Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Incident occurred July 11, 2017 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (KFFO), Greene County, Ohio



WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE --  A small private plane made an emergency landing Tuesday on a taxiway at Wright-Patterson because the pilot said the aircraft was running low on fuel, a base spokesman said.

The single-engine propeller plane had a pilot and passenger aboard, but the names of the two men and the type of aircraft involved were not immediately released Tuesday.

The aircraft landed on Taxiway B of Area A about 1:30 p.m. near the main runway, according to Wright-Patterson spokesman Daryl Mayer.

Base security forces set up a perimeter around the airplane and investigated the scene, Mayer said.

The pilot did not make radio contact with air traffic controllers at Wright-Patterson before landing, but he did radio he was low on fuel after the landing, Mayer said.

The pilot was not expected to face charges for landing on the military airfield, Mayer said.

“Certainly, in an emergency situation during extraordinary circumstances there are allowances that can be made,” the spokesman said.

The plane will be allowed to refuel and leave the air base, Mayer said late Tuesday afternoon.

http://www.daytondailynews.com





WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (WKEF/WRGT) - A small, single-engine propeller aircraft made an unannounced emergency landing around 1:30 p.m. at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Tuesday.

The pilot did not have contact with the tower during landing, but once he was on the Taxiway B of Area A, told officials he was forced to land due to low fuel.

Base Security Forces had responded to establish a perimeter around the aircraft, but allowed him to get fuel from the base before leaving.

http://fox45now.com

Walter J. Koladza Airport (KGBR) takes off on new strategy to build hangars, drops special permit application

GREAT BARRINGTON — Armed with lawyers and test results at a packed meeting, both sides in the escalating airport drama recalibrated Monday after the airport's owners changed their strategy to build three hangars at Walter J. Koladza Airport.

Attorney Lori Robbins told the town Select Board that Berkshire Aviation would withdraw its special permit application for permission to build in its residential/agricultural location, and instead file a permit application with the Zoning Board of Appeals.

Because the airport began operating before zoning regulations hit the books, it is known as a pre-existing, non-conforming entity. While it can always be an airport, it must have town permission to build anything new on the 93-acre property.

But at five charged public hearings, some airport neighbors objected to the 147-by-150-foot hangars on a number of grounds, then complained of the noise and potential safety hazards from the small country airport.

Soon the objections took a hard turn as two nearby wells revealed lead concentrations well above the US Environmental Protection Agency action level. Fingers pointed to the airport, raising the issue of leaded aviation gas, which many small aircraft still require and which the airport sells.

Yet just last week Krentsa released test results showing what the EPA considers very low lead concentrations in the airport's own well and faucet water.

And on Monday, Krentsa told the board that eight soil samples - taken from around the airport perimeter and at both ends of the runway - came up with "insignificant" lead levels. The samples were taken at a depth of between 0-8 inches, according to a report from EST Associates in Needham, an environmental consulting firm.

Those soil results, obtained by The Eagle, ranged from 12.3 parts per million in a sample near Route 71 between the airport office and a private home, and 21.7 ppm from a combined sample from both sides of the runway end at Seekonk Cross Road.

The EPA says naturally occurring lead in soil can range between 50 and 400 ppm. If soil where children play has 400 ppm lead concentrations, the EPA requires remediation, for instance.

The website of the UMassAmherst Center for Agriculture Food and the Environment says 400 ppm and below is a low level of lead in garden soil.

Later Krentsa told The Eagle that either side on both ends of the runway were chosen for sampling since that's where the aircraft "run-ups" are just before take off.

"Those areas have the most concentration of exhaust," Krentsa explained.

But while Krentsa turns to the ZBA to build hangars he says will protect aircraft and generate revenue, airport neighbors made it clear the lead issue will follow both Berkshire Aviation and the board.

"It's not that you can just walk away now," said Cheryl Lein. "It's not just the ZBA's role to take care of that."

Lein went on to cite a state Department of Environmental Protection report that lists the airport as one of a number of threats in that area to the aquifer, the town's drinking water recharge source. She said the town is responsible for taking care of the aquifer no matter what happens here.

