Friday, July 14, 2017

Skydiver did not deploy parachute; he sent wife video before he jumped

Experienced skydiver Capotorto Vitantonio jumped from a plane Tuesday morning about 10 a.m., just seconds before the crew received an urgent message from dispatchers on the ground, urging them to stop him.

But it was too late.

DeLand Police said Vitantonio jumped and did not pull the cord to open his parachute, according to a revised police report released Friday.

On Tuesday, Costansa Litellini, 25, ran into the Skydive Deland building on Flightline Boulevard, begging employee Tara Richards to stop her husband from sky diving.

Litellini had just received a video from him, saying he was “not going to pull the cord and that he was going somewhere wonderful,” police said.

Richards immediately radioed the plane, according to a police report, but Vitantonio, 27, had already jumped.

Richards told police she had seen Vitantonio before the flight and “he had seemed normal.”

She could not be reached for comment Friday.

Police were called to Skydive Deland on Tuesday in reference to an injured skydiver.

Officials began to search for Vitantonio from the sky and the ground.

They eventually found him face down in an open field near the runway.

A chaplain was called to the scene to let Litellini know that Vitantonio had died.

The United States Parachute Association, of which Skydive Deland is a member, reported 21 fatalities related to skydiving in 2016 out of 3.2 million estimated jumps by its members.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N2173S, registered to and operated by Sunrise Aviation Inc: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2017 in Marineland, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Sunrise Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2173S 

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Marineland, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 44-180, registration: N2173S
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 2300 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-44-180, N2173S, was destroyed during a descent and subsequent inflight breakup near Marineland, Florida. The flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sunrise Aviation Inc., Ormond Beach, Florida, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight which originated from Brunswick, Georgia, at an undetermined time with an intended destination of the Ormond Beach Municipal Airport (OMN), Ormond, Florida.

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the flight reported to Air Traffic Control that they had OMN in sight while at an altitude of about 5,400 feet mean sea level (MSL). Shortly after, radar and radio communication was lost with the accident airplane. The FAA issued an alert notice (ALNOT) shortly after. The main wreckage was located by air units about 1141 on July 14, 2017.

The main wreckage came to rest inverted within a heavily wooded area. The outboard portions of the left and right wings, baggage door, and a portion of the right stabilator were located throughout a 0.5-mile-long and 0.2-mile-wide debris path that spanned across water and marshland northwest of the main wreckage.

The located wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



Jeffrey Matthew Salan
August 29, 1946 - July 13, 2017



Muhammad Al-Anzi



Jeff Salan's Final Expenses

On the evening of July 13, 2017, our father and husband, Jeff Salan, was tragically killed in a plane crash. Jeff had been a pilot and instructor for more than half of his 70 years of life, and he loved every minute of it. He loved his career and his students, and there are hundreds, if not thousands, of pilots, both active and retired, who will tell you that they are alive today because of the skills and knowledge that they learned at Jeff Salan's side.

Jeff could have focused his career on making money, flying big jets and seeing the world, however, he chose to be home each day and do the one job he took even more pride in than teaching: being a father and husband.
Jeff has been married to his loving wife, Jane, for 40 years, and they raised two dutiful and family-oriented children. As the sole-earner in the household, Jeff worked nearly every day of the year to provide for his family. 

This loss has nearly broken us. We say nearly because he instilled in us his refusal to break or bend, even when times were at their worst. And times are certainly at their worst for our family.

The cost of burying our father, our husband, is insurmountable at this time without help. We do not cremate our family members, and we want to keep Jeff close to us and the place we have called home for the last 37 years.

The financial goal set for this fundraiser is an estimated cost for an in-ground burial at a cemetery near our home. An anonymous donor has now offered to cover those expenses, so the money raised will be used for associated costs and final expenses. We ask that you be generous, if you can, just as Jeff was generous towards his students, his coworkers, and his family. It may normally be a cliche, but Jeff Salan truly was the man who would give you the shirt off of his back without a second thought.

The Salan family thanks you in advance for all the help you may provide us in our time of need.

https://www.gofundme.com



FLAGLER COUNTY, Fla. - Jeffrey Salan, 70, of Ormond Beach, and Mohammed Alanazi, 27, from Saudi Arabia, died when a twin-engine plane from an Ormond Beach flight school went down late Thursday night, the medical examiner confirmed.

After hours of searching near the Flagler-St. Johns county line, the Piper PA44 was found Friday upside down in a clump of trees near Pellicer Creek, just west of Marineland. Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly said one body was found with the wreckage and there did not appear to be any survivors.

Salan was a flight instructor for Sunrise Aviation Fight School. A spokesman for the school said they were on a routine night training flight.

"The families of the student, all of whom are in Saudi Arabia, and the family of our local instructor are all distraught, as you can imagine," said Patrick Murphy, director of training for Sunrise Aviation.

A GoFundMe account has been set up to help Salan's family with funeral expenses. 

"Jeff could have focused his career on making money, flying big jets and seeing the world, however, he chose to be home each day and do the one job he took even more pride in than teaching: being a father and husband," the GoFundMe page reads. "Jeff has been married to his loving wife, Jane, for 40 years, and they raised two dutiful and family-oriented children. As the sole-earner in the household, Jeff worked nearly every day of the year to provide for his family. This loss has nearly broken us. We say nearly because he instilled in us his refusal to break or bend, even when times were at their worst. And times are certainly at their worst for our family."

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. They have not provided any indication of what might have caused the plane to go down.


https://www.news4jax.com




Jeddah — A Saudi commercial pilot under instruction was killed in a twin-engine plane crash in the River To Sea Preserve near the St. Johns County line on Thursday, National Transportation Safety Board Investigator Joshua Cawthra confirmed to the local media.

Muhammad Al-Anzi, 27, who died along with his 70-year-old flight instructor, is to be buried in Riyadh.

Al-Anzi, married with a 3-year-old daughter, had gone to the US in 2014 to obtain a commercial flight pilot license.

The “mangled” aircraft was found shortly before noon Friday after about a 12-hour search, according to Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly.

Investigators collected debris from the plane wreckage scattered across a marshy area near the Matanzas River in eastern Flagler County, reported the Daytona Beach News Journal.

Cawthra said that the cause of the crash is still under investigation, and that a preliminary report will be released within a week or so.

Authorities previously confirmed that the downed plane belonged to Sunrise Aviation, a private flight school in Ormond Beach.

Federal Aviation Administration reports indicate the flight was bound for Ormond Beach from Brunswick, Georgia, when radar contact was lost about 22 miles north of Ormond Beach just after 11 p.m. Thursday.


http://saudigazette.com.sa

National Transportation Safety Board Investigator Joshua Cawthra









A 12-hour search by land, water and air ended just before noon Friday when a Piper PA-44 Seminole trainer aircraft sought since the FAA first reported losing contact with it Thursday night was found upside-down in dense brush near Marineland and the Flagler/ St. Johns County line.

Crushed and cracked in half according to images just released by the Flagler County Sheriff’s Office, it appears those on board are dead, according to Sheriff Rick Staly.

The white airplane had been the subject of a search by multiple state, federal and local agencies since the FAA lost contact with it around 11 p.m. Thursday, Staly said.

The plane was being operated by Sunrise Flight Academy in Ormond Beach, and its training director confirmed a student from Saudi Arabia and an instructor are both missing, according to First Coast News.

