Friday, July 12, 2019

Boeing CV2, N243XT: Accident occurred June 21, 2019 in Beeville, Bee County, Texas

Boeing Company

https://registry.faa.gov/N243XT

NTSB Identification: DCA19CA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 21, 2019 in Beeville, TX
Aircraft: BOEING CV2, registration: N243XT

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

ICON A5, N83BA: Accident occurred July 11, 2019 near Chicago Executive Airport (KPWK), Wheeling, Illinois


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 


Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines, Illinois
ICON Aircraft; Vacaville, Canada
Rotech Flight Safety Ltd.; Vernon, British Columbia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N83BA


Location: Wheeling, IL
Accident Number: CEN19LA220
Date & Time: 07/11/2019, 2042 CDT
Registration: N83BA
Aircraft: Icon A-5
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 11, 2019, about 2042 central daylight time, an amphibious Icon Aircraft A5 light sport airplane, N83BA, collided with trees and terrain during a forced landing near Wheeling, Illinois. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned by CG 422 LLC and operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The cross-country flight departed Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana, at 1832, and was destined for Chicago Executive Airport (PWK), Wheeling, Illinois.

The pilot reported that he and his wife own two identical Icon Aircraft A5 airplanes, serial numbers 51 and 48, respectively. Earlier on the day of the accident, the pilot and his wife flew from St Louis Downtown Airport (CPS), Cahokia, Illinois, to EYE, in a loose formation. The pilot stated that both airplanes departed CPS with 17 gallons of fuel, as indicated on each airplane's fuel quantity gauge. The pilot reported that both airplanes had about 5 gallons of fuel remaining after completing the 2.9 hour flight from CPS to EYE. The pilot reported that the distance between CPS and EYE was about 202 nautical miles (nm) according to his flight planning software. After landing at EYE, the pilot had each airplane serviced with 12 gallons of fuel. After refueling, the fuel quantity gauge of each airplane indicated 17 gallons. The pilot reported that his flight planning software calculated 13 gallons of fuel was required for the estimated 2.4 hour flight from EYE to PWK. The pilot noted that the distance between EYE and PWK was about 165 nm, and that he expected to land at PWK with at least 4 gallons of fuel remaining.

The pilot reported that the flight from EYE to PWK was uneventful for about 2.3 hours at which time the engine began to lose power due to fuel exhaustion. The pilot stated that the loss of engine power occurred when the airplane was on a 3 mile left base leg for runway 16 at PWK. The pilot reported the engine subsequently had a total loss of power and a forced landing was made in a forest preserve about 1.2 miles from the airport. The airplane collided with trees and terrain during the forced landing, which resulted in substantial damage to the composite fuselage and wings. The pilot noted that his wife was able to safely land her airplane at PWK, and that her airplane had about 1.4 gallons (1.2 gallons usable) of fuel remaining after her 2.4 hour flight.

The airplane was powered by a Rotax 912iS Sport fuel injected 4-cylinder engine, rated at 100 hp at 5,800 rpm. The engine was equipped with an electric starter, dual-redundant ignition system, and a fully digital Engine Control Unit (ECU) that automatically adjusts fuel/air mixture throughout flight to maintain optimal performance, efficiency, and low emissions. The ECU also removes the need for a carburetor and associated mixture controls in the cockpit, making operation of the engine fully automatic for the pilot and eliminating the threat of carburetor icing. The commanded throttle position is sensed and transmitted to the ECU as a pilot request for specific power output. This signal is then combined with environmental inputs to provide the commanded response. The ECU adjusts the fuel/air mixture to ensure optimal performance. The normal operating range is from 1,700 to 5,500 rpm, with a redline of 5800 rpm.