But going to the ZBA for approval may give the board less control over what happens at the airport in future, said Sean Stanton, board chairman. The board had been looking at a number of conditions to attach to the special permit, like selling an unleaded fuel and limiting expansion.

"This is not the direction I wanted to go," he said.

And Richard Dohoney, the attorney for airport neighbors Marc Fasteau and Anne Fredericks said he had a "strong objection" to allowing this withdrawal. He said it put the community and the town through too long and expensive a process, particularly for some, "who had to hire overly priced lawyers to deal with all this."

While there were plenty of chuckles in the room at this, Dohoney continued on a stern path.

"There is a reason the Legislature put in a two-year ban on re-submissions [of permit applications]," he said. "It's to prevent exactly what happened here. It's an abuse of the process by big businesses like the airport who can come in and wear down the community, wear down the staff ..."

That two-year ban, however, only applies if a special permit is denied or if the withdrawal is accepted by the board "with prejudice."

Robbins told The Eagle while a pre-existing, non-conforming entity is allowed to grow, "it is a gray area as to when a business needs a special permit to expand."

Robbins also hinted that one standard the ZBA has to apply to the hangars might make it easier for that board to rule in the airport's favor. That is, if building them is not "substantially detrimental to the neighborhood" from what is already there. She said the hangars would only improve things.

"Those airplanes are now tethered to the ground," she said, referring to concerns over leaking fluids. "It's better to have them in the hangars."

But Dohoney told the board it should take a vote to have the state Department of Environmental Protection investigate the airport for lead.

"You owe it to the town," he said.

Christine Hatch, an assistant professor of hydrogeology at UMassAmherst said while she couldn't speak to the specifics of this issue and all its variables, data over time helps find the smoking gun in such an instance.

"What makes it possible to really know whether activity at the airport [is the cause] is to have before and after data, and water data that go back far enough," she said.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N6091E, Volux Aviation LLC: Fatal accident occurred September 03, 2016 near Hollywood, Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident 

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Miami, Florida
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Volux Aviation LLChttp://registry.faa.gov/N6091E

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA309
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 03, 2016 in Hollywood, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6091E
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot did not receive a weather briefing before beginning the cross-country flight. After takeoff, the pilot requested from air traffic control to fly below 500 ft above ground level along the ocean shoreline. The controller approved the request but advised of heavy precipitation (a thunderstorm) at the airplane's 12-o'clock position and 4 miles ahead. The controller further advised that the pilot should turn left and fly offshore 3 miles to avoid the thunderstorm. Although the pilot acknowledged the instructions, a review of radar and GPS data for the flight revealed that he continued on course. About 3 minutes later, the pilot reported the he was reversing direction, and no further communications were received from the pilot. Review of the airplane's GPS track overlaid on weather radar plots revealed that the airplane flew into an area of extreme intensity precipitation and then entered a rapid descent and impacted the ocean. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions. It is likely that the pilot lost control of the airplane when it encountered strong downdrafts and heavy rain associated with the thunderstorm.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate preflight and in-flight weather planning, which resulted in continued flight into a thunderstorm and a subsequent loss of airplane control.


Frederick Ivory Gautzsch Jr.
 Boca Raton, Florida 
November 11th, 1942 - September 3rd, 2016

Robert Chartrand 
February 8th, 1950 - September 3rd, 2016
Resident of La Salle, Quebec, Canada


A crashed Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N6091E, is seen about 40 ft underwater off Dania Beach.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 3, 2016, about 0950 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6091E, was destroyed when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean while maneuvering near Hollywood, Florida. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned by Volux Aviation LLC, and operated by the private pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airplane departed from Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP), Pompano Beach, Florida, at 0932 and was destined for Ocean Reef Club Airport (07FA), Key Largo, Florida.

While flying south along the shoreline, the pilot contacted the air traffic control tower at the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) and requested to fly through the tower's airspace below 500 ft above ground level. The air traffic controller approved the request but advised the pilot of "heavy precipitation at the 12 o'clock position and 4 miles ahead" and stated, "you should turn left and go off shore 3 miles to avoid the thunderstorm." The pilot acknowledged the communication, and 3 minutes later, the pilot reported, "I am turning back to the north." The air traffic controller approved the turn, and no further communications were received from the airplane.

