the contractor, Draken International.

He said the jet that crashed at 7:40 a.m. was returning along with another A-4 from a weapons school mission over the Nevada Test and Training Range north of the Las Vegas Valley.

The jet that crashed had made its initial approach to the base prior to landing, he said, and was flying toward the Las Vegas Motor Speedway when it went down near North Sloan Lane and East Ann Road, north of the base.

Poteet said witnesses saw two parachutes even though the pilot was the only person in the aircraft. First responders transported the pilot, whom he declilned to identify, to the base’s medical center, where he was treated for minor injuries.

“All these pilots are highly trained. We’re all former Air Force, Marine and Navy fighter pilots that have extensive experience. In fact, he is one of the most experienced pilots in our squadron,” said Poteet, himself a former pilot with the Thunderbirds air demonstration team at Nellis.

During the Vietnam War, A-4 Skyhawks were flown primarily by the Navy.

Poteet said there were no munitions on the aircraft.

Nellis spokeswoman Lea Green said the crash site is a privately owned, mostly vacant lot. The aircraft impacted a cinder block wall, causing a portion of it to tumble down, she said.

Poteet wouldn’t speculate on the cause of the accident or whether the company’s A-4 fleet will be grounded.

“It’s obviously up to the Nellis leadership and Draken leadership as far as what measures we’re going to take at this point,” he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board and U.S. Air Force Accident Investigation Board are conducting a joint probe to determine what caused the accident.

A Nellis statement said the crash site “is contained and the aircraft poses no threat to the community or natural resources.”

“Thankfully there were no injuries on the ground,” it said.

Metropolitan and North Las Vegas police were among the local agencies responding to the crash site.

The last military aircraft accident in Southern Nevada was June 7 when an unmanned MQ-9 Reaper drone from Creech Air Force Base crashed during a training mission 20 miles northwest of the 215 Beltway.

The last fatal crash involving an aircraft out of Nellis Air Force Base was June 28, 2011, when Capt. Eric Ziegler was killed when his F-16C crashed on public land near the test and training range.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.reviewjournal.com

Thrush S2R-T660, Arnt Aerial Spraying Inc., N40499; Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2016 in Ruthton, Pipestone County, Minnesota

ARNT AERIAL SPRAYING INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N40499 

FAA Flight Standards District Offices: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA326
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 19, 2016 in Ruthton, MN
Aircraft: THRUSH AIRCRAFT INC S2R T660, registration: N40499
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2016, about 0810 central daylight time, a Thrush model S2R-T660 agricultural airplane, N40499, was destroyed when it impacted a tower guy wire and the ground during spraying operations near Ruthton, Minnesota. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Arnt Aerial Spraying, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from an unconfirmed location at an unconfirmed time.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Pipestone, Minn. -  Friday morning officials responded to a report that a plane had crashed near Ruthon, Minnesota, or around 20 miles northeast of Pipestone, Minnesota. Upon arriving on scene they found the plane as well as the deceased body of the pilot, 68 year old James Arnt.

The call of the plane crash came in at 8:11am and responders from Pipestone County Sheriffs Office, Ruthton Fire Department, Ruthton First Responders, Pipestone County Ambulance, Tyler Ambulance, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Pipestone County Emergency Management, Sanford Air Care and Minnesota State Patrol all arrived on scene.

The plane crashed near the corner of 231st Street and 130th Avenue roughly 20 miles northeast of Pipestone after the pilots plane hit a wind monitoring tower for nearby wind turbines.

231st Street has been closed off since this morning as investigators from the Pipestone County Sheriff's Office as well as the FAA continue to investigate the scene. In addition, crews from Xcel Energy and NextEra Energy were on scene as well.

Arnt's sister was at the scene Friday afternoon. She wished to remain off camera due to the nature of the incident but spoke to KDLT News about her brother James. She said that she, along with James, come from a family of 10 siblings with James being the third to have passed. 