The airplane's pilot operating handbook (POH) contains a flight limitation for a maximum continuous engine speed of 5,500 rpm. The POH also limits engine operation at 5,800 rpm to 5 minutes or less. The POH provides expected fuel consumption rates from sea level to 12,000 ft pressure altitude at engine speeds between 4,000 rpm and 5,500 rpm. According to the cruise performance tables, the expected fuel consumption rate at a cruise altitude of 3,000 ft and an engine speed of 5,500 rpm, with a standard temperature lapse rate, was about 5 gallons per hour. The POH does not provide fuel consumption rates for engine operations above 5,500 rpm.

The operator's manual for the Rotax 912iS engine states that the engine operates between two modes, economy and power, which have significantly different fuel consumption rates. The manual notes that the switchover between the economy and power modes occurs when the throttle position is advanced above 97%. In the economy mode, the expected fuel consumption rate was about 4.8 gallons per hour at 5,500 rpm and a manifold pressure of 27 inches of mercury. In the power mode, the expected fuel consumption rate was about 6.9 and 7.1 gallons per hour at 5,500 rpm and 5,800 rpm, respectively.

The airplane was equipped with a digital data module that recorded basic GPS, engine, and flight parameters. According to the recovered data, the airplane departed runway 3 at EYE and proceeded north-northwest toward PWK. A preliminary review of the available parameter data indicated that the flight from EYE to PWK was 2.3 hours at a cruise altitude of about 3,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and an engine manifold pressure of 26.5 to 27 inches of mercury. The engine data indicated that 60.4% of the flight, about 1.4 hours, was operated above 5,500 rpm. Additionally, the data indicated that about 74.6% of the flight, about 1.7 hours, was with the throttle positioned at or above 97% (where the engine normally switches between economy and power modes). The data indicated that about 52.5% of the flight, about 1.2 hours, was with the throttle positioned at 100%. Additionally, the engine had operated in power mode for 68.4% of the flight, about 1.6 hours.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the fuel tank did not contain any useable fuel and the low fuel annunciator light was illuminated. Water was added to the fuel tank in 1 gallon increments to verify the accuracy of the fuel quantity gauge. The test results indicated that the low fuel light turned off after 1.75 gallons of water was added to the fuel tank. Additionally, the test results indicated that the fuel quantity gauge indicated on average about 1 to 1.5 gallons higher than the actual tank quantity.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Icon
Registration: N83BA
Model/Series: A-5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: CG 422 LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: PWK, 647 ft msl
Observation Time: 2052 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 80°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Indianapolis, IN (EYE)
Destination: Wheeling, IL (PWK)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.134722, -87.891667




Cook County Forest Preserve police block access to forest preserve drive near Dam No. 1 in the woods along the Des Plaines River near Chicago Executive Airport, Friday, July 12, 2019.



A small plane crashed in a Cook County forest preserve near Wheeling around 9 p.m. Thursday (July 11) while trying to land at Chicago Executive Airport.

It is believed the pilot was the only person aboard the plane when it crashed.

Chicago Executive Airport Executive Director Jamie Abbott said that the pilot survived the crash and was taken to Lutheran General Hospital last night.

The pilot of the Icon A5, a light sport aircraft, was attempting to land on Runway 16 at Chicago Executive Airport when the plane crashed 1.3 miles northeast of the airport, according to Tony Molinero, a spokesman for the FAA Great Lakes Region.

Abbott said that the pilot was in communication with the airport’s communication tower.

The FAA could not disclose further information related to the ongoing investigation.

Illinois State Police are also currently investigating the crash, according to Stacina Stagner, communications manager at Cook County Forest Preserves.

The plane has not yet been recovered from the forest preserve, Abbott said. It will be up to the pilot and his insurance company to determine how best to get it out.

Abbott said some of the potential options include removing trees or airlifting the plane out of the treetops.

Original article ➤  https://www.journal-topics.com




Prospect Heights, Wheeling, and Northbrook firefighter/paramedics responded about 8:47 p.m. Thursday July 11, 2019 to a report from the Chicago Executive Airport control tower that a small plane apparently crashed, and was last seen a quarter mile northeast of the airport. Initially, the control tower report was the only call to 9-1-1. The control tower reported the aircraft was last seen over the top of trees. 