Review of radar and GPS data that were downloaded from a portable GPS receiver, revealed that the pilot did not turn left and fly offshore as the air traffic controller advised. The data showed that the airplane instead maintained a southerly heading. The airplanes final GPS-derived position was recorded at 0950, with the airplane at a GPS altitude of 440 feet, a groundspeed of 85 knots, and tracking southbound. About 0951, when the pilot advised the controller that he was turning around and heading north, and when the airplane was about 3 miles east of FLL, radar contact was lost at a reported altitude of 200 feet with the airplane tracking eastbound. A search was initiated, and the airplane wreckage was located about 2 miles east of the shoreline submerged in the Atlantic Ocean in about 15 ft of water.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on July 6, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 795 hours. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated a total of 818.4 hours of flight experience before the accident flight, and had flown 3.5 hours in the previous 90 days.



AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA and aircraft maintenance records, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on December 13, 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320-H2AD engine that was driving a McCauley propeller. According to maintenance records, the most recent annual inspection was completed on February 16, 2016, at a total time in service of 5,047.8 hours. At that time, the engine had accumulated 38.3 hours since major overhaul. At the time of the accident, the airplane had flown about 105 hours since the last annual inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

There was no record of the pilot receiving any preflight weather briefing from flight service or a direct user access terminal.

At 0953, FLL reported wind from 150° at 10 knots, visibility 10 statute miles in light rain, scattered clouds at 1,500 ft and 6,000 ft, ceiling broken at 10,000 ft, broken clouds at 25,000 ft, temperature 27°C, dew point temperature 23°C, and altimeter 30.06 inches of Hg. The remarks section of the observation stated that rain began at 0952, and there were cumulonimbus clouds overhead through the north and from the west to northwest moving northeast. A thunderstorm was reported at FLL at 0956 with occasional in-cloud lightning to the north. The thunderstorm ended at 1023 with 0.01 inch of rain reported at the airport and with no significant change in flight conditions or wind gusts.

The National Weather Service Miami (KAMX) Weather Surveillance Radar – 1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) was operating in the severe storm precipitation mode surrounding the time of the accident. KAMX WSR-88D composite reflectivity images at 0938, 0943, 0948, and 0953 depicted a band of heavy-to-extreme intensity echoes along the southeast Florida coast and immediately east of FLL during the period, with the echoes in the immediate vicinity of the accident site reaching maximum intensity and then decreasing in intensity with time and moving north-northeastward. The lowest 0.5°-elevation scan depicted the conditions immediately above the airplane between 870 to 3,220 ft and depicted echoes between 40 to 52 dBZ (heavy-to-extreme intensity). Overlaying the airplane's GPS track on the 0953 0.5°-base reflectivity image (see figure 1) indicated that the airplane traveled into a small but intense reflectivity core of 51dBZ (extreme intensity) precipitation.

Figure 1 - KAMX WSR-88D Composite Reflectivity Image at 0953 with the airplane's 0950 GPS-derived position superimposed in magenta.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was recovered from the water and examined. The left and right wings were separated from the fuselage at their roots and exhibited aft crushing along their leading edges. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit area to all flight control surfaces. The measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a nose-down trim. Engine valve train continuity was verified, and thumb compression on all cylinders was established by rotating the propeller. All flight control surfaces remained at least partially attached to their respective attachment points. The flaps were in the "up" position. Both fuel tanks were breeched and exhibited signs of hydraulic deformation. The left main landing gear was separated from the fuselage. All seats were separated from their mounting points.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Broward County Medical Examiner, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, performed an autopsy on the pilot by. The autopsy findings included "multiple blunt force injuries."


The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The toxicology report stated that no carbon monoxide was detected in the blood, and no drugs were detected in the urine.