Arnt's sister said that James was a farmer but also was an avid pilot and had been flying planes since the 1970s and was planning on stopping flying later this year due to his age while his son, who recently got his aviation license, takes over. She also said that James was a Vietnam War Veteran would was able to come home on a Hardship Discharge to take care of their father would had cancer at the time.

The investigation will be handed over to the FAA, there's no date on when a full assessment of the crash will be released, says Pipestone County Sheriff Keith Vreeman.


Story and video:  http://m.kdlt.com




RUTHTON, MN- Chief Deputy Mike Hamann with the Pipestone County Sheriff's office confirms that a 68-year-old man died in a plane crash Friday morning around 8:00 AM. It happened in a rural part of Ruthton, Minnesota in Pipestone County.

Chief Deputy Hamann said when first responders arrived on the scene, they found that a single passenger agricultural spray plane struck a guy line structured radio tower. The plane and tower were severely damaged.

The pilot of the plane, James Arnt from Worthington MN, was pronounced dead at the scene. The crash is now under investigation by the FAA and the NTSB. The Chief Deputy says more information will be released as it becomes available to them.

Source:   http://www.ksfy.com


RUTHTON -- The Pipestone County Sheriff's Office has released the name of the pilot killed in a Friday morning plane crash of a crop duster in rural Pipestone County.

James Arnt of Worthington was the pilot and lone occupant of the crop dusting plane.

RUTHTON -- The Pipestone County Sheriff's office reports a 68-year-old male has died at the scene of a plane crash in rural Pipestone County.

The sheriff's office was notified at 8:11 a.m. today of a single passenger agricultural spray plane that had crashed in Fountain Prairie Township Section 1. Upon arrival, responders found the plane had struck a guy-line structured radio tower. The pilot was deceased at the scene and the airplane and the tower sustained severe damage.

Assisting at the scene were the Ruthton Fire Department, Ruthton First Responders, Pipestone County Ambulance, Tyler Ambulance, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Pipestone County Emergency Management, Sanford Air Care and the Minnesota State Patrol.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are responding to the scene to assist in the investigation. 

Source:   http://www.dglobe.com




RUTHTON, Minn. - A plane crash five miles west of Ruthton, Minn. kills the pilot after hitting a guide wire on a wind metering tower.

Chief Deputy Mike Hamann with the Pipestone County Sheriff's Office says that responders were called to the scene  at 8:11 a.m. Friday after the crop dusting plane crashed into a bean field.

The pilot, 68-year-old James Arnt of Worthington, Minn. was pronounced dead at the scene.


Source:   http://www.kdlt.com




Pipestone County -- Authorities say the plane clipped a tower used by the local power company to measure wind.

Crews in southwest Minnesota are responding to a reported plane crash near Ruthton.

The Pipestone County Sheriff's Office said a crop-dusting plane crashed Friday morning in the northern area of the county. The plane was found near 231st Street and 130th Avenue, west of Ruthton and south of Lake Benton.

Officials say the pilot, 68-year-old James Arnt of Worthington, MN, clipped guide wire near a tower used by a local power company and crashed into a field. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are helping in the investigation.

Robinson R44, HQ Aviation LLC, N30242: Fatal accident occurred March 22, 2015 in Orlando, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N30242

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Orlando FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA164
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 22, 2015 in Orlando, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/16/2016
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N30242
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Approximately 5 minutes after the pilot departed he told air traffic control that he wanted to return to the airport, but did not specify a reason. The pilot was unable to make it back to the airport and collided with trees, powerlines, and a residence. Post-accident examination of the helicopter found that the lower swashplate left forward attachment ear had no rod end hardware present. A review of the helicopter's maintenance logbook revealed there were no entries regarding the repairs to the main rotor system; however, the helicopter's journey log revealed that several flight tests had been conducted due to a track and balance issue with the main rotor blades. According the mechanic who performed the most recent maintenance to the swashplate, he did utilize the manufacturer's maintenance manual; however, he did not complete the work and the chief mechanic later completed the job. The chief mechanic did not make any entries into the logbook because he "forgot."

