Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Beech 1900C, registered to and operated by Alpine Aviation doing business as Alpine Air Express, N172GA: Accident occurred April 29, 2018 at Joe Foss Field Airport (KFSD), Sioux Falls, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N172GA

Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Accident Number: CEN18LA164
Date & Time: 04/29/2018, 2230 CDT
Registration: N172GA
Aircraft: BEECH 1900C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On April 29, 2018, about 2230 central daylight time, a Beech 1900C, N172GA, was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear collapsed as the airplane started to taxi for takeoff at Joe Foss Field Airport (FSD), Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The Airline Transport Pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Alpine Aviation, doing business as Alpine Air Express, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a non-scheduled domestic cargo flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight was originating from FSD, and was destined for Rapid City Regional Airport (RAP), Rapid City, South Dakota.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors, the airplane had just moved forward to taxi for takeoff when the right main landing gear collapsed. A post-accident examination of the airplane revealed the right main landing gear drag brace bolt failed at the wing forward attach point. The strut pivoted aft when the airplane moved forward, and the landing gear collapsed. The aft center wing lower spar cap was dented and deformed up to 0.090". Further examination found pitting corrosion on the spar cap.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/13/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/28/2017
Flight Time:  13968 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model), 8000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 133 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N172GA
Model/Series: 1900C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1982
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: UB-11
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/10/2018, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 16600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 117 Hours
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 41851 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-65B
Registered Owner:  Alpine Aviation, Inc.
Rated Power: 1100 hp
Operator: Alpine Aviation, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Alpine Air Express
Operator Designator Code: TIMA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFSD, 1429 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2256 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Sioux Falls, SD (FSD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Rapid City, SD (RAP)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2230 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Joe Foss Field (FSD)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 1429 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.581944, -96.741944 (est)

Sid Nelson: Pilot grounded for incident at Morris Municipal Airport (C09), Grundy County, Illinois




MORRIS, Ill. - The Federal Aviation Administration has found fault with the actions of a politically connected crop duster who operates out of a small city owned airport in Morris, IL.

WGN Investigates first reported on the air field confrontation between Sid Nelson and two other pilots in August of 2017.  Cell phone video showed Nelson landing at the Morris airport and then jumping out of his yellow crop duster and getting in the faces of a flight instructor and student pilot preparing for take off yards from the runway.

“You’ve heard of road rage – but this was more akin to runway rage,” said pilot John O’Connor.  His student pilot that day told a similar story. “I’d never seen a face on a human being look like that,” Nick Scholtes said.  “He was just livid.”  The two say Nelson violently shook their plane all the while propellers of both aircraft continued to spin.

The FAA just released the findings of its investigations into the incident.  “Your operation as described… was careless or reckless so as to endanger the life or property of another,” the FAA wrote.  The agency suspended Nelson’s pilot’s license for 42 days, effective January 11, 2018.  WGN Investigates only recently obtained the FAA’s letter after months of open records request denials by the agency.

Nelson did not return calls for comment.  However, in a previous interview he denied doing anything inappropriate and insisted he was trying to “help” the other pilots.

Morris police responded to the altercation near the runway but no charges were filed.  A police report indicated Morris mayor Dick Kopczick intervened in the investigation and instructed an officer to re-interview those involved.  Kopczick denied attempting to influence the investigation into his political ally’s conduct.  Nelson is once again flying out of the Morris airport. “He has his license and every right to be there,” Mayor Kopczick said.  However, the operators of a flight school that raised concerns about Nelson were told they’d have leave their office building on the airfield to make way for a long-planned parking lot expansion.   Mayor Kopczick called it “vindictive” to suggest the move was payback for speaking out.

Grundy County State's Attorney Jason Helland, who asked for a review of the mayor's intervention in the case, said he "commends the FAA for taking action."

Story and video ➤ http://wgntv.com

Harsh words. Bad blood.  Even a physical confrontation near a runway.  These are turbulent times at the city-owned airport in Morris, Illinois.  Now the FAA is investigating an incident between several pilots on the airfield.