Frederick Ivory Gautzsch Jr. (right)


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA309
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 03, 2016 in Hollywood, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N6091E
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 3, 2016 about 0952 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6091E, was destroyed when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean, while maneuvering near Hollywood, Florida. The private pilot and pilot rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane departed from Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP), Pompano Beach, Florida, and was destined for Ocean Reef Club Airport (07FA), Key Largo, Florida. The airplane was owned by Volux Aviation LLC, and operated by a private individual. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

While transitioning along the shoreline, the pilot contacted air traffic control and requested to fly below 500 feet above ground level. The air traffic controller approved the request but advised the pilot of "heavy Precipitation at the 12 o'clock position and 4 miles ahead," and further stated "you should turn left and go off shore 3 miles to avoid the thunderstorm." The pilot acknowledged the communication by stating "roger" and 3 minutes later the pilot reported "I am turning back to the north." The air traffic controller approved the turn and no further communications were received from the accident airplane.

The wreckage was subsequently located about 2 miles east of the Hollywood shoreline, submerged in the Atlantic Ocean in about 15 feet of water. The airplane was recovered and the wings exhibited accordion crushing from leading edge to trailing edge. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit area to all flight control surfaces. The measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a nose-down trim. Engine valve train continuity was verified and thumb compression was established by rotating the propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate was issued on July 6, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 795 hours.

Pilot flies Busch’s helicopter out of Swansea parking lot

Read the complete Court Documents with digital images of the prescription bottles and weapons seized from August Adolphus Busch IV: http://lmgcorporate.com/pdf





Two days after August Adolphus Busch IV, the former CEO of Anheuser-Busch, landed a helicopter on the parking lot of the Bronze Pointe office park in Swansea, a pilot hopped into the chopper Wednesday morning and took off.

The pilot declined to comment or give his name.


Swansea police prevented Busch, 53, from taking off in the Bell 407 helicopter Monday night. He was held overnight by police and released Tuesday afternoon.


The helicopter initially landed about 12:48 p.m. Monday, but police responded to the parking lot Monday night because a caller told police that an “intoxicated male was getting into the helicopter and attempting to fly away,” according to a search warrant application.


A judge ordered Busch to give blood, urine or other bodily fluid samples. No charges have been filed as of Wednesday.


When Busch tried to take off Monday night, he had four loaded guns, eight dogs and prescription pills with him. His wife, Dawna M. Wood, was also in the helicopter.


Busch took a portable breathalyzer at the scene, which came back negative for alcohol, according to the search warrant.


http://www.bnd.com

Ex-Anheuser-Busch CEO had loaded guns, 8 dogs and prescription pills in helicopter, police say

Swansea Police Department


On 07-10-17 at 12:48 PM Swansea Police Officers were dispatched to a report of a helicopter landing, for an unknown reason, at 1 Bronze Point, Swansea. Upon their arrival the helicopter was already on the ground in a parking lot. Assessment of the area and safety of the helicopter taking off due to close obstacles and buildings was of concern. Chief Steve Johnson contacted the FAA and they advised they would investigate the landing and requested pictures and information. The requested information was forwarded.


On 07-10-17 at 8:14 PM Swansea Police Officers were notified by a caller the pilot had returned to the helicopter and appeared too intoxicated to take off. When a Swansea Officer arrived the helicopter rotors were spinning and the engine was revving up. The Officer turned on the emergency lights on the squad car and the pilot powered down the engine. A second Swansea Officer arrived on scene. After a conversation with the pilot Standardized Field Sobriety Tests were performed on the pilot. Due to the totality of the circumstances the pilot was taken into custody. The St. Clair County State’s Attorney’s Office issued a search warrant for the blood, urine, breath or other bodily substance of the pilot. The pilot was transported to a local hospital where this was performed.


Swansea Police Chief Steve Johnson said, “We have been in close communications and coordination with the FAA and the St. Clair County State’s Attorney’s Office. This is not your normal case that a street police officer handles. The safety and security of the community, the pilot and passenger were of the utmost concern. The pilot was released from custody on 07-11-17 at 12:28 PM pending completion of the investigation. Family members are contacting another pilot to remove the helicopter.”














SWANSEA -- August Adolphus Busch IV, the former CEO of Anheuser-Busch, was flying his helicopter with four loaded guns, each with a round in the chamber; eight dogs; prescription pills and his wife riding along, according to police accounts and a search warrant application filed Tuesday.


The search warrant, signed by St. Clair County Associate Judge William Clay, commanded Busch to give blood, urine or other bodily fluid at Memorial Hospital in Belleville after his helicopter was found on a parking lot in Swansea.