The inflight loss of control was most likely caused by the detachment of the left front push-pull tube from the lower swashplate due to the liberation of the attachment bolt. The cause of the bolt liberation could not be conclusively determined because the attachment hardware could not be recovered.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An inflight loss of control due to the likely detachment of the forward left servo control tube upper rod end attachment bolt.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 22, 2015, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Robinson Helicopter Company R44 II, N30242, impacted a two-story residence while maneuvering near Orlando, Florida. The private pilot and the two passengers were fatally injured, and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to a private individual and operated by HQ Aviation. The local flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed from Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, shortly before the accident.

A review of voice transcriptions obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that the pilot contacted the ORL air traffic control tower to request his takeoff clearance. The pilot received a clearance, for a downtown departure leaving from the operator's helipad. Approximately 5 minutes later the pilot contacted the control tower and stated that he wanted to return to the operator's ramp. There were no other transmissions made by the pilot.

Multiple witnesses reported hearing a loud helicopter flying low, which caught their attention. As they looked in the direction of the sound they observed the helicopter descending into a tree. One witness watched the helicopter's main rotor blades break apart as it descended through the trees. The helicopter subsequently impacted a power line transformer before colliding with the residence and erupted in flames. The witnesses called the local authorities and attempted to extinguish the fire.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 48, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter. A review of his logbook revealed he had a total flight experience of 124 hours, including 13 hours during the last 6 months. The pilot possessed a third-class medical certificate dated September 6, 2013, with no limitations or restrictions. Further examination of the pilot's logbook revealed he was signed off on August 9, 2014 for the special federal aviation regulation (SFAR) No. 73, which required him to have special training to operate the Robinson R-44.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was a Robinson Helicopter Company model R44 II that was manufactured in 2007. It was powered by a Continental IO-540-AE1A5 engine, rated at 235 horsepower. The Hobbs meter was destroyed and per the journey log the last known recorded airframe total time was 1,267.5 hours on the day of the accident flight. The last annual inspection of the airframe and engine occurred on October 31, 2014, at an airframe total time of 1,092.1. The last recorded 100 hour inspection noted under discrepancies "rotated TR pitch links" on December 28, 2014, at an airframe total time of 1,186.1 hours. This was also the last maintenance entry made in the airframe logbook.

Though no recent maintenance entries were noted in the helicopter maintenance logbook, there were entries in its journey log (flight log of every flight) that several maintenance flights were conducted in support of attempts to track and balance the main rotor blades. The maintenance flights were identified by (MX or MTX) in the journey log. The first flight was conducted by another pilot on March 1, 2015, and the pilot stated that the MX flight was conducted for a track and balance of the main rotor blades. The next MX flight was conducted on March 6, 2015 and March 11, 2015, by another pilot who stated the flight was conducted for a track and balance of the main rotor blades. The last MX flight was conducted on March 15, 2015, and was signed off by the operator to show that the work was completed.

In a telephone interview, the mechanic who performed the most recent track and balance of the rotor blades stated he performed the job in accordance with the R44 Maintenance Manual section 10.230, the tail rotor in accordance with section 10.240 and the fan in accordance with section 6.240. He said that he did not complete the work and the chief mechanic later completed the job. The chief mechanic stated that he was not clear where the previous mechanic had finished the previous day. Further interviews with the chief mechanic, revealed that he performed the last check and reading of the track and balance of the main rotor blades. He also mentioned that he replaced the belt tensioning actuator gear motor on March 10, 2015, but "forgot" to make all of the entries in the helicopter's maintenance logbooks.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The recorded weather at ORL, at 1453, included winds from 240 degrees at 10 knots; 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds at 4,900, temperature 30 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 18 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the helicopter came to rest on the top floor of a two-story residence, about 3 miles northwest of ORL, and on a 360 degree magnetic heading. The wreckage debris field was about 50 yards in circumference. All flight control surfaces were located at the accident site. Examination of the wreckage revealed that a post-impact fire was concentrated within the second story of the building where the helicopter came to rest. A postcrash fire had consumed a majority of the wreckage. The main rotor mast, head, and gearbox were found separated from the main wreckage and within the debris field.

