Friday, July 29, 2016

Flight Design CTSW, N487CT: Incident occurred September 12, 2016 in hreveport, Louisiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N487CT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK THE PROPELLER, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA.  

Date: 12-SEP-16
Time: 16:22:00Z
Regis#: N487CT
Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Aircraft Model: CTSW
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SHREVEPORT
State: Louisiana

Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow, N94JR: Accident occurred July 28, 2016 near Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

http://registry.faa.gov/N94JR

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA276
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in Panama City, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200, registration: N94JR
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2016, at 1907 central daylight time, a Piper PA 28R-200, N94JR, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Panama City, Florida. The flight instructor was not injured, and the pilot receiving instruction sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Enterprise Municipal Airport (EDN), Enterprise, Alabama, about 1830, and was destined for Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP), Panama City, Florida.

According to the flight instructor, the purpose of the flight was to conduct a training session for the pilot receiving instruction, who was pursuing an instrument rating. While preparing for landing at ECP, at an altitude of 3,500 feet mean sea level (msl), the pilot reduced engine power to slow the airplane during the descent. He subsequently attempted to add power and level off; however, the engine was unresponsive and then lost all power. The flight instructor took control of the airplane and performed the engine failure checklist, but was unsuccessful in his attempts to restart the engine. He contacted the air traffic control tower and advised that they were unable to glide to the airport, and performed a forced landing in a wooded area about 3 miles north of ECP.

Examination of the accident scene by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest upright on the floor of a pine forest. The engine and forward section of the airplane was displaced upward and aft, the propeller blades were undamaged. The right wing exhibited leading edge damage, had separated from the fuselage at the root, and was displaced up and aft. The right fuel tank was breached and devoid of fuel. The left wing sustained leading edge damage remained attached, and was nearly full of fuel. The empennage remained attached and was undamaged. The landing gear was found extended.

The airplane was examined at a salvage facility by an FAA inspector. The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand at the propeller, and exhibited thumb compression on all four cylinders. Spark was detected at the spark plug leads from the left magneto on cylinder Nos. 1, 3 and 4, as the propeller was rotated by hand. Spark could not be detected using this method at the lead for cylinder No. 2, or from any leads from the right magneto. The fuel lines leading to the fuel flow gauges, the fuel servo and the fuel distribution manifold were wet with fuel when opened, but did not contain a measurable amount of fuel. The gascolator contained a small amount of fuel and was unobstructed. The fuel pump was connected to an external power source, and produced suction and pressure at the inlet and outlet, respectively.

Maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on April 11 2016, at which time the engine had accrued a total of 4,008 hours, with 106 hours since overhaul. The airplane flew about 21 hours since that inspection.

The engine was retained for further examination.




















AIRCRAFT:   1969 Piper PA 28R-200 Arrow N94JR, s/n: 28R-35380

ENGINE:       Lycoming IO-360-C1C, s/n: l-6659-51A

PROPELLER: Hartzell HC-C24YR-1BF, s/n: CH39732B

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks)

CURRENT TACH:  5327.09; Hobbs 1727

ENGINE:  Log indicates overhaul 04/21/2010 and installed 06/15/2010 at Tach 5200 with 3901.2 ETT and 0.0 TSMOH.  Log records Annual Inspection 04/11/2016 at Tach 5306.64, TSMOH 106.64

PROP:  Log indicates prop overhaul 07/26/2006.  Log records Annual Inspection on 04/11/2016 at PTSOH 243.64

AIRFRAME:  Log records Annual Inspection 04/11/2016 at Tach 5306.64, TTAF 5306.64

OTHER EQUIPMENT:  Narco MK 12D Audio panel, KX155 NAV COMM, Northstar M1 LORAN, King ADF

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 07/28/16, aircraft lost power on approach to Panama City Airport which resulted in pilot performing off field landing in a pine tree farm.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  The impact resulted in major damage to the aircraft.  The right wing was broken off.  The left wing was cut off to remove from forest and has a crushed leading edge.  The prop is damaged.  The engine is bent upward at a 45 degree angle and broken from the bottom mountings.  The fuselage is twisted.  The tail surfaces have damage.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT: Aircraft was disassembled and transported to Florida Air Recovery, Jacksonville, FL.