This was after Busch took a portable breathalyzer at the scene, which came back negative for alcohol, according to the search warrant.


The helicopter initially landed about 12:48 p.m. Monday. But it was about eight hours later when a caller told police that an “intoxicated male was getting into the helicopter and attempting to fly away,” the search warrant stated.


Swansea Officer Cheryl Venorsky arrived as the helicopter was preparing to take off. Venorsky turned on her emergency lights, and the pilot, later identified as Busch IV, shut the copter down, the court record stated.


Officer Jason Frank then got to the scene and found Busch, leaning against Venorsky’s squad car.


“I observed August Adolphus Busch IV to be unable to keep a single train of thought,” Frank wrote in a sworn affidavit. “I noticed August Adolphus Busch IV appeared anxious.”


Frank then gave Busch a breathalyzer, which came back .000 for alcohol. Frank asked Busch to complete some field sobriety tests.


Frank approached the helicopter and talked to Busch’s wife, Dawna M. Wood, who was seated inside.


“When asked, Dawna advised August Adolphus Busch IV has anxiety issues and is off of his medication due to recent fertility treatment. I made contact with August Adolphus Busch IV and I advised August Adolphus Busch IV and he was free to go,” Frank wrote. “Instead of departing, August Adolphus Busch IV continued to ramble about things that were unrelated. At that point, due to his continued ramblings, I became suspicious and I reinitiated my investigation.”


Frank wrote Busch continually changed subjects during their conversation.


“Taking the totality of circumstances into consideration, I believed (Busch) could be under the influence of a controlled substance. I advised (Busch) he was no longer allowed to get into his helicopter and fly away,” Frank wrote.


It was then that Busch told Frank he had a concealed carry permit and had a Rohrbaugh R9 9mm ... in his front pants pocket. Busch asked if Frank wanted him to take the gun out. Frank said yes.


“As I removed the Rohrbaugh R9 (Busch) advised the Rohrbaugh R9 was ‘hot,’” Frank wrote.


Frank put the gun inside the helicopter, according to the affidavit, and called Swansea Police Chief Steve Johnson.


Inside the helicopter, police found four bottles containing prescriptions in the chopper, according to the search warrant. Two were prescribed for Busch: Alprazolam, which is also marketed under the brand Xanax and is a minor tranquilizer, and Clonazepam, another tranquilizer that is used to treat panic attacks.


The other two prescription drugs were prescribed for his wife, the document showed.


At some point, Busch told the officers that he was having an anxiety attack and started jumping around and running sprints, saying he was trying to get oxygen to cope with the anxiety attack.


Once Busch calmed, Busch allowed Frank to pat search him, then Frank asked if he could search his helicopter. Frank wrote that he found a pepper spray gun, a Ruger .22 revolver, a Ruger .357 Magnum revolver and a Glock .357 Magnum. All the guns were loaded.


Busch was given a second set of field sobriety tests.


Busch was then arrested and taken to the Swansea Police Department.


Swansea police requested the help of a drug recognition expert with Fairview Heights Police Department. The officer said he would need some time to report his findings.


Frank stated he needed to retain the evidence collected in the investigation and possible prosecution of Busch for reckless conduct, unlawful use of a weapon and intoxicated person in or about an aircraft. No charges had been filed as of Tuesday.


Busch’s wife was allowed to leave, taking the eight dogs with her, Johnson said.


Busch, 53, is a commercial pilot with certificates in airplanes, single and multiengine planes, instrument airplanes and rotocraft helicopters.


No injuries were reported.


Cameron Wiggs, a data coordinator at OneSource in Bronze Pointe, said he and co-workers watched the helicopter land in the office complex parking lot off Illinois 159 on Monday afternoon.


The woman passenger got out and walked into a nearby office building, Wiggs said. Then, a black sport utility vehicle pulled up and the driver and pilot began to unload dogs from the chopper.


“There must have been seven or eight of them. All black and white. Shih tzus, maybe,” Wiggs said.


Police came an hour or two after the helicopter landed, talked to the pilot and driver, then left, Wiggs said.