Examination of the cockpit and cabin section revealed that the instrument console was destroyed by impact forces and fire. The collective and anti-torque pedals were found within the wreckage. The mixture was found within the wreckage in the full rich position and impact damaged. Examination of the flight control system revealed that is was fire and impact damaged. At the lower swashplate, the left forward attachment ear had no rod end hardware present, and could not be located. The rod end was present at the top of the left push pull tube, which was found within the wreckage.

The swashplate and push pull tube with the attached rod end were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination. The examination of the lower swashplate attachment lug bolt holes were examined for indications of damage or deformation. The side of the lug that butted up against the rod end was referred to as the "rod end-side" of the lug and the other side was referred to as the "opposite side." The rod end-side of the front left push-pull tube attachment lug exhibited an outward deformation along the outer lower portion of the bolt hole. There were no other notable features on the front left lug nor were there any signs of deformation on any of the other lugs.

Examination of the hydraulic control servos revealed that they were intact and the two forward servos had bends in their shafts and could not be moved. The aft servo piston was free to move when force was applied. The tail rotor pitch change slider was free to slide along the tail rotor gearbox output shaft.

Examination of the driveline revealed that the drive belts were completely burned away but displayed belt residue in the grooves of the upper and lower sheaves. The belt tension actuator was fractured between the anti-rotation scissors. The upper and lower actuator bearing were fire damaged. The lower bearing did not rotate when force was applied. The upper bearing rotated but dragged when force was applied. The sprag clutch was fire damaged and did not rotate. The forward flex coupling, main rotor gearbox input arm and main rotor gearbox was fractured. Further examination of the main rotor gearbox revealed that it was fire damaged. The main rotor gear box did not rotate and the mast tube was fractured. The main rotor shaft was bent and fractured. The droop stops and droop stop tusk were intact and in place. There was scoring on the main rotor hub just inboard of the pitch change housings.

Both main rotor blades were accounted for at the crash site. One main rotor blade was intact and impact damaged. The rotor blade was bent downward and approximately 33 inches from the coning bolt and the spar was fractured. The blade was distorted over the span of the blade and scored on the lower surface.

The opposite main rotor blade was fractured and scored on the lower surface. Examination revealed it was bent upward from the coning bolt and approximately 12 inches further outboard bent downward. The spar was fractured in two areas on the rotor blade; 70 and 104 inches from the coning bolt. The blade spar had a forward bend at the outboard separation. A section of the skin and honeycomb separated from the spar at the bend. The main rotor blade was sent to the NTSB Material Laboratory for further examination, and examined for indications of fatigue failure. The pieces consisted of an approximately 95-inch long section of blade from the outboard tip to a fracture through the spar at the inboard end and a smaller piece of the blade consisting of the trailing edge, upper and lower skins, and honeycomb core. The small piece was separated from the rest of the blade by a chordwise fracture approximately 80 inch from the blade tip and a longitudinal fracture that proceeded inboard just aft of the spar. The deformation and fracture features on the blade were visually examined. The blade exhibited an aft bend that extended from the blade tip to the approximate position of the chordwise fracture, buckling of the upper and lower skins, and a comparatively severe forward bend at the inboard end. The fracture at the inboard end of the spar was located at a circular hole in the spar and exhibited 45° inclined fracture surfaces, consistent with an overstress fracture. No evidence of fatigue was observed.

The intermediate flex coupling was intact but impact damaged. The tail rotor driveshaft was separated a few inches forward of the tail rotor driveshaft damper. The tail rotor driveshaft damper bearing was fire and impact damaged and was not free to rotate. The friction linkage was intact, but separated from the tail cone and the linkage pivots were fire damaged.