REMARKS: Logbooks are with field adjuster Riner of SIAI. Prior written permission required from insurance company to perform onsite inspection of wreckage.


Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com/N94JR.htm



BAY COUNTY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) - Two men escaped injury after the plane they were in crashed north of Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport Thursday afternoon.

It happened just after 6 p.m.

Investigators with the Bay County Sheriff’s Office tell us two pilots were in a Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow doing flight training after when the plane developed engine trouble.

Investigators say the lead pilot knew they weren’t going to make it to Beaches International Airport, so he looked for “the smallest trees” and decided to put the plane down there.

They wound up off Tram Road south of Highway 20 about two to three miles north of runway 16 at Beaches International Airport.

Both men escaped the crash with only minor injuries.

The plane, registered out of North Port, Florida, is a four seat single-engine fixed wing aircraft manufactured in 1969.

The flight originated in Enterprise, Alabama.

No names of anyone involved have been released. The FAA is leading the investigation into the crash.

Story and video:   http://www.wjhg.com

PZL-Okecie PZL-104 WILGA 80, N9726N: Incident occurred July 28, 2016 in Iliamna, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N9726N

Date: 28-JUL-16
Time: 17:53:00Z
Regis#: N9726N
Aircraft Make: PZL OKECIE
Aircraft Model: PZL104
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ILIAMNA
State: Alaska

AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND MADE A FORCED LANDING. ILIAMNA, ALASKA.

Cessna 172E Skyhawk, N3677S: Accident occurred July 28, 2016 in Rexburg, Madison County, Idaho

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3677S

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA403
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in Rexburg, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N3677S
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that while practicing short-field landings on runway 17, a 4,200 foot asphalt runway, he overshot his intended landing area. He reported that about 65 knots indicated air speed and 25 feet above ground level (AGL), he executed a go-around by applying mixture rich, full throttle, carburetor heat cold, but the electric flaps were left fully extended. He reported that he pulled back on the yoke, but he could not get the airplane to climb, and the airplane descended to the right side of the runway, and touched down in the safety area to the right of the runway and nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, vertical stabilizer and the rudder.


The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operations.

Photographs of the accident airplane provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed the airplane inverted with the flaps extended. 

The airplane manufacturer pilot operating handbook prescribed Balked Landing procedure states:

1. Throttle – Full Open

2. Carburetor Heat – Cold

3. Wing Flaps - 20 Degrees (Immediately)

4. Climb Speed – 55 Knots

5. Wing Flaps 10 Degrees (Until obstacles are cleared) Retract (after reaching a safe altitude and 60 KIAS)

The meteorological aerodrome report at accident airport about the time of the accident indicated: The temperature was 90 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point was 37 degrees Fahrenheit, the wind was out of 170 degrees true at 7 knots and varying between 140 degrees and 200 degrees true. The altimeter setting was 30.10. The field elevation at the airport was 4,858 feet and the density altitude was 7,850 feet.

According to the FAA Pamphlet 8740-2 pertaining to Density Altitude:

Whether due to high altitude, high temperature, or both, reduced air density (reported in terms of density altitude) adversely affects aerodynamic performance and decreases the engine's horsepower output. Takeoff distance, power available (in normally aspirated engines), and climb rate are all adversely affected. Landing distance is affected as well; although the indicated airspeed (IAS) remains the same, the true airspeed (TAS) increases. From the pilot's point of view, therefore, an increase in density altitude results in the following:

• Increased takeoff distance.

• Reduced rate of climb.

• Increased TAS (but same IAS) on approach and landing.

According to the aforementioned FAA Pamphlet, the Koch Chart (chart in docket) depicting the relationship between airport temperature (90 degrees) and airport pressure altitude (4,693 feet), the climb rate decreases by 64 percent. The pilot initiated the balked landing procedure at 25 feet AGL.