The FAA said that it lost contact with the Piper PA-44 aircraft approximately 22 miles north of Ormond Beach. The Coast Guard said it went down in the vicinity of Pellicer Creek, after taking off from Brunswick and heading to Ormond Beach. Witnesses heard what they described as the sound of an engine sputtering as the aircraft flew by, according to First Coast News.


Just after 11:30 a.m., the main part of the aircraft was discovered by a news helicopter from Orlando’s WESH-TV, crashed in the 90-acre River to Sea Preserve, which straddles both sides of Florida and is owned jointly by Flagler County and the Town of Marineland.

Staly said he had been to the wreck site and it appears that the aircraft clipped a tree and flipped over. Only one victim’s body was visible when he joined investigators there Friday morning, one of its landing gear deployed on the flattened wreckage surrounded by dense palmettos, according to Sheriff’s Office photos.

“It is a very tragic ending to a search. You always hope you can find people alive. There is no indication we will find survivors,” Staly said. “… I can see one [body]. It is a very crumpled aircraft, and by how it’s lying, you can’t see into the fuselage.”

The 34-year-old flight school, which also calls itself Sunrise Aviation, is based at 740 Airport Road in Ormond Beach. Sunrise is also a flight training provider for Florida State College at Jacksonville’s degree programs in professional pilot technology, as well as at Polk State College at Lakeland, Florida. It has satellite training facilities at Jacksonville’s Cecil and Herlong Recreational airports. The academy says it is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration on its website.

Staly couldn’t confirm how many people were in the airplane as what was a search and rescue operation shifted to a recovery effort that will see a crane brought in to flip it over so investigators can get inside. Staff at the Sunrise Flight Academy’s satellite office at Craig Airport did not wish to comment when reached. But a sign on the front door of its Ormond Beach office said all school activities were cancelled Friday since it is “dealing with an emergency involving one of its aircraft,” according to an image tweeted by First Coast News. The note also states a meeting was set for Friday afternoon with all cadets and instructors.

The Flagler County Sheriff’s Office command post was relocated to the crash site, which is on dry land, to “protect the scene.” The National Transportation Safety Board will take over the crash investigation.

“The indications are no one survived. It is clear one person is deceased inside the aircraft,” Staly said. “We can’t get inside to see how many more.”

Flagler County Sheriff’s Office Chief Mark Strobridge, who saw the wrecked aircraft, said it will be “days or weeks” before investigators can officially confirm who was on board. But rescuers got to the site on foot and via Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission airboat to find the aircraft “fairly intact,” Staly said.

“It was a hard impact,” he said, adding there was no sign of fire.

The Piper Seminole is a 27.6-foot-long aircraft with two 180-hp engines on a 38.6-foot wingspan, and has been built for more than 20 years, according to the aircraft company website.

Coast Guard assisted in the search for survivors, a crew aboard an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater was launched at 2:15 a.m. St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office and Fire Rescue as well as the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office joined in the search efforts.

http://staugustine.com

MARINELAND, FL (WTLV/WJXX) -- The wreckage of a small plane that crashed late Thursday has been found in a remote area near the Flagler-St. Johns County line. Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly said he believes there were no survivors.

The Flagler County Sheriff's Office confirmed that the plane they found is the same one they had been looking for that flew out of Sunrise Aviation flight school in Ormond Beach near Daytona.

Sunrise Aviation director of training Patrick Murphy told First Coast News that a 27-year-old student from Saudi Arabia and a 70-year-old instructor went missing. He said he believes they were on the plane, but this has yet to be confirmed by authorities.

The FAA said it lost contact with a Piper PA-44 aircraft approximately 22 miles north of Ormond Beach around 11 p.m. Thursday.

The aircraft took off on what the flight school calls a routine flight from St. Simons Island, Georgia and was returning to Ormond Beach when it disappeared. A crew aboard an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater was launched at 2:15 a.m.

The sheriff said the plane might have clipped a tree before crashing. Witnesses heard what they described as the sound of an engine sputtering.

The 27-year-old student has a young daughter and wife in Saudi Arabia. He was aiming to go back home to fly for an airline, First Coast News has learned.

"Most of our students are international, so we get to know them close," Murphy said. "Students are family, particularly in this kind of program where students come to us for six or 12 months."

Sunrise Aviation has been around since the 1980s. An official with the flight school said this is the first crash in which someone was critically hurt or killed.

Vans RV-8, N559JC: Accident occurred July 14, 2017 near Felts Field Airport (KSFF), Spokane County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/air/N559JC

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA153
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 14, 2017 in Spokane, WA
Aircraft: CLARK JAMES T VANS RV8, registration: N559JC
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 14, 2017, at 1330 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Clark Vans RV-8 airplane, N559JC, sustained substantial damage following a loss of engine power and subsequent off-airport forced landing from Felts Field Airport (FSS), Spokane, Washington. The pilot, the sole occupant, received minor injuries. The pilot/owner operated the airplane as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 local personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that the engine started to surge after takeoff and he turned back to the airport. During the turn back, the engine lost power and he observed black smoke coming from the engine compartment. The pilot made a forced landing to an open field that resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. 

The wreckage was transported to a secure facility for further examination.




SPOKANE, Wash. --  The man who crashed a plane in a field near Hillyard told KREM 2 News he is ok.

Jonathan Liard said, “I am ok, no major injuries just a couple scrapes and bruises.”

Liard said he was at home Saturday and he had gone to get some X-rays but they were all negative. He told KREM 2 News he could not discuss details of the crash because it is currently under investigation. 

An Spokane Police Department officer said the crash happened just after 1:30 p.m. Officer Scott Hice was driving just north of the precinct and saw the plane flying very low then saw the plane crash in a nearby field. The officer escorted Liard to safety.

Officials believe Liard was experiencing some engine problems mid-flight, forcing him to crash land the plane. Authorities said the pilot does have former military and flight experience. The officer on scene said Liard told him he was in the U.S. Air Force.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash. An official from the FAA confirmed the plane was a Vans RV8 traveling from Spokane Felts Field to Deer Park, Washington when it went down. 



A pilot walked away with only minor injuries Friday after his small two-seat airplane apparently had mechanical problems and crashed in a field just east of Hillyard.

Spokane Police Officer Scott Hice, who observed the crash, said he was getting into his car at the North Precinct when he heard what sounded like an aircraft with mechanical problems overhead.

“I heard him before I saw him. I looked up and he was flying almost over the top of us. I said, ‘Man, that guy’s flying low,’” Hice said. “You could see he was fighting it.”

The airplane was banking toward a large vacant field east of Market Street and north of Wellesley Avenue. “I knew he wasn’t going to make it out of that field.”

Hice first saw the plan flying north. He banked to the south and turned west before it went down.

“On the last turn, he kind of flared … and then goes down,” he said. “Obviously, the way he put it down, he knew what he was doing.”





Hice said he ran towards the downed craft while he radioed for help. Hice lost sight of the plane and didn’t know that the aircraft had landed in a depression in the field.

“I thought for sure he was gone. I was scared to death I would run up on a fire and someone was burning,” Hice said.

Instead, Hice saw a man walking his way. Hice asked him “Are you the pilot?” The man said yes. “He said, ‘I’m in the Air Force.’ It was pretty crazy.”