“You’ve heard of road rage,” said veteran pilot John O’Connor.  “This was more akin to runway rage.”  O’Connor, who spent 35 years as a military aviator, is describing a confrontation on a taxiway at the Morris airport in July.

O’Connor was applying for a new certification with flight instructor Nick Scholtes.  They were idling just shy of the runway while completing their final checklist when they say a larger crop duster landed from the opposite direction.  They say the pilot of that plane passed several open taxiways and brought his plane almost nose-to-nose with theirs.

“I’d never seen a face on a human being look like that,” flight instructor Nick Scholtes said.  “[The crop duster]  was just livid.”  Cell phone video recorded by Scholtes captured the tail end of the confrontation.  The crop duster got out of his plane with the propeller still running.  “He was making arm gestures and telling my pilot ‘get out of the plane! Get out of the plane!’”, O’Connor said. “He seemed to want to fight.”

The pilot of the crop duster is seen on video reaching his arm through the window and swatting away the cell phone as he yelled words to the effect of ‘get off the runway.’  When Scholtes and O’Connor refused they say the crop duster attempted to spin their small plane around and violently shook the plane’s wing.

After the two men say they refused to comply, the other pilot walked back to his running crop duster and spun it around.  “His wingtip couldn’t have been more than an inch-and-a-half from our propeller,” O’Connor said. “It’s still amazing to me they didn’t hit.  Then he prop-blasted us and our little plane was bounced back and forth.”

The two were rattled enough they called Morris police.  Initially, they said they didn’t want to pursue criminal charges.  That changed when they felt like they were portrayed as the aggressors.   The responding officer’s report describes “bad history” between two camps at the airfield.    On one side: The flight instructor and other pilots who use the airport for leisure flights.  On the other: The crop duster and the airport manager who referred to flight instructor Nick Scholtes as a “trouble maker” in the police report and talked about getting him “kicked out of the airport.”

The pilot of the crop duster claims the flight instructor intentionally blocked his path, the latest move in an ongoing feud.  He said he only got out of his plane because he thought the other pilots were having trouble.  “I grabbed the strut and shook it like that.  But that’s all I did.”  The crop duster insisted shaking the other plane was safe.

And who is the owner of that crop duster?    His name is Sid Nelson.  And he’s not just a crop duster.  He is also the former manager of the Morris airport and a current member of the Morris city council who was appointed to that position by the mayor.   That’s why it raised eyebrows when the responding officer noted in his report that he delivered a copy to Morris mayor Dick Kopczick “for his review.”

The mayor directed the cop to re-interview the airport manager, who offered a new witness who would say the flight instructor “intentional[ly] pulled in front of [Sid] Nelson.”   Police took no further action.  The case was closed.

Mayoral intervention is a no-no according to the Grundy County state’s attorney.  “I’ve been a career prosecutor for 13-and-a-half years,” Jason Helland said. “I’ve never seen a mayor get involved in a police investigation before.”   State’s attorney Helland said his initial requests for police to more thoroughly investigate the case were rebuffed.  However, after WGN began asking questions and confronted crop duster Sid Nelson nearly one month after the incident, Morris police reached out to the flight instructor to gather more information.

Mayor Kopczick, the Morris police chief and Morris airport manager Jeff Vogen did not respond to repeated requests for comments on the incident.

The crop duster insists he did nothing wrong. “I’ve been flying for 41 years,” Nelson said. “I got over 15,000 hours.  This is the first time I’ve ever encountered anything like this.”

The two pilots who felt they were threatened by Nelson say they simply want the friendly skies to return to the city-owned and subsidized Morris airfield.  “They get money from us as customers and money subsidized from the federal government but it’s not managed that way,” Scholtes said.

Story and video ➤ http://wgntv.com

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS
EASTERN DIVISION 

INTERNATIONAL AEROBATICS CLUB
CHAPTER 1 and NICHOLAS SCHOLTES, Plaintiffs,
 v.
CITY OF MORRIS, JEFFREY VOGEN, and SID NELSON, Defendants.