Wheeling police reported the pilot was the only person aboard the plane, and that initially he showed no signs of injuries. The elapsed time to located the pilot and the plane crash site was about 18 minutes from the time of the 9-1-1 call from the control tower. Rescuers determined the crash scene was located in dense trees about half-way between the Des Plaines River and Interstate 294, and about 1,350 feet south of Dundee Road. Emergency vehicles from several police agencies, Wheeling and Prospect Heights fire agencies, and airport support vehicles lined up along the shoulder lane of eastbound Dundee Road. The emergency operation did not require a road closure for Dundee Road.

Initially there was no information available regarding where the flight originated. NBC’s Natalie Martinez reported that they were also “aggressively” asked to leave the airport property. NBC’s Natalie Martinez and crew weren’t able to get any official information from the airport, but NBC and WGN were able to review the tower communications online and reported that Chicago Executive Airport control tower communications just before the crash involved two pilots that were approaching in tandem in two separate aircraft. A male pilot reported he was low on fuel, and was trailing an aircraft piloted by a female pilot. After the female pilot landed, she asked about the other pilot named Tom when she realized he didn’t land as expected.

After the pilot crashed, rescuers did not get a pinpointed report of the location of the crash — only that the aircraft was about one-quarter mile northeast of the airport, and possibly near I-294 and Dundee Road. Firefighters were also dispatched to search Dam 1 Woods near Dundee Road east of the Des Plaines River. Firefighters also searched the woods north of Dundee Road east of Portwine Road until it was confirmed that the pilot was south of Dundee Road. 

At 8:58 p.m. the pilot contacted the control tower, and reported he was safely out of the plane. At 9:05 p.m. firefighters were able to identify a cell phone ping from the pilot’s 9-1-1 call between Dam 1 Road and I-294, south of Dundee Road. Firefighters shared screen shots of the location on their phones. 

Police found the pilot and joined the pilot in the woods by 9:21 p.m. Police and firefighters escorted the pilot out of the woods, and the pilot reached the shoulder of eastbound Dundee Road by about 9:40 p.m. 

A Wheeling fire lieutenant encouraged the pilot to be evaluated by firefighter/paramedics as he was walked out of the thick woods with rescuers. 

The pilot, wearing an Icon A5 aircraft T-shirt was placed on a gurney and transferred to an awaiting Wheeling Fire Department ambulance. He was then transported by Wheeling firefighter/paramedics to Glenbrook Hospital.

Story and video ➤ https://www.arlingtoncardinal.com


CHICAGO (CBS) — Emergency responders were on scene after a small plane crash was reported in a wooded area in Wheeling near Chicago Executive Airport Thursday night.

The plane reportedly went down near Milwaukee Avenue.

A spokesperson for the airport said the flight did not originate there and officials were still working to gather information.

Video from the scene showed what appeared to be the pilot walking out of the woods between two police officers.

Story and video ➤ https://chicago.cbslocal.com
























WARRANTY:  There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage.  All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING.  Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.)  

HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted

AIRCRAFT:  2018 ICON A5 ‘FOUNDERS EDITION’ N83BA, SN: 00051, Hobbs 76.8                                                                                           
ENGINE:      Rotax 912iS (S/N 7703618), TSN: 76.8

PROPELLER:   Sensenich 3B0R5L68C-0 (S/N 314882C), TSN: 76.8

EQUIPMENT:     

Trig TC20

Trig TC90

The Garmin Aera 796 GPS, a portable avionic that the aircraft came equipped with, is not included with the salvage. 

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  :   Aircraft’s engine lost power as a result of exhaustion of fuel resulting in a forced off field landing.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Chicago Aviation Services, 980-293-0815  (Contact only for appointment to inspect salvage.) 
                                                                                                 
REMARKS:  
The Garmin Aera 796 GPS, a portable avionic that the aircraft came equipped with, is not included with the salvage

Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 

Salvage is as is/where is. 