The tail boom was separated from the main fuselage, and displayed fire damage. The tail rotor control tube was fractured at the fuselage, and remained attached to the tail rotor gearbox. The vertical fin and horizontal stabilizer were impact damaged and remained attached to the tail boom. The tail rotor blades were undamaged and remained intact to the gearbox. The aft flex coupling was intact. The tail rotor gearbox was intact and free to rotate, and contained blue oil.

Examination of the fuel system revealed that it was fire and impact damaged. The main fuel tank was not recovered. The auxiliary tank was distorted and the fuel cap was not recovered. The fuel tanks were not bladder-style tanks and were ruptured. The main fuel tank flexible outlet line was breached, but intact on the fuel valve. The fuel valve was in place and in the partially closed position. The gascolator was intact and was removed for examination and no debris was found in the fuel screen. The remaining fuel lines were fire damaged, but the fittings remained.

Examination of the engine revealed that when rotated by the cooling fan, continuity to the rear gears and valve train was confirmed. Compression and suction were observed on all four cylinders. Further examination of the engine revealed that the bottom of the sump was fire damaged and the fuel servo was not observed or recovered. The flow divider was intact and the fuel injector nozzles were removed and examined. The fuel injector nozzles were unobstructed. The engine driven fuel pump remained attached to the engine and was impact damaged. Examination of the magnetos revealed that they both remained attach to the engine. The left magneto was impact damaged, but when rotated by hand it sparked on all towers. The right magneto was fire damage and did not rotate. The top spark plugs were removed and top spark plugs and the electrodes were undamaged. The bottom spark plugs were not removed and examined using a borescope. The bottom spark plug electrodes were undamaged an oil soaked. Examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the State of Florida District Nine Medical Examiner, Orlando, Florida.

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot, with negative results for drugs and alcohol.

















In this undated photo of Bruce Titlebaum and Marsha Khan, Titlebaum (left) is wearing a T-shirt with a statement that was surely intended as whimsical, but after the couple's death in a helicopter crash in Orlando, seems almost macabre. 





Harry Anderson


A helicopter crash that killed three people last year in College Park was caused by a bolt that came loose, a National Transportation Safety Board investigation made public Tuesday found.

The missing bolt allowed a crucial piece of hardware to detach, and the pilot, Bruce Teitelbaum, lost control of the Robinson R44 II chopper and crashed into trees, power lines and a house, investigators concluded.

Teitelbaum, 48, his wife, Marsha Khan, 55, and their friend Harry Anderson, 43, died March 22, 2015 when the helicopter burst into flames as it hit the roof of the guest house on Alameda Street. No one was inside at the time.

Teitelbaum told an air-traffic controller he wanted to return to Orlando Executive Airport five minutes into the flight, but he did not say why.

Story and video:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA164
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 22, 2015 in Orlando, FL
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N30242
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this
aircraft accident report.

On March 22, 2015, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N30242, impacted a two-story building while maneuvering near Orlando, Florida. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to a private individual and operated by HQ Aviation, Orlando, Florida. The local flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed from Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, shortly before the accident.

Multiple witnesses reported hearing a loud helicopter flying low which caught their attention. As they looked in the direction of the sound they observed the helicopter descending into a tree canopy. One witness watched the helicopter's main rotor blades break apart as the helicopter descended through the trees. The helicopter subsequently impacted a power line transformer before it collided with a building and exploded into fire. The witnesses called 911 and attempted to extinguish the fire.

Preliminary review of air traffic control radar data and voice transcription revealed that the pilot requested a downtown departure. The helicopter departed ORL on a westerly heading and approximately 5 minutes into the flight the pilot requested to return to the airport. This was the last recorded transmission from the pilot.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in charge revealed that the helicopter impacted the top of a two-story building about 3 nautical miles northwest of ORL on a 360 degree magnetic heading. The wreckage debris field was about 50 yards in circumference. All flight control surfaces were located at the accident site. Examination of the wreckage revealed that a post-impact fire was concentrated within the second story of the building where the helicopter came to rest.

The cockpit section of the helicopter was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. The main rotor mast, head and gearbox were found within the wreckage debris field.