No. 13 C 04272
Judge John J. Tharp, Jr.
MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

The plaintiffs, Chapter 1 of the International Aerobatics Club and one of its members, Nicholas Scholtes, claim that the City of Morris is impermissibly regulating flight—which, they contend, only the Federal Aviation Administration can do—and is maliciously and arbitrarily threatening the Club’s members with prosecution under a local ordinance and regulations. Scholtes was in fact prosecuted for a violation of the Morris ordinance, although the charge eventually was dropped. The defendants are the City of Morris, where the airport from which the Club operates is located, the airport manager, Jeffrey Vogen, and former airport manager and current “Airport consultant” Sid Nelson, both of whom are alleged to be agents of the City of Morris. They have moved to dismiss the entire complaint. First, they argue that the Court lacks subject matter jurisdiction because there is no live case or controversy and no standing. They further argue that the plaintiffs fail to state a claim for any constitutional violation or for the tort of malicious prosecution, and, finally, that the defendants are entitled to qualified immunity. For the reasons that follow, the defendants’ motion is denied, except as to the substantive due process claim, which is dismissed without prejudice.

The International Aerobatics Club Chapter 1 is a non-profit membership organization that, among other things, provides opportunities for pilots to practice and perform aerobatic maneuvers. The City of Morris owns and operates the Morris Municipal Airport. IAC Chapter 1 members “fly through airspace, depart from and arrive at Morris Airport, and also rent hangar space at the airport.” Aerobatic flight is a legally recognized form of aircraft operation regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which has prescribed rules and regulations for 2 such flight. See 14 C.F.R. § 91.303. Under the regulations, no person may operate an aircraft in aerobatic flight: over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement; over an open air assembly of persons; within the lateral boundaries of the surface areas of certain airspace designated for an airport; within 4 nautical miles of the center line of any Federal airway; below an altitude of 1,500 feet above the surface; or when flight visibility is less than 3 statute miles. These regulations are subject to an FAA-issued waiver, for instance to create an Aerobatic Practice Area or an Aerobatic Competition Box, inside which the normal restrictions do not apply. An Aerobatic Practice Area is “established for the purpose of practicing aerobatic skills.” FAA Flight Standards Information Management Systems (FSIMS1 ), Vol. 3, Ch. 5, Section 1, ¶ 3- 118(a)(3)(a). “Pilots who wish to practice aerobatic maneuvers that do not meet the requirements of § 91.303 must obtain a waiver from the appropriate part(s) of § 91.303 in a designated area referred to as an aerobatic practice area. These areas are not to be considered event or competition sites. The aviation community uses these practice areas to establish and maintain proficiency as well as to enhance competitive skills in aerobatic maneuvers.” Id. ¶ 3-119. 

Read more here:  https://cases.justia.com

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, N726JB: Accident occurred August 09, 2015 at Clovis Municipal Airport (KCVN), Curry County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N726JB



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Clovis, NM
Accident Number: CEN15LA354
Date & Time: 08/09/2015, 0925 MDT
Registration: N726JB
Aircraft: CESSNA C421B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The private pilot reported that he was approaching the airport for landing in the multi-engine airplane when both engines began to surge. The pilot attempted to switch to the auxiliary fuel tanks, but inadvertently switched the left engine fuel selector to the off position. The left engine subsequently experienced a total loss of engine power. On final approach for landing, the airplane impacted terrain and was subsequently consumed by a postimpact fire; the fuel onboard the airplane at the time of the accident could not be determined. An examination of the airplane's engines and systems revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper management of fuel to the left engine during approach for landing, which resulted in a total loss of left engine power due to fuel starvation, and his subsequent failure to maintain control during the final landing approach, which resulted in collision with terrain. 

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid management (Cause)

Personnel issues
Incorrect action performance - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information 

On August 9, 2015, at 0925 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 421B, N726JB, impacted terrain following a loss of left engine power during final approach for landing on runway 12 at Clovis Municipal Airport (CVN), Clovis, New Mexico. The pilot received serious injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of accident. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Melrose, New Mexico, and was destined to CVN.

A completed National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Form 6120.1 was not received from the pilot, as required by Part 830.5, by either the NTSB Investigator-In-Charge or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Coordinator for the accident.