Hice then walked the pilot to an area near the intersection of Wellesley Ave. and Ferrall St. and waited for an ambulance, which was already en route. He said pilot was 31 years old, and suffered cuts on his face, arm and left leg.

“I just hoping he wasn’t dead,” Hice said. “I looked up and he was walking away from it like nothing happened.”

Fire Chief Brian Schaeffer identified the plane as an RV 8, a tandem two-seat, single-engine, low-wing aircraft sold by kit aircraft manufacturer Van’s aircraft.




The area, which is near Felts Field, has seen a fairly regular series of crashes over the past few years.

In December of last year, the pilot of a twin-engine aircraft crash landed at Felts Field. The aircraft touched down without its landing gear deployed. The pilot, the sole occupant of the aircraft, was uninjured in the crash.

In May of 2015, two men were killed when their Piper PA-46 crashed into the Spokane River shortly after takeoff while conducting a post-inspection test flight. The National Transportation Safety Board later ruled control cables on the plan that control banking and turning were improperly installed.

Also in 2015, in February, a Piper Malibu crashed near the Hamilton Street Bridge shortly after takeoff from Felts Field near the Hamilton Street bridge. It was later determined the plane was refueled with jet fuel. The pilot, who was pulled from the plane’s wreckage alive but in serious condition, later succumbed to his injuries.

http://www.spokesman.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N737EZ: Fatal accident occurred January 12,2016 near Fox Stephens Field - Gilmer Municipal Airport ( KJXI) Gilmer, Upshur County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N737EZ

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA083
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 12, 2016 in Gilmer, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N737EZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and one passenger departed on the approximate 35-minute personal flight with an unknown quantity of fuel onboard. Later that evening, they departed to return to their home airport in night visual meteorological conditions without adding additional fuel during their stop. While on final approach to their home airport, the engine lost total power and the airplane impacted trees and terrain. The passenger stated that the engine did not sound any different during the accident flight than on any of the previous flights and that there was no indication of a problem with the airplane when the engine lost power. Postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed no usable fuel within the airplane's fuel system, and no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation; therefore, it is likely that the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power as a result of fuel exhaustion. While it is unknown what preflight fuel planning the pilot performed and the extent of his preflight inspection, it is apparent that both were inadequate; had he performed both properly, he likely would not have run out of fuel.

Recorded GPS data showed that the pilot flew the traffic pattern 400-600 ft lower than the recommended 1,000-ft above airport elevation and turned to the base leg of the traffic pattern farther from the runway than recommended. Had the pilot flown the traffic pattern at the recommended altitude and distance from the runway, it may have been possible for the airplane to glide to the runway following the loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's inadequate preflight planning and inspection, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to maintain an appropriate traffic pattern altitude and distance from the runway, which may have allowed the airplane to glide to the runway following the loss of engine power.


Samuel Oliver Lucky 




HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 12, 2016, about 1954 central standard time, a Cessna 172N, N737EZ, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain following a loss of engine power about 0.5 nautical mile south/southwest of Fox Stephens Field-Gilmer Municipal Airport (JXI), Gilmer, Texas. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was privately owned and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. No flight plan was filed and the flight was not receiving any air traffic control services. Night visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed for the flight that departed from Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport (SLR), Sulphur Springs, Texas, about 1916 and was returning to JXI.

The passenger, who was the pilot's wife, stated that the pilot filled both of the airplane's wing fuel tanks a couple of days before the flight to SLR. The tanks were fueled from three gas cans that had a capacity of 5 gallons each and one that had a capacity of 6 gallons. However, the investigation could not determine how much total fuel was onboard the airplane following the refueling. The passenger said that she obtained the fuel from the airport in Gladewater, Texas, 1 or 1 1/2 weeks before the accident because the fuel there was cheaper than at JXI. The gas cans had been used solely for fueling the airplane. She said that the flight departed from JXI to SLR, was 33-34 minutes long, and there were no stops. 

The pilot's brother, who had dinner with the pilot and his wife near SLR, stated that he did not see the airplane depart from SLR. He said that when he left, the pilot was still getting the airplane warmed up, it was kind of cold outside, and the pilot's wife was already sitting in the airplane. The pilot's brother said that the airplane was tied down, and the pilot untied the tie downs and checked the airplane wings. The pilot then got into the airplane, turned the lights on, had the instrument lights on, and was "looking at things." He said that "he doesn't know how much looking around" at the airplane the pilot was doing and he said that he did not see the pilot reach up and shake the wings because he, the pilot's brother, was not paying attention. 

The passenger stated that the return flight was 29-32 minutes long with no stops. The cruise altitude for both legs of the flight was 3,500-3,700 ft. She said that the engine did not sound any different during the accident flight than from previous flights. There was no indication of a problem with the airplane when the engine lost power. She said that there were no alarms, and the pilot did not say anything was wrong before the engine quit. 

The airplane was located by law enforcement on January 13, 2016, about 0105, after it was reported overdue by a family member.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate on July 7, 2014, with no limitations. 

Review of the pilot's logbook showed that the pilot had accumulated 259.15 total hours of flight experience, of which 202.55 hours were in the accident airplane. The pilot's total flight experience at night was 13.5 hours. The two most recent entries for flight at night were 1.6 hours in February 2014 and 0.8 hours in December 2015. 

The pilot's most recent flight review was completed on September 22, 2015, in the accident airplane. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane, S/N 17269373, was registered to the pilot in July 2008. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-H2AD reciprocating engine, S/N L-3869-76. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on December 9, 2015, about 3 flight hours before the accident. 

The airplane was equipped with standard capacity tanks, which held 21.5 gallons each and provided a total capacity of 43 gallons and 40 gallons of usable fuel.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1955 automated weather observation at JXI included calm wind, clear skies, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 6°C, dew point 2°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury.

According to data from the US Naval Observatory, sunset occurred at 1734 on the evening of the accident, and the end of civil twilight was at 1800. Moonset occurred at 2039. The phase of the moon was a waxing crescent, with 9% of the moon's visible disk illuminated. 




WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest on a heading of about 040° about 0.5 nautical mile south/southwest of runway 36 in a wooded area. A wreckage path measured about 197 ft in length and was oriented on an approximate 050° heading. The airplane was resting on its left side and on top of the left wing, which was folded over and oriented along the length of the fuselage. The wings, flight control surfaces, and stabilizers were attached to the airframe. The wing flap cockpit control and the flap actuator were in the 20° positions. Flight control continuity from the control surfaces to the cockpit controls was confirmed. 

There was no fuel smell or leakage at the accident site. Both wing fuel tank caps and the auxiliary fuel tank cap were intact and secure. There was no usable fuel in the wing fuel tanks. About 8 oz of blue-colored liquid consistent in color with 100 low-lead aviation fuel was drained from the auxiliary fuel tank, and about 1 oz was drained from the airframe fuel strainer assembly. The fuel strainer did not contain debris. Removal and disassembly of the carburetor showed that the carburetor bowl contained about 2 oz of a liquid consistent in color with a mixture of oil and fuel. The remaining fuel from the auxiliary fuel tank, airframe fuel strainer, and carburetor bowl was tested for water using water sensing paste; the test showed no indication for the presence of water.

The propeller was attached to the propeller hub and engine. Neither propeller blade exhibited S-shaped bending or chordwise scratching. 