Air Tractor AT-602, Emrich Aerial Spraying, N2033N: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2016 in David City, Butler County, Nebraska

RAYNE AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N2033N

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA291
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in David City, NE
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR AT602, registration: N2033N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2016, about 1530 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-602, N2033N, impacted a corn field 3 miles northeast of David City, Nebraska. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Rayne Aviation, LLC, and operated by Emrich Aerial Spraying, LLC, both of Dorchester, Nebraska, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who was on-scene, the airplane had been spraying Headline® Fungicide (pyraclostrobin – a Group 11 fungicide). The airplane struck the ground in a wings-level, nose-down attitude in a corn field about 200 feet north of County Road 38 and west of County Road O intersection. There was no fire. The airplane was equipped with an inflatable restraint system and it had deployed. Flight Control continuity was confirmed to extent possible due to wreckage condition. The flap actuator was found in the fully extended position (~30 degrees deflection). According to the pilot's co-worker (and an Air Tractor pilot himself), agricultural pilots often make turns with flaps extended because of greater stability. Asked if the accident pilot reversed course by turning 45 degrees to the right, followed by a 180-degree turn to the left and another 135-degree turn to the left, he replied that the pilot was known to pull up and execute a wing-over maneuver instead. 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Ragnar Emrich
~



DAVID CITY -- A 37-year-old Dorchester man died Thursday afternoon in the crash of a spray plane 3 miles northeast of David City.

Ragnar Emrich was pronounced dead at the scene at 4 p.m., said Julie Reiter, the Butler County attorney.

Emrich was piloting the Emrich Aerial Spraying plane when it crashed in a cornfield about 70 yards north of County Road 38 and west of the County Road O intersection. A line of trees bordered the east-west road south of the crash site.

The crash was reported by a person who was in the area at about 3:20 p.m.

David City Fire and Rescue personnel made their way to the crash site with an ambulance, but soon moved the vehicle back to the road.

The site was restricted because of the presence of chemicals still in the plane.

The Butler County Sheriff’s Office and the Butler County Attorney’s Office were investigating the crash.

Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were making their way to the scene.







DAVID CITY — A 37-year-old Dorchester man was killed Thursday when the crop duster he was flying crashed in rural Butler County.

Ragnar Emrich was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash, which was reported around 3:20 p.m. when the plane was spotted in a cornfield about 3 miles northeast of David City, near the intersection of county roads O and 38.

According to online information, Emrich operated his own business, Emrich Aerial Spraying based in Dorchester.

Butler County Attorney Julie Reiter said County Road 38 was closed between roads N and O while officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board made their way to the site.

The Butler County Sheriff's and Attorney's offices are also part of the investigation. David City Fire and Rescue responded to the crash, which was reported by a person in the area.

Access to the area was restricted following the initial response because of the presence of agricultural chemicals still inside the plane.

Source:  http://columbustelegram.com

Piper PA-31T Cheyenne II, Cal-Ore Life Flight, N661TC: Fatal accident occurred July 29, 2016 in McKinleyville, Humboldt County, California

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N661TC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27


NTSB Identification: WPR16FA153
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, July 29, 2016 in McKinleyville, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31T, registration: N661TC
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 29, 2016, about 0105 Pacific daylight time, a twin-engine, turbine-powered, Piper PA-31T Cheyenne II airplane, N661TC, reported smoke in the cockpit and subsequently sustained an in-flight breakup and collision with tree-covered terrain near Arcata/Eureka Airport, McKinleyville, California. The accident airplane was being operated by Cal-Ore Life Flight as an instrument flight rules (IFR) air transport medical flight under the provisions of Title 14, CFR Part 135. The airline transport pilot, two medical personnel, and one patient were fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Dark night, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight departed Crescent City, California, at 0045, destined for Oakland International Airport, Oakland, California

A preliminary review of archived radar and voice communication data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that at 0058:12, as the airplane reached an altitude of about 15,000 feet msl, the accident pilot contacted Seattle air route traffic control center (ARTCC) and stated that he was going to turn back to Crescent City due to a smell of smoke in the cockpit. 