Witness stated that they heard the airplane engines "popping" as it approached and entered the traffic pattern. The airplane left wing contacted terrain short of runway 12 and the airplane cartwheeled. A post-impact fire occurred and the wings and fuselage were severely damaged.

The pilot provided a limited statement to the FAA Coordinator, in which he stated he had ample fuel for the short flight from a private ranch in Melrose, New Mexico to CVN (30 miles to the east), when both engines began to surge. The pilot stated he attempted to switch both tanks to Auxiliary but inadvertently switched the left fuel selector to Off. The left engine experienced a total loss of engine power. The pilot said he was too high to land on runway 22 and attempted to land on runway 12. However, the airplane impacted terrain approximately 1,000 feet southeast of the runway 12/22 intersection between runway 12 and the parallel taxiway. The aircraft was traveling southeast attempting to land on runway 12 before losing control.

An examination of the wreckage was conducted by an FAA inspector and the total amount of fuel onboard the airplane at the time of the accident could not be determined due to post impact damage and fire. No anomalies were noted with the airframe or engines that would have precluded normal operation. 

History of Flight

Approach
Fuel starvation (Defining event)
Loss of engine power (total)

Approach-VFR pattern final
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/11/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 3700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 300 hours (Total, this make and model), 20 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N726JB
Model/Series: C421B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1970
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 421B0020
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/22/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: GTSIO-520-H
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 375 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CVN, 4216 ft msl
Observation Time: 0915 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots/ 19 knots, 250°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Melrose, NM (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clovis, NM (CVN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0825 MDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Clovis Municipal Airport (CVN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4216 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5697 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  34.426667, -103.077500 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA354
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Clovis, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA C421B, registration: N726JB
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, at 0925 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 421B, N726JB, impacted terrain following a loss of left engine power during final approach for landing at Clovis Municipal Airport (CVN), Clovis, New Mexico. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of accident. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Melrose, New Mexico, and was destined to CVN.

Boeing-Stearman A75N1, N450JN: Incident occurred May 15, 2018 at Chino Airport (KCNO), San Bernardino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aircraft landed and lost tail gear.

http://registry.faa.gov/N450JN

Date: 16-MAY-18
Time: 00:33:00Z
Regis#: N450JN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: A75N1 (PT17)
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHINO
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 525, N513RV: Incident occurred May 15, 2018 at Palm Beach International Airport (KPBI), Palm Beach County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft while taxiing struck a parked car with wing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N513RV

Date: 16-MAY-18
Time: 00:27:00Z
Regis#: N513RV
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Learjet 35A, N9099: Incident occurred May 15, 2018 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft while taxiing went into a ditch.

Med Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9099

Date: 16-MAY-18
Time: 07:00:00Z
Regis#: N9099
Aircraft Make: LEARJET
Aircraft Model: 35A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AMBULANCE
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: MED AIR
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

DJI Inspire 1, N768VD: Incident occurred May 08, 2018 in Hollywood, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Unknown

Unmanned aircraft system clipped building and damaged roof of a vehicle.

Nelson Forensics LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N768VD

Date: 08-MAY-18
Time: 09:30:00Z
Regis#: N768VD
Aircraft Make: UAS
Aircraft Model: UNK
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 107
City: HOLLYWOOD
State: FLORIDA

Airlines Add Smaller Jets in Busy Trans-Atlantic Market: Single-aisle planes increase competition on world’s busiest long-haul routes



The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron
May 15, 2018 4:45 p.m. ET


Increasing numbers of smaller jets are making the trans-Atlantic crossing, giving consumers more travel options and airlines more flexibility in scheduling.

Low-fare carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA is using Boeing Co.’s 160-seat 737 Max in the world’s busiest long-haul market, while JetBlue Airways Corp. is eyeing its first European flights with a long-range version of the Airbus SE A321neo, which can carry around 200 passengers.

These planes are carving a niche alongside larger twin-aisle jets that members of the three global airline alliances—which have more than 75% of the world’s long-haul market—have long used to generate big profits carrying as many as 450 passengers across the Atlantic per flight.