The posting information is the best to our knowledge. 

An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended. 

LOGS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR COMPLETE.

American Ranger 1 AR1, N14968: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2019 near Hawley Municipal Airport (04Y), Clay County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N14968

Location: Hawley, MN
Accident Number: CEN19FA218
Date & Time: 07/11/2019, 1230 CDT
Registration: N14968
Aircraft: GIbb AR-1
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 11, 2019, about 1230 central daylight time, a Gibb AR-1, N14968, impacted terrain 300 ft from, and slightly to the right of, the departure end of runway 16 at the Hawley Municipal Airport (04Y), Hawley, Minnesota. The private pilot was fatally injured. The gyroplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The gyroplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the accident site at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from 04Y at an undetermined time.

A passerby driving eastbound on Highway 10 just south of the runway saw the gyroplane descend nose down and impact the ground. A fire erupted immediately. The passerby stopped, ran to the accident site, and pulled the pilot from the burning wreckage. The passerby sustained serious burns to his hands.

The on-scene investigation revealed the gyroplane struck the ground on a magnetic heading of 175°. There was a 30-ft ground scar from the impact point to the main body of wreckage. All of the wreckage was contained within a 50-ft perimeter. All components were accounted for, including both main rotor blades, the engine, and all 3 blades of the pusher-type propeller. The airspeed and vertical speed indicators registered 110 mph and 910 fpm down, respectively. The altimeter and Kollsman window registered 1,580 ft and 30.08 inches of mercury, respectively.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GIbb
Registration: N14968
Model/Series: AR-1
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JKJ, 918 ft msl
Observation Time: 1235 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hawley, MN (04Y)
Destination: Hawley, MN (04Y)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 46.000000, -96.000000 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Bradley James Gibb 

Bradley Gibb, 69, Vergas, Minn., died Thursday, July 11th, in an accident at Hawley Airport. He was an adventurous spirit who lived his life with great passion. He left this world and flew to heaven doing what he loved, flying his gyrocopter.

Brad was born November 7, 1949, in Fargo, N.D., to Donald and Mary (Vickers) Gibb. He attended Washington Elementary, Agassiz Junior High, and was a graduate of the last class of Fargo Central High, where he was a member of the swim team. In high school he met his future wife Kaylynn (Heth).

He attended the University of North Dakota and was a member of the ATO fraternity. He left school to work as a plumber for Robert Gibb and Sons Mechanical Contractors, the third generation in a family business started by his grandfather, Robert. In 1971, Brad and Kaylynn welcomed their only son, Jason.

Brad resumed his education at Moorhead State University, initially majoring in music. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in accounting. After a year working for a bank in New Mexico, he rejoined the family business as a plumbing and heating estimator. During his time at Gibb and Sons, the company was awarded many large mechanical contracts in the region such as West Acres, the Radisson, Fargo Water Treatment Plant, and the highlight of his 27-year career, the Fargodome.

His love of music began in 1959 when he took organ lessons with his father, played saxophone in the school band, and briefly played in a garage band with friends. After retiring, Brad returned to music in 2005, joining the FM Golden Notes New Horizons Band with Kaylynn. In 2010 they joined the East Valley Pops Orchestra in Mesa, Ariz. They also enjoyed entertaining at retirement homes, fundraisers, and church.

Brad loved golf, playing year-round after retirement at the Detroit Lakes (Minn.) Executive course and Fountain of the Sun in Mesa, Ariz. He also enjoyed spending time outdoors hunting, skiing, boating, and sailing, including many hours on the lakes of Minnesota and Lake of the Woods.

In the 1980s, Brad became an instrument-rated pilot, owning and operating a Piper airplane. He later built a fixed-wing ultralight aircraft. After retirement, he realized a life-long dream and earned his rating as a gyroplane pilot.

Brad is preceded in death by his parents and his brother Scott. 