The cockpit master/alternator switch was in the off positon, and the magneto key switch was in the both positon.

Throttle and mixture control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the carburetor. Examination of the engine confirmed the suction and expulsion of air through the top spark plug holes after removal of the spark plugs and when the engine was rotated through by hand using the propeller. Continuity of engine to the accessory section and of the valve train to the accessory section was confirmed during engine rotation. Rotation of both magnetos produced electrical spark through each magneto lead.

An Adventure Pilot iFly multifunction display was recovered from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Division for download.




MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Dallas County Medical Examiner's Office conducted an autopsy of the pilot on January 14, 2016. The autopsy report stated that the pilot died as a result of blunt force injuries. The manner of death was accident.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma performed toxicology testing. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Losartan, an antihypertensive medication, was detected in the liver, and pravastatin, a high cholesterol medication, was detected in the blood and liver. Neither medication is noted to adversely affect pilot performance.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

An Adventure Pilot iFly was recovered from the wreckage. The iFly unit is an externally-powered, multi-function display and GPS receiver with a high resolution, LCD touchscreen display. The unit included a built-in navigational database and was optionally capable of receiving inflight ADS-B information, including weather radar, airport weather reports, weather forecasts, and traffic advisories. The navigational and information features included terrain warnings, airspace alerts, and display of en route visual flight rule and instrument flight rule (IFR) navigational information and IFR approach charts.

Download of the recovered iFly unit showed two log files that corresponded to the date of the accident flight. The most recent log, the accident flight, spanned from 19:16:21 to 19:53:53, which captured the accident flight from JXI to SLR. The second log file spanned from 16:42:46 to 17:26:59 and captured the previous flight from SLR to JXI. 

During the last minute of flight, the airplane's speed steadily decreased from 79 knots to the last recorded speed of 29 knots. The GPS altitude also steadily decreased from 832 ft to 425 ft. At 19:53:16 the airplane was at 649 ft GPS altitude, 74 kts, and about 35 degrees past and .43 miles from the approach end of runway 36 at JXL. At 19:53:27 the airplane was at 583 ft GPS altitude, 70 kts, and about 55 degrees past and .62 miles from the approach end of runway 36. 

Figure 1 shows the flight track the airplane followed, which is consistent with a left downwind and a left base leg for runway 36 at JXI, which had an airport elevation of 415 feet. The GPS track indicated the airplane began a turn for the left base when the airplane reached about 55 degrees past abeam the approach end of runway 36, as depicted in Figure 1.

Plot of recorded data points for the accident flight showing the accident location near JXI. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations 61.57 Recent flight experience: Pilot in command, states in part:

(b)Night takeoff and landing experience. 

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers during the period beginning 1 hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise, unless within the preceding 90 days that person has made at least three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop during the period beginning 1 hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise, and – 

(i) The person acted as the sole manipulator of the flight controls; and 

(ii) The required takeoffs and landings were performed in an aircraft of the same category, class, and type (if a type rating is required), and, if the aircraft to be flown is an airplane with a tailwheel, the takeoffs and landings must have been made to a full stop in an airplane with a tailwheel.

Advisory Circular 90-66A - Recommended Standards Traffic Patterns for Aeronautical Operations at Airports without Operating Control Towers, stated in part:

c. It is recommended that airplanes observe a 1,000-foot above ground level (AGL) traffic pattern altitude. Large and turbine-powered airplanes should enter the traffic pattern at an altitude of 1,500 feet AGL or 500 feet above the established pattern altitude. A pilot may vary the size of the traffic pattern depending on the aircraft's performance characteristics.

d. The traffic pattern altitude should be maintained until the aircraft is at least abeam the approach end of the landing runway on the downwind leg.

e. The base leg turn should commence when the aircraft is at a point approximately 45 degrees relative bearing from the runway threshold.

The Cessna 172N airplane flight manual, Section 3, Amplified Emergency Procedures, Engine Failure, contained a chart of maximum glide distance, which is shown in Figure 2. 


The Cessna 172N flight manual chart for maximum glide distance shows an approximate glide distance of 1 nautical mile at an altitude of 500 ft above ground level with a speed of 65 knots indicated airspeed, propeller windmilling, flaps up, and zero wind.










NTSB Identification: CEN16FA083 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 13, 2016 in Gilmer, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N737EZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 13, 2016, about 0105 central standard time, a Cessna 172N, N737EZ, was located in a wooded area about 0.5 nautical miles south/southwest of runway 36 at Fox Stephens Field - Gilmer Municipal Airport (JXI), Gilmer, Texas. The airplane was found by a Texas Department of Public Safety Officer during a search with the Gilmer Police Department for an airplane that was reported by a family member to be overdue. The private non-instrument rated pilot was fatally injured and a passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane received substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan nor receiving any air traffic control services. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed from Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport, Sulphur Springs, Texas on January 12, 2016 about 1915 and was returning to JXI.

Eurocopter EC 135 P2+, N135LX: Incident occurred July 13, 2017 in Roanoke County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N135LX

Rotorcraft on landing, tail rotor sustained unknown damage.

Date: 13-JUL-17
Time: 11:50:00Z
Regis#: N135LX
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: EC135
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROANOKE
State: VIRGINIA

Piper PA-28-180, N992TF, Friendswood Aviation LLC: Incident occurred July 13, 2017 at Houston Southwest Airport (KAXH), Arcola, Fort Bend County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Friendswood Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N992TF

Aircraft went off the taxiway into a ditch.

Date: 13-JUL-17
Time: 22:25:00Z
Regis#: N992TF
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Beech D55, N1796A, A-S Ranch Inc: Accident occurred July 13, 2017 at Friedman Memorial Airport (KSUN), Hailey, Blaine County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

A-S Ranch Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1796A

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA154
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Hailey, ID
Aircraft: BEECH D55, registration: N1796A
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 2010 mountain daylight time, a Beech D55 twin-engine airplane, N1796A, landed hard and ground looped after touchdown on runway 31 at Friedman Memorial Airport (SUN), Hailey, Idaho. The airplane was registered to A-S Ranch Inc. and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed from a Caldwell, Idaho, airport at an unknown time. A flight plan was not filed. 

The pilot reported that the throttles were not mechanically rigged correctly, and were not aligned with each other, but he elected to fly the airplane with this condition. As he approached the airport from the southeast to land on runway 31, he realized that the airplane was too high. He reduced the power to lose altitude, and decided that he could still land safely on the runway. While on approach the airplane drifted to the right of centerline so he added power to go around. However, due to the mis-rigged throttles, he added too much power to the left engine, which increased the drift to the right. The pilot was able to return the airplane to a wings level attitude, but the nose was pitched up too high, and the airplane landed hard. The right-wing tip struck the runway, and the airplane ground looped.

Dean International, Inc., dba Dean International Flight School

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N80457

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA242 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Key Biscayne, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N80457
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 2320 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172M, N80457, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a road near Key Biscayne, Florida. The flight instructor was not injured and the private pilot receiving instruction sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to C & G Aircraft Parts, Inc., and operated by Dean International, Inc., dba Dean International Flight School, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida, about 2055.