Johnson issued a news release Tuesday afternoon, stating police received a call that a helicopter was landing for an unknown reason at 1 Bronze Point in Swansea at 12:48 p.m. Monday. When police arrived, they found the helicopter on the ground, too close to obstacles and buildings, Johnson said. The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted by Johnson and was advised that they would investigate the landing. The FAA also requested pictures and information.


“We have been in close communications and coordination with the FAA and the St. Clair County State’s Attorney’s Office,” the news release stated. “This is not your normal case that a street police officer handles. The safety and security of the community, the pilot and passenger were of the utmost concern. The pilot was released for custody on (Tuesday) at 12:28 p.m. pending completion of the investigation. Family members are contacting another pilot to remove the helicopter.”


A woman in a black Audi RS7 with Missouri plates arrived about 10:30 a.m. She left after spotting reporters, but returned and picked Busch up about 12:45 p.m. when Busch emerged from the police department.


Busch could not be reached for comment.


The Bell helicopter is listed to Jagger 4 LLC, a Missouri corporation. The helicopter is registered to 18130 Edison Ave. in Chesterfield, Mo., at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport.


August Busch IV is the great-great-grandson of Adolphus Busch, the founder of Anheuser-Busch in St. Louis. He was the last Busch family member to control the huge company before it was purchased by InBev, the Belgium-based brewing giant in a hostile takeover in 2008.


In 2010, Adrienne Nicole Martin, 27, Busch’s girlfriend, was found dead at his home in Huntleigh, Mo., at a time when Busch was in the house. A prosecutor in St. Louis County stated that after high levels of oxycodone and cocaine were found in her system at autopsy, her death was ruled an accidental overdose, according to news reports. In 2012, a lawsuit in her death brought by Martin’s former husband was settled for $1.75 million. No charges were filed in connection with Martin’s death.


In 1983, Busch was involved in a car crash while attending the University of Arizona that resulted in the death of a 21-year-old woman passenger. According to news accounts, Busch left the scene and was later found by police at his townhouse with a sawed off shotgun and in a dazed state. Busch, who suffered a skull fracture, was not charged.


In January, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Busch was involved in an altercation at a bank in Key West, Fla., when a man became angry with the way Busch had parked his car alleging it blocked access to an ATM machine. When the man confronted him, Busch allegedly pulled a licensed handgun, but kept it pointed at the ground. Busch was not charged.


http://www.bnd.com

Airline suspends operations nationwide, including out of Memphis International Airport (KMEM)



A startup regional airline out of New Orleans is suspending flights, including those out of Memphis, until it can find a new flight operator.

GLO Airlines announced Tuesday, July 11, it is suspending operations nationwide effective Saturday, July 15.

In recent weeks, GLO said it has had to cancel an “excessive number” of flights due to the “inability and unwillingness” of the airline’s flight operator, Smyrna, Tennessee-based Corporate Flight Management (CFM), to staff flights and maintain aircraft.

“CFM’s behavior has put an unacceptable strain on relationships with our passengers and other vendors,” said Trey Fayard, GLO founder and CEO, in the statement. “Despite growing demand, loyal customers, and our best efforts to enforce our contract, we have been unable to reach a resolution.”

GLO announced double-daily nonstop flights between Memphis International Airport (MEM) and Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY) in November 2015.

“I started GLO to deliver a superior product to my hometown and other worthy local markets, and I refuse to settle for anything less. We look forward to returning to all markets and expanding further once the right partner is found,” Fayard said.

Passengers who have already purchased airfare are being contacted by the company directly and will be refunded or re-accommodated until another operator can be secured.

https://www.bizjournals.com

Hurricane Hunters fly into danger to keep you safe



EAST PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) — The information gathered from inside and around a hurricane is critical to creating forecasts, which can save lives and property. The Hurricane Hunter aircraft were recently on Long Island and Eyewitness News got a personal tour of the planes.

Flying into hurricanes is dangerous, but Hurricane Hunter crews are well-trained.

“They have an incredible safety record but are very courageous because they know the dangers of what they are doing,” said Dr. Rick Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center. “They are so good at what they do that they are able to make safety a priority while collecting vital data.”