He is survived by his wife, Kaylynn; son, Jason (Pam); grandchildren, Claire and Alexander, of Moorhead, Minn.; brother, Steve (Lisa) of Rollag, Minn.; sister, Marsha of Rio Rancho, N.M., and a large extended family of nieces, nephews, cousins, and in-laws. Brad will be greatly missed.

A celebration of his life will be held July 19 at Detroit Lakes United Methodist Church at 2 p.m. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service. Burial will be at Riverside Cemetery in Fargo at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be sent to a charity of your choice. 

https://www.hansonrunsvold.com



HAWLEY, Minnesota (KVLY) Officials have released the name of the pilot who died in an aircraft crash at the Hawley Municipal Airport Thursday afternoon.

Authorities found Bradley Gibb, 69, of Vergas, Minnesota deceased when they arrived on the scene.

According to records from the Federal Aviation Administration, Gibb's aircraft was a American Ranger 1 AR1.

The website lists Gibb's aircraft was classified as experimental and its category classified as amateur built.

First responders were called to the Hawley Municipal Airport just before 12:30 Thursday afternoon for reports of a plane crash.

Clay County Sheriff Mark Empting said a bystander who was driving by the crash, pulled over and pulled the pilot out of the burning aircraft. Unfortunately the pilot was already deceased.

The bystander suffered minor burns on their hand, but they were treated and released by Hawley medical staff on the scene.

We talked with a family member of Gibb at the crash scene Thursday night, and they told us that Gibb flew his Rotorcraft as a hobby.

It's still unclear what caused the crash. Gibb was the only occupant of the Ultralight style aircraft at the time of crash. The crash remains under investigation at this time by the Clay County Sheriff’s Office, Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Story and video ➤ https://www.valleynewslive.com



HAWLEY, Minnesota (Valley News Live) A 911 recording details the calls between emergency responders after a specialized aircraft crashed in Clay County.

The pilot and lone occupant of the American Ranger 1 AR1 died in the crash, according to Sheriff Mark Emptying.

The call sounded like chaos as emergency responders drove to the aircraft crash Thursday at Hawley Airport along Highway 10.

“Just in case we got multiple injuries with this plane crash, don't know how many we got to deal with,” dispatch said.

It was a Clay County deputy who first arrived at the crash site a few minutes after noon.

Within minutes, several agencies were dispatched to the scene.

“We have a report of an airport crash or an aircraft crash by Hawley Municipal Airport. There’s someone possibly in the plane it's on fire. We’re getting multiple phone calls.”

During radio communication, emergency responders talked about how response times for other calls were slightly impacted because of the number of resources devoted to the crash.

“You can cancel the emergency...we have one patient who is DOA, we have one other bystander who has some slight burns to his hands that he received from pulling the victim out,” a dispatcher said.

Although injured, that individual did not require medical attention at a hospital.

A federal investigator is expected to arrive at the crash site Friday.

Story and video ➤ https://www.valleynewslive.com







HAWLEY, Minnesota (KFGO) - The pilot of a small ultralight aircraft is dead after crashing at the Hawley Municipal Airport.  The aircraft caught fire.

Clay County Sheriff Mark Empting says a bystander who pulled the victim from the burning aircraft had minor injuries.  

The crash, on airport property north of Hwy. 10, was reported at about 12:30 p.m. Thurs.

Deputies, Hawley HERT (Hawley Emergency Rescue Team) and the state patrol all responded to the scene.

The Clay County Sheriff's Office and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://kfgo.com

Piper PA-24-180 Comanche, N5840P: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2019 near Ketchikan International Airport (PAKT), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5840P 


Location: Ketchikan, AK
Accident Number: ANC19FA033
Date & Time: 07/11/2019, 1419 AKD
Registration: N5840P
Aircraft: Piper PA 24-180
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 11, 2019, about 1419 Alaska daylight time, a Piper PA-24-180 airplane, N5840P, sustained substantial damage after impacting terrain during a visual approach about 4 miles south of Ketchikan International Airport, (KTN) Ketchikan, Alaska. The airline transport pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to the Law Offices of Michael P Nash PC and operated by the pilot, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal visual flight rules (VFR) flight. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the destination and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Friday Harbor Airport (FHR), Friday Harbor, Washington, about 1010 Alaska daylight time.