The flight instructor stated that during the preflight inspection, both fuel tanks were visually inspected and also checked using a dipstick, and each tank contained about 15 gallons. The flight departed TMB with the fuel selector on the "both" position, and flew to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where the private pilot, who was receiving instruction for an instrument rating, executed a practice instrument approach that terminated with a full-stop landing. The airplane remained on the ground for about 15-18 minutes with the engine operating, then departed and flew to Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), West Palm Beach, Florida, where the private pilot executed another practice instrument approach, which terminated with a missed approach, and holding practice. About 2215, the flight instructor elected to return to TMB and requested visual flight rules flight following from air traffic control (ATC). The flight proceeded south, east, and then south along the shoreline. While flying near Key Biscayne with the engine operating between 2,300 and 2,350 rpm, the mixture control full rich, and the fuel selector on the same position it had been since the initial takeoff (both), the engine sputtered about 2-3 seconds, lost power, then increased briefly to 1,500 rpm, before losing power again. The private pilot reported the left and right fuel gauges at that time were indicating the lower red arc and between 1/4 and 1/2 capacity, respectively. Attempts to restore engine power consisted of moving the fuel selector to each fuel tank position, and checking the magnetos on each respective position, but engine power was not restored. The flight instructor declared an emergency with the ATC controller and requested emergency equipment. While descending for a forced landing to a road, the airplane collided with tree branches, and then a light pole, and came to rest within 25 to 30 ft of the touchdown point on the road.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, there was no evidence of fuel leakage or a breach of either fuel tank. Less than 1 gallon of fuel was drained from the left fuel tank, while about 10 gallons of fuel were drained from the right fuel tank. The airplane was recovered for further examination at a later date.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered to Air Christian Inc 
Operated by Dean International Inc dba Dean International Flight School

http://registry.faa.gov/N49453

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA231
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 01, 2017 in Homestead, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N49453
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 1, 2017, about 2118 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 152, N49453, was destroyed when it descended and impacted terrain in Everglades National Park, Homestead, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Air Christian, Inc., and operated by Dean International, Inc., dba Dean International Flight School, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida, about 2050.

According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration air traffic control (ATC) communication and radar information, the pilot contacted local control, and was cleared to takeoff from runway 9R with a right turn to the southwest. Uncorrelated radar targets consistent with the airplane were tracked from the first target located just past the departure end of runway 9R. The airplane then turned to the southwest and flew west of Miami Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51). The airplane then proceeded due west of X51, where, orbits consistent with a procedure turn and instrument holding procedures were noted. The last radar target at 2118, at an altitude of 950 ft msl, on a heading of 324° was noted at 25.49101° north latitude and -080.7483° west longitude.

The operator reported the pilot as missing to law enforcement on July 5, 2017; the wreckage was located in the evening about 2230. No emergency locator transmitter signal was reported to ATC by flight crews flying overhead or nearby, or received by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

The wreckage was recovered for examination at a later date.





One week after the body of a pilot who trained at a South Florida aviation school was discovered near a downed plane, another plane from that same school made a crash landing in Key Biscayne. 

The two people on board were no seriously injured in Friday’s incident. The crash was the most recent in an unusually high pattern of incidents originating from Dean International Flight School. Last week, Mark Ukaere was killed when his unauthorized flight crashed in the Everglades. Ukaere’s body was discovered near the plane with an alligator creeping close by.

One week later, most of the school’s planes were temporarily out of service, NBC 6 exclusively confirmed. Thirty-nine out of 50 planes were place into maintenance, at least nine by the order of the Federal Aviation Administration.

Some of the maintenance work is routine, but others include rudder issues, faulty brakes and loose or missing screws.

In an exclusive interview, the owner of the Dean International told NBC 6 the bigger the school, the more issues.

"If you're operating an operation like this, 50 aircraft, 60,000 miles per year, if you take our average and another schools' average, we're in a heck of a good shape," owner Robert Dean said.

NBC 6 uncovered and sifted a stack of documents obtained by the FAA and the National Transportation and Safety Board, which showed lengthy reports of planes that went down. Since 2007, the school logged a total of 29 accidents or incident – including 5 fatalities.

Dean defended the school, saying that despite the issues many students attend the school because it is one of the best aviation centers.

Watch Video:   http://www.nbcmiami.com

Dean International Inc: Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N80457, Cessna 152, N94292 and Cessna 152, N49453 

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N80457, C & G Aircraft Parts Inc: Accident occurred July 13, 2017 in Key Biscayne, Miami-Dade County, Florida 

  Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida

C & G Aircraft Parts Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N80457

Aircraft force landed on a road.

Date: 14-JUL-17
Time: 03:20:00Z
Regis#: N80457
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KEY BISCAYNE
State: FLORIDA




When a small Cessna 172 airplane crash-landed in Key Biscayne after its engine reportedly lost power late Thursday night, the forced landing broke one pilot’s nose and snapped the strut supporting the plane’s right wing. As the plane careened along Crandon Boulevard as its impromptu runway, it crashed into a light pole and then a tree, police said.

But both men on that flight — a flight instructor and his student — survived the crash. It was the second in as many weeks linked to Dean International Flight School in Miami, after a plane crash in the Everglades killed another student pilot from the school earlier this month.

Both accidents follow a checkered history for the flight school, which has had more than two dozen prior incidents or accidents logged with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board in the last 10 years, records show.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue spokesman Jorge Lafarga said officers were alerted to the Key Biscayne crash around 11:20 p.m. Thursday, and that Key Biscayne police and Miami-Dade police helped respond at the scene. The two men in the plane had only minor injuries, and one was taken to the hospital, police said.

The aircraft had taken off from Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and was headed for Miami Executive Airport before it was forced to land, FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said in an email.

NTSB investigator Tim Monville said the damage to the small plane was extensive enough to classify it as an accident, but that an investigation was just beginning. The FAA is also investigating the crash, Bergen said.

Though the plane was registered to C&G Aircraft Parts Inc., the tail of the plane bore Dean International’s name, partially masked with white tape. The address on FAA record for C&G Aircraft Parts Inc. is the same as the address for Air Christian Inc., the registered owner of another plane linked to Dean International that crashed in early July.

That plane, a Cessna 152 single-engine craft, disappeared July 1 after a student pilot with Dean International took off alone from Miami Executive Airport that evening, police said. The school’s owner, Robert Dean, reported the craft missing to the FAA the following Wednesday, four days later. The plane’s wreckage was spotted in the Everglades about seven miles west of Homestead later that night after an alert for the craft was sent out.

When rescue crews finally made it through the swampy landscape to recover that plane, they found a craft that had been functionally destroyed, Monville said. “The cockpit was fragmented, both wings were heavily damaged, the tail was broken off, but attached by cables.”

The pilot, whom news outlets later identified as Mark Ukaere, had been studying for an advanced certification at Dean International, according to roommates. He had been licensed to fly the craft but violated a flight school policy forbidding flying alone, Dean told Local 10.

Ukaere wasn’t the first pilot fatality in Dean International’s history. FAA records showed the school had more than two dozen prior accidents or incidents in the last 10 years, including a fatality in 2014 when a student pilot crashed into the water off Elliott Key and died. Two were injured in 2007 when a plane trying to make an emergency landing crashed into power lines and landed upside-down.

The FAA took action more than half a dozen times, issuing warning notices and fines to the school, records showed. The reports cited multiple issues in those cases, including failed pre-flight inspections and insufficient maintenance of fuel and oil fluid levels.