At 0058:26, the ARTCC specialist on duty cleared the accident airplane direct to the Crescent City Airport, issued him a descent clearance to 9,000 feet, and told him to let her know if he needed anything else.

At 0058:41, the accident pilot said "okay," and he stated that it looked like he was going to lose some power shortly, and said he would keep her posted as long as he could.

At 0058:52, the ARTCC specialist issued the Crescent City altimeter of 29.98, and then requested the total number of occupants on board, and how much fuel was remaining.

At 0059:07, the accident pilot stated that he had smoke in the cockpit, declared an emergency, said he was depressurizing and was heading back to Crescent City.

At 0059:21, the accident pilot asked the ARTCC specialist to call the fire department to have them standing by upon arrival. 

At 0059:25, the ARTCC specialist then acknowledged that crash rescue would be standing by at the Crescent City Airport, and she again asked how many people were on board.

At 0059:27, the accident pilot stated that he had three on board. There were no further communications received from the accident airplane despite multiple attempts by the ARTCC specialist on duty. 

During a telephone conversation with an National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator, a witness located near Cookson Camp, Arcata, California, reported that in the early morning hours of July 29, she heard an airplane circling overhead before it eventually flew westward, which was followed by about 15 seconds of silence. While looking out the window of her tent, she saw a large dome shaped flash to the west, followed by another flash and a loud rumble. 

The NTSB IIC, along with another NTSB investigator, two Federal Aviation Administration safety inspectors from the Oakland Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), two representatives from the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office, representatives from Cal-Ore Life Flight, and an Piper Aircraft air safety investigator reached the accident site on the afternoon of July 30. The accident site was located in an area of brush and heavily forested terrain. Large portions of the burned and fragmented airplane were scattered along a debris path oriented along a magnetic heading of 354 degrees, which measured about 2,400 feet in length. The fuselage, inboard and outboard sections of the wings, vertical tail, and portions of one horizontal stabilizer, were located in separate locations and exhibited minimal impact damage. Both inboard sections of the wings exhibited postcrash fire damage.

The fuselage and empennage came to rest on its left side and facing the direction of travel. The instrument panel and cockpit exhibited extensive impact damage. The cabin area of the fuselage was largely intact. Evidence of thermal damage was present in the forward section of the fuselage. A section of the forward fuselage, wiring, and associated components were removed and sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C., for further examination. 

Both engines separated from their respective engine firewalls and sustained impact damage, however; neither engine exhibited any sign of thermal damage. 

Control continuity could not be established due to numerous fractures in the system, missing cabling and flight control surfaces; however, all the fractures that were identified exhibited features consistent with tension overload. 

The closest weather reporting facility is Arcata/Eureka Airport (KACV), McKinleyville, located approximately 6 miles southwest of the accident site. At 0107, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at KACV, reported wind 180 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 1/2 statute miles, mist; runway 32 visual range 4,500 feet variable to greater than 6,000 feet, overcast clouds 200 feet; temperature 55 degrees F; dew point 54 degrees F; altimeter 29.85 inHg.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


CRANNELL (Humboldt County) -- The names of four people killed when a medical transport plane en route to Oakland crashed last week were released by authorities Monday.

All were from Crescent City, where the plane took off from early July 29.

Larry Mills, 54, the pilot of the twin-engine Piper PA31 Cheyenne, had 20 years of flying experience and was a volunteer first responder for 12 years.

Flight nurse Deborah Koon, 49, a native of New Zealand, spent 25 years as a critical care nurse.

Certified Flight Paramedic Michelle Tarwater, 30, got her certification more than five years ago.

The patient they were transporting was identified as April Rodriquez, 35. Sutter Health spokeswoman Nancy Turner said Monday that Rodriquez being transferred from Sutter Coast Hospital in Crescent City to California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. Under federal law she could not discuss Rodriquez's medical condition.