A family member of the pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to return the airplane home to the Wrangell Airport (WRG), Wrangell, Alaska, after the airplane's annual inspection at FHR. The pilot flew this route often and intended to stop at KTN to purchase their less expensive fuel before continuing onto WRG. On the morning of the flight, the pilot told his family that the forecast weather for KTN "wasn't looking good," and he intended to fly around Ketchikan and continue onto WRG if the weather in KTN was not good upon his arrival. He stated that he had 6 hours of fuel onboard and his expected time of arrival was 1445. The flight from FHR to KTN is about 522 nautical miles (nm), and WRG is about 70 nm further.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Ketchikan Flight Service Station (KTN FSS) report, about 1411 the pilot called KTN FSS 10 miles southeast of KTN with the current Automatic Flight Information Service (AFIS) weather Lima. He stated he intended on entering a right downwind for KTN runway 11. About 5 minutes later, the flight crew of an inbound Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 contacted KTN FSS with intentions to enter a left downwind for KTN runway 11. The accident pilot then reported that he "was hung up" and could not enter a right downwind but would wait for traffic to clear prior to entering a left downwind. There were no further communications received by the pilot. KTN FSS personnel attempted to contact the accident airplane on the radio and after no response was heard they notified local search and rescue units. The Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad, Ketchikan Police, Ketchikan Alaska State Troopers, US Coast Guard and local operators searched for the missing airplane until about 1630 when the wreckage was located.

A preliminary review of archived FAA radar and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADSB) data revealed that the airplane flew primarily a direct route to the KTN terminal area. At 1418, north of Judy Hill, the airplane initiated a left from a 322° track toward the southwest. The airplane descended from 625 ft down to 325 ft during the left turn and the last ground speed data was 118 knots. Refer to figure 1.


Figure 1. N5840P flight track (red) and wreckage location


The wreckage was located on the northwest side of Judy Hill at an elevation of 380 ft in lightly forested muskeg covered terrain. Judy Hill is an 814 ft hill situated at the southeast end of Gravina Island in the Tongass National Forrest. All major airplane components were located at the accident site. The debris track was about 300 ft long and 40 ft wide on a heading of 193° true. The debris field consisted of broken treetops, long deep ground scars, wing and empennage sections, and terminated at the inverted main fuselage, engine and inboard wings. Refer to figure 2. The wreckage has been recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Figure 2. Photograph of the main wreckage area



The closest weather reporting facility is KTN. At 1353, a METAR from KTN was reporting in part: wind, 110° at 13 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, scattered 900 ft, broken 1,400 ft, overcast 3,500 ft; temperature, 63° F; dew point 61° F; and an altimeter setting of 30.09 inches of mercury. KTN AFIS Lima contained the same weather information as the 1353 METAR. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5840P
Model/Series: PA 24-180 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAKT, 96 ft msl
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Friday Harbor, WA (FHR)
Destination: Ketchikan, AK (KTN) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 55.299167, -131.632500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Michael Nash

Michael Patrick Nash, 68, of Wrangell, Alaska passed away on July 11, 2019 in a plane crash on Judy Hill near Ketchikan, Alaska.

Michael was born to Albert and Priscilla Nash and grew up in Friday Harbor, Washington along with his six siblings. It was there he fell in love with airplanes and flying, a love that never wavered throughout his lifetime. At age 16 he baled hay for the summer in order to earn enough money to buy his first airplane. As a young man he struggled between wanting to serve God by becoming a priest or becoming a pilot. Eventually he did both, flying to smaller Alaskan communities to preach the gospel, and soon became known as the "Flying Priest."