“If you’re going to hit turbulence – and we do hit turbulence in most of the storms – it’s going to be in the eye wall,” U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Shannon Hailes explained. “It’s going to be fairly bumpy.”

Hailes said missions typically last 10 hours but some can last as long as 13.  While flying, there are “hours and hours of boredom and then seconds of sheer terror,” Hailes said, half-jokingly.



Air Force pilots fly C-130J Hurricane Hunter Aircraft right into the middle of the hurricanes. The C-130J’s are 97 feet long and nearly 39 feet high, with a wing span of more than 132 feet.

Hailes has been flying into hurricanes since 2003 and said he fell in love with the mission. He said every storm has its own personality and he didn’t experience much turbulence until he flew into Hurricane Rita in 2005.

“When I flew into Rita, I got to know what they were talking about, really big,” he recalled. “The entire time, almost the entire storm was turbulent.  Sometimes you can let the autopilot fly… you couldn’t… it kept kicking off the entire time. So you were hand-flying for 10-12 hours, going through storms the entire time.”

Hurricane Rita currently stands as the 4th strongest hurricane on record in the Atlantic Basin and the strongest hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico.

To collect data, Hurricane Hunter pilots start out by flying at an altitude of 1,000 feet, looking to see if a storm will turn into something. If it develops, they’ll fly higher and higher in a pattern.




“We’ll fly about 110 miles,” Hailes said. “We go into the eye and we’ll fly 110 miles out the other side. We’re making big X’s in the sky through a hurricane.”

“You can’t see out of the planes a lot of the times,” he added. “You’re having these 150 mph-155 mph winds coming through. You’ve got sheets and sheets of rain, so you can’ see out of the windshield, so you’re using all your instruments to fly a straight line through it.”

Meteorologists on the flight drop what is called a dropsonde into the hurricane. It’s an instrument pack, which is dropped from the bottom of the aircraft and then it parachutes down into the storm. It measures temperature, wind, humidity and atmospheric pressure. That information is relayed back to the National Hurricane Center and is used to determine the intensity of the storm and what it could do in the future.

“There really is a direct connection between the data collected by these aircraft and your personal safety because the data is beamed directly to the Hurricane Center and help us make more accurate forecasts and issue timely warnings,” Dr. Knabb said.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also has Hurricane Hunter aircraft. Lt. David Cowan spoke of the G-4 jet he flies around hurricanes.

“This plane primarily flies 41 to 45 thousand feet, about 8-9 hours in duration,” he explained. “This aircraft will usually have 8-10 people on board, including two on-board meteorologists.”

The meteorologists tell the pilots where to go and check the quality of the data. Cowan said there is “a lot of science on board the aircraft.”

The information collected during G-4 flights is not only from dropsondes but also from radar data. That data is used to help forecast models meteorologists use on a daily basis when storms threaten the United States.

Speaking about the U.S. Air Force missions, Cowan said, “we’re able to pair the information together and ultimately figure out how strong the hurricane is going to be and ultimately where it’s going to go.”

Cowan flew the NOAA mission around Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

“The biggest thing that I get out of this is the fact that knowing that you’re on top of this animal, this Category 5 hurricane, and you’re at the peak of the pyramid as far as data collection and dissemination goes,” Cowan opined.

“I’m a little different than a lot of people,” Hailes said about the danger of these missions, “but I love the fact that we’re helping all the people out there.”

http://wpri.com

Dalles City cancels Columbia Gorge Regional Airport (KDLS) operation contracts: Two companies given six months’ notice of termination

The Dalles City Council voted unanimously Monday evening to cancel contracts with two firms managing operations at the Columbia Gorge Regional Airport in Dallesport.

Following an executive session in which the mayor and councilors discussed possible litigation, the elected body reconvened in open session to take action regarding the airport.

Councilor Linda Miller then made two separate motions; the first to terminate the city’s contract with Aeronautical Management Inc., and provide AMI with six months’ notice of the termination, as required in the contract. AMI manages the airport operations, providing a variety of services, including air traffic control and leasing the hangars.

Miller’s motion also stipulated that cancellation of the contract be contingent upon the Klickitat County Board of Commissioners also canceling the contract. The city and county jointly own the airport and both jurisdictions must be in agreement on business and policy decisions.