REACH Air Medical Services, the parent company behind the Cal-Ore Life Flight plane that crashed, said memorial services are being planned for those killed.

Don Wharton, REACH Director of Business Development, said everyone who knew those on board was still in shock and mourning. He said crews for medical transport companies "are heroes."

Company employees are considered like family, added Wharton, and to lose them in "such horrible circumstances is shocking to say the least."

The plane took off from Crescent City about 12:29 a.m. July 29. About a half-hour later, Mills radioed there was smoke in the cockpit and he was going to try to return to Crescent City. But officials soon lost radar contact.

Humboldt County sheriff's department crews found the plane wreckage and bodies about 10 a.m. Friday on private timber company land that was densely forested.

The National Transportation Safety Board is heading the investigation into the cause of the crash. A preliminary report is expected within the next two weeks.


Source:   http://www.mercurynews.com





UPDATE, 9:34 p.m.: From the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:

On 07/29/2016 at about 2030 hours, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Coroner’s Division completed recovery of the victims from this accident. 

Tragically, four fatalities were confirmed. All four subjects, three females and one male, were recovered from inside the wreckage of the aircraft.

The ages and identities of the victims are being withheld at this time pending identification and notification of next of kin.

UPDATE, 7:15 p.m.: The Associated Press reports that all bodies have been recovered.

UPDATE, 12:50 p.m.: From the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:

The National Transportation Safety Board will arrive tomorrow around 1100 hours [11 a.m.]. The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office has secured the scene.

There is a quarter-mile debris field for the crash site. Personnel have confirmed plane went down into timber.

Sheriff’s Office is in communication with REACH Air Medical Services with information for the victim’s family. Personnel have confirmed four people were on the plane, and as noted earlier confirmed two fatalities.

UPDATE, 12:29 p.m.: Sheriff’s Office employees have responded to the scene of the crash along with personnel from the California Highway Patrol and employees of Green Diamond Resource Company, which owns the land where the plane went down.

Don Wharton, the director of business relations with Cal-Ore Life Flight’s partner organization REACH Air Medical Services, said he doesn’t yet know if all four passengers aboard the plane were killed. He said he’s remaining hopeful.

“This obviously is going to be a very difficult time for us,” Wharton said.

UPDATE, 11:09 a.m.: The crash has caused at least two small vegetation fires.  just called in additional resources to help handle one of them.

UPDATE, 10:59 a.m.: The Office of the County Administrator says that at least two people are confirmed to have died in this crash.

UPDATE, 10:32 a.m.: From Scanner Traffic Indicates’ “Tristan,” who is posting updates over there:

A CHP helicopter has confirmed that the wreckage is from the missing plane. The FAA has notified the NTSB [National Transportation Safety Board].

UPDATE: This was a Cal-Ore Life Flight plane. From the company’s website this morning:

REACH Air Medical Services confirms there was an incident involving a Cal-Ore Life Flight aircraft out of our Crescent City, CA base. The plane, a Piper Cheyenne II, departed Crescent City Airport for Oakland International Airport. At approximately 1:05 AM PST on 07/29/16, we lost communication with the aircraft. The manifest confirms four persons on board: the pilot, a flight nurse, a transport medic, and a patient. At this time, we cannot provide you with additional details or the identity of people aboard the plane.

From the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:

This is all of the preliminary information we have on a missing plane in the Arcata area:

The pilot of a twin-engine Piper PA31 declared an emergency due to smoke in the cockpit around 1 a.m. Friday.
The plane was flying from Crescent City to Oakland.
The pilot indicated he was going to return to Crescent City.
Radar contact with the aircraft was lost about 5 miles northeast of Arcata Airport.
We believe there were three people on board.
The Humboldt County Sheriff is searching for the aircraft.
The tail number is N661TC.

The Federal Aviation Administration database lists the plane as being registered to Blue Goose Aviation of Roseburg, Oregon.