A preliminary report on the plane that crashed in the Everglades is still pending, but Monville said that initial tests of the emergency locator transmitter had showed it did not send out a signal.

Dean, the flight school’s owner, did not return calls for comment Friday. He defended his school’s flying record to NBC6, which previously reported on the flight school’s history, though he acknowledged that his school’s history of accidents was higher than average.

“If you’re operating an operation like this, 50 aircraft, 60,000 miles per year, if you take our average and another schools’ average, we’re in a heck of a good shape,” Dean told the station.

Multiple passersby who saw the crashed plane in Key Biscayne Friday said those on board were lucky to have survived. As Downtown Towing pulled the wreckage of the plane into a street off the main boulevard on Friday afternoon, some tourists took photos and passengers in cars inching by rolled down their windows for a better look. The plane’s wings were separated from the body, and a light pole and no turns street sign were knocked over.

Leonardo Caldreron, 50, said he was thankful no one had been seriously hurt in the crash — and impressed the pilot had landed the plane given the narrowness of the road and the many trees lining it.

“I’m surprised it didn’t catch on fire,” he said. “I was trying to look for skid marks.”


http://www.miamiherald.com







Two men inside a small plane survived after it crashed Thursday night on Key Biscayne’s main road.

Police and fire rescue agencies were called at 11:18 p.m. to the Cessna C172 single-engine aircraft.

It collided with a tree in the 4000 block of Crandon Boulevard, Key Biscayne Police Chief Charles Press said.

“No other vehicles or people were involved,” Press said. “Everyone walked away from the crash.”

The plane, built in 1976, “reportedly lost power,” an FAA spokeswoman said in an email Friday. It had taken off from Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and was destined for Miami Executive Airport, but landed instead on the island that is east of Miami. The FAA will investigate the crash, she said.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue was joined at the scene by Key Biscayne Fire Rescue and Miami-Dade Police.

“There was no fire and the crash survivors had minor injuries,” said Lt. Felipe Lay of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. “One was taken to a hospital.”

The crash site is near the tennis center where the Miami Open international tournament is played.

“Traffic obviously was affected to a small degree,” Press said. “But it was late. There wasn’t a lot of traffic, and it’s moving normally today.”

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board were notified, the fire official said. A light pole was knocked out of its base and Florida Power & Light came to fix it.

“I think it was more of a safety issue rather than for a power outage,” Lay said.

The plane is registered to C&G Aircraft Parts Inc., in Miami. On its tail was an ad for a flight school, Dean International.

On July 5, a crashed Cessna 152 plane registered to Air Christian Inc., was discovered in the Everglades, seven miles west of Homestead. It was linked to Dean International Flight School at Miami Executive Airport, according to records.

The body of the pilot, the only person aboard, was found next to the wreckage, authorities said.

“The aircraft went missing from Miami Executive Airport [July 1],” FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said at that time.

On July 3, the plane’s owner alerted the FAA that it was missing, she said. Miami-Dade Fire Rescue’s aviation unit found the crash scene.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating that crash.

Robert Dean, of the flight school, was on vacation and not available to comment, a staffer said.


http://www.sun-sentinel.com


Radar image of the flight path of a plane before it crashed in The Everglades, killing the pilot.


It was a shocking discovery in the depths of the Everglades Thursday morning: A man's body was found next to a mangled plane as a gator crept nearby.

The pilot-in-training, identified as Mark Ukaere, went on an unauthorized flight and crashed in the murky waters, officials said. It was later revealed that the plane went missing from the Dean International Flight School Saturday, but wasn't reported missing until four days later.

NBC 6 analyzed reports that reveal past problems at the aviation school. NBC 6 also obtained an exclusive radar image highlighting the deadly flight path into the Everglades.

Robert Dean runs the aviation center from Miami Executive Airport. The school houses 50 aircraft and logs 60,000 miles per year.

"The reason there's so many children, so many kids at this school is because of our safety record, because of the way we maintain the planes," Dean told NBC 6. "The pilots, the captains who fly, all send their kids. Why? Because this is one of the best schools." 

However, Dean admits his school has higher instances of accidents and issues than most other schools.

NBC 6 obtained reports by the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration of downed planes at Dean International. Since 2007, a total of 29 accidents or incidents have been documented, including five fatalities.

The reports reveal other issues such as failed pre-flight inspections, loss of engine power, unsatisfactory oil fluid levels and even fuel exhaustion.

"If you're operating an operation like this, 50 aircraft, 60,000 miles per year, if you take our average and another schools' average, we're in a heck of a good shape," Dean said.

Many of the incidents could have been avoided if the pilot checked the gauges, and the planes were properly maintained, according to the reports. Aviation experts say it is ultimately the operator's responsibility to maintain airworthiness.

NBC 6 also found enforcement actions taken by the FAA; the school faced corrections, warnings and fines in the past. 

The cause of this week's crash is still under investigation.

A memorial in honor of Ukaere will be held Saturday at Dean International Flight School.

http://www.nbcmiami.com

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Cessna 152, N49453, Air Christian Inc: Fatal accident occurred near Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Miami-Dade County, Florida 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida 

Air Christian Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N49453

Aircraft crashed into a swamp area.  The one (1) soul on board was fatally injured. Subject of an alert notice.  Wreckage located seven (7) miles from Homestead, Florida.

Date: 06-JUL-17
Time: 06:09:00Z
Regis#: N49453
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: HOMESTEAD
State: FLORIDA






Mercy Akinyemi: Pilot said he flew alone because flight instructor was a no-show

MIAMI-DADE, Fla. - While flying a Cessna 152, Mark Ukaere sent pictures to his girlfriend, Mercy Akinyemi, before crashing in the Florida Everglades. 

Akinyemi, who lives in New Jersey, said she warned him that it was getting dark. He sent her selfies from the cockpit on Saturday.

"I asked him why he did you have to fly alone. You just landed without anyone," Akinyemi said. "He said the guy never showed up. His instructor never showed up."

It would be the last pictures he would send her. Ukaere, 29, died. Authorities found his body on Wednesday. Alligators preyed upon his remains.

"Right now, everyone is confused. Everyone is devastated," Akinyemi said. 

The plane belonging to Dean Flight Training was destroyed. Ukaere, a licensed pilot, was working on an advanced certification. 

Robert Dean, the flight school's owner, attributed the cause of the crash to spatial disorientation due to the darkness of the night over the Everglades.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board were investigating. 

https://www.local10.com



An alligator can be seen next to the body of the victim, which is blurred.






Mark Ukaere

The ex girlfriend of Mark Ukaere apologizes to him.





SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) - A small airplane was found in the Everglades, along with the body of a pilot, after the plane had gone missing, Wednesday night.

According to Miami-Dade Police, they received a call from the owner of Dean International Flight School regarding the missing plane at 10:19 p.m., Wednesday, and dispatched an Air Rescue unit.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said a downed Cessna 152 single-engine airplane was later found at 1:58 a.m., Thursday, in an area seven miles west of Homestead General Aviation.

Police said the pilot’s body was found near the wreckage. Officials have yet to identify the deceased pilot, but roommates of Mark Ukaere, a student at the flight school, said they fear he is the pilot killed in the crash.