“This will be a game changer,” said Tamur Goudarzi Pour, vice president for the Americas at Deutsche Lufthansa AG , the fifth-largest trans-Atlantic operator and a member alongside United Continental Holdings Inc. UAL 2.09% of Star Alliance, the biggest interairline association.

Capacity on flights between North America and Europe was roughly flat in the decade to 2013. Since then, capacity has climbed more than 20% as the big airlines have expanded and Norwegian, Iceland’s Wow Air and other low-cost entrants have added service on twin-aisle jets between major cities.

The smaller planes added more recently make up only about 2% of trans-Atlantic capacity but have more markedly expanded the list of cities served.

The trans-Atlantic market is highly seasonal, and the drop-off in traffic has in the past forced discounters to offer even lower fares to fill their planes in the winter. The smaller new jets are more versatile, and they can be deployed on other routes, such as to the Caribbean or Southern Europe, or rented out to other airlines during the winter.

“You can increase aircraft utilization and use the same flight crews,” said consultant James Halstead at Aviation Strategy Ltd.

Norwegian spearheaded the low-cost push across the Atlantic with Boeing 787 Dreamliners before adding 737 Max jets to link smaller cities. Norwegian started 737 flights from Scotland and Ireland to the U.S. last summer.

Some of those routes haven’t worked out. Norwegian is dropping flights from Edinburgh, Scotland, to Hartford, Conn., and Providence, R.I. Chief Executive Bjørn Kjos said Norwegian has learned at least one of the destinations on its trans-Atlantic routes needs to be a major city.

JetBlue executives said they are considering using a longer-range version of the new single-aisle Airbus A321neo to start trans-Atlantic service. JetBlue has built a big presence in New York and Boston, luring business-class passengers with its Mint cabin on domestic transcontinental flights, which offers lie-flat beds.

“It’s a market with high fares and not great service,” said Marty St. George, JetBlue’s marketing chief. The airline needs to give Airbus two years’ notice to secure the longer-range jets, so it would likely be 2020 before service could begin.

Scandinavian airline Primera Air also plans to fly Airbus A321neo planes between London and New York. For now, the airline is using a rented Boeing 757, the maker’s largest single-aisle passenger plane.

Some European airlines are establishing or overhauling subsidiaries to address the threat. Big airlines are introducing stripped-down economy fares to compete with low-cost domestic carriers on trans-Atlantic routes.

International Consolidated Airlines Group SA, the largest trans-Atlantic player through its British Airways, Iberia and Aer Lingus units, plans to use the Airbus A321LR to expand Aer Lingus’s U.S. network. The jets could also be used in IAG’s budget long-haul startup, called Level.

Dublin-based Aer Lingus will start receiving the planes next year. Chief Executive Stephen Kavanagh said they will be used to reach at least a dozen new U.S. destinations. “It’ll open up new markets,” Mr. Kavanagh said at an IAG investor meeting.

IAG was sufficiently worried about competition from low-cost rivals that it submitted unsolicited bids for Norwegian earlier this year, both of which were rejected. IAG bought a minority stake in Norwegian, which it views as a vehicle for further expansion to the U.S.

Europe’s biggest airline Ryanair Holdings PLC has flirted with starting service to the U.S. for a decade. Chief Executive Michael O’Leary said he’s waiting for plane prices to drop before embarking on trans-Atlantic hops.

In the meantime, Ryanair is talking to long-haul carriers to feed its flights though cooperation deals.

—Robert Wall contributed to this article.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Cleveland Nieuport #11, N917AB: Accident occurred August 06, 2015 at Bellingham International Airport (KBLI), Whatcom County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N917AB
  
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Bellingham, WA
Accident Number: WPR15LA235
Date & Time: 08/06/2015, 2000 PDT
Registration: N917AB
Aircraft: CLEVELAND ALLAN B NIEUPORT 11#
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 6, 2015, about 2000 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Cleveland Nieuport #11 airplane, N917AB, experienced a partial loss of engine power during a maintenance check flight and landed short of a closed runway at Bellingham International Airport, Bellingham, Washington. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that the engine had just been replaced during a recent condition inspection. Prior to the flight, the engine had been run 5 times, which included the initial run, test run, engine tuning, taxi test and subsequent high-speed taxi test. The pilot stated that he intended to fly over the airport to remain within gliding distance of the runway. Just after takeoff from runway 16, at an altitude of 700 ft above ground level, a reduction in engine rpm was observed despite the throttle being at full power. The pilot noted that the engine rpm was still decaying, that he heard no unusual sounds from the engine, and that it was not running rough. The pilot further reported that he notified the tower controller that he was having engine problems and was subsequently cleared to land runway 34.