Miller’s second motion was to terminate the contract with Gorge Aviation Services, LLC, also giving six months’ notice, and also subject to approval by Klickitat County. Gorge Aviation Services is the airport’s fixed base operator, which provides refueling, pilot, maintenance and mechanical services, as well as operating a flight school.

Both motions passed 5-0.

County officials could decide as soon as today, July 11, whether to follow the city’s lead and end the management contracts with GAS and AMI. Ending the contracts has been under consideration by city officials for several months, although the specific reasons have not been made public.

Chuck Covert, one of the airport managers, declined to comment on the city’s action.

“I am not able to talk about it due to possible litigation,” Covert said after the council’s votes.

Mayor Steve Lawrence said it was an action the city needed to take, but he declined to offer details.

“It’s something requiring change, so we’re moving forward and making a change,” Lawrence said Monday evening.

Lawrence said the contracts with the two companies have been in place for several years.

If the county votes to terminate the airport management contracts, requests for proposals (RFPs) will be going out to find new management for the airport.

City officials said they have been “working on options,” but it is not yet clear when the RFPs might be going out.

Watch Live: Firefighters battle wildfire in Lakeside, San Diego County, California



SAN DIEGO — Firefighters are battling a wildfire south of Interstate 8 in Lakeside.

Firefighters have closed I-8 in both directions as they stage crews to fight the fire, which is climbing the steep hills south of the freeway.

Ground crews are being aided by water-dropping helicopters that are filling with water at nearby Lake Jennings. 

Air tankers from Ramona are also dropping fire retardant in an attempt to stop the fire from spreading.

http://fox5sandiego.com

Beech B-55, N4167P: Incident occurred July 07, 2017 at Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas, Texas

Cavanaugh Collection Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N4167P

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 07-JUL-17
Time: 23:42:00Z
Regis#: N4167P
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE55
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ADDISON
State: TEXAS

CubCrafters CC11-160, N111JW: Accident occurred July 09, 2017 in Milesville, Haakon County, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N111JW

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA265
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 09, 2017 in Milesville, SD
Aircraft: CUBCRAFTERS INC CC11-160, registration: N111JW
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 9, 2017, about 1315 mountain daylight time, a Cubcrafters CC11-160 airplane, N111JW, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during cruise flight near Milesville, South Dakota. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Philip Airport (PHP), Philip, South Dakota, about 1300.

The pilot informed Federal Aviation Administration inspectors that the engine lost power without warning during cruise flight. His efforts to restore engine power were not successful and the subsequent forced landing resulted in damage to the fuselage and both wings.

Maule MT-7-235 Super Rocket, N136CP, Civil Air Patrol Inc: Incident occurred July 08, 2017 near Farmers Pride Airport (9N7), Fredericksburg, Bethel Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Civil Air Patrol Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N136CP

Aircraft during glider tow operations, force landed in a field near the airport.

Date: 08-JUL-17
Time: 22:05:00Z
Regis#: N136CP
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: MT7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: FREDERICKSBURG
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cessna 180, N4683B: Accident occurred July 09, 2017 near Baker City Municipal Airport (KBKE), Baker County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4683B

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA147
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 09, 2017 in Baker City, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N4683B
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 9, 2017, about 0630 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 180, N4683B, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near the Baker City Municipal Airport (BKE), Baker, Oregon. The certificated commercial pilot and sole passenger were not injured. The personal cross-country flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed Johnson Creek Airstrip (3U2), Yellow Pine, Idaho, about 0630 mountain daylight time, with the destination being Red Bluff Municipal Airport (RBL), Red Bluff, California; BKE was a planned en route refueling stop.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that while he was on the 45-degree entry for a left downwind approach to runway 17, the engine quit without warning. The pilot stated that he then made an emergency descent in an attempt to land on runway 26, however, he landed about 100 yards short in a hay field. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both door posts, and both wing struts. The pilot reported that prior to the engine quitting, the fuel selector was selected to the BOTH position. He added that at the time of the event the fuel totalizer indicated 14 gallons.


The airplane will be recovered to a secured location for further examination.