Ukaere’s roommates said he is a licensed pilot who has been continuing his training. He has been missing since Saturday night.

According to Robert Dean, the owner of the flight school, the pilot took off without permission at 8:50 p.m. “The individual was qualified to fly the aircraft, but he broke every single company policy,” he said.

Dean said they conducted their own search before contacting the FBI, Wednesday morning. “In our minds, we thought that he had already taken off, and he was doing what’s called a solo cross country,” he said. “Sunday went by. People went looking for the aircraft but could not find it, and then Tuesday was the holiday, the Fourth of July.”

Moreover, Dean said, Ukaere was not supposed to be flying in the dark without a co-pilot.

A trainer at the school said flying solo should only come after years of experience. “You take your time, you log your hours, but those hours do not really guarantee the right experience or the right to control the aircraft,” he said. “Some people get it in 20, some people get it in 60. So it is really sad, but it is not discouraging at all because it is motivation to investigate that occurrence — what happened, what was the effect of it and to learn from it.”


http://wsvn.com




MIAMI (CBSMiami) – In the Everglades, west of Homestead, a small plane could be seen from the air mangled in an apparent crash dive.

The scene is infused with alligators and accessible only by airboat.

The plane, a Cessna 152, was occupied by just the pilot who was apparently killed outright.

Mark Ukaere, from Nigeria, was an advanced student at Miami Executive Airport’s Dean Flight Training school, his fellow students told CBS4’s Gary Nelson. Ukaere did not have any family in South Florida.

The school’s owner, Robert Dean, said Ukaere took off in the plane Saturday night without telling anyone.

“He decided to go fly, himself,” said Dean. “He basically took the aircraft away from here without any authorization.”

Dean said Ukaere, who crashed into the Everglades muck, was well aware of rules against solo night flights.

“The individual is qualified to fly the aircraft, but he broke company policy. They are required to fly at night with two pilots on board,” Dean said.

The requirement is for good reason. Pilots not fully instrument-qualified can easily lose their bearings at night.

Ukaere, a licensed pilot, was working on getting his instrument rating.

“You go out there in the pitch dark and you basically have spatial disorientation,” Dean said. “So what happened is he took off and he went into what is basically called a black hole.”

Knowing the danger, why did the company not report the plane and its pilot missing for four days?

“In our minds, we thought that he had taken off and he was doing what is called a solo cross-country,” Dean said.

It was not until after the July 4th holiday, when Ukaere had not returned, and the plane couldn’t be located at any airport around the state, that the company reported it missing.

A Miami-Dade Fire Rescue helicopter found it in the swamp hours later.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. Miami-Dade homicide detectives are handling the death investigation.

Various local and federal agencies, as of Thursday afternoon, could not say what, if any, civil or criminal liability the company might face for the delay in reporting its aircraft missing.


http://miami.cbslocal.com

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Fla. - A small airplane that apparently crashed in the Florida Everglades has been found.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the single-engine Cessna 152 was found in a swampy area about seven miles west of Homestead.

The FAA said the pilot was the only person on board.

Miami-Dade police Detective Argemis Colome said Miami-Dade Fire Rescue found the wreckage at about 9:30 p.m. Wednesday.  

A view from Sky 10 showed a body in the swamp next to the wreckage. An alligator was wading next to the body.

The plane was registered to Air Christian Inc. in Miami. The same plane was forced to make an emergency landing on U.S. Highway 41 in Collier County in December 2015.

A logo for Dean International Flight Training & Aircraft Rentals was on the side of the plane. The company is based at Miami Executive Airport. 

Local 10 News reporter Liane Morejon spoke to the flight school's owner, who said the pilot took off on an unauthorized solo flight at 8:40 p.m. Saturday.

Robert Dean said he called different places he thought the pilot might have gone to and people who might have been with him before contacting the FBI Wednesday night. 

The business owner said he believes the pilot suffered from spatial disorientation as he flew in pitch darkness over the Everglades. 

FAA and National Transportation Safety Board investigators arrived at the scene Thursday morning.


https://www.local10.com


A pilot was killed after his Cessna 152 single-engine plane crashed deep in the Everglades Wednesday night, authorities said.

A Miami-Dade Fire Rescue air unit first spotted the plane wreckage around 10:20 p.m. with a body alongside the debris, police spokesman Argemis Colome said. Fire Rescue then alerted Miami-Dade police, but because of the conditions authorities decided to wait till morning to go out to the scene, he said.

The crash is “so far into the Everglades that they might have to take airboats,” said Colome. The Federal Aviation Administration said the crash happened about seven miles west of Homestead. The pilot was the only person on the plane.

The plane that crashed had been housed at Miami Executive Airport, Colome added, though he said officers were still investigating when the plane had taken off. The pilot’s identity was not released.


Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the agency is investigating the crash, and the National Transportation Safety Board is determining what caused the aircraft to go down.

http://www.miamiherald.com

MIAMI, Fla. (CBS12) —  One person is dead following a plane crash in the Florida Everglades.

According to CBS Miami, the FAA said the plane was reported missing Wednesday night after it left Miami Executive Airport. 

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue crews found the plane Thursday morning in a swampy area about seven miles west of Homestead, said the Federal Aviation Administration in statement to CBS Miami.

The pilot hasn't been identified.

Authorities say the plane is registered to Air Christian Inc., of Miami.

http://cbs12.com

The wreckage of a small, single engine aircraft was found in a swampy area of the Everglades early Thursday morning.

The Cessna 152 was found about seven miles west of Homestead, the FAA said in a statement. Only the pilot was on board.

Footage appeared to show the pilot's body amid the wreckage.

No information was released about how the plane got in the swampy area. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are en route to begin their investigation.

http://www.nbcmiami.com

Cessna 152, N49453:  Incident occurred December 06, 2015 in Collier County, Florida 



A small plane experiencing mechanical difficulties landed safely Sunday morning on U.S. 41 in eastern Collier County.

The Collier County Sheriff's Office said the plane landed near mile marker 49 in Ochopee after water got into the aircraft's engine.

The pilot was a flight student and the only person onboard, according to the FAA, which said the plane was a single-engine Cessna 152.

No one was injured.

US 41 has since reopened.

Source:  http://www.nbc-2.com



The pilot of a Cessna 152 experiencing mechanical difficulties landed safely Sunday morning on U.S. 41 in eastern Collier County.

The Collier County Sheriff’s Office received a call around 10:50 a.m. about the plane landing near mile marker 49 on U.S. 41, near the county line.

Karie Partington, a Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman, said the pilot was a flight school student flying from the east coast. 

The student was the only person onboard.

There was no damage to the plane and the pilot was not injured.

Around noon, the road was temporarily blocked in both direction for emergency vehicles.

The plane eventually restarted and the pilot flew it back out, Partington said.

Source:  http://www.naplesnews.com



OCHOPEE, Fla – A mechanical problem leads a student pilot to make an emergency landing on US41.  The FAA tells Wink News a Cessna 152 landed in Ochopee around 10:45am.  The Collier County Sheriff’s Office says the student is from a school on the East Coast, and he was not injured in the landing. An unknown mechanical problem caused the student pilot to make the decision. There is currently no roadblock. 