While the engine rpm continued to decrease, the pilot realized that he was unable to reach runway 34 and attempted to land on a closed runway, while observing that the engine rpm had decreased from 3,000 to 2,500, then down to 2,000, which was an rpm setting for a power off approach to landing. The pilot then observed a stand of trees directly in front of his position, at which time he maneuvered to avoid striking them, along with an adjacent airport perimeter fence. Subsequently, the airplane landed hard and nosed over in a grassy area short of the runway.

The airplane was powered by a Hummel, 76 HP, Volkswagen 2180 cc engine with dual weber carburetors, and a single point electronic ignition system. Examination of the airplane was performed by the pilot, an airframe and powerplant mechanic, and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. The FAA inspector reported that the examination revealed that the fuel system appeared to be in operable condition. Further examination revealed that the fuel tank was void of any fuel, and that a vent line at the top of the fuel tank was separated from the tank as a result of the accident. The fuel lines were intact to the fuel pump, which was a stock Volkswagen style fuel pump. The pump was removed and operated normally when actuated by hand. The carburetor throats were clear and clean. The throttle linkages were not damaged and moved freely. The idle and full throttle stops were intact, and the throttle linkage moved to both stops.

The Volkswagen style ignition system featured a Bosch distributor with stock ignition wires and spark plugs. In addition, the ignition coil was also stock. The FAA inspector stated that the original points and condenser were replaced when the engine was equipped with an electronic type automotive ignition system. The ignition system revealed evidence of damage.

The engine was rotated in the direction of rotation and the distributor shaft rotated correctly with a slight amount of delay. The drive gear revealed some backlash, which according to a mechanic, was normal for the engine.

Engine valve train continuity was established throughout the engine. The FAA inspector reported that they did not observe any evidence of mechanical anomalies with the airframe or engine.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 69
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/01/2007
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  10000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 135 hours (Total, this make and model), 7500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CLEVELAND ALLAN B
Registration: N917AB
Model/Series: NIEUPORT 11# NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 010
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/06/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 850 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 0 Hours
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 346 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: VW- Hummel
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: Type 1- 2180
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBLI, 149 ft msl
Observation Time: 0319 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 28°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Bellingham, WA (BLI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bellingham, WA (BLI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: BELLINGHAM INTL (BLI)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 170 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Soft
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  48.787778, -122.541944 (est)

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan EX, N942AC, registered to and operated by Multi-Aero Inc d/b/a Air Choice One Inc: Accident occurred August 02, 2015 at O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Chicago, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; West Chicago, Illinois

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N942AC 
 
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Chicago, IL
Accident Number: CEN15LA334
Date & Time: 08/02/2015, 1437 CDT
Registration: N942AC
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 2 Minor, 7 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Scheduled 

On August 2, 2015, at 1437 central daylight time, a Cessna 208B, N942AC, operating as Air Choice One (call sign Weber) flight 2627, was substantially damaged when a wind gust lifted it up and it impacted the taxiway while awaiting takeoff clearance at Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Chicago, Illinois. The two flight crewmembers and five passengers were not injured; two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Multi-Aero, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a scheduled domestic passenger flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The airplane had departed the terminal gate at 1410 and was destined for Southeast Iowa Regional Airport (BRL), Burlington, Iowa.

There had been numerous reports of wind shear and microbursts in the immediate vicinity. According to the captain and first officer's statements, they were awaiting takeoff clearance on runway 22L when the control tower asked that they move aside to allow other aircraft to pass. As the captain was making a right turn, a wind gust lifted the right side of the airplane and turned it clockwise. The airplane remained nose down, resting on its left wing for several seconds, then fell back upright coming to rest on all three landing gears. The engine was secured, and all occupants deplaned through the main cabin door. A post-accident examination showed the outboard portion of the left wing was bent up about 30 degrees, the left aileron was damaged, and all three propeller blades were impact damaged.