Source:   https://lostcoastoutpost.com


















3rd UPDATE:

A statement on the Cal-Ore Life Flight website states the company has been informed there were no survivors on the medical plane carrying four, including a patient, that crashed on timber land near McKinleyville on Friday.

“This is one of the saddest moments in our history. We have been told there were no survivors. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the patient and our crewmembers,” a posting on the company website states. “Until we have positive confirmation from the local authorities, we cannot release the identification of those on board. We have critical incident stress management (CISM) teams in the area and we are doing all we can to help those involved. We will provide more information as soon as all family notifications have been made.”

2nd UPDATE:

The National Transportation Safety Board will arrive on scene at 11 a.m. tomorrow to investigate the plane crash north of McKinleyville that killed at least two people early this morning, the county of Humboldt announced in a press release.

The scene has been secured by the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office, the release states, and efforts continue to find the two unaccounted for passengers on the Cal-Ore Life Flight that went down after departing from Crescent City at about 12:30 a.m.

1st UPDATE: (posted 11 a.m.)
Rescue crews have located wreckage believed to be that of a missing Cal-Ore Life Flight that departed Crescent City early this morning bound for Oakland but went missing somewhere near Arcata, and two fatalities have been confirmed.

Scanner traffic indicates the wreckage was found in two debris fields on Green Diamond property north of McKinleyville, and that crews located two possibly deceased people. According to a statement released by Cal-Ore Life Flight this morning, the flight departed from Crescent City shortly before 12:30 a.m. carrying four people — a pilot, a transport medic, a flight nurse and a patient.

Humboldt County Sheriff’s Lt. Wayne Hanson said this morning that rescue crews set out early this morning looking for the plane. They gathered at the coordinates were it was last captured on radar, and fanned out from there on foot and all-terrain vehicles.

The county of Humboldt just issued a press release confirming that crews have located the wreckage site, and that two fatalities have been confirmed at this time. 

PREVIOUSLY (posted at 8:33 a.m.)
The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is searching for a missing airplane that was believed to be carrying three people from Crescent City to Oakland early this morning before the pilot declared an emergency and the plane disappeared from local radar.

According to a brief press release, the twin engine Piper PA31 was in the Arcata area when the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit around 1 a.m. today and reported he was returning to Crescent City. “Radar contact with the aircraft was lost about 5 miles northeast of Arcata Airport,” the press release states.

The sheriff’s office has launched a search for the plane, which carries the tail number N661TC.

The following was sent from the sheriff's office this morning:

This is all of the preliminary information we have on a missing plane in the Arcata area:

The pilot of a twin-engine Piper PA31 declared an emergency due to smoke in the cockpit around 1 a.m. Friday.

The plane was flying from Crescent City to Oakland.

The pilot indicated he was going to return to Crescent City.

Radar contact with the aircraft was lost about 5 miles northeast of Arcata Airport.

We believe there were three people on board.

The Humboldt County Sheriff is searching for the aircraft.

The tail number is N661TC.


Source: http://www.northcoastjournal.com




At approximately 1 a.m. today, the pilot of a twin-engine Piper PA31  radioed that he had smoke in the cockpit of his plane. The aircraft, tail number N661TC, which had been scheduled to fly from Crescent City to Oakland has not been heard of since. Three people are believed to have been on board.

Radar contact was lost with the plane about five miles northeast of the Arcata Airport, according to information from Wayne Hanson of the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. Hanson said, the pilot had said he was going to return to Crescent City. 

The Sheriff’s Office is searching for the plane, said Hanson. Because of the fog, aircraft has not been able to go up to search.

UPDATE 9:50 a.m.: EMS1, an information service for emergency medical personnel, reports that this is a medical flight. Staff writes, ” A Cal‐Ore Life Flight fixed-wing aircraft, with three crew members and a patient on board, lost contact with its originating airport early Friday morning.” Read more here. 

UPDATE 10 a.m.: Scanner traffic indicates that a possible crash site has been found. We’ll update as soon as possible.

UPDATE 10:02 a.m.: Helicopter crews are setting down “near the old nursery” (We think near Fieldbrook) to search the crash site.