Source:  http://www.winknews.com




A Cessna 152 plane experiencing mechanical difficulties landed safely Sunday morning on U.S. 41 in eastern Collier County. The plane landed near mile marker 49 of U.S. 41, near the county line, around 11:10 a.m., according to a dispatcher. Public information officer Karie Partington said the pilot was a flight student flying from the east coast. The student pilot was the only person in the plane. Collier County sheriff's deputies are on scene. There are no injuries and no damage to the plane. At 12:05 p.m., FDOT reported that traffic in both directions was blocked for emergency vehicles, and motorists should use an alternative route.

Cessna 152, N94292, Air Christian Inc: Accident occurred Sunday, November 13, 2016 in Miami, Florida 




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Air Christian Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N94292

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA044
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 13, 2016 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N94292
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 13, 2016, about 1400 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 152, N94292, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Miami, Florida. The private pilots were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the instructional flight operated by Dean International, Inc., which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.The flight originated at Lakeland Linder Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida about 1220, and was destined for Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida.

Each pilot provided a written statement, and both statements were consistent throughout. The pilots described the flight as a "buddy" flight, the purpose of which was to build flight time for each.

The airplane was in cruise flight over the Everglades about 2,000 feet when the crew noted some engine "roughness." They noted that the engine oil temperature was "normal" but the engine oil pressure indication was "low." The pilot on the controls turned the airplane towards the nearest airport, which was 18 miles from its position at that time. Approximately 1 minute later, the engine stopped producing power, and the crew selected a road for the forced landing. During the descent, an engine restart was attempted and was unsuccessful.

The airplane touched down prior to the road on soft, wet ground, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. The pilots egressed the airplane uninjured.

The first pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on September 8, 2015. The pilot reported 212.5 total hours of flight experience, all of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

The second pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on July 11, 2016. The pilot reported 128.3 total hours of flight experience, all of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

The two-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1982 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-235 series engine. Its most recent 100-hour inspection was completed November 3, 2016 at 10,955 total aircraft hours, and the airplane had accrued 52 hours since that date. An engine overhaul was completed 246 aircraft hours prior to the accident.


During recovery of the airplane, large cracks were noted in the engine crankcase in the vicinity of the number 2 cylinder. The airplane's engine was retained for further examination.




Fearing an alligator attack, two shaken survivors of a plane crash in the Everglades took refuge on Jimmie and Betty Osceola's airboat.

"I told them not to worry about them," Betty Osceola said Monday about swamp reptiles.

She didn't share with the men from India -- whose single engine plane crashed Sunday in far western Broward County -- anything about the water moccasins that live in that part of the swamp.

"They didn't mention the snakes, and I didn't tell them," Betty Osceola said. "They didn't need anything else to worry about."

Pilot Divyank Sejwal and student Preet Kanwar Singh Dhaliwal were in a Cessna 152 aircraft that belongs to Dean International, Inc., a flight school that operates out of Miami Executive Airport in Miami-Dade County.

Robert Dean, owner of the plane and 35-year-old school that attracts about 300 aviation students each year, said something happened with the Cessna's engine. A Federal Aviation Administration investigator was scheduled to visit the crash site Monday, he said.

"We don't know yet," Dean said of a possible cause. "The plane had been reliable in the past."

Of the student and pilot, he said, "They are licensed private pilots. They are trained and did exactly what they were trained to do."

"The pilot did an amazing job," said Dean. "They are safe. The plane will be recovered and our whole goal is to determine what took place and make sure it never happens again."

Betty Osceola, 49, and Jimmie Osceola, 70, of Ochopee in Collier County, own Buffalo Tiger Airboat Tours that is on the Miccosukee Reservation in Miami-Dade County.

"It was a beautiful day, so we decided to tour [Water Conservation Area] 3A," Betty Osceola said.

They steered an airboat toward an area of tree islands, hammocks that are north of Interstate 75 where the tribe has camps and teaches children about the environment. They also take airboat tour customers there.

On Sunday afternoon, they wanted to clear brush and check on the conditions of the islands. The couple skimmed their boat over the sawgrass and beneath the interstate to their destination and awaiting chores.

Later in the afternoon as they headed south toward home, they first noticed the Cessna.

"It was getting lower," Betty Osceola said. "At first I didn't pay attention because you have planes do their flight lessons and we normally see them out there."

As the airboat was about 1.5 miles south of Interstate-75, the couple became concerned.

"The plane just kept getting lower and lower and lower, too low," she said. "It passed over us, heading northeast. My husband didn't see the propeller turning before it crashed. He signaled to make a U-turn."

They were wearing ear protection and couldn't hear if the Cessna's engine had died. She spun the airboat around and at first, couldn't see the plane.

Then, she said, "We saw the tail go up and it landed on the roof."

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue said the Cessna's nose gear hit the swamp before it flipped over.

As the couple raced their airboat to the crash, Betty Osceola said she thought, "Oh Lord, don't let us find dead bodies. If they were still stuck in the plane, our thought was we'd do what we could to get them out."

Instead, the couple saw two men in uniform, standing on a wing. The survivors looked "a little bit stunned," she said. "We asked if they were OK or hurt anywhere, and they said they were OK. But we didn't know if they were in shock."

Luckily there wasn't a fire.

"Thank God," Betty Osceola said. "They were able to get out on their own."

They invited the men to sit on the airboat while the foursome waited for help.

The Osceolas called the tribe's police department because, she said, "They have wildlife officers that patrol the area. They would find us faster than the other police departments, unless you've got helicopters."

The men told the Osceolas the plane wasn't acting right, and it went down before they could get to a highway, Betty Osceola said.

One of the fliers reported the crash in a phone call, she said, "and they thought they were near I-95. If nobody had seen them go down, it would have been a bit before they were found, unless [responders] took the signal off that phone."

But the Osceolas found the crash survivors, in an area where water was about a foot deep, and stayed with them until rescuers arrived.

"I'm glad my husband and I were there at the right time to help them, and that they were OK," Betty Osceola said.

After about 30 minutes, helicopters from Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue circled above.

When Miami-Dade's helicopter landed, one of the responders asked if the airboat was stuck, and if everyone was OK.

Sejwal and Dhaliwal shook the Osceolas' hands and thanked them, Betty Osceola said.

The Miami-Dade helicopter flew the men to Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport, according to Dean.

He described their survival as "no hospital, no injuries, no scratches. It's amazing."

Betty Osceola said about witnessing a plane crash,"When we got home, the adrenaline was still going. It's not something that I ever wanted to experience. I don't ever want to see that again."


Source:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com

A small Cessna 152 plane made an emergency landing Sunday afternoon off Alligator Alley, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement.

The two men on board were not injured, Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles said. When the nose gear hit the swamp, the plane flipped over, Jaches said.

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue found the downed plane about a mile and a half south of Interstate 75 near mile marker 47, Jachles said.

"The two men told firefighters the plane quit; they lost power," Jachles said.

The men were identified as Preetkanwar Singh Dhaliwal, 20, and Divvank Sejwal, 23. It's unclear which man was the pilot and where the plane was heading. It's also unknown from where the plane took off.

The two-seat aircraft landed about 2:30 p.m. Sunday, the FAA said. Fire Rescue received the call about 2:55 p.m., Jachles said.

The plane had 20 gallons on board, Jachles said.

A private airboat and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue assisted in the rescue, Jachles said. A Miami-Dade Fire Rescue helicopter flew the two men away from the scene.  The FAA is continuing their investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com