After 25 years of service Michael stepped down from the priesthood. He realized that many people he spoke with as a priest had more legal problems than spiritual so what better way to continue to help people than by becoming an attorney. He enrolled in the Creighton University School of Law in Omaha, Nebraska in 2003. Because of a job offer in 2007, he applied to and passed the bar in Iowa. In 2008 he was admitted into the Alaska bar and moved his law practice in 2011 to the state that had captivated his heart years before. Michael was very generous with his time and often took clients Pro Bono. Helping people was always his number one priority. It was at the Wrangell court where he met his future wife, Leanna. They were married on August 16, 2014.

He was preceded in death by his parents Albert and Priscilla Nash, and brother-in-Law Robert Strasser.

He leaves behind his wife of five years, Leanna (Splinter) Nash of Wrangell; step-daughters Veronica Blunt and Jessica (Chris) Stewart; "adopted son" Zack Nelson; and six siblings, Jack "John" Nash of San Diego, California, Mary Nash, Debbie (Robert) Nash-Strasser, Teresa (Norman) Nash-DeGraaff, Virginia Nash, and Tom (Tracy) Nash all of Friday Harbor; nine nieces and nephews; three grandnieces, along with numerous cousins. Michael's first grandchild will be arriving in October.

A funeral will be held at noon on August 16, 2019 at the St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in Wrangell, with a reception to follow.

https://www.wrangellsentinel.com



ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - UPDATE:7/12/2019 

Alaska State Troopers have released the name of the pilot killed in a plane crash in Ketchikan.

Alaska State Troopers says 68-year-old Michael Nash of Wrangell was the pilot and single occupant of his Piper PA-24-180 Comanche.

Nash was found deceased inside the aircraft at about 400 feet elevation.

UPDATE:

The Coast Guard says that the missing plane has been located along with the sole passenger on the plane.

The wreck was located by the Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad, and the Alaska State Troopers are now coordinating the retrieval of the body and the wreckage.

The Alaska Volunteer Rescue Squad reported its location of the plane at 4:47 p.m. near Judy Hill, directly across the channel from the town Ketchikan and just south of the Ketchikan Airport, where it was expected to land.

The helicopter that was originally reported to have been dispatched to the scene never arrived, as the plane had already been located.

Original article:

The search is on for a plane near Ketchikan that was reported as overdue at 3:04 p.m.

The Coast Guard sent out two small boats to the area, near Blank Inlet on Gravina Island, as well as a helicopter. The small boats were on the scene by 4:30 p.m. and the helicopter arrived around 5:15 p.m.

The Coast Guard says that currently the status of the operation is “searching for overdue aircraft,” but the last known communication occurred at 2:30 p.m. according to what the Coast Guard received from Ketchikan Flight Services.

The Coast Guard says the weather at the time included clouds, 13 mph winds, and light rain. The visibility was nine miles and the temperature was 62 degrees.


Original article ➤ https://www.ktuu.com

Aerodynamic Stall: Cessna 182B, N2467G; accident occurred July 11, 2019 at Lincoln Municipal Airport (0R2), Benton County, Missouri

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N2467G


Location: Lincoln, MO
Accident Number: GAA19CA406
Date & Time: 07/11/2019, 1130 CDT
Registration: N2467G
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during landing with 40° flaps, he reduced power and began the flare. He added that he heard the stall warning horn and felt a buffet and then the airplane "pitched down [then] straight back to flare." He said the airplane was "high and slow," and it landed hard. The nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane bounced and then slid to a stop.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during landing, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and a subsequent hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)
Hard landing

Landing gear collapse

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Glider
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/17/2016
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/23/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1533 hours (Total, all aircraft), 110 hours (Total, this make and model), 1448 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2467G
Model/Series: 182 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1959
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 51767
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/03/2018, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3552.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRAW, 936 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1635 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 190°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Warrensburg, MO (RCM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lincoln, MO (0R2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1100 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: LINCOLN MUNI (0R2)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 940 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2940 ft / 125 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.400556, -93.332500 (est)