UPDATE 10:24 a.m.: According to the scanner, the FAA is requesting the crash site be secured.

UPDATE 10:39 a.m.: Debris is smoldering and fire crews are on the scene.

UPDATE 11:03 a.m.: Visibility was low this morning when the plane was in trouble. The Crescent City airport had 4 miles visibility at 1 a.m. http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mesowest/getobext.php?wfo=eka&sid=Kcec&num=72&raw=0 TThe Arcata airport had three miles visibility at one a.m. http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mesowest/getobext.php?wfo=eka&sid=Kacv&num=72&raw=0

UPDATE 11:12 a.m.: Vegetation fire from the crash is requiring more fire crews including a helicopter.

Press release from Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:

This morning at about 10 a.m. Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office search and rescue teams located a crash site on private timber company in the Cranell area of Humboldt County which is located to the north of McKinleyville. At this time at least two fatalities have been confirmed. National Transportation Safety Board has been notified.

Continue to check this page and our Facebook page for updates.

Original news release at 8:15 a.m.:

This is all of the preliminary information we have on a missing plane in the Arcata area:

The pilot of a twin-engine Piper PA31 declared an emergency due to smoke in the cockpit around 1 a.m. Friday.

The plane was flying from Crescent City to Oakland.

The pilot indicated he was going to return to Crescent City.

Radar contact with the aircraft was lost about 5 miles northeast of Arcata Airport.

We believe there were three people on board.

The Humboldt County Sheriff is searching for the aircraft.

The tail number is N661TC.

Source:  http://kymkemp.com




UPDATE (11:10 a.m.): According to a CAO press release, 2 fatalities are confirmed. Location of crash site is on private timber company in the Cranell area of Humboldt County, north of McKinleyville.

According to the HCSO, the plane, along with deceased subjects, have been located. More information to be released.

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Missing plane in Arcata area (from HCSO):

The pilot of a twin-engine Piper PA31 declared an emergency due to smoke in the cockpit around 1 a.m. Friday.

The plane was flying from Crescent City to Oakland.

The pilot indicated he was going to return to Crescent City.

Radar contact with the aircraft was lost about 5 miles northeast of Arcata Airport.

We believe there were three people on board.

The Humboldt County Sheriff is searching for the aircraft.

The tail number is N661TC.

Missing Plane (from CAL-ORE)

REACH Air Medical Services and Cal-Ore Life Flight can confirm that an incident has occurred involving a Piper Cheyenne aircraft associated with our Crescent City, CA base. The plane departed from Crescent City Airport, Jack McNamara Field, for Oakland International Airport at approximately 00:29 AM PST today.

We lost communication with the aircraft at 01:05 AM PST. There were four persons on board: the pilot, a transport medic, a flight nurse and a patient.

At this time, we cannot provide the identity of those on board the aircraft, or other details, until family notifications have been completed. Any comment about the cause or other details of the incident would be unfounded speculation.

We are working with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office who leading the search efforts.

Further updates about this incident will be posted here as soon as they are confirmed.

Source:  http://kiem-tv.com





Authorities in Northern California were searching for a small medical transport plane carrying four people that went missing early Friday.

The pilot of the plane radioed an emergency at around 1 a.m. PT (4 a.m. ET) when smoke filled the cockpit, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Parent company REACH Air Medical Services said the plane was carrying a pilot, flight nurse, transport medic and patient when it went missing over Arcata, California, along the Pacific coast.

The dual-engine Piper PA31 was about 5 miles northeast of the Arcata-Eureka Airport, according to FAA spokesman Ian Gregor.

The plane was headed from the northern town of Crescent City to Oakland, a 360-mile trip. Before the plane went missing, the pilot reported that he planned to return to Crescent City.

Don Wharton, spokesman for Cal-Ore Life Flight, which provides the service through REACH, could not immediately provide information about the staff members on board.

"All pilots come to us with vast amount of experience, the average being well over 3,000 miles of air carrier flying time," he said in a statement. "These are all highly skilled professionals."