According to a special weather study conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board, the National Weather Service's (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart valid at the time of the accident depicted a low pressure system over northwestern Michigan, with a cold front extending to the southwest through Wisconsin, Minnesota, into Iowa and then westward into Nebraska. To the east of the low, a warm front extended across northern Wisconsin and Lake Michigan, into north-central Michigan. An outflow boundary associated with thunderstorms was depicted just east of the warm front over extreme eastern Michigan into Lake Huron.

The National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Research Application Laboratory's (RAL) regional radar mosaic image 2 minutes prior to the accident depicted a defined line of thunderstorms over Lake Michigan and into northeastern Wisconsin in the vicinity of the warm front and another area over eastern Michigan associated with the outflow boundary. There was another large intense-to-extreme area of echoes observed in the vicinity of ORD moving eastward across northern Illinois at approximately 40 knots.

The NWS Storm Prediction Center (SPC) issued a Convective Outlook at 1116 CDT that indicated the potential for thunderstorms and a greater than 30% probability of wind gusts greater than 50 knots, and a 15% probability of hail 1 inch in diameter or larger, and a 2% probability of a tornado in the Chicago area.

ORD's special weather observation at 1429 indicated the wind to be from 230° at 17 knots, gusting to 24 knots, visibility 10 miles in thunderstorm, a few clouds at 5,000 feet agl, scattered clouds at 7,000 feet, ceiling broken at 9,000 feet, and broken at 20,000 feet, temperature 31° Celsius (C), dew point 19° C, altimeter 29.74 inches of mercury (Hg). Remarks: Peak wind from 240° at 27 knots occurred at 1402 CDT, thunderstorm began at 1428 CDT, frequent lightning in cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground to the west. Thunderstorm west moving east, temperature 31.1° C, dew point 19.4° C.

ORD's special weather observation at 1443 indicated the wind to be from 250° at 16 knots gusting to 45 knots. Runway 10L's visual range (RVR) was 700 feet variable to better than 6,000 feet. Weather: thunderstorm, hail, and moderate rain, scattered clouds at 5,000 feet agl. Cumulonimbus and scattered clouds at 7,000 feet, broken ceiling at 9,000 feet, and broken clouds at 20,000 feet. Temperature, 27° C, dew point, 22° C, altimeter 29.76 inches of Hg. Remarks: Peak wind from 270° at 45 knots occurred at 1440 CDT, rain began at 1942, hail began 1943, thunderstorm began 1928, pressure rising rapidly, frequent lightning cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground overhead, thunderstorm overhead moving east, temperature 26.7° C, dew point 21.7° C. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/19/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/25/2015
Flight Time:  5800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2100 hours (Total, this make and model), 4200 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 240 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 80 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 23, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/22/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/27/2015
Flight Time: (Estimated) 591 hours (Total, all aircraft), 22 hours (Total, this make and model), 201 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 175 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 100 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N942AC
Model/Series: 208B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Commuter; Normal
Serial Number: 208B-5202
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 10
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/25/2015, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8842 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 55 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 357 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-140
Registered Owner: Multi-Aero, Inc.
Rated Power: 867 hp
Operator: Multi-Aero, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135)
Operator Does Business As: Air Choice One, Inc.
Operator Designator Code: MUIA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KORD, 674 ft msl
Observation Time: 1443 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 313°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 5000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft agl
Visibility: 2 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots/ 45 knots, 250°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.76 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Thunderstorms - Small Hail and/or Snow Pellets; Moderate - Thunderstorms - Rain
Departure Point: Chicago, IL (ORD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Burlington, IA (BRL)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1410 CDT
Type of Airspace: Air Traffic Control; Class B

Airport Information

Airport: Chicago O'Hare International (ORD)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 672 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28C
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10801 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 7 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.966944, -87.894167 (est)